xt754746r382 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt754746r382/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky University of Kentucky 1930 course catalogs  English University of Kentucky This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. University of Kentucky course catalogs, 1865- Bulletin, University of Kentucky, Summer Session, Vol. 22, No. 2, 1930 text Bulletin, University of Kentucky, Summer Session, Vol. 22, No. 2, 1930 1930 1930 2013 true xt754746r382 section xt754746r382   ·· ,;     ·— —   .,,_;     ,¢._.-,
 
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Summer Sess1on 1930
First Term: June 16 to July 19
§ Second Term: July 21 to August 23
A February, 1930  
  Published by the Universityiof Kentucky, Lexington. Entered as Sec~
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under the Act ot July 16, 1894. I
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  V‘ , Saturday May 17 Last date for ex-service men to make `
  ·»_A Qi   1 application for free tuition and room
  _ rent for iirst term.
  ‘ Q Monday June 16 Registration for first term.
  ·· V Tuesday June 17 1 Classes ·begin.
  Friday June 20 Last date for making changes in regis-
 ;. tration or in schedule without pay-
  ·‘_’ ih — ~ ment of tee.
  Friday June 20 _ Last date for making application for ·
  V _ ` . A ex-service benefits for second term.
  T s M011d&y June 23 Last date upon which a student may
  register for credit for the first term's . ’
    ;_' . work. ,
 Sly Monday June 23 Last date upon which a student may V
  p ~ be dropped without e grade by the ·
    2 dean. ‘ `
  , l Tuesday June 24 Last date upon which a student may _
  `...f   _ ‘ withdraw and receive a refund of  {_
  matriculatiou fee for the iirst term.  fl
  ’—'A _ Saturday July 19 Examinations tor first term. {
“  Monday July 21 Registration for second term. Q
 4: V Tuesday July 22 Classes begin. , ‘ _._
  Friday July 25 Last date for making changes in regis- {
  _· ~ . tration or in schedule without pay-  
  ment ot tee. 5
  _ Monday July 28 Last date on which a student may = V  
¥·'  A . . register for credit for the term’s A -
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  ’_'· - Monday July 28 Last date upon which e, student may
’   . be dropped without a grade by the ·
>`  I dean.
  p __Tuesday July 29 Last date upon which a student may i
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 i   J Bulletin
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  { University of Kentucky  
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Summer Session 1930 J
  First Term: June 16 to July 19
    Second Term: July 21 to August 23 J
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CONTENTS
Page
Admission ............A......................................................................................... 11
Changes in Registration ................................................................................ 22
College of Arts and Sciences .r...................................................................... 25
College of Agriculture .................................................................................... 45
College of Engineering .......,.........................................,............,.,....,...r........ 47
College of Law .,,....,...............__._._._..._.._._....._.._.r....,....r........,,,,,..............rr...... 50
College of Education ...._...,..,..............__..,.,_.,...__......_.__,_,,,____.A_....._,__,._......... 51
College of Commerce ........_______,______,,__,___,____________,______,___,______________,.___,,,_,_.,,_ 57
Ex—Service Men ...........................,............................................................,..... 24
Faculty ...........,...i................,.....................................,............................i.......... 4
Fee for Change in Classification ................................................................ 22
_ Fees ....i........>.....................................................................,....... i ...................... Z1
General lnformation .......,...............i..................,...................,........i.......,...... 10
General Requirements for a Degree ........................................................ 13
General Requirements for the Master’s Degree .............................ii..... 19
General Requirements for the Doctor’s Degree .......ii............i.............. 19
Late Classitication Fee ..,.......................................>..................,,................. 22
Late Registration, .....,.,...,.................... . ........._...........ii.......,,....`...............,,.. 22
Marking System ...........................................................................,....i............. 23
Officers of Summer Session ......,..........................................,...................... 3 L
Officersof Administration ..................,.... Q .............,.................................... 3 ·
Placement Service ..ii............................................. V ...,..>.................,...............i 2'3
Recreation for Summer Session Students .........,,...,................................. 24
Reduced Railroad Rates ......i...........................................t.............,............... 21 _
Refunds ...i.....................,,...........................,...4.,.,........................................... 2:
Requirements for Graduation-
College of Arts and Sciences .........................................................,.... I5
College of Agriculture ......i..................................................................t.. l··
College of Engineering ........................................... C ........................... 16
College of Law ........................................................................................ 16 V
College of Education .............,.............................................................. 17
College of Commerce ...C ...................... C ...................... C ......................... 17
The Graduate School .............................................................................. 18
Room and Board ........................... C .................. C ........................................... 23
Residence Requirements for Graduation ............... C ................................. 12
Schedule of Lectures and Recitations ........................... C ......................... 59
V Student Load ........................... C ...................... C .......... C .......... .CC .................. 21
Teachers’ Certificates .............................................................................,...... 20 `

 Q
OFFICERS OF THE SUMMER SESSION
FRANK LI:RoNn MUVEY, Ph. D., LL. D., President.
W. C. BELL, M. A.. State Superintendent of Schools.
’ WILLIAM S. TAYLOR, Ph. D., Director of the Summer Session.
A OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION
FRANK LmRom> MCVEY, Ph. D., LL. D., President.
W. C. BELL, M. A., State Superintendent of Schools.
  PAUL Piucmricm Boro, M. A., Ph. D., Dean, College of Arts and Sciences.
  TIIo1x1As Pom Coomm, B. S. in Agr., Dean, College of Agriculture.
  Fmcoimicx PAUL Amumsou, M. E., Dean, College of Engineering.
  ALVIN E. EvANs, Ph. D., J. D., Dean, College of Law.
  WILLIAM S. TAYLoIn, Ph. D., Dean, College of Education.
? EDWARD Wmsr, A. M., Ph. D., Dean, College of Commerce.
` W. D. Fuuxuousm, Ph. D., Dean, Graduate School.
" WEILINGTON PATRICK, Ph. D., Director of University Extension.
COLUMBUS RUDOLPH Mmoum, A. M., Dean of Men.
SAIIAII G. BLANDING, A. M., Dean of Women.
I Mus. P. K. Homms, A. B., Dean of Women in the Summer Session.
* Ezn.A L GILLIS, A. B., Registrar.
DAvIn HOWARD PEAK, A. M., Business Agent.
Q MARGARET ISADORE Kms, A. B., Librarian. _
{ `
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  FACULTY
J ADAMS, JESSE E., Ph. D.
Professor of Education
‘ ALLEN, RICHARD S. Ph. D.
` Associate Professor Anatomy and Physiology
I ALLEN, W1LL1AM RAY, Ph. D.
; Associate Professor of Zoology
  ANDERSON, WALTEE SEWELL, M. A.
. ~ Professor of Genetics
i AEHEE, E. J., M. A.
Instructor in Psychology
BARKENBUS, CHARLES, Ph. D.
Ass-isstant Professor of Organic Chemistry .
Q BARKLEY, MAELE RHODES, B. S. in H. E.
U . ~ Instructor in Home Economics
L BARNETT, BRINKLEY, B. M. E.
` Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering
i BEDFORD, MATPHEWV HUME, Ph. D.
Assistant Professor of Physical Chemistry
BEEHLEE, WILLIIXLI N., B. A.
. Instructor in Sociology
` BEST, HAEDY, Ph. D.
C Professor of Sociology and Head of the Department
` BLACKXVELL, J. D. Ph. D. .
  Director of Vocational Education, Maryland  
, BOYD, PAUL PEENTTUE, Ph. D. *
g Dean, College of Arts and Sciences and Head of the Department  
of Mathematics
BOYNTON, PAUL L., Ph. D.
Associate Professor of Psychology
` BRADY, GE0mE KEYPORTS, Ph. D.
Associate Professor of English `
BEAU¤z, ALFRED, M. A.
Assistant Professor of Zoology _
I BROWN, MARION C., M. A. .
Instructor in Mathematics  
BUEEAU, ERNEST ADOLPHE, Ph. B., M. M. g
Professor of Electrical Engineering ‘ $
. CANADY, EMMEYT JOHN, A. B., M. A. T
Instructor in Mathematics .
CARTER, LUDTAN H., M. A.  
Assistant Professor of Economics  
CHALELEY, LYMAN, B. L. ,
Professor of Law §
. 4 4

 CHAMBERS, JOHN S., M. D. A
Professor of Hygiene and Public Health; Head of Department
DAN*I·zLER, LEHRE L., M. A.
Professor Philol0gy;.Head of Department of English Language
and Literature
DAVIS, J0E LEE, M. A.
Instructor in English ~
DAvIs, JDSERH MORTON, M. A.
Professor of Mathematics
DIcI;ER, JDIIN BDRN
Superintendent of Shops; Head of Department of Practical
Mechanics
DUNCAN, MRS. MAY K., M. A.
Professor of Elementary Education
ELY, FORDYCE
Professor of Animal Husbandry
EVANS, ALVIN E., Ph. D., J. D.
Dean, College of Law
FARQUHAR, EDWARD FRANKI.IN, M. A.
Professor of Lxiterature
  FISR, EDWARD
V Assistant Professor of Art
Y Fosmm, MAY, M. S. in H. E. _
Instructor in Home Economics
. FREEMAN, WILLIAM EDXVIN, A. B., E. E.
  Assistant Dean of the College of Engineering; Head of the De-
 ` partment of Electrical Engineering
  FUNKIIDUSER, WILLIAM DELRER·I~, Ph. D.
E Dean of the Graduate School; Professor of Zoology; Head of
Department
GA1,LAwAY, WII.I.A][ FRANCIS, M. A.
Instructor in English
. GILLIS, EzRA L., A. B.
4 Registrar, University of Kentucky
E GREIIAN, EN0cII BACON, A. B.
  Professor of Journalism; Head of Department
  GRIFFIN, GERALD, A. B.
  Instructor in Journalism
i HARRINGTDN, MH.DRED, B. S.
 . Instructor in Library Science
E HARRIS, WILLIAM JEFFERSON, B. S. in Agriculture
  Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry
: HEINZ, WILRUR A., A. B.
  Instructor in Hygiene
  HILI., HENRY H., Ph. D. ·
¥ Professor of Educational Administration
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A 1 I HOLLOWAY, J. B., M. A. A
, Instructor in Education
‘   I HOLMES, HENRY BERT, M. A.
      Assistant Professor of Romance Languages
l 1 E HOLMES, MRS. SARAH K.
I     Assistant Dean of Women
3     HOEINE, JOHN SIIILRAIAN, M. E. 1
¥   { Associate Professor of Drawing V
` Q   HORLACIII*ZI{, LEV1 JACKSON, M. S. in Agr. -
;   G Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry; Assistant to the Dean  
z i   JENNINGS, WALTER WLLsoN, Ph. D. Y
x     Professor of Economics  
;   JETT, CARTER COLELIAN, M. E.  
i Professor of Machine Design `€
X   g JOHNSON, JAMES RIGHARD, B. M. E.
;   Professor of Applied Mechanics [
`   JONES, THE0D0RE T0L1y1AN, Ph. D. "
L   Professor of Ancient Languages; Head of Department `
,   KING, MARGARET ISADORE, A. B.  
2   Librarian, Instructor in Library Science i
j   KNA1>1>, CHARLES M., Ph. D. »
  Associate Professor of History Q
T   KNIGHT, GRANT C., A. M.  
_   Associate Professor of English i
Qi KOPPIUS, OTT0 TOWVNSEND, Ph. D. ,
  Associate Professor of Physics E;
  KUIPER, JOHN, M. A.  
{y_ Associate Professor of Philosophy lj
  LAMLPERT, CARL ALBERT
y lj Professor of Music; Head of the Department
  LANDTN, HARoLD, Ph. D.
`Q Instructor in History, Ohio State University
  LATTMER, CLA1RoRNE, Ph. D.
`z Professor in Mathematics A
i LAWRENCE, A. J., A. B. T
Q Instructor in Economics  
Q LEST0UR0E0N, FLORA ELIZABETH, Ph. D. .i
i Associate Professor in Mathematics  
_ LIGON, MOSES EDWVARD, A. M.  
¤ Professor of Secondary Education; Principal of University High ‘
. School  
t McCoy, H. S., M. A.  
A Speial Lecturer Q
g McFARLAN, ARTHUR CRANE, Ph. D. g
A Professor of Geology; Head of the Department  
· A
. A

   MCFAILLAND, FRANK T., Ph. D.
Professor of Botany; Head of the Department
McIN1·m;n, B1mT11US BOSToN, B. S., M. S.
Assistant Professor of Botany
McV1~;Y, FRANK LEROND, Ph. D., LL. D.
President of the University
, MAnT1N, JAMES W., A. B., A. M. ·.
Professor of Economies
]\Jl£I.C[1b1R, C. R., LL. B., M. A.
Dean of Men, Professo·r of German Language and Literature
  M1·1‘c11m.L, J. S., M. A.
  Instructor in Education
  1\Iu‘e111a1.1., Joux R1c11A1m, A. B.
" Assistant Professor of Chemistry
Moomc, NLLL E., M. A.
  Instructor in Elementary Education
·h> _ MomcLAN1>, Roy, A. B., LL. B.
,§ Associate Professor of Law
V; Nom, JAMES T11oMAS CoT·roN, A. M., Litt. D.
  Professor of History of Education
  PA1.m1;1:, Enom: Z., Ph. D.
  Associate Professor of Economics
  PA1;1<1·:1c, E1·111;L L., M. A.
Q Professor of Home Economics
  PA*1·n1cK, VVELLINGTON, P11. D.
§j Director of University Extension
 ? P1NN1·;Y, O. H., M. D.
  Associate Professor of Hygiene .
  Po1:*1*M.xNx, VICTOR R., B. J.
Q ' Assistant Professor in Journalism
a P1:1111·;, Joy, A. B.
§ Instructor in Art `
·· RAu1.ANu, Gmoiccrc, LL. D.
1 Instructor in the College of Law
¢* R.xxoALL, FKANK H., A. B., LL. B., S. J. D. ‘
  Professor of Law
 3 ROBINSON, Lmwrs CASS, M. S. A
  Assistant Professor of Geology
_‘ Ro1:1NS0N, Sm, B. S.
  Professor of Physical Education; Head of the Department
 C Ross, CLAY CA]\’[I’BE’LL, Ph. D.
E Professor of Educational Psychology
1
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, .   I Roush, C0Lv1N P., B. S., LL. B.  
  1   Q Instructor in Economics  
i     Scummco, lvlomus, B. S., D. V. M.  
}   { Professor of Bacteriology; Head of the Department  
  1 { » Smnvm, AL1¢mzTA W1Ls0N, M. A. ig
{ ;   Assistant Professor of Romance Languages  
i   } Scuxcu, BLALN1; WILBUR, M. A.  
; ¥ Q ‘~ Assistant Professor of Romance Languages ji
§     SHANNON, JAs1·m B., M. A. j
Q   i Instructor in Political Science }
L   SHANNON, Ronmm, M. A.  
{     Instructor in English '  
  `   Srsvomc, DAVID NORTON  
  E Instructor in Automotive Engineering g
i lg p Sovru, DUDLEY EUGENE, M. A. i
    , Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy
      S1~1cKA1m, R0NmLLA, M. S. .
i   ? Associate Professor of Home Economics Education I
  I STATES, MARSHALL Nm', Ph. D.  
}   Professor of Physics I
    SuLz1an, ELMKR GRIFFITH, A. B.  
2*. Instructor in Music and Director of Publicity Bureau  
3   SU·1·us.nLAND, WILLIAM Rommvr, A. B.  
  ;@. Assistant Professor of Public Speaking ·
~   TAYL01:, WILLIAM SEPTIMUS, Ph. D.  
`   Dean, College of Education; Director of thc Summer Session Y_
  THURMAN, GORDON OWEN  
i   Instructor in Machine Shop  
;   WAUE, Gmmnunm, A. M.  
  . Assistant Professor of Home Economics  
A Q A WALP, PAUL W., M. A.  
;   Instructor in Political Science  
j   WALTMAN, 0. s., B. s., m Agr. ij
  Instructor in Horticulture ·  
  WATKINS, IsAAc GREEN j
j_ Assistant in Engineering Laboratories ,  
{ WHITEHEAD, GUY G
{I City Superintendent of Schools; Lecturer in oozzege of Education  
. WEAVER, RALPH Howmz, Ph. D. {
`Q Assistant Professor of Bacteriology g
T Wmsm, EDVVARD, Ph. D.  
fj Dean, College of Commerce; Professor of Economics  
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  Wmxvono, Emxvmm JAMES, M. S. in Agr.
Ii Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry
  WILSON, Lmvomz, B. S.
  Instructor in Music
if W1Ls0N, PAULINE CLARK
gc? Assistant Professor of Home Economics.
  NVISICLY, CA1u<11c, B. S.
U Instructor in Library Science
  Woous, RAL1-11 H., A. M.
?‘ Associate Professor of Agricultural Education P
  Z11xmuc1zMA1~:, Amac JL*1.1us, B. S. in Chemistry, M. S.
{ Instructor in Chemistry
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I   I GENERAL INFORMATION IQ
I . ·.I
f `   LENGTH OF SESSION ,]
I i` ‘ A
` I I II The summer session of the University of Kentucky for 1930 will bo I
{     ten weeks in length and will be divided into two terms, the first to  
»   I I begin June 16 and close July 19, and the second to begin July 21 and  
; I I I I
_ I . ;; close August 23. v,,.
l     Classes during the summer session will begin at 7:30 a. m. The Y
  , first hour will be from 7:30 to 8:20, the second hour from 8:30 to 9:20,  
` ,IQ I l the fifth hour closing at 12:20 daily.  
`   I The courses listed for each term may be found in this catalog. No  
,     courses other than those scheduled will be offered.  
  I CLASSES OF COURSES I
`     Courses will be offered for graduates and for undergraduates in  
I   the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Agriculture, the Col- t
1 Ig   lege of Engineering, the College of Law, the College of Education, and  
_   the College of Commerce. I
. 2** ·
  FOR WHOM PLANNED  
    The summer session program of the University of Kentucky has  
`   I been planned to meet the needs of the following groups;  
  1. Teachers in the public schools who wish additional training in I `
  their special lines of work and who desire to work toward college Q
E;   degrees.
  2. Teachers in private and parochial schools who wish additional  
  training in their special lines of work and who desire to work toward ~
*5 I college degrees. 5
`   3. Supervisors of grade school work in special subjects. ,
` ij 4. City superintendents who desire to acquaint themselves with  
`   recent progress in education and who have special problems for solu- I
I r tion ·
IL ‘  
I   · 5. County superintendents who desire to study the problems of  
I   the organization and administration of rural education and problems I
it relating to the social life of the community.  
I   6. Teachers in junior colleges who desire additional training in  
;{ the particular fields in which they work and who are working toward  
  higher degrees. ,  
  7. Normal school and college teachers who desire additional train- g
  lng in their chosen fields and who are working toward advanced ,  
§‘ degrees.  
I 8. Undergraduates in agriculture, arts and sciences, commerce,  
I education, engineering and law who find it desirable to shorten the gi
ef
I period of their college courses.  
  9. Persons desiring training for Y. M. C. A., Y. W. C. A. and social  
I welfare service, including playground directors.  
I `
I 10  
   

  
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{ ADMISSION
* Students will be admitted to the University as their previous train-
  ing warrants. They will be admitted to the freshman class, to ad-
  vanced standing, to special courses as special students, or admitted as
E} graduate students.
g4 TO THE FRESHMAN CLASS
{ An applicant for admission to the freshman class of any of the col-
fi leges of the University except the College of Law must offer credit for
if fifteen units of high school or other secondary school work, so chosen
I as to include the five basic units prescribed by all the colleges. Only
_ students who hold certificates of graduation from an accredited high
  school will be admitted without examination. No student will be
i admitted as a candidate for a degree with less than fifteen units.
S TO THE COLLEGE OF LAW
  The College of Law is co-educational. Both men and women are
E admitted either in the regular session or in the summer session. The
' i same requirements for admission to the summer session prevail as for
  the regular session—the completion of two years of college work, or
l. sixty semester hours.
· Students from other law schools of the American Association of
  Law Schools are admitted on the same terms as students of the Uni-
; versity of Kentucky College of Law.
  TO ADVANCED STANDING
V Candidates who can present equivalents of any part of the college
work may secure advanced standing and thereby reduce the number of
  hours required for graduation. They may secure this advanced stand-
  ing by one of two methods:
it a—By examination on each subject for which credit is desired.
  b-—By transfer from an accredited college or university. An oiliclal
1; statement must be submitted to the Registrar certifying in detail the
  work for which credit is desired.
f:
  AS SPECIAL STUDENTS
  A graduate of another university or college may enter the Unl-
3 versity to pursue any special work. Other persons may be admitted as
  special students under the following conditions:
It a——T.hey must be prepared to do the work desired, and give good
Q reason for not taking a regular course.
  b—They must be at least twenty—one years of age.
  11

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   l: _ AS GRADUATE STUDENTS 5
f       The Graduate School is open to students who are graduates of this  
? E} wi or any other university or college of recognized standing. Application
  it ¤ for admission to this `school should be made to the Registrar of the G
l     University, and should be accompanied by ofiicial certificates attesting
    , the candidate’~s completion of an undergraduate course. _
      For further information, see statement of the Graduate School.  
`   \ I  
i ig)? BY CERTIFICATE  
I fw Persons who desire to enter the University by certificate instead of   `
    `V by examination must have their credits certified by the superintendent l
  V . or principal of the school in which they may be secured. Blank forms  
l 4, Q for such certificates will be furnished by the Registrar of the Univer-  
    _ sity on application. These certificates should be properly made out. ,
  il   signed and mailed to the Registrar as early as possible and not later  
i   than one week before registration. Only graduates of accredited  
  gil` schools or those who have completed the accredited course will be *‘
.   admitted upon certificate. A diploma, such as is given at graduation  
j     to high school pupils, cannot be substituted for this certificate.  
  I BY EXAMINATION  
, il ji If not a graduate of an accredited high school the student must °
Y W present entrance credits for 15 units, including those prescribed, and  
  h pass examinations in four subjects as follows:  
  1. ENGLISH (including composition). ll
  2. Myrrrnixrnrros (algebra and plane geometry). ‘  
  { 3. Two Soimzers of at least one unit each to be selected by the is
;   student. The list of entrance subjects may be procured from the °
  `· Registrar.
    1 If the student is not a graduate of the school from which he comes,  
f l` he will not be admitted on entrance examinations within one year after F
.   leaving such school unless he presents a statement of honorable  
i   dismissai.  
  RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION  
§g» Two semesters of work at the Univeristy of Kentucky will satisfy  
  the residence requirements for the bachelor’s or the master’s degree.  
  Three summer terms are considered equivalent to one semester. For  
`. the bachelor’s degree thirty semester credits must be completed in the  
_*_ ‘ senior year (thc work to be done in the college from which the student  
,·, is to be graduated). For the master’s degree, at least twenty—four  
  credits must be completed, in addition to the thesis.  
  12  
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  X
  GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR A DEGREE
L All applicants for a degree must have satisfied the following .
requirements z
1. Niiixinnn or Cnnmrs.
An applicant for a degree must have the required number of
_ acceptable credits. One semester’s work in a beginning modern foreign
  language cannot be accepted until the student has received a passing
3 grade in thc work of the second semester.
i 2. RlCQU.I1tl£h[ldNTS ron Glmnunrioiv.
1* ` A. B. & B. S. *127 semester hours
_] B. S. in Agr. *139.3 semester hours
F B. S. in H. E. *133.1 semester hours
jj A. B. in Educa."i127 semester hours
` B. S. in Com. *127 semester hours
I LL. B. *80 semester hours (60 A&S credits required for
Qg admission.)
  *With equal number of quality points. B. S. in Eng. College.
  Completion of courses outlined in University catalog.
it 3. Ctassirickrion AS A R1·;cur..xir Srumzxr.
  An applicant must be a regular student and cannot be doing work
  as a special student. The student must have a standing of 1.0 after
  all penalties have been subtracted. All advanced work that is accepted
  is counted with a standing of 1.0.
fi 4. Fixlxncmr. Dmtmqurziwrs.
  An applicant must 110t be a delinquent iinancially at the Book
tt Store, Business Oillce, Post Otlice, Library, Athletic or Military Depart-
it ment or any other odlce at the University.
*}‘ · 5. GlcourR1;QU11=1sM1aNrs.
All group requirements and requirements in Military Science and
Physical Education must have been met.
` 6. Rnsiniancic R1§QUlRl·Z)[EN'l`S.
5 The residence requirement must be fulnlled. Permission for all
  extension taken in the Senior year must be obtained from the Dean
  and must not violate the Senior Residence Rule.
  7. Exrmvsion Wow;.
  Not more than 12 credits may be taken by extension in any one
  calendar year. This is the maximum amount that may be counted,
;  whether it is taken at the University of Kentucky or elsewhere.
_ 8. AI’PLICAT1ON ron A Dnennn.
§ Application for a degree must be nled in the Oiilce of the Registrar
  at the time announced for the tiling ot applications. The student is
if responsible for making application for the correct degree. That is, lf
  a student is working for the degree, Bachelor of Arts in Education, he
  should apply for this degree and not make application for the degree, .
  13

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‘ i   1 Bachelor of Arts, granted in the College of Arts and Sciences. If, for é
5 l l ly}   any reason, a student does not receive the degree at the time indicated ¥
{   {ali   on the application, it will be necessary for him to tile another applica-  
3   tion, as we are not responsible for carrying over applications from
    l one session to another. _
g   ; Note-In the rush of work it may be impossible to take into con- `
i     sideration all the elements that enter into your problem. Your record 5
il ,, will be checked according to the above outline and will bear the re- Q
   .}` sponsibility of having satisfied the requirements outlined above.
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  REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
  COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
I f Dmnnns
` The college offers courses leading to the following degrees: `
  Bachelor- of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.
~ Bachelor oi Science in Industrial Chemistry.
_ Tun Dnoiusn or Baoumon or ARTS
For the degree of Bachelor of Arts the student is required to gain
a total of 127 credits and 127 points, that is, a standing ot 1, subject
to the following conditions:
Otrrmxn or Rnouimzmmzrrs ron GRADUATION
I. Gimnizsr. Rnonnusmnnrs.
Matriculation Lectures .3 credit
. Military Science (men) 5.6 credits
; Physical Education 2.8 credits
i Hygiene 1.3 credits
é English 6 to 12 credits
(12 it' only 3 units entrance.)
{ II. Gnour R1;c,pU1iu;ixi1;N*i‘s Lower Division Freshman and Sophomore
` years
1. Foreign Languages, 6 to 18 credits. (6 in 1 language if 3 or
' more units entrance 12 if only 2 units entrance; 18 if only
I or no unit entrance).
; French, German, Greek, Italian, Latin or Spanish.
E 2. History and Social Sciences, 6 to 12 credits (6 in one depart-
I ment if 1 unit entrance in History; 12 including 6 credits in
History, if no entrance in History).
tu Economics, History, Political Science or Sociology.
·· 3. Mathematics, Philosophy or Psychology, 6 credits in one
§ T department. _
·, 4. Physical Science, 6 to 10 credits in one department.
if Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology or Physics.
  5. Biological Science, 6 to 8 credits in one department.
  Bacteriology, Botany, Physiology or Zoology.
  III. Maron 20 credits, Upper Division, Junior and Senior years. Any
  department, exclusive of elementary courses.
  IV. Mrivons 20 credits, Upper Division, Junior and Senior years.
  May be in two departments or related groups, exclusive of
  elementary courses. Consult Head of Major Department.
it 15
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1 N11?  
i {   V. ELECTIVES IN Orman CoLLEoEs or run Umvnnsrry. Not more than  
;   30 credits.  
      VI. In the Arts—Education course the student must take 20 credits  
        in one minor.  
  i     VII. RESIDENCE RULE. The Senior year must be spent in residence in  
  E, lg this college.  
E   bl: VIII. Term. Cmamrs Rmqonuzo, 127 credits.  
1 il E 11
    COLLEGE or AGRICULTURE 14
T ii. W; To receive the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, a il
1   student must complete 139.3 credits of work with a standing of 1. i i
1 W 1 X 1 , . i
j { W These credits are classihed as follows: 1 I
{   Prescribed subjects, n0n—agriculture 48.0 credits  
5   Prescribed subjects, agriculture 32.3 credits  
E     Electives required in agriculture 30.0 credits 1-
`   Q} Free electives 29.0 credits  
    -——·— Et
1   it Total 139.3 credits ji
1 ., { .
i     Students who have not had physics in high school will be required  
{M11 to take a six-credit course in college which will reduce the number »,
$2 E of free electives credits to 23. The tree electives may be in agriculture. i
_   =* It will thus be seen that there is opportunity to take work in agri-  
 yl culture amounting to 91.3 credits.  
1   To receive the degree of Bachelor of Science in Home Economics, l"
  1 a student must complete 133.1 credits of work with a standing of 1.  
    The amount of work a student will be permitted to carry is indi-  
5 W cated in outline of courses. However, it a student has maintained  
ij. a standing of 2 during a semester, he may, upon permission of the  
M1: dean, carry additional hours the following semester.  
‘   The maximum and minimum hours for special students are the  
    same as for regular students.  
  3 Prior to the senior year all candidates for the degree in agricul-  
`   ture must satisfy the dean that they have had at least one year’s work  
  on the farm or work for two summer vacations of three months each.  
Q 1* A student desiring to do work in any department of instruction  
  should select his courses of study upon the advice of the head of the Q1
r  department.  
*1:1    
V1 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING ‘_ 
  Comzsss or STUDY AND Dmenmcs  
{gil The College of Engineering oifers instruction leading to the follow-  ·
  lng baccalaurate degrees:   _
  Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering.  
  16  
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11.