xt75736m1m72 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt75736m1m72/data/mets.xml   Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station. 1957 journals 145 English Lexington. Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station Regulatory series, bulletin. n.145 text Regulatory series, bulletin. n.145 1957 2014 true xt75736m1m72 section xt75736m1m72 Regulatory Bulletin 145 I S
  Commercial Feeds in Kentucky, i
S — 1957
Including Report on Oilicial Feed
Samples Analyzed
October-December, 1957
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University of Kentucky
Agricultural Experiment Station
Lexington

 FEED AN'D FERTILIZER DEPARTMENT
KENTUCKY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
Bruce Poundstone, Head of Department
Robert Mathews, Asst. Adm. & Chief Inspector
Guy P. Zickefoose, Auditor-Inspector ·
David M. Daugherty, Registration Inspector
FIELD INSPECTION V
Otis R. Wheeler Neville Hulette Noel J. Howard
M. M. Davis W. M. Routt
LABORATORY
Harry R. Allen J. A. Shrader Lelah Gault
Valva Midkiff Gary R. Leslie Norma Holbrook
J. T. Adair Dewey H. Newman, Jr. Robert N. Price
Jo Ann Dawson _
CONTENTS Page
Commercial Feed in Kentucky, l957 .................. 3
Estimated Tonnage of Sales by Class of Feed, Kentucky l957 ...... lo
Average Composition of the More Common Feedstuffs .......... 5-6 V
Miscellaneous Samples Analyzed in 1947-57 .............. 7
Method of Calculating the Analysis of A Feed Mixture ......... 8
Weights Per Bushel. . . . .... . .... . ............. 9
Microscopic Examination of Feeds ...... . . .... . . .... 10
Urea . . . ............ . .... . ..... . ..... ll
Recormuendations for Preparation of Labels for Feeds which Contain
Drugs ...... . .... . ................. l2-l3
Sample Labels ................. . . ........ . lio-15
Analysis of Medicated Feeds ..................... 16-l8
Analysis of Non-Protein Nitrogen from Urea in Feeds .... . .... l9-25
Report of Official Dog Food Samples Analyzed ........... . 26-27
Protein and Mineral Feeds and Mineral Feeds ...... . ..... 28-37
Report of Official Feed Samples Analyzed for October, November
and December, 1957 ............... . . . . . . 38-70
This report compiled and prepared by Robert Mathews and Bruce Poundstone.
Analytical data by the laboratory staff.

 Quarterly Report on Feed Samples, 1957 3
I COM ERCIAL FEED IN KENTUCKY, 1957
The estimated tonnage of commercial feeds consumed in Kentucky
during 1957 was 572,957 tons. This was 18,964 tons less than was
consumed in 1956.
Estimated tonnage of feed sold in Kentucky beginning with 1940,
was as follows:
` 1940 . . . 353,138 1949 . . . 607,255
_ 1941 . . . 347,055 1950 . . . 584,441
1942 . . . 416,805 1951 . . . 612,946
1943 . . . 630,438 1952 . . . 648,800
1944 . . . 663,039 1953 . . . 662,267
1945 . . . 671,350 1954 . . , 566,229
1946 . . . 647,661 1955 . . . 541,536
1947 . . . 582,375 1956 . . . 591,921
1948 . . . 634,000 1957 . . . 572,957
A summary of estimated sales by class of feed is given on page 4.
In 1957, inspectors collected 3,193 samples of feed. Out of these
, samples 2,343 equaled guarantee or were within tolerance; 1,492 equaled
guarantee in every respect; 275 were below guarantee in protein; 145
below guarantee in fat; 126 above guarantee in fiber; 206 adulterated;
180 misbranded; 69 above guarantee in urea; 27 below guarantee in
calcium; 8 below guarantee in phosphorus.
‘ The record of samples correctly labeled in 1957 was 73%. This was
5% less than the record for 1956.
The percentage of feed samples meeting the guarantee since 1948 is
listed below:
I 1948 . . . 56% 1953 . . . 77%
1949 . . . 68% 1954 . . . 78%
1950 . . . 70% 1955 . . . 81%
1951 . . . 79% 1956 . . . 78%
1952 . . . 78% 1957 . . . 73%
I

 4 Regulatory Bulletin No. 145 l
ESTIMATED TONNAGE OF SALES BY CLASS OF FEED,
KENTUCKY, 1957
Mixed Feed Iggg
Calf Feed 3,723
Cattle Feed 8,635
Dairy Feed 95,008 ‘
Dog & Cat Feed 8,710
Horse & Mule Feed 12,115
Mineral Feed 5,606
Pig & Hog Feed 66,909
Poultry Mashes 175,748
Rabbit Feed 1,835
Scratch Feed l2,835
Sheep Feed 776
Stock Feed 4,989 _
Turkey Mashes 14,290
Miscellaneous Mixed Feed 13,916
TOTAL MIXED FEED 425,095
Straight Materials Egg;
Alfalfa Products 812
Animal Products 11,851
Barley Products 294
Brewers Products 477
Corn Products 31,236
Cottonseed Products 10,530
Distillers Products 3,328
Linseed & Flax Products 335
Molasses 16,786
Oat Products 1,642
Soybean Products 22,065
Wheat Products 42,820
Miscellaneous Products 5,686
TOTAL STRAIGHT MATERIAL 147,862
GRAND TOTAL 572,957

 l Quarterly Report on Feed Samples, 1957 5
commracmi Frans , 1957
AVERAGE COM OSITION OF THE MORE COMMON FEHDSTUFFS
 
Carbohydrates
Feedstuff Protein Fat Fiber N.F. Water Ash
_,_..._L.;.;_..;_;.. 
Alfalfa Leaf Meal 21.0 2.8 16.0 40.5 7.7 12.0
Alfalfa Meal 14.0 2.0 30.0 36.0 9.0 9.0
Barley 12.0 2.0 5.4 67.3 10.6 2.7
Barley Feed 13.5 3.5 8.7 60.9 9.3 4.9
Beet Pulp, Dried 9.2 0.5 19.8 57.2 9.9 3.4
. Blood, Dried 84.5 1.1 1.0 0.7 8.2 4.5
Bone Meal, Raw 26.0 5.0 1.0 2.5 6.4 59.1
Bone Meal, Steamed 7.5 1.2 1.5 3.2 5.7 81.3
Brewers Dried Grains 25.0 6.4 16.0 41.0 7.7 3.9
Buckwheat 10.8 2.5 10.5 62.3 12.0 1.9
Buttermilk, Dried 33.0 6.0 0.3 43.1 7.6 10.0
Buttermilk, Semi—Solid 13.4 3.0 0.0 15.9 65.0 2.7
Citrus Meal 5.9 3.1 11.5 62.7 9.9 6.9
Coconut Oil Meal 20.5 8.0 10.5 45.0 9.5 6.5
Corn 8.0 3.9 2.0 69.9 15.0 1.2
Corn Bran 9.7 7.3 9.2 62.0 9.4 2.4
Corn and Cob Meal 7.0 3.5 8.0 66.1 14.0 1.5
Crushed Ear Corn & Husks 7.0 3.0 10.6 69.2 11.0 1.8
Corn Chop 8.0 3.5 2.0 71.0 14.0 1.5
Corn Feed Meal 8.0 4.5 3.0 71.1 11.4 2.0
Corn Germ Meal 21.0 9.0 9.0 50.7 7.0 3.3
Corn Gluten Feed 25.5 2.7 7.6 48.8 9.1 6.3
4 Corn Gluten Meal 43.1 2.0 4.0 39.8 8.6 2.5
Cottonseed Meal 41.5 6.3 10.4 28.1 7.2 6.5
Cottonseed Meal Solvent 41.1 2.1 11.0 31.1 9.2 6.8
Cottonseed Feed 34.6 6.3 14.1 31.5 7.6 5.9
Distillers Dried Grains, Corn 26.1 8.8 12.8 44.2 7.1 2.5
Distillers Dried Grains, Rye 24.4 5.6 11.5 48.3 6.l 22.4
Distillers Dried Solubles 28.5 9.6 4.4 42.5 7.0 7.4
' Fish Meal 60.9 6.8 0.9 5.0 7.1 17.6
Flaxseed 24.0 35.9 6.3 24.0 9.2 4.3
Flaxseed Screenings Oil Feed 25.0 7.1 11.7 40.3 8.1 7.8
Hominy Feed 11.2 6.9 5.2 64.2 9.6 2.9
Lespedeza Seed 36.6 7.6 9.6 32.8 8.3 5.1
Linseed Oil Meal 35.4 5.8 8.2 36.0 9.0 5.6
Linseed Oil Meal, Solvent 36.6 1.0 9.3 38.3 9.6 5.6
Malt Sprouts 26.8 1.3 14.2 44.3 7.4 6.0
Meat Scraps 55% 55.8 9.3 2.1 1.3 6.1 25.4
Meat & Bone Scraps, 50% 51.0 10.1 2.1 1.6 6.1 29.1
Molasses, Cane 3.0 0.0 0.0 61.7 25.7 6.1
Molasses, Beet 7.8 0.0 0.0 62.1 22.0 7.0
Oats 12.0 4.6 11.0 58.6 10.4 3.4
Oat Kernels 16.0 6.4 1.6 66.0 8.0 2.0
Oat Middlings 15.9 5.2 3.3 64.6 8.6 2.4
Peanut Kernels 30.4 47.7 2.5 11.7 5.4 2.3
Peanut Oil Meal 43.5 7.6 13.3 23.4 7.0 5.2
Peanut Oil Meal, Solvent 51.5 1.4 5.7 27.2 8.4 5.8
Peanut Skins 15.9 22.4 10.6 42.2 6.2 2.7

 6 Regulatory Bulletin No. 145 `
Average Composition of the More Common Feedstuffs, Continued
Z:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::;:::::::::;:2:::::
Carbohydrates
Feedstuff Protein Fat Fiber N. F. Water Ash
Extract
Rice Bran 12.5 12.5 12.5 44.0 9.0 9.5
Rye 11.8 1.8 1.8 73.2 9.4 2.0
Rye Middlings 16.6 3.4 5.2 61.2 9.8 3.8
Skimmed Milk, Dried 34.0 1.0 0.0 51.0 6.0 8.0
Sorghum Grains 9.5 3.4 2.0 72.2 12.0 1.9
Soybean (Seed) 36.5 17.5 4.3 26.5 9.9 5.3
Soybean Oil Meal 44.3 5.3 5.7 29.6 9.1 6.0
Soybean Oil Meal, Solvent 46.1 1.0 5.9 31.8 9.4 5.8
Taukage, 60% 60.6 8.5 2.0 1.8 6.9 20.2 `
Tankage with bone 50% 51.3 11.5 2.3 2.3 6.2 26.1
Wheat 10.5 1.7 2.8 72.9 10.2 1.9
Wheat Bran 14.0 3.5 9.5 56.9 10.1 6.0
Wheat Mixed Feed 13.5 3.5 7.5 60.2 10.1 5.2
Wheat Brown Middlings or Shorts 15.0 3.5 7.1 58.7 10.3 5.4 ·
Wheat Gray Middlings or Shorts 15.0 3.5 6.0 60.6 10.5 4.4
Wheat Flour, Red Dog 16.0 3.5 3.0 66.4 8.5 2.6
Wheat Flour, Patent 10.9 1.3 0.4 74.7 12.3 0.5
Wheat Germ Meal 27.8 9.2 3.3 44.4 8.9 4.5 V
Grain Screenings (from wheat) 10.5 1.7 2.8 70.8 9.6 4.6
Whey, Dried 12.2 0.8 0.2 70.4 6.5 9.9
Yeast Brewers, Dried 44.9 0.7 2.7 38.8 6.2 6.9
Yeast, Irradiated, Dried 48.7 1.1 5.5 32.2 6.4 6.4
ROUGHAGES
Alfalfa Hay 14.5 2.3 29.7 36.3 B.6 8.6
Blue Grass Hay 8.2 2.5 29.8 42.5 10.5 6.5
Clover Hay, White 14.4 2.4 22.5 40.9 12.0 7.8
Clover Hay, Red 11.8 2.6 27.3 40.1 11.8 6.4
Corn Stover, without ear 5.9 1.6 30.8 46.5 9.4 5.8
Corn Stover, with ear 7.8 2.2 27.1 47.6 8.9 6.4
Cowpea Hay 18.6 2.6 22.5 35.1 9.9 11.3
Fescue Hay 7.0 1.9 30.3 43.2 11.8 6.8
Lespedez Hay 13.5 2.5 28.0 40.1 10.5 5.4
Soybean Hay 15.5 2.8 26.5 38.7 9.2 7.3
Timothy Hay 6.2 2.5 29.8 45.0 ll.6 4.9
FILLERS
Alfalfa Stem Meal 11.5 1.3 36.3 34.8 9.0 7.1
Corn Cob 2.3 0.4 32.1 54.0 9.6 1.6
Corn Husk or Shuck 3.4 0.9 28.2 49.6 15.0 2.9
Cottonseed Hulls 3.9 1.0 45.5 37.2 9.7 2.7
Flax Plant By-Products 6.4 2.1 44.4 33.1 8.1 5.9
Oat Mill By-Product 5.6 1.8 27.9 50.8 7.6 6.3
Oat Hull Feed 3.5 1.5 32.5 49.3 7.6 5.6
Oat Hulls 3.0 1.0 35.0 47.7 6.8 6.5
Screenings*
Chaff and dust**
*Varies in quality from fair to poor.
**Varies in quality from poor to worthless and even dangerous.

 V Quarterly Report on Feed Samples, 1957 7
COMMERCIAL FEEDS
Miscellaneous Samples Analyzed in 1947-57
 
Feedstuff Protein Fat Fiber
Activated Sewer Sludge 29.2 6.0 6.7
_ Alfalfa Silage 4.0 0.9 9.5
Barley Bran 15.2 5.2 14.9
Bluegrass Chaff 7.1 1.9 28.5
Bluegrass Screenings 6.7 2.0 26.1 ‘
Blackberry Seeds 9.6 —-- -—--
` Bread 12.5 5.3 0.7
` Brewers Wet Grains 10.3 1.0 3.4
Buckwheat Feed & Hulls 9.6 2.9 22.4
Cake, Ground 4.8 9.9 1.5
, Cob 6 Shuck Meal 3.2 0.6 31.6 —
Cookie Meal 7.7 8.6 0.8
Corn Blowings 8.7 1.9 15.7
Corn Fodder & Soybean Plant 10.1 3.9 17.0
Cracklings, Edible 67.1 28.1 1.1
Cracklings, lnedible 44.1 22.2 3.0
Distillers Thin Slop 1.4 —--- ----
Fescue Silage 2.8 1.3 8.9
Honey Suckle 2.8 0.02 6.0
Ice Cream Cones, Ground 9.2 1.5 0.7
Johnson Grass 7.8 0.8 37.6
Kale Seed 24.3 40.0 9.6
Korean Hay 13.9 ---- ---- V
l Korean Screenings 21.9 3.6 20.8
Lespedeza Screenings 19.8 15.7 26.2
Lima Beans, Ground 21.5 1.5 6.1
Malt Hulls, Ground 10.3 1-8 22.5
Osage Orange Apple 2.5 4.3 1.7
Peanut Vine Meal 10.1 2.3 34.0
· Popcorn, Ground 9.4 2.5 2.7
Popcorn, Popped and Crushed 8.4 12.8 2.9
1 Potato Flour 2.0 --—- -—--
Potato Flakes 9.0 ---- —-—-
Rag Weed Seed 17.2 16.2 34.4
Sorghum, Ground (Stalk & Leaves) 4.1 2.9 19.6
Ground Unthreshed Heads of Grain Sorghum 6.4 2.1 10.5
Fescue & Clover Silage 2.0 1.0 8.0
Oat Silage 1.9 1.5 9.8
Straw Silage 6.5 3.0 19.5
Sudan Grass Silage 5.9 1.1 14.0
Sudan & Soybean Silage 2.4 0.6 7.9
Vetch Seed 26.4 0.7 7.6
Walnut Shells & Meats 13.2 24.2 27.1
Walnut Meat Skins & Small Amount of Shell 21.5 45.5 12.0
Wheat Toast, Ground 12.6 4.9 0.5
Wild Onions 6.7 0.2 1.0
Wheat Silage 4.4 1.4 22.7

 8 mcgulatory Bulletin No. 145
METHOD OF CALCULATING THE ANALYSIS OF
A FEED MIXTURE
Requests are often received for a method of calculating the analysis
of a given feed mixture. Examples are given of two classes of feed most
commonly mixed by the feeder, in 1,000-pound batches, for his stock.
Example l. 20—percent protein dairy feed
1 2 3 4
Percentage Hundreds of Pounds of
Ingredients of protein, pounds of protein from
or pounds each each V
in 100 ingredient ingredient
150 pounds wheat bran 15 1.5 22.5
200 pounds ground shelled corn 9 2 18.0
150 pounds hominy meal ll 1.5 16.5
150 pounds cottonseed meal 41 1.5 61.5
150 pounds soybean oil meal 41 1.5 61.5
100 pounds ground oats ll 1 11.0
100 pounds alfalfa meal 14 1 14.0
1000 pounds 10 205.0
Then 205.0 divided by 10 = 20.5, the percentage of protein in this feed.
Example 2. 20-percent protein laying mash
1 2 3 4
Percentage Hundreds of Pounds of
Ingredients of protein, pounds of protein from
or pounds each each
in 100 ingredient ingredient
150 pounds wheat bran 15 1.5 22.5 _
200 pounds wheat middlings 16 2 32.0
200 pounds ground yellow corn 9 2 18.0
100 pounds ground oats 11 1 11.0
150 pounds meat scraps 50 1.5 75.0
100 pounds alfalfa meal 14 1 14.0
100 pounds soybean oil meal 41 1 41.0
1000 pounds 10 213.5
Then 213.5 divided by 10 = 21.35, the percentage of protein in this feed.
Explanation of Method used in Table 1.
l. List the number of pounds and ingredients in column l.
2. Get from the guaranty on the official tag or from the average
analysis the protein content of each ingredient and put it in
column 2.
3. Place the hundreds of pounds of each ingredient in column 3.
For example, 150 pounds of an ingredient is listed as 1.5
hundred pounds. _
4. Multiply the figure for each ingredient in column 2 by that in
column 3 to get the figure in column 4. This is multiplying the
number of pounds of protein in a hundred, by the number of hun-
dred pounds of each ingredient, to get the total pounds of pro-
tein furnished by each ingredient.
A 5. Add column 3, which gives the total weight of the mixture, in
hundred pounds.
6. Add column 4, which gives the total weight of protein in the
mixture.
7. Divide the sum of column 4 by the sum of column 3. This gives
the percentage of protein in the mixture.
The percentages of other substances such as fat or fiber can be
calculated in a similar way.

 Quarterly Report on Feed Samples, 1957 9
HEIGHTS PER BUSHEL
Feeders and Feed Manufacturers often need to know the legal weight re-
quirements for grain and seeds when sold for feeding and other purposes.
·The following is quoted from the Kentucky Revised Statutes in this con-
[ nection.
363.040 (4821] Bushel, what weight constitutes. The following weights
V constitute a bushel of the article named:
(1) Barley, forty-seven pounds.
, (2) Bluegrass seed, fourteen pounds. _
(3) Bottom onion sets, thirty-six pounds.
(4) Bran, twenty pounds.
(5) Buckwheat, fifty-six pounds.
(6) Castor beans, forty—five pounds.
(7) Clover Seed, sixty pounds.
(8) Coal, seventy-six pounds.
(9) Corn in the ear, seventy pounds.
from November l to December 31
inclusive, and sixty-eight pounds
at all other times of the year.
(10) Corn meal, fifty pounds.
(ll) Corn, shelled, fifty-six pounds.
(12) Dried apples, twenty-four pounds.
(13) Dried peaches, thirty-nine pounds.
(lh) Ear corn in the shuck, seventy-five
pounds. I
(15) English bluegrass seed, fourteen
pounds.
‘ (16) Fine salt, fifty—five pounds.
(17) Flax seed, fifty-six pounds.
(18) Ground peas, twenty-four pounds.
(19) Hemp seed, forty-four pounds.
V (20) Hungarian grass seed, fifty pounds.
` (21) Irish potatoes, sixty pounds.
. (22) Millet seed, fifty pounds.
(23) Oats, shelled, thirty-two pounds.
(25) Onions, fifty-seven pounds.
(25) Orchard grass seed, fourteen pounds
(26) Peas, sixty pounds.
(27) Plastering hair, eight pounds.
(28) Rye, fifty-six pounds.
(29) Salt, fifty pounds.
(30) Sweet potatoes, fifty-five pounds
(31) Timothy seed, forty-five pounds.
(32) Turnips, sixty pounds
(33) Unslaked lime, thirty-five pounds.
(36) Wheat, sixty pounds.
(35) Nhite beans, sixty pounds.

 10 Regulatory Bulletin No. 145
MICROSCOPIC EXAMINATION OF FEEDS ·
lt is important that the guarantee placed on a bag of feed be a true
picture of the contents of that bag.
When the Kentucky Feed Law was adopted in 1906, it was thought a `
chemical determination of the amount of protein, fat, and fiber was adequate
in judging the accuracy of labeling a feed. Later it was shown that the
source of protein, fat, and fiber was as important, if not more important, ·
than the amount present. For this reason, all official samples of feeds
analyzed by the Kentucky Feed Laboratories have, since 1918, been examined
with the aid of_the microscope to determine whether the ingredient list
shown was adhered to.
Theoretically it would be possible to blend chicken feathers, leather,
weed seeds, pulp wood, a little soybean oil meal or urea in the proper
proportions and make a product that would meet a chemical guarantee
resembling that of a feed but it would not be a good feed. Obviously no one
‘ would try to make a feed this way, but cases have been found where feeds
have been cheapened by the use of undeclared additions of such products aa
rice hulls, oat hulls, corn cobs, mixed screenings, ground chaff and dust,
weed seeds, peanut hulls, etc. In such instances the chemical guarantee
will be met with regard to protein, fat and fiber even though the quality .
of the feed is quite different from that declared in the ingredient list.
A recent sample of 16% Dairy Feed vas found to be adulterated with
mixed screenings (chaff, hulls, rachis, stems, weed seeds, etc.) although
within the chemical guarantee. Another sample of Brewers Dried Grains was
within the guarantee chemically, but found by means of microscopic analysis
to contain oat hull feed.
`
Another feed - an 18% Laying Mash - though slightly low in protein _
but well within the fiber guarantee. By microscopic analysis, it was
found to be adulterated with oat hulls.
Kentucky was one of the pioneers in this method of analysis. Nearly
all states now use some form of microscopic analysis along with the chem-
ical analysis. It has proven to be as valuable to the farmer and honest
manufacturers as any other form of analysis. The farmer is assured the
feed he is buying is as represented. To the manufacturer, it offers pro-
tection against unfair and unscrupulous competition.

 Quarterly Report on Feed Samples, l957 ll
UREA
The following information may be of some help to manufacturers and
feeders using urea.
Urea is a white crystalline powder made by combining ammonia and
carbon dioxide under pressure in equipment that will withstand high
temperature.
Urea contains 46.5% nitrogen, which is equivalent to 29l% protein}
The commercial product "262" Feed Compound, is urea which has been diluted
with other materials to prevent caking, and contains 62% nitrogen which is .
equivalent to 262% protein. The addition of l percent of this material to
a dairy feed is equivalent to adding 2.62% protein. Besides urea's pro-
tein equivalent value, one must also consider its lack of energy value as
compared to the common high protein feeds. An example of this, if the
nitrogen in urea is used as efficiently as the nitrogen io high protein
feeds, it will require approximately lh pounds of urea, plus 100 pounds _
of grain to replace 100 pounds of soybean oilmeal.
Urea, when used as an ingredient in feeds sold in Kentucky is
shown in the guaranteed analysis as follows: Crude Protein %.
This includes not more than % equivalent crude protein from
non-protein nitrogen. Crude Fat %. Crude Fiber %.
One percent of "262 Feed Compound" would be 2.62% equivalent protein from
non-protein nitrogen. Urea should be shown as an ingredient under
"lngredients".
Cattle, sheep, and goats are able to convert urea to a usable form
- through the action of micro—organisms in the rumen. The organisms con- ~
vert the nitrogen of urea to protein in their cell bodies which are in
turn digested by the animal.
` Horses, swine, dogs, and other single-stomach animals are unable to
f utilize urea.
I The Association of American Feed Control Officials has a regulation
to the effect that urea be used in such limited quantities as to insure
the total amount present shall not exceed 3 percent of the (grain) ration
or l/3 of the total protein. lf a feed contains more than 3 percent of
urea, the label shall bear a statement of proper usage and the following
in type of such couspicnousness as to render it likely to be read and
understood by ordinary individuals under customary conditions of pur-
chase and use.
. WARNING: This feed should be used only in accordance with
directions furnished on the label.

 12 Regulatory Bulletin No. lA5
RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PREPARATION OF
LABELS FOR FEEDS WHICH CONTAIN DRUGS
The following information is intended for use as a guide in pre-
paring labels for new products and in revising labels for present products
when necessary. It is suggested that typed copy of proposed labeling be
submitted to State and Federal officials for comment before the copy is
submitted to the printer.
Types of Labels
Labels for medicated complete feeds generally fall into h different
types, as follows: `
Type 1 is for a feed which contains drug(s) for growth promotion and/or
disease prevention, and which is to be fed continuously for an indefinite
period. The product name is followed by the word "medicated" in letters at
least half as tall as those of the product name. This type of label can be
used for any drug-containing feed not included among the other types.
Exempted from medicated labeling are feeds which contain non—therapeutic
levels of antibiotics (those with less than 50 grams per ton usually
qualify), since these are not classed as medicated feeds.
Type 2 is for a feed which contains drug(s) at the treatment level,
to be fed as the sole ration for a limited period of time. The word
"medicated" appears in the forepart of the product name, in letters of
same size as remainder of product name. _
Type 3 is for a feed which contains hormone(s) or hormone-like sub-
stances (e.g., diethylstilbestrol).
Type 4 is for a feed which contains drug(s) at the treatment level
for a specific disease or condition. It differs from Type 2 only in that
the product name indicates the purpose of the drug and the word "medicated"
thus need not be a part of the product name (e.g., "Pig Wormer").
Supplements or premixes which contain drugs and which are to be diluted Q
by mixing with other feeds before use are also covered by these four types
of labels. The type of label to be used in each case will depend upon the
purpose of the drug and directions for use of the finished feed after such
dilution. If the resulting feed when diluted according to directions will
contain non-therapeutic levels and no therapeutic claims are made, Type 1
label will be used. If the directions given are such that Type 2 as well
as Type l can apply, then the Type 2 label must be used. Complete direc-
tions for feeding are to be included in labeling any feed which may be
sold to the feeder either in the original package or in custom-mixed feeds.
Information Required on the Label
Drug—containing feeds are required to carry certain information in _
their labeling. The requirements are essentially the same for all four
types. It is suggested that the label carry this information in the
following form:
l. Net weight.
2. Brand name or trade name.
3. Product name (may include brand name and, for
Types l and 2, the word "medicated").
Q. Purpose (statement of the purpose of the medication
and reference to directions for use).
5. Active drug ingredients (list of common names, not
trade names, and PQFCEHKHBB present, for each drug.
Antibiotics are to be expressed in grams per pound
and may also be in grams per ton).
6. Guaranteed analysis of the feed.
7. Feed ingredients (common name of each). •
8. Name and address of manufacturer or registrant.
9. Detailed feeding directions (to be displayed
prominently on either front or reverse side of the
label). A check list follows:

 _ Quarterly Report on Feed Samples, l957 13
a. Purpose (if necessary to clarify or amplify
the above statement
b. when to feed (specific period necessary for
effective use).
c. How to feed, or mix for feeding (feeding
method to be followed, i.e., free choice, sole
4 ration, intermittent feeding, etc.; mixing
directions for premixes, etc., should give
proper level of medication for purpose intended).
d. Precautions (statement of precautions where
, misuse of the product may be injurious to
animals or man).
e. Warning statement (a withdraval period may
be required for safety. Witn a mixture of
drugs, use tne longest period).
f. Otner feeds (reference may oe made to otner .
feeds wnicn have a part in a feeding program
for tne animal)

 ll; Regulatory Bulletin No. UIS _
SAMPLE LABELS
An example of each ot the four types ot labels is snovm below. The
drugs listed on tnese labels were selected only tor illustrative purposes `
and it is not intended to imply that they are preferred over other drugs
which may be used for the same purpose.
BLUE BIRD BLUE BIRD _
TURKEY GROWER (EI) ·¤· MEDICATED HOG
M¤·*i¤¤*=d RAIION (PDQ)
A preventive ¤E¤l¤5¥ ¤¤Yb1‘¤€·1k5 of For the treatment of infectious enter-
blackhead in turkey flocks when fed aus in swine when fed as directed on
according to directions on this label. this ]abc]_
Active Drug Ingvedienrlsl Adgye pw! ingudieiig;
2-Acctylamino-5- Streptumycin"0.075 grams per lb. (as
nitrothiazole ,,._______ ____O_0l5% streptomycin sulfate)
(,.7., , __,:T_¢_ Penicillin _____ 0,025 grams procaine
` penicillin per pound
G¤¤*¤··•==¤ ¤··¤¥v¤i= equivaiene to 0.0156
4~—·—- -——.....é grams penicillin G
  (Master Standard)
~— --—--—-—Y Arsanillic Acid ............i. 0.01%
  Y"'  “ e....r¤..m4 A...iy.;,
 
....,_?{,_ INGREDIENTS
   
Munuhmuved hy Manufactured hy
BLUE BIRD FEED MILLS BLUE BIRD FEED MILLS
MILLVILLE, KENTUCKY MU—·LVU··¥·E· KENTUCKY
i noo uss. usr wzicwr ‘°° '·"’- NH ‘”"°’"
Type l Label Type ?.Label
Continued on next page

 Ouarterl. Report on Feed Sam les, 1957 15
Y P
BLUE BIRD BLUE BIRD ·
- U.UUII% IIIEIHYLSTII.- :3, H06 WORMER
    For the Removal of Large Round-
FOR FATTENING BEEF CATTLE worms (Ascaris Lumbricoides). Fol-
Feed at the rate O! 2 1bs* PE1, anim? Iow directions on other side of mg.
§E§.S§‘%:§Z$J€SE2$§iiT‘“‘“‘5"““" C d _ "'g'rQ'"’ '""°"‘°"" 06157 `
B mlum Xl E ............ »
CAUTION: Usa Only as Directed U
Active Drug Ingredient: Guaranteed Analysis
Diethylslilbostrol .......... 0,0011%  
Incorporated in  
BLUE BIRD STEER FEED  
¤..Y.Z,..¤..» ,·....»,.:. ¤~¤¤¤¤¤=~rs
   
4 INGREDIENTS   I
  t
   
   
 
M f d b Manufactured hy
anu acture y
BLUE BIRD FEED MILLS
BLUE BIRD FEED MILLS LLVMJE CKY
' MILLVILLE, KENTUCKY MI V
wo LBS, NET WEIGHT 100 LBS. NET WEIGHT
Type 3 Label TYP€ A Label

 16 Regulatory Bulletin No. 145
ANALYSIS OF MEDICATED FEEDS
.
 
MANUFACTURER, BRAND AND REMARKS DRUG GUARANTEED FOUND
ALLIED MILLS, INC., CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
Wayne Starter & Grower (136) Nicarbazin 0.01 0.0108
wayne Rocket Broiler Finisher (196A) Nicarbazin 0.01 0.01
3-Nitro-4 0.005 0.0051
AUBREY FEED MILLS, LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY
Red A All Mash Starter & Grower Nicarbazin 0.0125 0.00203
Red A Super High Energy Broiler Ration Crumbles 3-Nitro-4 0.0005 0.00499 '
Bifuran 0.00691
Red A Super High Energy Broiler Ration Crumbles 3-Nitro-4 0.005 0.00558
Bifuran 0.00714
THE BEARDSTOWN MILLS COMPANY, BEARDSTOWN, ILLINOIS
Critic Super Baby Pig Starter Arsanilic Acid 0.01 0.012
CADIZ MILLING COMPANY, CADIZ, KENTUCKY
Sunbeam 20% Starting Mash Sulfaquinoxaline 0.015 0.0018
COOPERATIVE MILLS, INC., CINCINNATI, OHIO
44% Broiler Concentrate Nicarbazin 0.31 0.0218
3—Nitro—4 0.0125 0.0128
Broiler Maker (SM) Nicarbazin 0.0125 0.00958
3-Nitro-4 0.005 0.00457 .
Broiler Maker (NZ) 3-Nitro-4 0.005 0.00681
Broiler Maker Nicarbazin 0.0125 0.0052
Broiler Maker Nicarbazin 0.0125 0.0108
Broiler Maker 3—Nitro-4 0.005 0.0052
Broiler Maker Finishers Nicarbazin 0.0125 0.0107 ‘
3-Nitro-4 0.005 0.00472
Broiler Maker Finisher Nicarbazin 0.0125 0.0117
Broiler Maker Finisher Nicarbazin 0.0125 0.0119
Broiler Maker Finisher 3-Nitro-4 0.005 0.0052
THE EARLY S DANIEL COMPANY, CINCINNATI, OHIO i
Tuxedo Pig Grower-Pellets Arsanilic Acid 0.01 0.01
Tuxedo Pig Grower Arsanilic Acid 0.01 0.01
Tuxedo Pig Grower Arsanilic Acid 0.01 0.0078
Tuxedo Pig Grower Arsanilic Acid 0.01 0.01
FARMERS ELEVATORS, INC., OWENSBORO, KENTUCKY
Feeders Friend 20% H. E. Broiler Finisher Arsanilic Acid 0.01 0.0113
Nicarbazin 0.01 0.01055
Feeders Friend Pig Starter Arsanilic Acid 0.05 0.0087
Feeders Friend Pig Starter Arsanilic Acid 0.01 0.01
Feeders Friend Pig Starter Arsanilic Acid 0.01 0.01
GENERAL MILLS, INC., MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA
Larro Surepork Complete (AGS) Arsanilic Acid 0.01 0.0088
Larro Surepork Complete (AGS) Arsanilic Acid 0.01 0.0084
EDWARD F. GOEKE 6. SONS, EVANSVILLE, INDIANA
Gay-Key 40% Hog Supplement Arsanilic Acid 0.01 0.0018 `
GREEN COUNTY MILLING COMPANY, GREENSBURG, KENTUCKY
Greenco Hi-Calorie Broiler Formula 3-Nitro—4 0.005 0.0056
HALES 6: HUNTER COMPANY, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
Red Comb Broiler Starter Z-3 Nicarbazin 0.01 0.01055
3—Nitro-4 0.005 0.00467
Red Comb Broiler Starter Z-3 3-Nitro-4 0.005 0.0051
HAYDON MILL 6: GRAIN COMPANY, SPRINGFIELD, KENTUCKY
Magic Broiler Starter 3-Nitro-4 0.0075 0.0078
Magic Broiler Finisher 3-Nitro-4 0.005 0.0065
 
For protein, fat and fiber analysis of the above samples see report of official feed samples
analyzed in the pages that follow.

 Quarterly Report on Feed Samples, 1957 U
ANALYSIS OF HEDICATED FEEDS
 
 
MANUFACTURER, BRAND AND REMARKS DRUG GUARANTEED FOUND -
McMILLEN FEED MILLS, FORT WAYNE, INDIANA
Master Mix Chick Starter 21A Nicarbazin 0.01 0.012
Master Mix Baby Pig Creep (518) Arsanilic Acid 0.0013 0.01 _
Master Mix Pig-Ets (52A) Arsanilic Acid 0.01 0.0084
CHARLES NUNN 8 SONS MILLING COMPANY, EVANSVILLE, INDIANA
, Nunn-Better Starter Mash Nitrophenide 0.0125 0.0085
NUTRENA MILLS, INC., MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA
Nutrena Creep — 20 Master Pig Starter Arsanilic Acid 0.01 0.0066 _
Nutrena Shoat - 14 Arsanilic Acid 0.01 0.008
Nutrena 10% Hog Finisher - Not Registered Arsanilic Acid 0.01 0.01
PIERCE & WILLIAMS, HOPKINSVILLE, KENTUCKY
Check-R-Mix Pig Starter (D) 3AB 3-Nitro—4 0.0031 0.0
PILLSBURY MILLS, INC., CLINTON, IOWA —
Pi1lsbury's Best Medicated 4X Suppletine
Poultry Furazolidone 0.011 0.011
Pillsbury's Best Pig Feast (HA8) Arsanilic Acid 0.01 0.01
Pillsbury's Best Pig Feast (HA8) Arsanilic Acid 0.01 0.01
PROVIC0 FEEDS & CONCENTRATES, CINCINNATI, OHIO
Chlortetracycline, Oxytetracycliue 8 Furazolidone
Mix in Provicc S. F. (Stress Formula) Furazolidone 0.011 0.0083
‘ THE QUAKER OATS COWANY, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
Ful-O-Pep Super Broiler Pre-Starter Hicarbazin 0.01 0.008
3-Nitro-/4 0.005 0.004
Ful—O-Pep Gro-Pork 45% Supplement Araanilic Acid 0.05 0.05
Fu1-0-Pep Pig Starter (K) M Arssnillc Acid 0.01 0.0144
Ful-O-Pep Gro-Pork (280) K Arsanilic Acid 0.01 0.008
RALSTON PURINA COMPANY, ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI
Purina Turkey Growena SQ Sulfaquinoxaline 0.0175 0.0158
Purina Chick Growena NC Nicarbazin 0.01 0.0044
’ Purina Broiler Chow Starter 3 NC Nicarbazin 0.01 0.0082
3-Nitro-4 0.005 0.0047
Purina Broiler Chow Starter 3 NC Nicarbazin 0.01 0.0082
Purina Broiler Chow Starter (B) 3 NC Nicarbazin 0.01 0.01
3-Nitro-4 0.005 0.0063
Purina Broiler Chow Finisher 3 NC Nicarbazin 0.01 0.01025
3-Nitro-4 0.005 0.00443
Purina Pig Startena Special Arsanillc Acid 0.01 0.015
Purina Pig Startena Special Arsauilic Acid 0.01 0.01
Purina Hog Fatena Purazolidone 0.0025 0.003
Purina Hog Fatena Furazolidone 0.0025 0.003
STALEY MILLING COMPANY, KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI
Medicated Chick Spicer Atoms Nitrophenide 0.01875 0.0105
Furazolidone 0.011 0.012
A. E. STALEY MANUFACTURING COMPANY, DECATUR, ILLINOIS
Sta1ey's Pig Concentrate (A) Arsanilic Acid 0.04 0.053
SWIFT & COMPANY, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
Swift's Sulfaqulnoxaline Mixture Mixed with
Swift‘s Chick Starter Sulfaquinoxaline 0.0125 0.0128
Swift's Poultry Grower Nicarbazin 0.0125 0.008
Swift's Broiler Ration Ky Nicarbazin 0.01 0.0086
3—N1tro-4 0.005 0.00394
Swift'a Broiler Finisher N Nicarbazin 0.01 0.005
3-Nitro-4 0.005 0.005
For protein, fat and fiber analysis of the above samples see report of official feed samples
analyzed in the pages that follow.

 18 Regulatory Bulletin No. l!•5
ANALYSIS OF MEDICATED FEEDS
MANUFACTURER, BRAND AND REMARKS DRUG GUARANTEED FOUND _
SWIFT & COMPANY, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS (Con't)
Swift's Broiler Ration Nicarbazin 0.01 0.0093
3—Nitr¤—·’• 0.005 0.0059
TILFORD & WALTERS MILLS, METROPOLIS, ILLINOIS
Masco 142 Shoat Grower 3-Nitro-h 0.0025 0.000393
Mssco 12% Hog Finishing Ration 3-Nitro-lo 0.0025 0.00196
Masco 16% Pig Starter 3-Nitro-lo 0.0025 0.00123
NOOFFORD FEED COMPANY, VERSAILLES, KENTUCKY
3-Nitro-I4 Mixture in Big W Broiler Starter
E. Grower 3-Nitro-/o 0.005 0.00537
V
 
f
For protein, fst and fiber anslysls of the above samples see report of official. feed samples
analyzed in the pages that follow.

 Quarterly Report on Feed Samples, 1957 19
ANALYSIS OF NON·PROTEIN NITROGEN FROM UREA IN FEEDS
 
NON-PROTEIN NITROGEN
 
ALLEN COUNTY FEED 6- SEED, SCOTTSVILLE, KENTUCKY
Si¤mon'a 167. Milk Maker 5.24 5.90
ALLIED MILLS, INC., CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
‘ Wayne 42% Dairy Mixing Supplement: "S" 14.00 13.60 .
Sugarine 16% Dairy 4.00 4.40
Sugarine 16% Dairy 4.00 4.30
Sugarine 16% Dairy 4.00 3.50
0.0011% Diethyatilbestrol Mixture for Fattening Beef Cattle in
Wayne Beef Balancer 8.75 8.20
Wayne Roughage Supplement "AA" 12.00 13.60
Wayne Roughage Supplement 12.00 13.80 I
AUBREY FEED MILLS, LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY
Red A 44% Dairy Supplement 15.00 14.70
Red A 44% Dairy Supplement 15.00 14.10
Red A 32% Dairy Supplement 10.48 4.10
Red A 32% Dairy Supplement 10.48 4.80
Red A 24% Dairy Feed 7.86 8.60 `
Red A 247. Dairy Feed 7.86 7.00
Red A 24% Dairy Feed 7.86 7.80
Red A 24% Dairy Feed 7.86 6.40
Supreme 24% Dairy Feed 7.86 7.10
Red A 20% Dairy Feed 6.55 4.90
Red A 20% Dairy Feed 6.55 5.21
Red A 20% Dairy Feed 6.55 4r9O
Red A 18% Dairy Feed 4.62 2.40
Red A 18% Dairy Feed 4.62 3.40
Red