xt759z909b9q https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt759z909b9q/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19581022  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 22, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 22, 1958 1958 2013 true xt759z909b9q section xt759z909b9q Cooperstown Residents
To Get Ballots Today
lot s for nomin.itini conn- - didates In the-- election, to be held n.rn and the mayor will constitute
the Cooperstown Council.
cilincn for (loopci tow n Coun- Nov.
The purpose r( the council, a
Kavencraft Said the three nomicil will he clisti ibutcil t mI.i y to
nees from each of Coopersfowns outlined by Havenrrnft. ts to proresidents of the I'lmciMtN 12 wings would inert nt 7 pni. mote nny and all activities of com-nuinterest to all Ct'pcrtown
housing projec t.
Thursday. Oct. 3). in Memorial
Hall to nominate candidates for residents. It al. o serves n a means
Dave Raveneraft.
for the group, said Student Con-pre- mayor. The four persons who re- of communication bctwen Univermembers would distribute ceive the largest number of nomi- sity administrative officials and
ballots and a letter of explanation nations for mayor will be placed residents of the housing project.
to each apartment In the housing on the ballot for the November A constitution for the organization Is being prepared. Ravencraft
election.
project.
4a id.
At the election Itself, Coopers- Kadi resident will be permitted
Any CiKiperstown resident, stuto nominate three persons from town residents will vote for one
Is eluible for
dent or
his wing for councilman. The three candidate for mayor and also for
council membership and to vote In
persons from each wing receiving a council representative from their
the most nominations will be can- - respective wings. The 11 council- - the election.
1

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5-- 6.

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non-stiule-

nt.

Dr. James Shear flew from aboard ship by helicopter to visit Mirny
the Russian base In Antartica. Two Russian scientists are at cx- -

Russian equipment.

Dr. Shear Was Group Leader
Doing Antarctica Research

HOE IKM

Dr. James Shear, associate professor of Geography, has recently
returned from the Antarctic where he served as the scientific leader
of a joint expedition composed of 14 men from the U. S. and New

scientist

be available

would

for

further study.

Volume L

Lexington, Ky., Wednesday, Oc tober

TV Course
To Be Given

The Russians presented Dr.
Shear with many gifts including
cigarettes, scientific equipment,
beaver skin hats and canceled
Russian stamps signed by Russian
leaders.
Political problems were not dis"The Basic Principles of Modern
cussed, but Dr. Shear said that
Physics" is a televised college
pictures and busts of Lenin were
credit course which can be taken
displayed in every building.

In Physics

Dr.hearrought-backwarouSh- -th

penguins. One was an Albino
which was the only one of its
kind ever to be captured. It will
be sent to the Smithsonian Onith-olog- y
Museum. He pointed out that
it was easy to capture penguins
because Cape Hallett was located
in a rookery containing an estimated 200,000.
In late February Dr. Shear-attendestruments attached.
the International Scientic
Dr. Shear stated that the Symporium during which time he
warmest month was January dur- reported the Cape Hallett expediing which time an average tem- tion as being 80 to 90 per cent
perature f 31 degrees was re- successful.
corded. August, a warm month in
most regions of the U. S. was just
the opposite at Cape Hallett
where the average temperature
was 18 degrees below zero.
On Oct. 22, the highest wind
ever observed in Antarctica comDr. James A. Shear, associate
pletely destroyed the weather obreservation instruments. The wind professor at the University,
Accomplishment
with speeds up to a 114 m.p.h. ceived an Alumni
College's
blew snow and volcanic ash against Award at Westminster
Saturday
the buildings removing all paint. annual alumni dinner
The sun disappeared from May night.
A 1939 graduate of the New Wilto August. The men celebrated its
reappearance with a softball game mington, Pa., school, Dr. Shear has
on sea ice with the thermometer done polar research on the Arctic
standing at 9 degrees above zero. coastal plain of Alaska and classiDr. Shear travelled 1,500 miles fied research for the Air Force.
In June, 1956, he served as one
to visit the Russian scientific base
of the scientific leaders of one of
at Mirny.
Air Soviet scientific equipment the United States stations in the
was opened for observation. Be- Antarctic in conjunction with the
cause cf a limited visit, Dr. Shear International Geophysical Year.
Dr. Shear has taught at Westwas unable to examine Russian
minster, Carnegie Institute of
scientific data, but he said that
all facts collected by the Russian Technology, Clark University and
Boston University. His particular
fields of emphasis include geography of polar regions and agricultural geography.
d

Arctic Expert
Gets Award

UK Medical

Admission'
Rules Set
Admission standards for UK's
Medical Center have been approved by a faculty committee.
The school will open in 1360.
President Dickey said the standards are similar to those at leading medical schools.
Generally, a liberal arts degree
and.AH academic ta ruling la pre4 medical work of 2.75 based on a
scale will be required.
A University committee on Medical College admissions stated a
fundamental education in physics,
chemistry, biology and Englbh is
essential.

I

J

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

By HERBERT STEELY

Zealand.
Antarctica is a large body of
land covering an area greater than
the U. S. and Europe. Most of this
land is a high plateau covered
by an icecap several thousand feet
thick.
Dr. Shear and his associates
spent 15 months at Gape Hallett
gathering scientific data for the
International Geophysical Year.
The study included a study of the
southern lights, air glow and col- 1
iw - itf ry tYf iys o hrtttf -- - Vio
Ionized layers. These layers consist of charged particles high in
the atmosphere which make long
range radio broadcasts possible.
The group investigated earthquakes and the earth's magnetic
field. They also gathered vital
weather data using surface instruments and sending balloons as
high as 90,000 ft. with weather in-

H

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v

'22,

18

Educational Meeting
Planned For October
"A New Look With Education
And Personnel" will be the theme
5
of the Oct.
meeting of the
KentucKy Association of Counselors and Women Deans at the
24-2-

University.

:

:

Following registration. ' held in
Programs.
conjunction with the 35th UK
According to Mr. C. R. Hager,
Extended Programs, approximately Educational Conference, a dinner
150 inquiries were received, and between 30 and 40 students have enrolled. The course is offered at
oO a.m. Monday - through Friday
over WAVE in Louisville and
WLW-- T
in Cincinnati.
.Any upper classman may receive
three hours credit for the course.
High school seniors with unusually
good backgrounds in mathematics
it
and science may take it as a
The Hilltoppers accompanied by
class."
Joe Posie's band have been signed
Regular enrollment cards are by Student Congress for the Homefilled out for the class and the coming dance. Cost of the two
fee is the same as for a Univer- groups Is $1,750. The dance will
sity course. Lesson plans.' synop- be held Nov. 1, in the SUB ballsis, and instructions are sent to the room.
student.
A representative of the National
After watching the program each Student Association spoke to Stumorning, the student completes dent Congress Monday regarding
the day's lesson and sends it to the the possibilities of membership in
Extension Department. Dr. Lewis the national group.
W. Cochran of the Physics DepartHe stated NSA was formed to
ment grades the lessons and reassist student government, groups
turns them to the student.
The course is being offered na- in solving mutual problems. Over
tionwide in the hope that it will 300 colleges and universities are
members.
raise the caliber of instruction.
Student Congress heard an insurance representative outline possibilities for selecting a plan giving
UK students the best possible accident coverage under existing
conditions.

SC Signs

Hilltoppers
For Dance

non-cred-

Huguelet
To

Numlicr

lXH

Fill

will be held in the SUB for all

visiting deans.
A Blazer Lecture. "Soviet Russia
Revisited." by Arthur May. professor of history at the University

ol

Roclwj4erT

will-concr- ude

trrrj-Fri-

program. Doris B. Sewafd,
dean of women, will be at homo
to the delegates following the lecture.
Miss Elma Taylor, president of
the organization, will preside over
the Saturday morning business
session. Separate meetings of college counselors, headed by Dr.
Jeannette Seudder, dean of women
at the University of Buffalo, and
the high school counselors, headed
by Mrs. Ben Black, dean of girli
at Henry Clay High School, will
begin at 10 a. m.
Dr. Seudder will be the main

luncheon speaker at Jewell Hall.
tour of Holmes Hall will conclude the meeting.
A

Kappa tSig
Pledge Class
Elects Heads
The Kappa Sigma pledge class
Monday night elected the following officers;
Jim Daniels. Kuttawa, president;
Steve Webb, Rlveredge. New Jersey, vice president; Dave Bauer,
Westchester. Ohio, secretary;
Claude Gilbert, Evarts, treasurer.

Vacancy
Guy A. Huguelet Jr., Lexington,
has been appointed to the executive board of the UK Alumni Association to fill the unexpired term
of William Franz of Cincinnati.
The announcement was made
Tuesday by William M. Gant,
Owensboro. president of the association. Huguelet will hold the
position until June 1.
A native of Lexington, he graduated from Bolles Military School,
Jacksonville, Fla., and received a
B. S. in Commerce from the University in 1951.
Huguelet served as a first lieutenant in the U. S. Army infantry
until 1956 and is now associated

:

$i

Iff o

an

LaayM
GUY A. IIUGUELET

investment securities firm.
He is a member of the Phi Delta
Theta fraternity. Junior Chamber
of Commerce. Optombt Club and
the. executive board of the Lexing
ton branch of the American
Cancer Society.

SUB'YMCA Leader ship Committee
Leadership Training program committee has been
The member of the committee are, top, Bob
elected for
Wainscott and Sonny Miniard; bottom, Ann Armstrong and Bob
Chambliss, chairman.
SUB-YMC-

A

1958-5-

9.

day

.

* U--

WVclncstl.iy. Oct. 22. 1058

KFNTrCKY KHUN EL.

THE

Leaders Meeting
Planned A I UK

Shaver To Attend
Educators Meeting

"Community
annual meeting designed to bring
lenders of Kentucky communities
together to swap notes on
and hear the advice
of specialists, will be held Nov. 10
at UK.
Approximately 300 persons from
all over the state are expected to
attend the sessions, according to
Dr. Willis A. Sutton Jr., executive
director of the UK sociology department's Community Service Bureau, which sponsors the project.
The seventh annual session of
the school will feature "courses"
explaining roles of varied organizations in community development,
and an address by Dr. Howard
consultant in community
adult education, University of
Michigan.
Dr. McClusky will speak on "The
Challenge of Community Development."
The piop.rnm will be held at SUH
starting at 9 a.m. (CDT), and
continuing through 4:30 p.m.
I K TrcsiiVnt Frank G. Dickey
has sent letters of invitation to
on'n; unity leaders throughout the
state. Dr. Sutton s.iid. lie added
that all other persons who would
like to attend are urged to come.
The. Bureau of ConxuiuiuLy Scxv.- -.
ire will provide consultation and
other help for communities which
need and seek it following the
meeting, Dr. Sutton said.
In past years, the bureau ,has
worked with a number of cities,
including Somerset. Clinton.
Mt. Sterling.
Paris
School-for-a-D.iy-

of flight
testing,
and
On Friday the group will tour
WADC's materials, propulsion and
aero medical laboratories, nuclear
engineering test facility, hih
temperature fatalities in the Alr- -'
craft Laboratory and USAF Institute of Technology.

at WADC's directorate

Shaver, clem of tlio UK
IiiRinrcrinR Drp.irtmnit. will bo
rniong cnRinccriiiR nnd srioncr
riofr.sors from 20 U. S. colleges
nnd universities to visit the Wright
Air Development Center and the
Air Material Command.
The seventh annual conference
will
representatives
of college
Air
meet at Wright-Patterso- n
Force Base, Ohio, on Oct. 2? and 24.
The conference H to orient key
educators with WADC and AMC
TroRrams and to outline career
opportunities for college graduates
Wright-Patterso- n
?.i
Air Force
Rase and in the federal service.
E.

11.

er

Scientists End
Meeting Here

CLASSiFfEDADS
.

e.

-

t

hit lustry, Engineering
3Ic;t Set For Oct. 30

Blakcman Jewelry
WATCH AND CLOCK

Located At

Kentucky produces more bourunion: This may account for the
abundance of alcoholics.

1km

DAY RENTAL
SERVICE

1

FIRST NIGHTER
FORMAL WEAR AND
ACCESSORIES

Special Group Price;

CAMPUS

REPRESENTATIVE

TEL.

DAVID FREYMAN

f..

7

--

:v

-

fir.
y y &plt

s
m

:

A

-

MOUTHWATERING

BEEF

BARBECUE

Lexington's Largest and Oldest Bank

ANYTIME

surface treatment
in fashion- -

V n!
15S-'"T- l

X

fM

w-.?.--

'S M

FROM . .

5 a. m. - 7 p. m., MOM. . FRI.
7 a. m. - 3p. m., SAT. - SUN.

AMD TRUST COMPANY

17

KX--

VII

I'

BLUE K

FOUR CONVENIENT LOCATIONS

m

h
ffJ vfrv j
m

with corduroy

j

19c

FIRST NATIONAL BANK

Southland

117 S. UPPER

PHILLIP GALL & SON

sity

IT'S SMART TO DO BUSINESS WITH

Chevy Chase

ITIMKM

bon than any other state In the

m-- Special!

from the University and
wants from
industry.

what-theTJnIver-

Downtown

bo
n talic by Dr.

used to illustrate
Douglas W. Schwartz, director of
the Museum of Anthiopology. today at 7:30 p.m. in the museum.
Dr. Schwartz will speak on "Ice
Age Man In America. Kentucky's
Earliest Hunters." This is the first
of a series of papers by various
speakers which will cover the total
range of Kentucky prehistory. The
talk is to be given at the Kentucky
Archaeological Society's first meeting of the season.

K

wants

28

artifacts will

n

BLUE

College Conference will be held
on Oct. 30 in the Guignol Theatre.
The purpose of the conference
is to strengthen further the relations between industry and college
by determining
what industry

Famous Brand Jewelry
Gifts For All Occasions

(

Shep-herdsvill-

The Industry and Engineering

REPAIRING

SOlVa EUCLID, PHONE

udvnt-K-throimhou-

.

--

Palco-India-

."

Mc-C'lus-

Between 300 nnd 400 Kentucky
scientists were on campus Friday
HiRhliRht.s, will be a film, and Saturday for the 44th semi'"tunics Strength" the story of annual meeting of the Kentucky
AMC; a fV5th Fighter Interceptor Academy of Science.
Professors from various colleges
Squadron ' scramble," and a disin the state met with members of
play of the latest 'USAF aircraft
industry to exchange ideas on science nnd read scientific papers.
Dr. A. T. Krebs. head of the
radiology division of the Army
Medical Research Laboratory at
FOR KENT
$r."
per. Fort Knox, addressed the group
furnished cl uplox
iii.il iitiliti"
ittt c;h;,l'
i:iiv tli
Friday evening on '"Newer ConI. IK) Il.ills I.inc
210ct.3t
cepts of Radiation Dangers."
WANTED
The Junior Academy of Science,
JJK.NTK.T)
TUX . Ori. 2. Size 4f- - or 42. composed . if . high,
.school .4
-JJtN 2ti37 or- MW,V
SlOct.St
the state, met SaturFOR SALE
day. The Junior Academy, with a
TAPK HtCOKDFH. "Ktr"" ewe vr.tr
o!l. like new. first $7."i.no bus ft. Ciil membership of over 1.000, is under
22()ct.3t sponsorship of the Academy.
fur-Pi.-h-

Apr Man Will He
Dr. SrlnviirlzH Topic
vv

Vf;

RESTAURANT

Eastland

on So. Lim across from
the Administration Bldg.

1

shipwrecked sailors insist
on Camels than any other
cigarette today. It stands
to reason : the best tobacco
makes the best smoke. The
Camel blend of costly to-

IA

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j

baccos ha

l

that's our
slender tapered

More buxom blondes with

flat with the
triangular toe

.

llj

treatment and
the

never been

r'
ll!

ed

J
A

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5"i

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e

f; r

match!

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eyelets to

equalled for rich flavor and
easygoing mildness. No
wonder Camel is the No. 1
cigarette of all!

ji
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xxi'Ii

fU

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Bei9e. Black,

leave the fads and
fancy stuff to landlubbers...

$7.95

Have a real

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Hit)

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cigarette -have o CAMEL

m..- -

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"How can I be sure
you've got some Camels?"

V

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.

CHOWN

NIOUTI

sons

.

yt'ir

J

(IarperaUd)

138 W. MAIN ST.

OPEN MONDAY NIGHT TILL 9
:

a

1.

RryuoUj Tub C

. WliMlM-Salr-

If 0,

j

I

* Woi Cullura Irks Reds,
Says Mrs. Paul Lilllc

I he WoiM CulVci. r. .!:.!. ..f Or- Women swept the streets, workrd
crews, and h.u-- , Mniati..n of the TY.nh::u' Pio- in construction
vested grain on collective farms,
plans to
pn -- ,., a
she said.
liaison oflire in Fui, France, ;
According to Mrs. Little, any cordiiu to Dr. Lyiu.in V. C'iiiu;r
Russian can have a decent stand- ciran of education.
ard of living today if he is willing
WCOTP's annual assembly of
to work for it. However, in many delegates in
on the
areas the people have to wait in new office to
their
line as long as six to eight hours work with UNESCO and to brine
a day to receive food.
closer cooperation with the United

culture is the mo.st
thing you can say to a
ruian," according to Mrs. Paul
Little. Lexington, who recently
t cured the Soviet Union.
Mrs. Little lectured and .showed
.';des of her trip to a YWCA mas3
r.cmbership meeting last week.
Everywhere she saw evidences
(f a cultural build-uGuides
liom the government-operate- d
Bureau were trained "to
fliow us a beautiful Russia."
Mrs. Little and her husband entered the USSR at Warsaw,
Foland. They were the first American tourists permitted entry to
that country since the Communists
nc

KM

I,

Wulm-Ml.n-

The Littles visited the Ukraine
region where their plane flew only
a few feet above the wheat fields.
She said it seemed as if they were
not even off the ground.
After leaving the Soviet Union,
the Littles landed at Vienna. Although she had seen the best of
took over.
Russian life, Mrs.
reThe exercise of religious free- lieved to be in a Little was
Western nation.
pardom in the lives of
was a joy," she said. "It was as
ticularly impressed Mrs. Little. "It
though you were dropping some
She said. "They got religious lib- heavy cloak."
erty in October, 1956, and worship in the church of their
The UK Infirmary is not
She stated the Polish people
equipped to do brain surgery.
seem to rebel against the Comd
munists through
Although the Psychology De-- I
partment trains rats, it does not
activities.
From Warsaw, they flew to Mos- require them to pass the language
cow, where they visited the Krem- proficiency test.
lin and toured the city.
On viewing the bodies, of Stalin
2iid Lenin. Mrs. Little said, "Mr.
3IOVIE GUIDE
Stalin looked as though he might
to. you, but Mr. Lenin is ASHLAND "Long Hot Summer,"
2:10, 5:45. 9:25.
withered a little."
"Night Passage," 4:05, 7:40.
Everywhere she saw more women
than men. They were never able BEN ALI "Man Of The West,"
to find out where the men were.
U12, 3:19, 5:26, 7:33, 9:40.
the'-peopl-

e."

!lint

1(S

Holdcn

I

'Ihe Aveinlily ururtl the

vhAMn

lirevls.

JjcV
Alci
Hjwkint
Guiftctt
COLOR Jnd SCOPE

Once

frtm

CtntinvMf

2 PM

WED., THURS., Oct. 22, 25

4:56, 7:14, 9:32.

"LONG HOT SUMMER"

HOSPITALIZATION
INCOME PROTECTION
INSURANCE

LIFE

JIM YOUNG
Special Agent

ARCHIE ROBERTS AGENCY
INDIANAPOLIS LIFE INSURANCE CO.
PHONE:
4-96-

Paul Newman,

Joanne Woodward
Also

STRAND "Reluctant Debutante,"

James Stewart, Audie Murphy
In Color

.

t

mT

TONIGHT
Margia
Cesar

ROMERO

"V
and

...

LL

I

VWM;'

r

-

f.

A"

meet the Medic with the
Bedside Manner

in

T
L

DEAN

REX

HARRISON

0

KAY

NOW!

KENDALL

f&

"Rx MURDER"

mnasm

JOHN SAXON

NOW!

The lovin 'INV both in COLOR
both ESCTATIC!
Ingrid Bergman

Cary-Granta-

" J- '

CINfMASCOfI 'METtOCOlOa

-

'

BIG
1

uSftl

m

1

nd

"INDISCREET"
June Allyson and Rossano Brazii

"INTERLUDE"

tmuhT'

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-

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-

--

.

jw"-

-

FAKE HE El
.

YOU HAVE

21

HFATERSr

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Colorscopc

1:00, 3:07, 5:14, 7:21, 9:28.

nnnn

"wW"' -

'Ih-Ca-

ENDS

Brian
KEITH

SKYVUE

"NIGHT PASSAGE"

--

ELECTRIC

LAST TIMES TONITE

LEXINGTON "S winging and
Singing." 7:07, 10:33. '
''Bridge on the River Kwai," 7 : 37r

In Color

tt

I

QUALITY

Because a student is majotini? in
engineering doesn't mean he is
stupid, although he usually is.
Fraternities and sororities are
stalwart defenders of t lie American Way of Life. That's why they
call themselves Greeks.

r

VISION
SCREW

Ir

1

FOR

j

CIRCLE 25 "Villa," 7:00, 10:30.
"Rx Murder," 8:48.
FAMILY "Indiscreet," 7:00, 10:45.
"Interlude," 9:00.
KENTUCKY "Gigi," 12:20, 2:38,

Mh

SEE THIS MAN . .

church-sponsore-

WIDt

'

.

COME NOW TO

.

...

THE
ONLY UNTIL

SECOND FLOOR

November 4

JOURNAL3SM

'"t..X.f

To Have Your

St

..

...

..

v

BUILDING

s3
4

Sitting Fee -- $3.00
Picture Taken
Hours:
For The
9-1-

1959

J'

Kcntuckian

-

'

2;

1:30-- 5

'

Monday - Friday
-

S-

RIVER KWAI"

iiiiiss communications to keep the
public, informed of rvlucatinn.il

Nations and international nongovernmental organizations interested in education.
The Assembly discussed "Public
Support for Education" and recommended that all nations provide

T,-

22.

"BRIDGE ON THE

of

u.-- r

f.

Willm

liquid be uk'umm-vm all counon stale and national ler!s
tries

;

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.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 22
HELD OVER TWO MORE DAYS

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.......i Mimnrt lor rfl:ir.iti..ii

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Rome-decide-

In-tour- ist

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KV KI

World Teadirrs Group
Discusses Public Support

9

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a-

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Don't Be Left Out Of Your Kentuckian

w

* The Kentucky Kernel

a

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Uniwrmty or Ktmlcky

"Tk

At of f.mh 3, 1S79.
Krntmfcy si winiiil
rot Office nt I.rtineton. ilnnnil thr rciruUr M t l.m m.illrr nndrr
k
Tulilisheil lour tiinr a
'.r ixit'i t holiilj)! anj cxm.
MX DOI.LAHS A SCHOOL YKAR
!

Eirtwfd It Ihr

h'l

Jim Hamtton,

Editor-in-Chi-

ef

Lahry Van IIoose, Chief Sports Editor
Chief Netvs Editor
Ann Robehts, Society Ed iter
Norman McMullin, Advertising Manager
Manager
Pbxbt Ashley, Business
Andt

Eprr-B.soN-,

n

John Mitchell, Staff Thotonrapher
Marilyn Lyverj and Judy Pcnncbakcr, Proofreaders

jr
x

..1

Labry Van IIoose, Swrfj Editor

James Nolan, Associate Editor

Xv

hi .

.WEDNESDAY'S NEWS STAFF
Joanie WEISSINGEHEaior

1

1

All Hail The Prefabs
Every year certain editorial subjects crop up in the Kernel's schedule,
some of which we privately refer to
as our "seasonal crusades."
For instance, in the fall one must
criticize the bookstore's outrageous
prices; in the spring, when MkO has
saturated the campus with its malodorous fertilier, we arc beholden to
comment on it. Periodically wc also
drag out the night Grill suggestion
and bat that around in L"0 words or
less.

Leaders among these perennial
gripes are the Social Sciences Building and Chemistry Annex, those two
prefabricated holdovers from the last
Big Fracas. But this year we have decided to praise and promote the merits
of these majestic edifices rather than
heap scorn upon them. Never let it
be said that our editorial pen is
tainted by vitriol; rather, let us evaluate the unseen advantages of these
wooden structures, using the Social
Sciences Building as an example.
Consider, if you will, the microscopic thickness of the classroom
walls. In no other building on campus can one sit in a political science
class and, at the same time, hear the
gist of a sociology lecture taking
place in the next room. Thus the
student gets the benefit of two lectures, absorbs twice as much learning,
and yet is not subjected to the botheration of enrolling in two classes.
Past malcontents have complained
about the impossibility of heating
these classrooms in winter and of
cooling them in summer. Such remarks obviously are made hastily and
without considering one of education's newest concepts, recently bor

rowed from the theatre. Just as actors often go out and
live like a character whom they are
to portray on the boards, so may students project themselves into their
classes. What could be more edifying
than studying the Eskimo in a classroom where the temperature hovers
around frceing? In the spring and
summer terms one can shilt one's
studies to Africa, and the tcmpcra-tuiof the Sudan or the Sahara is
brought right into the classroom. It
adds a touch of realism unobtainable
anywhere else on campus.

Too often we find campus build-ingssadorned with decorative
that their primary purpose-- as
halls of learning seems subservient
to that of aesthetics, which everyone
knows is not utilitarian and won't
"help college graduates increase their
earning power.
One cannot accuse our prefabs of
such luxuries as plush lounges, comfortable chairs or handsomely appointed offices. These are meat-am- i
potatoes, buildings, devoid of such
architectural desserts. If they are
bleak, it is with a purpose; if their
floors sag when walked upon, it is to
demonstrate that the paths of life do
not lead across
carpeting.
We hope the University's new
master plan includes more of these
structures, but in the meantime we
urge everyone to treat those we have
with utmost care. Tread softly down
their creaking hallways;, speak quietly
Vhile inside them; don't slam their
delicately hung doors.
And for heaven's sake watch where
you throw your 'cigarettes.

WASHINGTON

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tween $5,000 and $8,000.
Replying to questions about herself,
Mme. Butrov, an attractive brown-hairewoman, said she has two children and
is the daughter of a professor of ancient

questions

Would you ask if the Russian embassy
invited you in and said fire away?
Housewives here for a woman's con-

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Classrooms Without Frills

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LEWINE

(AP)-W- hat

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About Russian Women
By FRANCES

;! ,A

Sounds From Space
By JOHN BECKLER

the
BARSTOW, Calif. (AP)-- In
Desert
deep silence of the Mojave
the United States is cupping a giant
ear to hear the sounds of the space
age.

The big,

dish-shape-

antenna now,

d

standing in one of the most desolate
sections of the Southern California
desert soon will be able to pick up
satellites as
the "beep" of
far as 400,000 miles away.
By 19G2, say scientists from the
California Institute of Technology
Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, the antenna will be able to
bring in signals as far as four bilman-mad- e

lion miles away.

The laboratory

building the
tracking facility lor the Army, and
is rushing to complete.it in time for
the moon probe attempt the Army is
scheduled to make shortly.
Crews are working day and night
to lit the intricate steel structure together and rig the complicated cir
cuits of its radio receiving and elec
tronic control equipment.
,

is

The antenna

is 85 feet in

diameter

and rises 110 feet above the powdery
dust of a long dry lake bed. Black
lava hills ring the lake bed. As far
as the eye can sec there is not a
green, growing thing.

The site

is

180 miles Trom

Los

Angeles in a corner of Camp Irwin,
the Army's vast training center for
tank units.
The Gold Stone Tracking Facility
is much like a radio telescope. Its
big, curving antenna collects the
radio energy that falls on it from the
skies and focuses it onto a specially
timed antenna that picks out the
desired signal. It is geared to track
a much faster quarry than radio telescopes tuned in to distant stars.
Besides fixing the location of a
satellite, the big ear will pick up the
scientific information sent back by a
satellite. All the information is reduced to a numbered code in a prod
cessing room at the site and
to JPL back in Pasadena to
be added to the growing store of
knowledge about the woild of space.
tcle-txpe-

d

The Readers' Form

ference on housing got that chance and .history.
Leadership Conference
here are some of the questions they . "Certainly smart," one woman commented about Mme. Butrov's gray and To The Editor:
asked:
What do Russian teachers get paid? white print dress. They set out to learn
I noted with interest (the amusing
Do Soviet women diet? How niuch does where she bought it.
kind) the banner story in Tuesday's
"American she's been here two years paper'expounding on the activities
it cost to sit in a box at the Bolshoi
' and wears American clothes," re)orted
Theater?
of Leadership Conference.
back Mrs. Sally Erb of Memphis, Tenn.
Every one of the Si delegates invited
Leadership is an inspiring task
fchowed up, plus a few men representing
"Are the Russians curious alxmt us,
and I can think of no group' that
me uuiiuuig inuusiry which sjonsoreu too?" one woman asked. "Very much,"
Mme.' Butrov assured her, adding "Ameri- .could be more inspirational on the
the housing conference.
subject than the University adminisThings started off witli Mine. Valeri cans are very much resjKxtcd."
tration.
Can a Russian travel about freely?
Butrov, wife of an embassy counselor,
Reading the story I see that Dr.
taking the women on a tour of the Mine. Butrov said she was surprised "you
huge mansion. She told tjiein the house hae the impression we don't have Elton, alter favoring
at the 11)57 conference, now
oiiginally was owned "by a man whose freedom."
Well, said one woman, would it be sa)s "some improvement should be
name )ou all know Pullman."
possible for a Russian woman to pkk forthcoming, within .the iiearfuture."
"He made Pullman cats a millionaire,"
up and leae her' family and attend a Later he admitted a projected change
'
the said.
conference as we are doin"?
coming in the spring of
Then the questions were imited.
"Of course," was the reply.
How nuuh would it cost to sit in a box
The Intel faith Council problem
"Do they diet like we do?"
in the Bolshoi Theater for the ballet?
again heard from Dr. Elton, who said
Mine. Butrov, who is of about medium
$3 fur a front row seat.
About
weight herself, laughingly said "Oh, no, "this change was planned."
How much do teachers get paid? Be
they take it more easy."
Then we go to Dr. Dickey with a
.

--

--

"pre-classilica-tio-

10.

for a church service in
Memorial Hall and he concluded that
"if the Kentucky attorney general
ruled favorably on such a plan, there
would at least be no legal barriers."
Really, now, what a profound conclusion!
Finally, Dean Martin expLrhrtiF
that "tlie faculty is attempting . . ."
I'm elated to read that such academic answers and profound reasoning are heralded by the University
administration at a leadership conference.
The conference may have been a
social success, but seems it came up
with few answers to problcmsund we"
suggestion

question the term "Leadership,

Con-

ference."

Mabe "Conference to Announce
Plans Which Are Planned in the Near
Futuie" would be more appropriate.

(Name Withheld)

* TUT KENTITKY KHRMI, WcLumLm,

PAGING

Hooks Of I K Press
Kcvietceri
or hi wide

Shutter
Talk
lij

'Dharma Bums ' By Jack Kerovac
Gives More On 'Beat Mystique

ARTS

the

Ky HETTY

"The

"A creative photographer

finds
subject determines the essential
quality (mood, texture, and emotion), and then Interprets the
effect of this quality on himself,"
Yoichi Okamoto, chief of visual
materials branch, U.S. Informa-lio- n
Agency, told students of the
Washington Photographic Workshop.
To develop creativity, the photographer should practice looking
at everything as If he were seeing
it for the first time. "Don't shoot
cliches," warned Mr. Okamoto.
"If you've seen it pictured before, don't shoot it."
According to Mr. Okamoto, abstract shapes in the photograph
have two jobs. The first is an emotional relationship. The vertical
line carries the emotional meaning
cf dignity, a horizontal line denotes rcct or quietness. The second
job of the abstract shape is that
of organizing the picture. This is
.een when vertical lines parallel
the sides of the picture, giving it
order.
Eastman Kodak has a new color
film called Kodak Ektacolor Sheet
Film Type S. (Commercial Cam- rra, xNumoer n wnicn oners a
wide choice of color materials for
type of camera and for every
possible contingency.
!

KrnMuo

To Kxclutnue Movies

ANNE C.OSS

Press has its
books reviewed in nearly every
European country. One such book
is "The Verbal Icon" by W. K.
Wimsatt Jr., Associate Professor
of English at Yale University. The
book is composed of studies in the
meaning of poet