xt759z909b7j https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt759z909b7j/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19430129  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January 29, 1943 text The Kentucky Kernel, January 29, 1943 1943 2013 true xt759z909b7j section xt759z909b7j Best Copy Available

The Kentucky Kernel

ON fWfiE TWO
It's Not Spring; Fever
That's Making Us Shiver

UNIVERSITY

VOLUME XXXIV

Z246

I

Franz Schubert will be the subject of the first open class of the
winter quarter to be held the fourth

V.

RELIGIOUS STUDY

,

hour today in room 19, Art center,
by Professor Carl A. Lampert. head
of the music department. Professor
Lampert will supplement his lecture
with recordings of "The
and par: of the famous "Unfinished
Symphony."
In discussing "The World's Greatest Melodist." the professor will devote most of his talk to some of the
additional information which has
been uncovered in recent years by
researchers in music. These facts,
according to Professor Lampert. are
entirely unknown to most people.
T Speak On Son
He will speak briefly, in addition,
on the importance of the
Schubert song and will attempt to
clarify the present attitude towards
it. In order o do this, he will play
appropriate selections illustrating his
points.
This open discussion is a part of
the regular course. Survey of Music
Literature. No knowledge of the
previous lectures is necessary for
an understanding of the class.
Plan In Second Year
The open class program, which is
now in its second year at the University, was inaugurated by the arts
and sciences college to give students
a chance to sample courses other
than those in which they are enrolled. Discussions which can be
understood and appreciated apart
from the entire course are opened
to all students, according to the
plan.
Next in the series will be "Insanity
and Intelligence of Twins" which
will be discussed by Edward Newbury, assistant professor of psychology.

The YWCA and the YMCA are
conducting a religious survey among
students of the University to find
out the amount of participation in
religious affairs by students during
the present war crisis.
Questionnaires
are being distributed to the men's and women's
dormitories, to organized houses on
the campus, and to tov.-- students.
T Evaluate Material
me xm-- i wi,a win eva.uaie u.c
.
Professor Carl Lampert
... ,.
material collected to find out how
. . will discuss
Sihu- - mucn religious work has been done
on the campus and to ascertain hat
lilts til
bcrt in art open
can be done In the future.
o'clock today.
Virginia Baskett. Casper. Wyom
ing, arts and sciences sophomore,
and Brice Kennelly. Covington, arts
and sciences sophomore, are
i
in
of the committee
charge of the survey.
The blanks will be distributed in
Patterson hall by Ruth Anthony; in
Boyd hall by Pat Wallace; in Jewell
hall by Charline Lisanby: in Patt
annex by Helen Milman; in McDowell house by Reba Smith; in
The inaugural issue of Campus Hamilton house by Marjorie Smith.
News From The Kentucky Kernel and in the men's dormitories by
has been published and sent to ap- Brice Kennelly and Howard Morgan.
Blanks Distributed
proximately 1.000 former students.
will be disThe questionnaires
Sponsored by the Alumni Asso
tributed in the sorority houses by
ciation, the sheet of news condensed the following: Lillian Nichols. Chi
from regular issues of the Kernel Omega: Algernon Dixon. Kappa
is sent to men now serving in the Kappa Gamma; Lois Ogden. Alpha
armed forces.
Xi Delta; Eloise Bennett. Alpha
Issued monthly, the Campus News Gamma Delta; Margaret Hatcher.
Alpha Delta Pi; Elsie March. Zeta
is edited by Miss Marguerite Mc
Laughlin.
assistant professor of Tau A1Pha: Pat Rinier. Kappa
Journalism. She is assisted by Dr. Delta; and Virginia Basket. Delta
Delta Delta.
Niel Plummer, head of the JournalTwo copies of the questionnaire
ism department, and Miss Helen
King, assistant director of the pub- will be given to each person attending Y meetings Tuesday evening
lic relations bureau.
and other blanks will be sent to
two-paLooking like a
edition town students who are picked at
of the Kernel, the Campus News
random from the student directory.
contains news items and feature Dr. Harry Best, head of the Sostories from the regular editions ciology department, will also give
which will be of interest to alumni. the questionnaires to members of
At the end of each story is printed his classes.
the date on which it appeared In
The material will be tabulated as
the Kernel.
have
soon as the questionnaires
been returned and the results will
be published in the Kernel.

..

ALUMNI TO. GET
CAMPUS NEWS

Paper Is Sent

To Men In Forces

SEMMONS, KING
ATTEND MEET

Library Institute
Held At Chicago
Mlss Mildred Semmons, head of
of library science,
and Miss Margaret King. University
librarian, are attending the Institute on War and Postwar Issues of
the American Library Association
now being held in Chicago, January
1.
The meeting is
being held in conjunction with a
war planning council of the organization at the Drake hotel.
Miss Semmons represents, at the
national institute, the University
Hiid its American Library Association
accredited library school, and, as a
1irector, the Kentucky Library As
sociation. Miss King is a member
of the committee for a regional institute which will follow the national one.
meeting replaces
The three-da- y
lor the group of invited represent
tatives from all areas of the United
States, the midwinter meeting of
the American Library Association
which is devoted primarily to meetings of the American Library Association council, important commit
g
groups.
tees, and

tht department

14 DELEGATES

Journalism Profs
ATTEND Y MEET Attend Convention
Twelve students and the two "Y"
secretaries. Miss Rosalie Oakes and
Bart N. Peak, will represent the
University
at the Y
1
Conference being held January
at Berea.
The student representatives are
Bob Davis. Fred Erwin, Frances
Kendall. Dorothy Collins. Pat Kent.
Duane Van Horn. Sarah Mclnteer.
Carolyn Spicer.
Helen Harrison.
Wilma Salmon, Sarah Anne Hall,
and Mary Elizabeth Stigall.
"Present Responsibility of the
Church for Building a Better World
Order" is the theme of the conference. This subject will be discussed
of Dr. Morunder the
ns R. Mitchell, head of the education department of State Teachers
College. Florence,' Ala.; Dr. Haridas
T. Muxumdar. Indian lecturer, author, and statesman. New York
City; Dr. Wyatt A. Smart, Chandler
School of Theology, Emory University, Ga.; and Howard A. Kester,
Fellowship of
general secretary.
Southern Churchmen, Black Mountain, N. C.
A

29-3-

policy-makin-

'SO THL7
Ky Mcrl Halter

ItwMmn When do yon think the
ar will he over?

Seniors Must File
For All Degrees

CHESTER THEISS. A & S: I
think that it will be over about the
nd of this year.

Seniors who entered the winter quarter and who expect to
complete their requirements for
graduation, at the close of the

JOHN TRIMBLE, Ag: Well. I
am not an expert, but I think it
will end in the .spring of '44. I
hope that it will end soon for I am
about to be drafted.
KENNEY THOMAS. A & S: I
might be a bit optimistic, but I believe that it will end by November
of this year.
OMAR ALLEN, A & S: I do not
ce why we will not be able to
our enemies this winter.

de-te- at

J D. DELANO, Jr., Engineering :
I suppose that some will say that I
am a pessimist, but I do not be- Ileve that we will achieve complete
victory until the winter of '45.
-

LUCY THOMAS.
that this war will end in the
spring of '44
lk-v- e

be-

LrU
'

ed

6: S: I

.1

...

Erl-Kin-

A

st

THROUGH SURVEY
Bill Cross . . ,
Questionnaires
Initios his nit heslni Id
I' niii tiiitimmw night fur
Being Distributed
lat nionsjHiiisored dance
Among Students
tin' ijiiaitrr.

j

j

winter, spring or summer quarter, and who have NOT made
application for degrees, are requested to do so on Monday,
February 1. This applies also
to graduate students who expect
to complete their requirements
for graduate degrees. All applications should be filed in
room 16 of the Administration
building.
As the commencement lists are
made from these cards, it is
very important to file an application at this time.
Le M. Chamberlain
lean nf the University
Jid Registrar

Dr. Niel Plummer, head of the
Prof.
of Journalism;
Willis C. Tucker and Prof. Victor
R. Portmann. professors of JournalMcism; and Miss Marguerite
Laughlin,
assistant professor of
journalism, are attending the annual midwinter convention of the
Kentucky Press Association being
held in Louisville.

department

Block And Bridle
To Meet Monday
Block and Bridle will meet at 7:30
the Card room of
the Union building.
p. m. Monday in

NEVADA SENATOR

ON STOP HERE

the
the
of

Schrughani Talks
To Engineers On

Changing World

Senator James G. Schrughani a
graduate of the University in the
class of 1900 and now United States
Senator from Nevada, spoke to an

AT UNION HOP

assembly of senior engineering students Wednesday during a short
stop-ovin Lexington.
His time being limited. Sen.
Schrugham's speech. "This Changing World" was brief. The Senator,
who graduated in engineering and
received his master's degree here,
outlined to his listeners the rapid
changes that have taken place in
the last few decades and how they
have changed our whole mode of
life.
This same situation will exist in
the next ten or twenty years when
new inventions brought about mainly by engineering will constantly be
introduced.
The senator also di.scus.sed the
importance of the engineer of today
and tomorrow learning things other
than engineering. Because of the
growing complexity of the world,
the future engineer should be well
informed on such matters as geography, political science, and even
history, he said.
Before being elected senator this
was
Scrugham
past
November.
United States representative from
his adopted state of Nevada for ten
years. Previous to that he had beei
professor and later dean of the engineering college of the University
of Nevada for many years. He was
also at one time editor of the Nevada
er

SATURDAY NIGHT
The last
dance
of the quarter., the
Hop,
will be held from 9 to 12 p. m. Saturday in the Bluegrass room of the
Union building. Featuring six
Bill Cross and his orchestra
will play.
Dress for the dance will be formal
for women and optional for men.
Tickets are $1.
Sizes I'p Dancers
Cross, according to those who have
danced to his music, has the happy
faculty of quickly sizing up the
dancers, and playing their requests
before they make them. His orchestra presents both swing and
sweet music.
In addition, the organization has
numerous novelties featuring the
piano styles of Dave
Perry and the specialties of Dave
Mahanes. Ray Wetzel, and Jimmy
Trevathan. For those who like
singing, the Glee Club is featured.
Formed Band Here
Cross, who formed his orchestra
while a student here, boasts of having played more school and college
engagements throughout Kentucky,
Tennessee,
and Ohio than any
"name" band. He has played for
junior and senior proms at the
University. Eastern State Teachers
College, Transylvania College, University of Cincinnati, Xavier University, and the University of LouisUnion-sponsor-

Mid-Wint- er

ie

ville.

'

state Journal.

Sir Norman Angell, British-bor- n
author, editor, and correspondent,
will speak at convocation at 10 a.
m.. Thursday. February 2. in Me- morial hall. All third hour classes
day will be dismissed.
'.'The Place of Force in the Main- tenance of Peace" will be the topic
of Sir Norman's address.
Sir Norman is living in the United
States at present for the purpose of
writing and lecturing at various col- lege and university assemblies.
Youth Here
Concurrent with his writing and
speaking career. Sir Norman has
spent several decades in public ser- vice. Though born in England, he
spent his early youth in America
where he began his long journal- istic career.
On his return to Europe, he acted
as correspondent for several Amer- ican newspapers. Later he became
editor and general manager for the
Paris Daily Mail and other period- -

The University Men's Glee Club,
under the direction of Lewis Henry
Horton, will present a concert at
the regular Sunday Afternoon Musicale at 4 pin in Memorial hall
Sunday.
Robert Kuhlmaii. baritone, accompanied by Adele Gensemer, will
sing two solos. "Dover Beach," a
poem by Matthew Arnold, and "I
Head an Army." a poem by James
Joyce. Both have been set to music
by Barber.
Allen T Sul
A trio of South American numbers, including "Ay Ay Ay" will be
sung by the Glee Club and will feature Leonard S. Allen, bass. Cleveland, Ohio, agriculture senior, as
soloist, singing "A Brazilian Lullaby" arranged by Bunting. Kuhl-ma- n
and the Glee Club will present "Mexican Serenade" by Lester
for the third South American
number.
The Glee Club will open the pro- -

Today, Tomorrow
Mian Alice Lloyd,

j

at--

a

dean of women

the University of Michigan, and
member of the
of the

President's Manpower commission,
interview senior women today
and tomorrow, concerning the op- portunitie.s for employment upon
will

until 1931 he edited BTal"tiii.
A banquet open to all University
the periodical French Affairs, and

Sir Norman Angell
In United States
To Write, Lecture

icaLs. From 1928

during two of those years he served
in the British Parliament.
Awarded Nebel Prize
He is a member of the Council
of the Royal Institute of Interna- tional Affairs and has been
ident of the Com it e mondial con-thtre la guerre et le fascism." In 1933.
he mas awarded the Nobel Peace
Prize.
The lecturer has written numerous
articles and books relating to eco- nomic and political questions of
interest. A few of these are "The
Great Illusion." "Peace and the
tators." "Preface to Peace." and "If
Britain Is To Live." An article by
Sir Norman concerning education
and the present crisis, appearing in
the February. 1941. news bulletin of
the Institute of International Edu- cation, received favorable comment
here and abroad.
"Let the People Know." Sir Norman's latest book, has been chosen
by the Book of the Month club a.
its most recent offering to American
readers.
-

'

'

women, women faculty members,
and wives of faculty members will
be held for Mi.- - Lloyd at 8:30
in the Football room of the
Student Union. Jane Hayes is in
charge of arrangements, and reservations are being made at the oft ice
of the Dean of Women.
Interviews Held
Interviews with Miss Lloyd will
be held in the Music room of the
Union building. The Interviews will
be conducted in small groups of
four or five women with the same
interest. Students are requested to
bring written reports of the courses
which they have taken to the interview.
Underclassmen may sit in on the
ht

'

s-

at

i

Die-Spe- nt

"
h"""
Llwd as to opportunities for em
ployment upon their graduation.
The schedule for interviews follows:
Friday
,
3
History
0
English
4:00-4:Commerce
00-3:-

3:30-4:0-

4.

Pre-Me-

0

4:45-3:0-

d

5
Sociology
0
Romance Languages
Saturday Morning
Home Economics
10:00-1- 0
30
Dietetics
Nursery School
5
Elementary Education 10:45-11:11:15-11:Social Work
11:30-11:Physical Education
11:45-1- 2
0
Political Science
Saturday AflereiMMi
Medical Technology
5
Psychology
0
Business Education
2:30-- 2
45
Art
0
Library Science
0
Journalism
3:10-3:- 2
Music
3:20-3:Zoology
0
Law
3:40-3:Mathematics
OC
3:50-Economics
5:00-5:15:15-3:3-

Hook J anglers Peeve
Of Phone Operator

9:15-10:-

00

10:30-10:4-

30

By CELIA BfcDr.RMAN

If you're a chronic telephone hook
gra.s another busy period.
Majors
jangler, stay off the University
The green, red. and white lights
wires. "Flashers" are the pet and on the switchboard flash most per- Cover Convention
only peeve of Miss Bettie Swope. sistently from 9 to 12 in the morn- For Publication
who has been plugging calls in and ing and from 1:30 to 3 in the after- campus
journalism
University
students out on years. switchboards for the noon. The few minutes between
past 23
classes see another Increase in busi- covering and reporting the meetare
cap- - nes3
Miss Swope 's
ings and speeches of the thirty-firaverage of 2500
r,rar-,k
nnnnal form ntiH Hrttno '(II V'.'llt i ( IM able hands put in an
local and 18 long distance calls a ment
being held on the campus. These
of Maintenance and Opera-- !
,
......
tions, and the comptroller's office
reporters are working in connection the first floor
of the Administration
are the greatest telephone users.
with C. A. Lewis, editor, agriculbuilding.
However. "I don't care how much
tural extension division.
When Miss Swope took over the people use
Group
renorts nf the
Aftr rofoivintr
their phones as long as
telephone operating duties for the
students. Mr. Lewis will coordinate en ire campus in 1925 there were they don't flash," Miss Swope de- To Hold
clares.
and combine them and release a only 27
stations and three trunk
complete story to local and state
Few people making calls to camTne Westminster Fellowship group
lines on her board. Tooay
pus offices are prepared to give de- ill meet at the Maxwell Street
sitv telephones number 160 with
Journalists covering these meet- - 134 extensions. There are 10 trunk sired numbers, but this causes no Presbyterian Church this afternoon
i
renawMiw.
lugs uiciuuc Lwwauu Un..V;. wn lilies connecting with the Lexington delay as Miss Swope automatically and tonight for its inid-yesnider Alic
plugs in the correct station when treat.
othy Scott, ptriri
up SIlOU 111
Watkins, Fillmore Bowen. Richard; asicui. dciui r selling
she is told who is wanted.
Beginning at 4:30 p. m.. the bus- the Administration building. Miss
.
Eubanks. Scotty McCulloch. Doro-- 1 Swope
.v,- .lm swucnuoaru w
worked at the Experiment
.'"
thy Angle, and Lois Ogden.
completely only once in the supper at 8:30. The social period
station, which had the first switch- P81 ,wo decades. A galaxy of col- - j will begin at 8 o'clock..
board on the campus
At the regular meeting of the
She claims to be able to recog- - ored "8nts reminding Miss Swope
Red Cross Holds
every staff member bv his of a Christmas tree greeted her on group on Sunday evening, the vouna
nize
' Couruship" led

Journalism

j

I:3U-I.4- ."

1:45-2:1-

2:15-2:3-

2:45-3:03:00-3:1-

Kampus
Kernels

quick-movin-

g-

j

st

3:30-3:4-

50
4.

BLOCK AMI BRIDLE . . .
. . . will meet at 7:30 p. m., Monday. February 1, in the Card room
of the Union building. Dr. W. D.
Funkhouser will speak.
WESTMINSTER . . .
fellowship will meet at 4:30 p.
m. today at the Maxwell Ctreet PreS'
byterian Church.
DITCH LUNCH
. . . club will meet at noon today in
the Footb&ll room of the Union
members'
building
to celebrate
birthdays.
SWEATER SWING . . .
. . . will be held Tuesday afternoon,
in the Bluegrass room,
from
Union building.
OPEN HOUSE . . .
to be held in the
. . . for soldiers
Music room. Union building, Sunday afternoon, from

...

6.

Westminster
Ketreat

tt

Univer-newspape-

r.

,--..

ar

Nursing Course

the one morning she was late to people will discuss
worK. campus callers were incom- - oy wrs. uuuins .wumuuuu

Miss Swope savs that she has
identified many people whom she
has met by matching them up itn
their telephone voices.
Football season is the busiest time
of the year for the campus tele
phone system, especially the few
days before homecoming. The period after exams, when determined
students keep the wires hot seeking
voice.

special six weeks' course in home
nursing was begun last night. Spun- sored by the Red Cross, the course
is being taught by Mrs. Elliott
Classes meet from 7:30 to 9 p. m.
each Tuesday and Thursday at the
Public Health center.
A

gram with "Lord, to Us Be Ever
Heeding" by Bortniansky. followed
by "My Native Land" by Gretchan- inoff and "Hospodi Pomilue" by

f

Lvov.

The familiar "Loch Lomond" and
"Sweet and Low." arranged by
Ringwald. and "O God, Our Help
in Ages Past." arranged by
will be presented for the
third section of the program.
Program Concludes
The Glee Club will conclude the
program with "British Children's
Prayer" by Wolte. "By the Bend of
the River" by Edwards, and "Steal
Away." a Negro spiritual arranged
by Ringwald.
The Glee Club will be accom- panied by Lela W. Cullis. instruct- or in applied music, organist, and
Carroll Robie. arts and sciences
sophomore, pianist.
Ushers for Sunday's Musicale will
Hagan. Janet
include Kathleen
Palmer, and Laura Jeanne Blake.
oeia; ana ttaipu
ineinoers oi
Kemp, Pierre Pujol, and John Kerr,
IIK'inhers of Phi Mil Alpha.
Croft-Davi-

30

'

,,lUl

t

i

s,

if
Up
.

v

,

Robert Kuhlmaii
il lll hi' tCHllO'd soloist
,

.Mi

Hi

irnonil

Ev,.nt

'

Spelniau Original Drawing!
Feature Librarv Exhibition

Books pertaining to the subject
of war are the most popular ones
read on the campus at the present
time. Whether this is due to assign- ments in class or to natural interest
is not known. All the new fiction
that the library is able to obtain
today is about the war.
"See Here Private Hargrove was
one of the most popular books during he summer and its popularity
Some of the new
is still great.
books that have been added are "Get
Thee Behind Me." "The Song of
Bernadette." "Reprisal," and "The
Valley of Decision."

By ALFRED SHIRK

Frosh Blunders
Surprised to see that headline
at this time ol the year? Wei!,
so are we but it seems that our
friends still haven't
learned.
During a recent survey, one
of tile Kernel reporters approached a likely looking lad
and began questioning him
"What class are you in?"

little

"Freshman."
"What college are you in?"
The boy looked at the reporter
with a dazed sort of surprise
and answered disgustedly. "This
one .of course."

bv.

uu

Miss Swope looks forward to the at 7 o'clock,
day when a dial system will be in- The discussion, which is the
for University use.
This ond topic in the series on Lose,
hope may become a reality after Courtship, and Marriage, will begin
at 7:30 p. m.
the war. she opines.

UK Men's Glee Club 7 o Sing Books On War
Are Most Popular
Al Musicale A I 4 p.m. Sunday
Horton To Lead
Group In Concert
At Memorial Hall

Miss Alice Lloyd
To Meet Women

British Author, Editor
To Address Convocation
Thursday, February 2

MAKES SPEECH

CROSS TO PLAY

boogie-woog-

i

Women's Dean Is Here
To Confer With Seniors
On Job Opportunities

Sgt. Alvin C. York, who was
to have spoken at the thirty-firannual Farm and Home
convention here yesterday, did
not arrive.
The hero of World War I was
in
reported
snowbound
the
mountains of Tennessee.

V

i.

Nl'MliFK

York Snowbound,
Could Not Appear

.

Tus-iilMsj-

Hi:t

FRIDAY. JANUARY

Professor Carl A. Lampert
To Discuss Franz Schubert
A I Opcu Class Fourth Hour
Y IS CONDUCTING

Wildcats Sally Forth
Alalia
To

OF KENTUCKY

LEXINGTON. KENTUCKY.

Recordings Will
Supplement Talk
On Melodist Today

ON PACK FOUU

'

Flatboats and log rafts, shacks I
thoroughbreds
and
and cabins,
country homes.
With the Kentucky river as a
connecting link, these and other
scenes of life in the mountain
country and the rolling bluegrass as
viewed through the eyes of authors
and artists, make up the display of
Kentuckiana now on exhibition in
the main lobby of the University
Library.
Arranged by Miss Margaret I.
King, head librarian, the collection
features the original drawings of
John A Spelman III which were the
for Dr. Thomas D.
illustrations
Clark's "The Kentucky" and Marie
Campbell's 'Cloud Walking."
presents
The
exhibition
also
schools, customs, and mountain life
in general as seen in the works of
James Still and Jesse Stuart.
Single and double-pag- e
drawings,
chapter heads, and jacket designs
are included in the two sets of
Spelman s drawings, which were
lottiieU to tiie library by the publishers of tiie books.
"The Kentucky."
published in
February, 1942. as one of the Rivers
of America series, deals with nioun- tan leers, moon.shine makers, poli- -

tics, ballads. Shakers. Matboat men.
,'
and other phases of life on and near
the river.
The twists and bends of the Kentucky among the rolling hills and
are seen in the
flat bottom-land- s
linoleum cuts which illustrate the
book.

The variety of life observed by
is shown in his drawings
stills, hemp fields,
of mountain
cemeteries, and horse farms, among
the wooded, rolling and mountainous sections of the state connected
by the Kentucky. Two distinct cultures are seen through these drawings: the Bluegrass between Boones-bor- o
and Ohio through which the
river cuts a deep gorge, and the
mountain country, where creeks be
come the highways.
"Cloud Walking." also published
last year, deals with the lite and
customs of mountain folk Pencil
of rural objects a mill,
drawing
s,
dulcimers, a pump were
reproduced as chapter heads in Miss
Campbell's book.
Other work by Spelman. who is
head of the art department of the
Pine Mountain Settlement school,
include pages taken from calendars
drawn and pruited at the school by
the
aitist

the artist

* The Kernel Editorial Page

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER

OF THE UNIVERSITY

DtTRWti TH

F17HI.T6HED

HCEPT

SCHOOL TEAR
OR ESAMTNATIOIt PBRIQD9

HOMTUTB

Kntma M the Pout Office at Lrxlnfton, Krntnrky.
ttror.fl rlftM matter under the Art of liarrh $, 1879.
Lfxtnfton Bosrd of Commerce
Kentucky Pre
AMocl.tlon
National Editorial Atsorlation

.1 I

. Am M
National Advertising Service, Inc.
cwtwe PmUuksn

ccc

MAtMSOH Avd.
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tot

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WHAT
STICK

wM.

IS A DC AO
LANDING '?

( iht- kt'iiitl wlurtin
ismu
were twu works haMi1 on ilic wontlers ol
-

srin

and llie evils raiisert hv its lexer, limes have
changed! Old man weather tlet itletl we had
had too many tampns strolls in
ienieiatiire. loo ninth wishiii" we were outside while silling in tlassrooms. um in.inv spring
ljshi.i t notes.
We ve geuinp, our lasic tf snow now. In lad.
so far we're plowed under. Si i intlies ot ii!
r

Some say more.
low all the
This writer followed the snow
w;t
lo MtX'ev hall the other morning to say
the least, hlaed a trail across the campus. We
w n hi (fa trtitk skidding across Fin lid. almost
love
plunging into the gym: we saw lhree-"ws
working industriously on a
the snow"
"wou'd-ltesnow man: and we sat calmly hv
while aiious snowlighis ensued outside I he
I'tiion. We Ixrame very uncomfortable alter
awhile, though. Icfausc they even started throwing the siufl inside the window of the grill.
We Kit:
As we walked hat k over on Fiulid we noted
that i he ewell hall resident, lortunaie enough
to even own cars (not een mentioning tires and
gas), had parked their cars about I'll feet from
the (in It. (oiess thev couldn't even see the itirh!
Vi to end this little treatise on the weather,
we're wondering. You guessed it. wonder what
it will Ik- when Friday rolls around. No predictions, mind von. only laying a small Iki that n il
Imspin, g again! In anuary. loo!
e

1

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NX
A' XV

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5

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loiiunate again. This time
lniersit
it find- - itself with a convention lealiiring so
tnanv s leakers, and v many interesting stihjeds
that one is loned to race trout one building to
anoiher to keep Irom missing out on anyihing.
ihiilv-lits- i
I In
annual I arm and Home
meeting 1 Hesdav through Friday has
iortctul. It has been lorcelul in that it is
linielv. It has (oim- at just the right minute.
F.vcrv solid Amerian wants to know and should
I

he

is

(on-xemi't- n

i

-

THE ACT OF
LANDItJG AN

?M
missed the (tiignol produdion of the
and Old l.ace." vou

latking for a wonderful plol
and the (uignol plavers turned in sujht
i
maiu es.
plav was not

jki-fo-

Of (ourse. we all gaed when Don Irvine,
ho. iiu identallv. was pevfeel as IVu is Karloll's
double in the role of onathan Brewster (grue
v?me. isn't iir). walked on the stage, and we
jimiM'd with the audience when Mortimer
(plawd to x i let lion bv F.li Popa) ojiened the
w indow x.ii and found I lie corpse.
We. loo.
were etpiaJIv surprised when we found that those
two sweet old ladies really murdered coplc.
1 he (liuias:.
however, came when we were applauding at the drop of the curtain and eected
to see the apcarane of the entire company.
Thirteen horrible looking creatures strolled,
jerked, and staggered arro the stage. It was
good to know later that they were merely
pledges drafted for the roles.
rou;uets should tie tossed over Guignol vvav.
Alter lejH'aied productions of this iyc. they
stirelv (an t w tailed amateurs at their work.
A.W.
w

Morale - Its Effect And Upkeep
THE FREE LANCE hv Boh Warth
There are few persons in high
who flatly predict, a did
Admiral HaLsey a short time ago. a
complete United Nations victory in
1943. and there are as few in low
places despite the patriotic tendenOver- cy toward
comiueiice can or a uuiigeiou&
ihme. but at least it is indicative
ol rush morale on the part of the
in man population.
ISlil even llie most pessimistic
cracker barrel philosophers are
lreely volunteering
the inform- tion for what it is worth that Ger- many is positively doomed thi

thus making it possible to Is psychological strength; or. with
simply good
off Japan at our leisure. The jets erudition,
"
theory is that once the German
fcnMBMa. lhaf
Almy suffers a decisive defeat the the moraU; curve ta Germany. since
Nazi State will collapse internally Nau propaganda committed suicide
w ithout the necessity o; a long and
by annihilating the Red Army too
year,

es

poli-'-

'

bloody process of mutual decima- - many times, is so low as to make
tion uiitil sheer weight of numbers our anemic business index curve in
fri
H.Rinn
the Great Depression look positive
Considered strictly from a mili- - ly radiant with vitamins. That was
Ury standpoint tne ,ogic of tnat tne way u was ta i918 bef01.e tne
conclusion is flawless. Our single collapse; ergo, it will happen again.
objection rnnrprni rh
nnclatoH flows the dialectic.
premise upon which the argument
Prediction of the future on the
is based: that wars are decided by basis of past experience is perhaps
military strength alone. One other the only valid method of prognostiimportant factor, we should think. cation, but in this cai-- we recall
the familiar story' of the shepherd
boy who cried "wolf! wolf!" once
too often. In the last war we promised leniency for a defeated Germany, and the people capitulated
on that assumption.
r,
Whether the Allies actually did
'.. an?
"betray" the German people or not
4
Is irrelevant, for the fact remains
that Hitler rode to power upon just
sense of despair
this
and disillusion which permeated
the German mentality in post-wdays. The Nazis are still playing
upon this feeling, though in a quite
11
different way.
Within the past year a fundamental revolution has taken place
in the propaganda diet of the Germans. From a belligerent air of
supreme confidence the press has
changed its tune to one of fatalistic resignation. The only weapon
h-?- r
left in the propaganda arsenal now
Is Fear: and it is being played up
for all it is worth.
'
?L;; j
The people understand only too
well what an Allied victory will
mean for them if the conquered
people of Europe are allowed a free
hand in exacting their revenge, as
they realize subconsciously, if in no
other way, the essential war guilt
of their leaders. A cornered rat is
the moM dangerous, and so it may
be that a
population,
-- The St..i s and Sli ipcs have
OI R FLAG IN FRENCH MOROCCO
even an anti-Naone as the case
Mrategic Moroccan town
keen raised above this old lort neur S.ifi,
Ls now in actual
facti. will
(ptuied by U. S. infantrymen. LooUouts keep watch foi any be fanatically zealous in its prove to
defense
aign ol the enemy.
of the Fatherland.
1

Tf--

1

deep-seat-

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5sx

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fear-riddzi

.1

ANSWER:

g

The

i'

i

know jusi how he ian help the war effort on the
home I tut. Subjects such as "Normal Living
in Abnormal Times." "Familv Well-beinand
the I'ci iii.iik ni l'eat e." and "The Farm Familv
in a World at War" could almost be called
thev were dcfinitclv
genet :! lopiis
to evervonc.
We lound out tile honors of air raids and
how it feels traveling in a convov from Mrs.
lien SI.
of Lexington, the wife of Li.
(j). Lowry.
We heard Seontd OfTtter Anne Sweenev of
I he WAAC's tell the general
assembly how it fell
memlier of the women's brant h of the
to IkAiniv.
All in all. we were much impressed, we
learned a lol and we won't soon forget it. Hojk-vo