xt75736m2w95 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt75736m2w95/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19670210  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 10, 1967 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 10, 1967 1967 2015 true xt75736m2w95 section xt75736m2w95 Inside Todays Kernel
China expert who recently visited
Peking likens the situation to the
French Revolution: fage five.

Glenn Taylor has designed the sets
for "The Sea Gull:" togt Two.

A

Greek Week begins Monday with a
student-facultnight: toge Three.

UK's coaches now begin to eye the
baseball season: foge Sii.

y

of Kentucky
University FRIDAY, FEIl.
LEXINGTON,

Vol. 58, No. 95

10, 1967

KY.,

Eight Pages

Election She Lost

petition contesting last
week's Young Democrats' presidential election was filed Thursday hy the loser, Jerry Coins,
f
vote.
asking for a
Miss Coins, a surprise write-i-n
candidate, lost by one vote
to Charles L. Lamar for the
club presidency last Tuesday. Mr.
Lamar received 33 votes, Miss
Goins 32, one other candidate
received one and one unmarked
ballot was cast, totaling 67 votes.
Only 66 persons were registered.
In the petition. Miss Coins
stated, "By reason of this
possibly altering the
outcome of the presidential race,
the presidential election appears
invalid."
"Injury to the petitioner may
be shown by the fact that the
A

run-of-

above stated discrcpency resulted
in the petitioner's beingdeprived
of a reasonable opportunity to
be elected to the Club presidency," the petition further stated.
Miss Coins said,

"I

run-of-

15--

m

JERRY COINS
Contests YD Election
mittec. But the question is, will
outgoing president Bill Dcskins
or the incoming president sit with
the committee to decide this question?
Miss Goins said she was not
sure who would act upon her
s
petition. Neither Lamar or
could be reached for comment on the situation. However,
it appears club sentiment would
Des-kin-

favor a

runoff election.

Group Sets Referendum On SG
An independently sponsored
referendum on the reputation and
representation of Student Government will be held Monday
through Friday at the Student
Center.
The referendum, sponsored by
a group headed by David
a sophomore, and Darrell
Harrison, a freshman, will be
held in the Student Center basement.
Listed on ballots will be two
questions: "Do you feel the present Student Government is
representative," and "Do you
Hol-wer- k,

feel the present Student Government has the respect of the student body?"
Holwerk said the vote outcome is intended to provide a
factual basis of student opinion
of Student Government. Holwerk
speculates the opinions may run
against SG.
"Perhaps something constructive can come from this referendum . . . something of a challenge
to Student Government," Holwerk explained. "This referendum will give us a factual basis
to say that Student Government

Reagan Puts On Surprise
Shoiv For Protest Marchers
From Combined Dispatches

SACRAMENTO, Calif. Gov. Ronald Reagan made a surprise
appearance here before a group of 3,000 students Thursday to defend
his proposed budget cuts for higher education.
Students and faculty will

Governor Reagan said that
the budget cuts and tuition
charge were temporary, but the
state was in a "dire" financial
situation.
The students had begun a
e
march to the Capitol
at 10 a.m. carrying a banner
which said "Keep Politics Out
of Higher Education."
After a series of speeches by
teachers and students protesting
Reagan's economy and tuition
proposals, the governor made
his unexpected appearance.
one-mil-

,

-

-

march again Saturday.
The marches will also oppose
the firing of University of California President Clark Kerr, according to five students editors
who discussed the marches on
Sacramento at a press conference
held in Washington in connection with the 1967 National College Editors Conference.
John Maybury, editor of the
El Caucho at the University of
California at Santa Rarbara, estimated that 25,000 students and
Continued On Page

l-

-

y

-

f

7

'

Seven.

Group Similar To Those Formed
In Growing Numher Of Stales

feel that

the doubt of the validity of the
election might cause a larger
split than letting it remain as
it is. I feel the mistake was a
human error."
The petition was submitted
to the Executive Committee,
which will have final decision
upon whether or not to grant a
f
election. However, at this
point there is some confusion
over who will make-u- p
the
ember committee. According to
the club's constitution the president is the chairman of the com- -

Clark Kerr sees a need to worry obout
separation of school and state: Poge

State Now Has
Youth Council

Jerry Goins Contests
YD

Editorial discusses the draft system
and proposals tor it: toge Four.

is not representative and doesn't

have the support of the student
body," he added.
Holwerk said he hoped a
record of discontent with Student Government might spur
groups to be interested in Student Government. Heopined that
SG candidates in the spring elections might consider it an issue
and run on a platform of equal
representation.
Currently, SG representatives
are elected in a popular campus-wid-e
election. Nearly always, the
elections put a wide majority
of Creeks into office. Administration posts, also filled by popular election, are almost always
manned by Greeks.
An alternate proposal representation by liousing units and
interest groups currently is
being discussed by the President" s Council of Students.
The whole question of equal
representation has been a lingering topic of discussion for many
years, but never satisfactorily
solved.
Holwerk said voting would be
open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
daily. Voters will have their ID
cards punched, and ballots will
be placed in "squawk boxes"
owned by the Student Center
Board. Volunteers will man the
polls.
Holwerk said buttons proclaiming "I dig equal representation" may be placed in campus
mailboxes Saturday.

amr-

By JO WARREN
Kentucky is among the growing number of states that have
formed youth councils to provide advising and feedback from
youth at state levels on issues concerning young people.
Ihe Kentucky Advisory Youth nel for presenting vouths views
Council (KAYC) is such an or- to the KCCY on matters of stateganization and is responsible for wide concern and interest, and
presenting the views of the youth will attempt to stimulatethought
in this state. The Council comes and action of the youth of the
under the Kentucky Commission state regarding these concerns.
for Children and youth (KCCY).
The council's "Objectives for
The commission has as part '67" revolve around assisting the
of its concerns youth participation attorney general in planning a
in community planning and serprogram on juvenile deliqucncy;
vice. According to Miss Betty involvement in a youth conferKirlin, executive secretary of the ence to be held in August; and
KCCY, the commission, in line representing Kentucky at meetwith this concern and following ings concerning youth both withthe recommendations of the 1960 in the state and in other states.
Presidential Conference on ChilThe KAYC is now searching
dren and Youth, began the ground for
young people to bring its
work for a youth council.
membership to 25 as required
Young people from across the by the group's proposed
state were recommended by varMembership of the Council will
ious organizations for the pilot include a representative from
group to lay the foundations for each of the seven Congressional
the KAYC. This group of 14 inDistricts and 18 members at large.
cluded a member of the NeighMembers must be 16 to 23
borhood Youth Corps, a person
years of age, but do not need to
living at the Kentucky Children's be in school to be eligible, acHome, one living in a settleto Miss Becnel. The prement house, president of the state cording
sent membership campaign ends
councils association
student
this weekend. Further informa(high school),and others repre- tion and applications
may be
senting a cross section of the obtained by writing the KCCY
state's young people.
in Frankfort.
Three members ot this original group are now University
students and are still active in
the Council: Ernie Harris, counNon-Violencil chairman; Becky Becnel, secretary; and Mary Lou Swope,
membership chairman. Miss kirlin is one of the adult advisers
for the group along with Robert
Dr. Joseph Engelberg, departJohnson, vice president for stument of physiology and biophydent affairs.
sics, will speak at 7:30 p.m.
Miss Kirlin, who is also a Monday on "Applications of the
Approach" at the
instructor in the social
work department, said "In no third of seven seminars on Nonviolence.
way did the adult wishes domThe
seminar,
sponsored
inate the youths recommendations regarding the Council." through the Committee on Peace
Education and Research, is an
The year of ground work was unofficial
program disculminated last November when
various aspects of noncussing
Gov. Edward Breathitt officially
violence as approach to living.
designated the KAYC and apMonday's seminar will be in
pointed 11 members of the oreither Room 222, Commerce
iginal group to the council.
Building or in the auditorium,
The KAYC has a
purdepending upon the number of
pose in that it will provide a chan- - people who attend.
by-law- s.

Third Seminar

On
Set For Monday
ce

Non-Viole-

part-tim- e

non-cred-

it

two-fol- d

-

1

v

-

1

-

Peter Nero Introduces Miss UK Finalists
Twelve of the 15 finalists in the Miss University of
Kentucky contest were on hand Thursday night to be
presented by Peter Nero following the intermission of

his concert. Each coed was presented a long stemmed
rose by the pianist. The finals of the pageant will be
held at 8 p.m. next Friday in Memorial Hall. The

winner gets a place in the Miss Kentucky contest.
A review of the concert is on page two.
Kernel Photo by

f .H

t.rv.yi

* J --

Till'.

lK kV KI:KM:L.

KI--

1

Iiid.i.

l

ib.

10. HM.7.

Music: Nero The Swinger

'

I

B

here, and returned, all to the

He seriously Introduced one
number as "the third movement
of a concerto by an English musician," and then proceeded to

JOHN Z EH

tune of

$1S0.

Kernel Associate Eii(or
Nero said after the show his
If artists like IVtcr Nero
style comes out of both a love
played regularly in Memorial
and disgust for Jazz and classiColiseum, the building would be play "Winchester Cathedral."
cal music. He takes what he
And Nero complimented the
known not as the House That
likes from each and puts it toback- Hupp lmilt, but as a monument
piano procured for him. Hut
gether, he explained.
to fine music.
stage, University program direcThe assembly job he does,
Nero charmed 2,600 persons
tor Jane Hatchcldcr had to tell
as demonstrated last night, dehim it didn't belong to the school,
Thursday night at a Student
serves a standing-room-onl- y
but to the Cincinnati Symphony
Center Hoard concert with his
crowd, even at Kentucky.
masterful technique. The disapbe rented, shipped
It had to
pointing turnout meant quite a
financial loss. Hut culturally, the
concert was a victory.
He played for the first time
publically his own arrangement
of the Sound of Music; it won't
be the last time it's heard. His
interpretation of Porgy and Bess
Glenn Taylor has designed the stage settings now being created
w as equally delightful.
.
for the next Department of Theatre Arts production, Chekhov's
The concert was a lesson in "The Sea Cull" to be presented Feb.
... .
music appreciation, and should
Taylor is also playing tnc
display in the lobby
have been required listening for "role of Medvedenko, the scliool
of the Fine Arts Building during
music students. Nero's style,
master, in the play, and so has the nin of the play.
strictly his own, encompasses
a double involvement.
No stranger to the Guignol,
everything from pure jazz to an
ingenious use of the classics,
Taylor has designed programs,
spiced with wit. He played
mailing pieces, the new dqiart-mentGershwin's "I Cot Hhythm" as
brochure, posters, and
a theme with variations ranging
the like over the past two years.
from Liszt to "P.K. Wrigley's
Last summer he served as de'Double Your Pleasure . . .
for
the Centennial
signer
(Honest, the gum commercial
Theatre's brochurcand programs.
jingle was in there.)
In addition, he has constructed
props for the stage.
Si. Louis
Taylor has completed eleven
hours in Theatre Arts courses
In Concert Monday
including Scene Design.
The play calls for interiors
Sidney Harth, violin soloist
and head of the music depart- of Sorin's Russian home (year,
Glenn Taylor, senior art major,
ment of the Carnegie Institute
1900) and for garden scenes nearand assistant professor Charles
of Technology, will appear as by on the estate. Designs conGrimsley of the Department of
guest artist with the St. Louis sist of four line drawings or eleSymphony Orchestra in a concert vations, one for each of the four Theatre Arts, discuss details of
at 8:15 p.m. Monday night at acts of the play, and four ground Taylor's designs for Chekhov's
Memorial Coliseum.
"The Sea Gull."
plan drawings. These drawings
'

y

vr

Glenn Taylor Designing
Sets For The Sea Gull'
22-2-

r

r

u

r

iI
,
Peter Nero played and clowned his way through a concert at
Manorial Gdcsium Thursday night to the delight of a smaller
than expected audience.
.

University
Methodist Chapel
E. MAXWELL

151

CHURCH
METHODIST
at Clay Avenue
DR. J. T. HARMON,
Pastor
Dr. W. P. Fryman, minister, visitation
9:45 a.m. Church School
11 a.m.
"Time and Place"
7 p.m. "Giants and Infants"
PARK
East

High

Sunday, Feb. 12
Sermon

CANTERBURY HOUSE

by

Rev. Fornash
At 11 a.m. WORSHIP

SERVICE

Episcopal Church
SUNDAY

472

ROSE ST.

SERVICES

8:00 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.
7:00 p.m. 2nd Sundays
10:30 a.m. The Rev. Paul Denlinger
Episcopal
Seminary, Lexington

F'

al

Elmore Ryle, Minister
Ave.
Miss Mary Hulda Allen, Minister of Education
Church School 9:30 A.M.
Morning Worship 10:45 A.M.
"THE ESSENTIAL UNITY"
Sermon

5.00 P.M.

Youth Groups

Classified advertisements, 5 cents per
word ($1.00 minimum).
Deadline for acceptance of classified
copy is 3 p.m. the day preceding publication. To place classified ad come to
Room 111 or 113. Journalism Bldg.
Furnished
apartment. Across street from UK
Med Center, $125 monthly. Living
room, dining room, kitchen, bath.

CRESTWOOD CHRISTIAN CHURCH
DRIVE

Sunday Worship

10:30 a.m.
For Transportation

REV.

Sunday
Call

Call

2F7t

JAMES A. LOLLIS, Minister

College Seminar
277-378-

9:30 a.m.

9

PARKWAY

ORIN M SIMMERMAN,

Two guitars, Baldwin
$550, sell $275.
sell for list price $350.
and with hardshell case.
7F7t
after 4 p.m.

WANTED Bus drivers. Must have
valid Ky. driver's license. Must be
over 25. have mornings or afternoons free. Apply Wallace's Book

New Moon, 10'x56';
separate dining room, two bedrooms,
fenced
yard, awning; can finance
for $52 per month. $2725. Call
7F4t&F14

WANTED Expert knitter for work
in yarn shop. Must be experienced.
9F2t
Call 252-75for appointment.

FOR

SALE

electric No.
Martin
new

299-14-

FOR SALE

PENTHOUSE
IN THE
COUNTRY

SALE 1963 Austin Princess 3
Litre MK II. Perfect condition; black,
red leather interior, automatic; new
shocks and battery; excellent tires;
power steering, many other extras.
Must sell. Call
after 6:30
277-08-

Pm- -

FOR

8F5t

2356 HARRODS8URG RD.
9:30 a.m. College Class
"The Taste of New Wine"

DONALD

R. HERREN,

Minister

10:50 a.m. Morning Worship
Sacrament of Lord's Supper
PROVIDED FOR STUDENTS
or
Call

TRANSPORTATION

277-402- 9

277-617- 6

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
171 NORTH

RICHARD T. HARBISON, Minister
College Class. Mr. Jack Matthews, Leader
11:00 a.m. "True Neighborliness"

MILL ST.

9:45 a.m.

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
WEST HIGH

at

UPPER ST.

RUSSELL R. PATTON, Minister

9:35 a.m. College Class
10:50 am. "The Lincoln of the Second Inaugural"
6:15 p.m. Fellowship Night, Dr. Thomas Ford, Speaker
or
Transportation provided for students Call
252-034- 4

277-669- 4

BOOK
STORE needs
your used textbooks. Bring them in
anytime. We pay top prices. We buy
all used textbooks.
9Ftf

WALLACE'S

HELP WANTED
Laundry
e
washman,
Sunday work,
8 a.m. 4:30 p.m. We will train: $1.50
per hour. See Mr. Parry, personnel
director at Good Samaritan Hospital
for details.
9F4t

MALE

--

SALE

1959

Chev.

V--

Nestled f h'h on a wooded bluff
overlooking a winding stream with
a sweeping view of bluegrass countryside. Two bedrooms, two screen
ed porches, two balconies, fireplace,
carpet, terrace,
and carport.
Newly constructed with all modern features. Private and secluded.
Unique and luxurious living in.
equaled at any price In this area.
In the country, yet only It .nin-utfrom L'K. $175 per month
unfurnished.
9
or
ofter 5 p.m.

PERSONAL
GIBGSRH

LMIV!

FWHMFNXZHVI-ZMVHKRZ-

IVHKLMWVAHRDEL-FHKOZR-

CIA.

Convt.. new
top and carpets; 8 automatic; xtra
sharp, with many new parts, $495.
Call
iQK3t

299-406- 6

TYPING

TYPING expertly and promptly done
in my home. Experience legal, technical, academic. Phone
5.

7F4t

The Kentucky Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except holidays and
exam periods.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4986.
Nick Pope, chairman, and Patricia
Ann Nickell, secretary.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1913.
Advertising published herein Is intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
$8.00
Yearly, by mail
Per copy, from files
$.10
KERNEL TELEPHONES.
2321
Editor, Managing Editor
Editorial Page Editor,
Associate Editors, Sports .... 2320
2447
News Desk
Advertising, Business,
2319
Circulation
"

F

lOFlt

THANKS

S. M. for asking D. S. Gold-digger- s.
He was becoming a pest.
lOFlt
Lexington Xylophone Ass.

wall-to-wa- ll

299-173-

SOUTHERN HILLS METHODIST CHURCH

7Ftf

FOR

0.

Donald XV. Durham. Minister
(Nest to HoiplUb
J. R. Wood, Pastoral Minister
Dewey Sanders, Associate Minister
In Rear of Church)
Samuel Morris, Youth Minister
(Parking
9:50 a.m. Sunday School
9 a.m. and 11 a.m. "Give Up, But Don' rQuit," The Rev. Sanders
7:30 p.m. "Not to Destroy, but to Fulfill," The Rev. Wood
(Parking in Rear of Church)
Nursery for all Services

Store.

part-tim-

SALE 1959 Chevy, automatic
trans. Radio, heater. Good engine."
8F3t
$195. Call 6213.

JR., Minister

CENTENARY METHODIST CHURCH

19G4

FOR

9:50 a.m. Church School; College Class: Sam Davis, Teacher
11:00 a.m. "The Cross of the Modern Disciple," John Cooke
7:15 p.m. "Christ for the World," a drama by the young people

1716 8. Lime

531. Cost

FOR SALE 1964 Austin Healy Sprite.
Car can be seen after 7 p.m. or all
day Saturday and Sunday. Call 278-38after 7 p.m.
7F4t

ALDERSGATE METHODIST CHURCH
1881 EASTLAND

WANTED

FOR SALE

Both
Call

FOR RENT
FOR RENT

1882 BELLEFONTE

"Si

L

CLASSIFIED ADS

at Kentucky

Nursery provided during Morning Worship

m

mi

Symphony

WOODLAND CHRISTIAN CHURCH
East High

h

r

fill

If you don't help

your school officials
open recreation areas
nights, weekends and
during the summer,
nobody else will. .
OTIOETJiq
For a fro. button and information
to help you. writ:
I
ritnew, Washington. D.C. 20203

FataiDKNTS COUNCIL ON PHYSICAL FTTNBS8.

* 'Mir KI.NTI (KY kl.RM.I., Ind.iv.

Two Donovan Scholars Came
To UK
Long

'

I

Way-Shang- hai

It's a long way from Shanghai to a
efficiency
in Cooperstown, but a
gentle Chinese couple have carried off the tradition with dignity and poise.
Mr. and Mrs. Chu Ching I hi,
one-roo-

came to the United States the
end of an eight year refugee
--

trail-- in

1957.

Today they enjoy what is
known as "permanent resident"
status in this country.
Their reason for moving to

Faculty Student Niglit
To Keynote Greek Week
--

Creek Week officially begins with faculty-studediscussions
Monday. Lasting from 7 to 10 p.m. , the discussions will be divided
into nine academic areas.
nications, Art, English and
Fraternity houses in the Hill- Speech, All Foreign Languages
top, Woodland Avenue area will and Literature, Journalism, Lihost the groups, enabling the
brary Science, Music, Radio-Tstudents to go from group to Films,
Philosophy, and Theater
group in order to meet and talk Arts.)
with professors from the acaPHYS. SCIENCES-Kap- pa
demic departments represented.
Sigma House (Includes: AeroAccording to Paul Shoemaker
Comof the Greek Week Steering Com- space, Botany, Chemistry,
puter Science, Geology, Hygiene
in these dis"our
V

mittee,
point
and Public Health, Mathematics,
cussions is to establish a better
and
communication between faculty Microbiology, Physics
Statistics and Zoology.
and students. We've never sponCOLLEGE OF AGRICULsored an event of this type in
TURE AND HOME ECONOMconnection with Creek Week, ICS
Alpha Tau Omega House
but feel confident that it will
COLLEGES OF MEDIbe of great benefit to both the
NURSCINE, DENTISTRY,
professors and students." These
ING, AND PHARMACY-Lam-b- da
discussions are open to all UK
Chi Alpha House.
students, both Creek and
COLLEGE OF LAW-P- hi
Tau House
The nine University divisions Kappa
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECand their meeting places for the
TURE AND ENGINEERING
Faculty-StudeDiscussions are: Phi
Sigma Kappa House
SOCIAL SCIENCES-Alp- ha
COLLEGE OF EDUCATGamma Rlio House (Includes: ION-Pi
Kappa Alpha House
Anthroixdogy, History, Military
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS
Science, Patterson School of DiAND ECONOMICS Sigma Chi
plomacy and International Com- House
merce, Political Science, Social
At 6 p.m. Wednesday the
Work, Sociology, Geography, and
Greek Week banquet will be
Psychology.)
LIBERAL ARTS Phi Delta held in the Student Center ballTheta House (Includes: Commu- - room. Gene S. Graham, associate professor of journalism at
the University of Illinois, will
Arl Film Saturday
be guest speaker.
The first in a series of recent
Saturday night's Greek Week
films on art will be shown at
dance will feature Wilson Pickett.
2 p.m. Saturday in Room 218
The dance will be held in the
of the Fine Arts Building.
Student Center ballroom from
withThe films will be shown
S:30 to 12:30. Tickets are availout charge.
Initiated as part of the new able for $4 per couple in advance
or So at the dxr. They may
program for the University of be
purchased at the Student CenArt Gallery, the films
Kentucky
ter from Monday through Frito be shown will cover the enAt least one UK I.D. card
tire history of art from prehistoric day.
per couple is required for adcave painting to the most recent
mission to the dance.
non-Gree- k.

styles.

The first film, "The Americans: Three East Coast Artists
at Work," shows Milton Avery',
Hans Hofmann, and Jack Twor-koat work in their respective
studios.
v

Running

"

"

7-

-.'J
'

J

'

Li

'

:

is the Donovan ProSenior Citizens. Mr.
(Mm attends classes in marketing and business administration,
and Mrs. Chi is studying sociology.
The subjects are not entirely
new to them. Mr. Chu earned

bachelor's and master's degrees
in economics and business administration at the University of
to
Pennsylvania.
Returning
China in 1919, he taught the
subjects at Shanghai and Peking
universities.
He currently is
his
knowledge, because he believes
that "one never knows what tomorrow may offer."
Mrs. Chu finds the "intellectual atmosphere of the campus
so agreeable," and "it is such a
hospitable place. People are so
kind and helpful."
Although preferring the
Chinese style of dress,
she adds, "I think American
styles and clothes are for the
most part very beautiful, but not
so comfortable" as her
(a straight dress hanging free from
the shoulders, slightly split at
the skirt and buttoned high at
the neck).
"We like American shoes,"
he said. "They are so elegant.
You should have seen the shoes
we had to wear when we were
refugees. Our maids had fashioned them from old bedsheets,
braiding them to make soles and
layering them for the uppers.
But in those days it was the best
we could have, and we were glad
to have them."
Mr. Chu, because of the years
of his youth spend on the American campus, feels quite at ease
clothes.
in occidental-stylFleeing China through Canton and Hong Kong, Mr. and Mrs.
Chu ev entually were able to enter
the U.S. through the sponsorship of a married daughter, who
is a naturalized American citi- -

o.

.

.

Lexington
gram for

Mr. and Mrs. Chu Ching Hsi, refugees from China, are at UK
participating in the Donovan Scholars program.

up-dati-

Cee-ba- o

e

STUDENT CENTER
THEATRE
WAR

"Life here is delightful," Mrs.
Chu said. "We love the stores
and the wonderful variety of
things offered especially the supermarkets which we now can
shop together. It is a far cry
from old Shanghai days when
my Amah followed along behind,
carrying the foods that I selected."
"Nowadays," interjected Mr.
Chi, "the old order is reversed
and I, like a good American husband, push the grocery cart and
carry the bundles. But you
know I find that I like it. In
fact, we both thoroughly enjoy
American customs. The Sunday
papers for one thing. We even
read all the advertisements."
He finds his classes at the
College of Business and Economics

"stimulating." His

How to tyind

the Ideal
Summer Job...
START NOW! See McCALL'S
GUIDE TO SUMMER JOBS.
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losophy of reciprocity helps him
make friends easily, both among
the students and the faculty. His
cosmopolitan experience contributes to the scope of his participation in class activities.
While Mr. Chu speaks often
of conditions in today's China,
much of what he says cannot be
quoted because of certain political and familial circumstances.
Neverthelesss he is not restrained
in evincing optimism about the
future for his

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Greek Week art show in Room

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of the Student Center. Sculptures and paintings of UK Greeks
will be exhibited.

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* The Kentucky Kernel
The South's Outstanding College Daily
llNIVI HSI1Y OF Kl.NIUCKY
F.STAULISHF.D

FRIDAY, FKH.

1894

10.

1

967

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.

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Sum: lindii, Editorial

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Chant,

Editor-in-Chi-

Wilmam Knait,

Edge Editor

A Voluntary Draft
weekend's conference on
the draft in Washington, D.C.
strongly indicates that an overwhelming majority of the nation's
students from the far left to the
far right are opposed to the existing Selective Service law.
L'ast

The conference, organized by
Moderator magazine, was attended
by student leaders from nearly every
quarter of political thought and
representing many different political, religious and social perspectives.
The widely diversified attitudes
represented should give extreme
significance to the resolution adopted by the student leaders. It
said, in part, "that the present
draft system with its inherent in-

justices is incompatible with traditional American principles of individual freedom within a democratic society, and that for this
reason the draft should be eliminated."
It is also significant that a poll
of 30,500 students at 23 campuses
also showed widespread dissatisfaction with the current Selective
Service System.
We, too, believe the draft is
inequitable and does riot conform
with the basic principles of a truly
democratic society. Every human
person should have the right to
act freely and responsibly and

...

Or Only

But even if the entire draft system is not eliminated, it appears
that some improvement may be
forthcoming.
The President's Commission on
the Draft, a diverse
group composed of civil rights leaders, educators, clergymen, former
government officials and business
executives, has proposed drastic
changes in the current Selective
Service System.
This group is expected soon to
propose that student deferments
gradually be done away with, and
that all physically and mentally
capable youths be exposed to the
or 19 years
draft at
of age.
Apparently, the reasoning behind this is that students graduate
from colleges and universities after
four years, only to return the following autumn enrolled in graduate school. With the present draft
cutoff age of 26 years, it is quite
easy for many young men to escape
military service altogether.
In addition, young men in the
bracket are reported to adapt more readily to,
and generally be in better physical condition for, military

lousiness Manager

...

should be able to plan his own.
life as he sees fit. Any form of
compulsory conscription violates
these rights.
Most of the student leaders said
some form of voluntary national
service should be initiated as an
alternative to the draft. We agree
that voluntary national service, and
thus a voluntary military, is the
most desirable and viable alternative to the draft, and we endorse
the establishment of such a system.
Prof. Walter Oi, an economist
at the University of Washington and
Dea participant in the 1964-6- 5
partment of Defense draft study,
has concluded from his research
that a voluntary army would be
possible. He says a 2.7 million man
voluntary army would mean an additional budgetary cost ofonly$4.05
billion, and he argues that the nation would receive an overall savings if such an army were est-

ablished.

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Letters To The Editor:

Therefore, the idea of voluntary
national service is not impossible
nor is it extremely radical. Given
this fact and the fact that there
is widespread opposition to the
present draft system,we think Congress should abolish the Selective"
Service System and adopt legislation whereby a young person can
serve society voluntarily and ac.

cording to his own conscience.

A

l
1

Fairer One?

Open Alumni Gym On Weekends
To the Editor of the Kernel:
Basketball is an instutition at
the University of Kentucky. Coach
'
Rupp's four NCAA titles and last

year's national championship team
have made Lexington the basketball capitol of the world.
But what's wrong with letting
the clods shoot a few baskets? Why
isn't Alumni Gym open on Saturday and Sunday? Busy schedules
make it impossible for many stu-

dents to use the gym during the
Finally, a person 19 years of week, even when it is available
age is not as likely to have his between PE classes and scheduled
life's goals interrupted as is a intramurals.
person of the early to middle 20's.
On weekends, when many stuAlthough we favor complete eli- dents are free to get some exercise,
mination of the draft, this proposal they face locked doors at the Gym.
would improve the present system. Surely, a University which can supWe have maintained throughout
port an outstanding intercollegiate
the year that if a person must be athletic program can bear the resubjected to the draft, it is far latively nominal cost necessary to
better to have it over and done keep the Gym open over the weekwith early than to have his life end.
disrupted shortly after beginning
The University has provided a
his family or finding a permanent fine environment for the Wildcats.
job.
It should also provide recreation
There is one concept of the facilities for students athletically
Commission, however, with which less talented.
we definitely do not agree. This
Ed Campbell
is the group's recommendation not
A & S Senior
to allow work in humanitarian
organizations, such as the Peace
The Mud Trucks Cometh
Corps, to satisfy a person's miliOne particularly wet and mistary obligations.
erable day recently, while sliding
The reasoning of the Commission is that this type of work in between my classes, it came to my
no way equates with the risks attention that soineth