xt754746qx03 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt754746qx03/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19560720  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, July 20, 1956 text The Kentucky Kernel, July 20, 1956 1956 2013 true xt754746qx03 section xt754746qx03 Two Operas
Scheduled
By Workshop

Education
Must Meet
Challenge

AS

Education In a democracy can
and will meet the challenges coming out of American business,
teachers gathered last Friday
morning at the opening session of
the ninth annual Business Education Conference at the University
of Kentucky were told.
The speaker was Dr. E. C. Mc-Gi- ll,
head of the Kansas State
Teachers College Department of
Business Education and president
of the United Business Education
Association.
"We have too great a Job to fail
now," Dr. McGill told his audience.
"In order to accomplish such an
objective In the most expedient
manner possible, education, business and industry must become
partners in this great undertaking."
The speaker listed several challenges educational institutions face
in their relationship with business.
They include:
Encouraging a closer relationship
between business education and
business; providing specific preparation to meet managerial problems; teaching a better understanding of the American economic system; emphasizing human
relations; cultivating desirable personal attributes; developing flexibility, or the ability to adapt to
different assignments within an
organization; promoting methods
of communication; providing an
adult education program which Is
adjusted to the needs and desires
of employed people who want to
continue to learn, and making
available proper placement services.

There are other forceful challenges being directed at education.
Dr. McGill noted. "With new developments in science, automation
and an acceptance of our expanded
citizenship responsibilities, we cannot fail."
Dr. McGill was Introduced at
the morning session by Virgil
Young, vice president of the Nu
Chapter of Delta Pi Epsilon, a
business education honorary society.
Also on the program were Prof.
Elise Davis, University of Tennessee, who offered the teachers some
suggestions in developing good
work habits in the teaching of
shorthand, and Dr. Helen H.
Green, Michigan State University,
who discussed the problems pertaining to extracurricular activities.
In a luncheon address, Dr. McGill challenged the educators to
"think ideas for yourself, and have
the fortitude to believe and develop them. I feel that I must
help people develop the strength
to take a stand on prominent and
controversial issues after they have
gotten the facts."
Miss Katie Carpenter, president
of the Nu Chapter, presided at the
luncheon.
The afternoon meeting consisted
of a typing demonstration and
drill by Alan Lloyd, typewriting
editor of the Gregg Publishing Division, McGraw-Hi- ll
Book Co., a
talk by Dr. Green on "Ideas for
Effective Assembly Programs," and
a problems clinic directed by Dr.
Thomas Hogancamp, head of the
Murray State Teachers College
Department of Business Education.
The conference, which ended
Saturday, was sponsored by the Nu
Chapter and the UK Department
of Business Education.

Vol. XLVII

IS. IE DSIv IE J

University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky., Friday, July 20, 1956

By VIRGINIA 8NODGRASS

No. 3 1

Institute To
Study College
Management

ct

The fourth annual College Business Management Institute will bo
held on the campus from July
Powers Jones, coordinator for
the Institute, said.
About 70 students from 20 states
throughout the United States will
attend the meeting. The purpose
of the Institute is to set up a
course of study in which college
business officers and business office personnel may receive instruction in the various phases of col- entertainment started the trend of
lege business management.
producing them together and now
Lloyd Morey, president-emeritu- s
one is seldom seen without the
and former comptroller at the Uni- other.
versity of Illinois, will be the prin"The Telephone" which features
cipal speaker. He will speak on
Barbara Watson as Lucy and
"Principles and Guides for Execu- Charles Sims and Robert Davis
tive Management in Higher Educa- alternating in the part of Ben
tion."
takes place in a modern setting
Frank D. Peterson,
on the patio of Lucy's apartment.
in charge of business administraBen has come to ask Lucy to martion at the University, started the ry him but the telephone keeps
Institute in 1952. In a letter to interrupting much to Ben's disthe prospective students he said may. A surprise ending makes this
"The Institute will not only pro- opera very entertaining.
vide a means to further the educa"The Medium" is essentially the
tion and training of business ofstory of a fortune teller, a deaf-mu- te
fice personnel but will help to
and a young girl. It stars
standardize the various functions
Monica, Dudley
and procedures in college business Phyllis Tilton as (the
),
Saunders as Toby
management.''
Sally Hoffman Braun as Mme.
The course is set up on a three
(Baba), Ebba Jo Ilaagenson
year basis so that students may Flora
as Mrs. Goblneau, Leonard Wolfe
continue their studies over the as Mr. Ooblneau. and Margaret
three-yeperiod. Among the stu- Dowllng Wehle as Mrs. Nolan.
dents who are to be present for
The setting Is also modern and
the studies are two officers from the action takes place on the outthe U.S. Merchant Marine Acad- skirts of a great city.
emy at Kings Point, N. Y.
The accompanists for both opactivities for eras are John W. Whitaker nd J.
the group include a tour of the Harold Nave.
bluegrass farms and the surroundThe production director for the
ing area, and a smorgasbord in the wnrkshnn is Miss LolO Robinson.
Student Union ballroom.
Her assistant is Dudley Saunders.
The students will live in Dono- The house manager is Fred Sllter.
van and Jewell Halls, and in local Publicity is being handled by Boyd
hotels while they are in Lexing- Keenon, Jim Barrickman, Norvel
CoDeland. William Hubbell. and
ton, Jones said.
Virginia Snodgrass.
The hostesses, ail momers oi
A.
pt. members are Mrs. FrankMrs.
Wehle, Mrs. I. Haagenson,
Georgia Mae Woire, Mrs. jonea
Tilton, Mrs. B. H. Sims, Mrs. Bonuntil Oct. 15. At that time Col. nie Watson, Mrs. Gladys Hoffman,
Rogers will leave for an assign- and Mrs. Mary Lee Braun.
ment in Korea.
Reservations may be obtained by
Three years is considered the calling University extension 2396.
"normal tour" for ROTC personnel.
The new department head Is a
native d Paris and a West Point
'
23-2- 9.

'

iv

Medical School
This block diagram shows the proposed location of the various parts
of the new medical college. The building includes a dental school,
teaching hospital, ambulent patient quarters, outpatient clinic, clinical sciences, and basic sciences departments. The school is scheduled
for completion in 1965 and will be built on the Experiment Station
Farm.

Education Team
Tells Workshop
Of Services
A team of State Department of
Education representatives has interpreted some of the department
services for about 70 people attending the workshop on supervision at
the University of Kentucky.
Representing the Division of In
structional Services were Don
Hale, director; Sam Taylor, supervisor of secondary education; Donald Elswick, curriculum supervisor;
Mrs. Irene Gullette, library super
visor; C. T. Wood, head of attend
ance and pupil personnel; Claude
Taylor, supervisor of elementary
education, and Richard Lee Gentry, head of the health, physical
education and safety program. Two
members of the Division of Teach
er Education and Certification
Frank Vittitow and Mrs. Mary
Marshall also participated in the
discussions.
The speakers gave an interpre
tation of the roles of the principal,
supervisor, superintendent, librar
ian and other special services. They
also discussed an overall program
of evaluation that will have as its
purpose the upgrading .of educational opportunities.
The workshop is sponsored by
the UK College of Education, the
State Department of Education
and the Kentucky Association of
Educational Supervisors.

Snow Will Spend
Year In Hawaii
Studying Polynesia

students have been
agriculture and home
economics scholarships at the University ' of Kentucky, Prof. L. J.
Horlacher, associate dean of the
College of Agriculture and Home
Economics, has announced.
The scholarships range from $100
to $400, and are for the year 195.6-5- 7.
Donors of the awards are the
Houston Endowment, Inc., the
Sears Roebuck Foundation, the
Kroger Co., Lexington Radio Station WLAP and the Jessamine and
Jefferson County Farm Bureaus.
One of the recipients, Richard D.
Featherston III, Lexington, achieved the highest scholastic standing
last year among the UK freshmen
In agriculture, and was awarded
the sophomore Sears Roebuck
Agricultural Foundation scholarship.
(Continued on Page 4)

Monday, July 23 Reception at
Ashland, Home of Henry Clay,
Ashland, 4:00.
Tuesday, July 24
Forum: Religion and the Public
Schools, "Alternate Plans"
YM-YWC- A

SUB, 7:00.

Wednesday, July 25 UK Summer Opera; "The Telephone"
and "The Medium" (tickets,
Guignol box office), Guignol,
8:00.

Thursday, July
Outdoor
Folk Dance, Women's Gym, 7:30.
Opera, Guifnol, 8:00.
July
Friday, July
28, Opera, Guifnol, 8:00.
26

'Friday, Aug.

3

Summer

School Commencement,
orial Coliseum, 8:00.

Mem-

J

nt

deaf-mute-

Dr. Charles E. Snow, professor
of anthropology at the University,
will leave after this term for Ha- wau wnere ne will continue a
study of the Polynesian race.
Snow recently received a $7,000
grant from the National Research
Foundation of Washington, D. C,
which will pay for a year's work
in Hawaii.
He became interested in the
Polynesian group when he was
stationed in the Hawaiian Islands
as a member of the American
Graves Registration Service. Short
ly after he returned to the Uni
versity he was granted a sabbatical
(Continued on Page 4)

ar

Extra-curricul-

ar

Grubbs Named PMS&T
A new professor of Military
Science and Tactics has been
named to succeed Col. Henry H.
Rogers who has been in charge of
the army ROTC for the past three
years.
Col. William E. Grubbs, a native
Kentuckian, will head the Military
Science Department in September.
Col. Grubbs is chief of the West
Virginia Military District. He will
arrive in Lexington Sept. 15.
Both Col. Rogers and Col.
Grubbs will serve in the position
piiiii.ii)iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiii'nii)iiiiiiinuniinipiriPnniiiMiiiiriniiiii

42 Receive
Scholarships

vice-preside-

fi

hi

graduatejxlass of

Dr. Donovan
at To Speak
At Western

1930.

Col. Grubbs is married and has
two sons. One son will enroll
UK this fall as a sophomore. The
other is in high school.
m

iiiiiiuhii

Y-

pi-

m

-

Forty-tw- o

Kampus Kalendar

UK's Summer Opera Workshop
and
The Medium" July
at 1:30 pjn.
"The Telephone"
25 26. 27. and 23 in the Oulgnol
Theatre, Fine Arts Building. The
director of the Opera Wokshop is
Aimo Klvlnieml.
"The Telephone" is a one-aMenot-t- l.
comic opera by Oian-Carl- o
originally written for
It was
production by the Ballet Society
and was first presented by them
along with "The Medium" in New
York City, 1947. The Broadway
production, based on the Ballet
Society, also appeared In 1947.
"The Medium." also by MenotU
is a tragic opera in two acts. It
was first produced at Columbia
...... A
.
wun iwr. ic- University in
as the stage director, u ww
nottl
the
then revised and restaged for proSociety. The Broadway
Ballet
duction was taken from this revision. The Broadway production
of the two operas as an evening's
will present

awarded

U'r -- -t

"

f;
...

i

"77ic Medium"
o
MenotU opera The Medium" which
Rehearsing for the
will be presented July 25 are (L to r.) Leonard Wolfe (Mr. Goblneau),
Ebba Jo Ilaagenson (Mrs. Goblneau) and Margaret Wehle (Mrs.
Nolan). The second opera will be The Telephone."
GUn-Carl-

Dr. Herman L. Donovan, UK's
retiring president, will address 174
graduates at the Fiftieth Anniversary Commencement of Western
Kentucky State College, Aug. 1.
Dr. Donovan was the first student registered when Western
opened as a state supported school
in 1906. He received a diploma
from the school, then known as
the Western Kentucky State Normal School, In 1908. He received
his A.B. from UK in 1914 and an
M A. from Columbia in 1920.
He did graduate work at the
University of Chicago and got his
Ph.D. degree from George Peabody
College for Teachers in 1924.
He holds the LL.D. degree from
UK. Georgetown College, Berea.
University of Louisville, and Transylvania.
The UK president has held
prominent positions in varioua
educational systems throughout
Kentucky. He was president of
Eastern State College for 13 years
before coming to the University In
1941. Upon retirement in September, he will be succeeded by Dr.
Frank O. Dickey, dean of the College of Education.

* 2

-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, July 20,

1956

Barnhart Paints Mexico
By JIM MILES

Many Interesting: paintings have
been done by Professor C. Raymond Barnhart of the University
Art Department during his sabbatical leave from August 1955 to
June 1 of this year.
Prof. Barnhart 6pent approximately half of his leave In Mexico,
depicting on canvas both the rural
and city life of the Mexican people. While doing the actual paintings In Mexico City, Mr. Barnhart,
accompanied by his wife and
daughter, traveled extensively on
weekends throughout various
Mexican villages gathering Ideas
for his work.
During these trips, Barnhart was
very fortunate In purchasing a collection of popular arts and crafts
that are fast becoming extinct due
to the Inroads of mechanization.
This collection includes weaving,
pottery, basketry, and toys, handmade by the village Inhabitants.
This collection may be exhibited
sometime within the coming school
year.
The paintings have been done in
oil, lacquer, and acrylic resin a
special plastic medium developed
by a Mexican friend. Acrylic resin
Is similar to water paint, but has
an advantage In that it Is unaffected by water after it dries.
Prof. Barnhart pointed out the revival of mosaics a process whereby pieces of colored glass are
cemented on a flat surface to form
the ideas of the artist. He has Just
completed a mosaic of a bullfight.
Throughout Mexico, Barnhart
added, modern architecture Is be

ing given great attention by builders, and sculpture and murals are
fast becoming an important part
of every structure. There has been,
also, a revival of Interest of popular art In Mexico among the more
cultivated people and three art
centers have been established In
Mexico City to encourage this art.
"The people of Mexico respect
and use the works of the artist;
the environment is a creative climate for the artist," Barnhart said.
' Leaving Mexico City in January,
he settled just outside San Francisco where he completed a series
of contemporary landscape paintings, one of which Included the
famed "Golden Gate" bridge shadowed by fog. Barnhart also
studied Japanese handwriting,
from a Buddist priest, in order to
learn better control of the brush.
Japanese art is becoming a strong
influence in California design in
architecture, ceramics, and in the
development of the garden as an

art.

Not all of Bamhart's time was
spent painting
much time was
spent visiting exhibitions and museums, attending lectures, and in
visiting art schools and college art
departments. During his leave, he
met many professional artists,
architects, and craftsmen, and discussed ideas and problems relating
art to our contemporary culture.
Some thirty paintings were done
by Barnhart during his sabbatical
leave; half of these In Mexico and
the other half completed In

Group To Hear
Albright Speak
"Alternate Plans" will be the
subject of Dr. E. D. Albright's lecA
Forum,
ture before the
YM-YWC-

July 24, SUB, at 7 p.m. Dr. Albright is a member of the College

of Education.
The talk is to be on the various
plans concerning religious instruction In the public school, and sug-

20 At Geology Camp
About 20 geology students are
presently camped at Crested Butte,
Colo., as part of their requirements
for a degree In geology.
The summer encampment, held
annually, began June 9 when the
students left the University, Dr.
Lois J. Campbell of the Oeology
Department said.
The group is under the direction
of Dr. Arthur C. McFarlan, head
of the department. Dr. McFarlan
left the campus June 1 as part of
the advance party to set up the
camp for the students who fol.

gested revisions in the existing
methods. It will last for about 45
minutes. Following this will be a
discussion period which will be
open to the public.
Student chairman for the clos- lowed. principle purpose of the trip
The
ing session of the Forum on "Remapligion and the Public Schools" will is to give students practice in
ping. They will be required to
be Nell Logan.
camp studies
Attendance at the meetings dur- write a report of the
wheft they return.
ing the summer has been "fairly
In addition to students from the
regular about 30 to 75 people
everytlme," according to Joy Lease,
The Oulgnol Theatre seats apExecutive Director of the YWCA.
proximately 425 persons.
The University of Kentucky Libraries contain over 600,000 volumes.
Memorial Hall seats 1,100 persons and is equipped with a pipe
organ and carillonic bells.
Gladys Kammerer, Political
Dr.
Science Department, will speak on
"Choosing Delegates to the National Political Convention" at the
July 24 meeting of the Dutch
Lunch Club.
Dealing with the theory of such
elections, Dr. Kammerer will ex
plain their Importance and rela
tion to the Individual.
This is the last of a series on
political activity and citizen participation which has been sponsored

Club To Discuss
Delegate Choice

University, there are several students from schools not in Kentucky, Dr. Campbell said.
The students are living In tents
while they are in Colorado. All of
the cooking is done by Harry Taylor, head cook at Donovan Hall,
Dr. Campbell said.
The group is expected to return
to the University shortly after
August 4, the day the encampment
ends.

PINKSTON'S
WATCH SHOP
Fine Watches
Watch Repairing
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Diamond Rings
130 N. LIMESTONE
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PHONE

COLONEL

of the

by the club.

WEEK

The Kentucky Kernel
Entered at the Post Office at Lexington,
Kentucky, as second class matter under
the Act of March 3. 1879.
Published weekly during1 school except
holidays and exams.

Mothproofing
ALL YEAR ROUND

Using

Mycel Controlled Dry Cleaning

Paul Daniel
Editor
Managing Editor . . . Graydon Hambrick
Frances Edney
News Editor
Advertising Mgr
Tex Thomas
Perry J. Ashley
Business Mgr
Ray Cravens
Cartoonist
Reporters: George Ellen Asher,
Orcena Lyle, Charles W. Kurtz. Virginia
Snodgrass. Jim Miles, George Perry,
Walter Wyatt, Ann Shirley GiUock, Lois
Florence.

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The Stirrup Cup is proud to announce Kay Martersteck as

Colonel of the Week.

An English major, Kay has a 3.8 overall standing (she adds
hastily that it might be 3.75) in addition to all the many extracurricular activities in which she participates. She is a member
of Phi Beta Kappa,
of Alpha Lambda Delta,
of Cwens, member of the BSU Council and Choir,
of Phi Sigma Iota (romance languages honorary),
of Troupers, Alpha Gamma Delta sorority.

at its

ex-mem- ber
ary

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And she graduates this August.

We hope you enjoy your two delicious Stirrup Cup meals, Kay.

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL. Friday, fulr 20,

Texas Prof Comes To UK

Bernard Fitzgerald, UK's new
Director of Music Education and
of the concert band, is no stranger
to Kentucky. He was last here as
a guest professor of music education in 1954.
Mr. Fitzgerald comes to UK from
the University of Texas in Austin.
With him is his family; his wife,
Ina, who he met at Oberlln College; his son, Terry, 16, who will
be a senior in high school this fall;
and his daughter, Kathleen, 11,
who is in Junior high.
Mr. Fitzgerald was born in Martinsville, Illinois. He went to secondary schools in Illinois and Indiana. He got his Bachelor of Music degree from Oberlln College in
Oberlln, Ohio, where he majored
In trumpet and music education.
He got his Master of Music degree
from Jordan Conservatory of Music
where he majored in composition
and trumpet.
During college he was president

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He has taught in Kansas, Arkansas, Idaho, New York, and

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of his class for two years and
social chairman for two years. He
was also president of the band for

I

19

Texas. He also taught trumpet at
the national music camp in Inter-loche- n,
Michigan.
He was president of the College
Band Directors National Association in 1950. He is a member of
the Music Educators National Conference; the American Bandmasters Association; Phi Mu Alpha,
national honorary music fraternity; Pi Kappa Lambda, national
music honor society; and has been
elected as an honorary life member of Kappa Kappa Psl, national
college band fraternity.

ONE DAY

Hamilton To Speak
On Ashland's
Past And Present

K

-3

CIRCLE BAR
Present

Dr. Holman Hamilton, assistant
professor of history at the University of Kentucky, will be the

"SMOKE" RICHARDSON'S ORCHESRTA
Friday and Saturday Nights

guest speaker at the annual reception to be given at 4 p.m., July 23,
on the lawn at Ashland, home of
Henry Clay.
His topic will be "Ashland, Then
and Now."
The reception is sponsored Jointly by the University and the Henry
Clay Memorial foundation, in
commemoration of the life and
services of the great statesman.
Dr. Hamilton's talk will be preceded by a musical program to be
presented by James King, an instructor in the UK Department of
Music, and Mrs. King. The couple
might be dressed in costumes netting of the Clay era, and the compositions will include those popular in that period.
Dr. Hamilton completed his undergraduate work at Williams College and the University of Indiana.
He joined the staff of the Fort
Wayne (Ind.) Journal-Gazett- e
as
a reporter, and later became editorial writer. The historian came
to Kentucky In 1935 seeking ma
terial for a biography of Zachary
Taylor. The congenial atmosphere
of the Blue Grass and the wealth
of Taylor material resulted In the
Hamiltons moving to Lexington.
He received the Doctor of Philosophy degree at UK in 1954. Because of his record as a student,
researcher and writer. Dr. Hamilton was invited to remain at the
University as assistant professor of
history. biIn addition to a
ography of Zachary Taylor, the
historian has written numerous
articles and reviews for various
Journals. He currently is writing a
book on the "Compromise of 1850."
The speaker will be introduced
at the reception by Dr. Hambleton
Tapp.
two-volu-

1956-

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, July 20,

4

Snow Granted
1)
(Continued from
leave, and he returned to the Inlands to study the Polynesian type
of bones.
For his work In Identifying unknown war dead, while working
with the Graves Registration Serv
ice, Dr. Snow was given an Army
award for meritorious civilian
service. He has previously worked
for armed forces agencies In test
lng cold weather equipment.
As a physical anthropologist,
Snow Is Interested In exact physical measurements of human bones
"The purpose of the study," Snow
said, "will be to determine the age,
sex, cause of death, etc." of the
Polynesian group.

1956

Westminster

by Ray Cravens

Campus Crossfire

The Westminster Fellowship will

go to Natural Bridge for an

Pa-r-

The College of Law was or
ganized in 1008.
Of the seventy law reviews published by the nation's law schools,
the Kentucky Law Journal Is the
tenth oldest.

1

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-I

J-

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-I

1:30 p.m.

the Fellowship.

Paul Johnson and Spivey Massey
will lead the worship service. No
program will be held.

aT.
..

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Wesley Foundation
Wesley Foundation's "Seminar
On 'Denominations" will focus on
the Protestant Episcopal Church
this week, at the Monday meeting,
July 23, Wesley House, 7 to 8 p.m.
Rev. Robert Smith, Vicar of St.
James Church, Shelbyville, Ky
will represent the

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20-2-

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TRIBUTE TO BAD MAN

Color
James Cagney
Color

July

22-23-- 24

23 PACES TO BAKER STREET
Color Van Johnson Vera Miles
MY LADY

GOOD-BY- E

Walter Brennan Brandon
De Wilde
July

Wed-Th- u,

25-2-

6

THE TENDER TRAP

Color
Frank Sinatra

Debbie Rcnolds

THE TALL MEN

Color

Jane Russell

Clark Gable

Repair sarrlce, adding maa,
chinal, naw and mad
carboni, ribbons, and
office supplies.

UP TO

$300

117 Cheapside

Dial

PHONE

16

07

387 ROSE ST.

ey,

FOR THE
FINEST
IN
REFRESHMENT
TRY

od

RENTED

mw

BREAKFAST ALL DAY

75c PLATE LUNCHES
SANDWICHES
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STEAKS
SEA FOOD

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COLD BEVERAGES
O
MID-NIT- E

Lexington

mm

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f?ne

Block from University
820 S. Limestone St.

1

The CoUege of Engineering was
organized In 1918 with the consolidation of different engineering

O Standard
O Portable
O Electric

High St. and Cochran

$300.00 EASY

LEXINGTON

944 Winchester Rd.

Campus Agent Wanted

BUSINESS MACHINES

We need a campus agent to sell
nationally advertised drawing sets,
slide rules and fluorescent lamps
to entering engineering freshmen
this fall. Tremendous profits, no
investment required. Posters and
brochures supplied free. Printed
sales heJp provided. Write:

COMPANY

departments.

EMPIRE ENGINEERING

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Incorporated

(Continued from Page 1)
Hollis Summers, UK novelist and
Mary Breeding, of Breeding, a
transfer student, also was granted poet, will be a staff member at
a sophomore scholarship. The oth Morehead State College's fifth aner students are recent graduates nual Writer's Workshop July
3.
of various high schools throughout
Students are still being accepted
state. The high school seniors
the
for the workshop, Dr. James
are:
director; said. Student
David Allen, Sebree; Walter Aus
tin, Rumsey; Kenneth Baker, Som- writers of various ages and profeserset; Stuart Berryman and Wil- sions from Kentucky, Illinois, Tenliam Johnson, Nicholasville; Jef- nessee, Ohio and West Virginia alferson Brother Jr., Mt. Sterling; ready have enrolled.
McConkey said the workshop will
George Brown, Olmstead; Mell-woCooksey, Willisburg; John Include a series of night programs
Frazier, Simpsonville ; Harold open to the public. The first one,
Grooms, Paris; Paul Halrston, July 23, will feature Collister
Milton; Bernard Holinde and Har Hutchison, Cleveland poet and
old Burton, Owensboro; Robert author of "Toward Daybreak."
Mattlngly, Sharon King and Jane
A bird
Walsh, Louisville; Ronald Kingus, two pairs. In the hand is worth
Augusta; Hugh Mahln, Keene;
Sammy Medley, Shelbyville.
Robert Rogers and Ernestine
Williams, Russellville; Loren Royal
TYPEWRITERS
Jr., Hartford; Joseph Scott, Fern
Creek; Dudley Sisk, Lexington;
George Stephens, Vernon; Joseph
Truinbo, Finch ville; Kenneth Whi-ti- s,
Dabney; Gayle Williams and
Bettie Renaker, La Grange; Chap-pell Wilson. Cadiz; Hilton Withers,
Boyd; Neleta Clarkson, Dunneville;
Mary Conder, Harrodsburg; Carol
Francis, Sharon Grove; Norma
French, Sunflsh; Mae Hedgecock,
Brooksville; Barbara Kirkland,
Gravel Switch; Draxie Newsom,
Late Model
Robinson Creek; Ann Smith, Pa
ri u can, and Helen Wheeler,
RENTAL MACHINES
Mor-ganfle-

S. Lime

Typewriters, Adding Machines

PAYMASTER LOANS

REPAHEIED

OPEN TILL

SERVICE

RENTAL SERVICE

SOLD

CHICKEN
CHOPS

TYPEWRITER

Designed Especially for
UK Faculty and Personnel

Mc-Conk-

The Champions

Sun-Mon-T-

KENTUCKY

23-Aug- ust

THREE FOR THE SHOW

Betty Grabte

Episcopal

PERSONAL LOANS

UK Novelist On
Morehcad Staff

Scholarships

Dean Frank J. Welch, College
and Home Economics, has been appointed to a
five-ma- n
federal commission to
promote Increased industrial use
of agricultural products.
The bipartisan commission was
appointed by President Eisenhower,
and Its creation was authorized in
the recently enacted farm bill.
Nominated with Dean Welch
were George H. Soppers, Engle-woo- d,
N. J., Industrialist; Charles
R. Sayre, Scott, Miss., cotton farmer; Karl D. Butler, Ithaca, N. Y.,
a farmer, and J. LeRoy Welsh,
Omaha, chairman of the University of Nebraska board of regents.
of Agriculture

Churches.
The seminar, to which the public is invited, is designed as a series
for the summer session.

"Is this the seminar in Modern Political Thought?"
VISION

174 E. Maxwell, at
will be provided by
Food

minster House,

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m

i

In-

formal outing Sunday, July 22.
The group will leave the West-

Welch Appointed
By Eisenhower

SUPPLY

COMPANY
114, Canal St. Station
New York City 13, N. Y.

P. O. Box

NOBODY CAN
LAUNDER
A
SHIRT LIKE

7

145 S. LIMESTONE
Phone

80

A

Fountain
O

irvoce

SWIMMING ACCESSORIES

COSMETICS
O PRESCRIPTION SERVICE
O SCHOOL SUPPLIES
O TOBACCO PIPES
O TOILETRIES

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Dunn

1

LIME AND MAXWELL

C.

*