xt759z909c1k https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt759z909c1k/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19560224  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 24, 1956 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 24, 1956 1956 2013 true xt759z909c1k section xt759z909c1k 16,859 Students Forecast For 1965
Sixteen thousand right hundrril and
dent at the University of Kentucky in 19f.!

fifty-nin-

stu-

e

This possibility was advanced by the Committer of 15
in a report to the Board of Trustees, and represents the
maximum estimate of this committee after n study by its
members as to what kind of a university Kentucky will

be in 19C5.
However, the minimum estimate of student rnrollment
for 1963 was 10,392, which still represents a fain of some
3,500 students over present figure.
The Committee of 15 Is an advisory board created In

September, 1954 by the Board of Trustees with the Immediate objective of studying UK and its program nnd the
e
goal of finding out what kind of a university
Kentucky will be in 1965. its 100th anniversary.
Dr. Thomas E. Clark, head of the History Department,
serves as chairman of the committee, which also includes
both
Lto M. Chamberlain and Frank D.
Peterson.
The committee also forecast that by I960 I'K would
have a maximum of 10.400 students enrolled and a mini
mum of 8,100. Dr. Robert L. Mills, registrar, predicted

the figure would br somewhere around 9.000.
There are two major rrasoin for the predicted increase
according to the committer. Our is the sharp incrra.r in
the number of children who will reach rollegr ntr in the
lf.GO's and the othrr is that thr quality of public school
programs is definitely improving, thus increasing the proportion of high school graduates going on to collrgr.
Members of thr committer arr now studying thr problems which will arise with thr rxprctrd surgr in enrollment, but thrsr report will not br completed for somr
time.

long-rang-

vice-presiden-

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Vol. XLVII University of Kentucky, Lexington. Ky., Friday. Feb. 21. 1950

Religious Emphasis Week
Begins Sunday, March 4

Concert Series Offers
Mozart Piano Festival

duo-piani-

sts

'Let's Face It'
To Be Local Theme

Take Notice Seniors

Pierre Lubosliutz, Gcnia NemenofF, and Boris Goklovsky
will appear in the Mozart Piano Festival, at 8:15 p.m. Monday,
Feb. 27 in Memorial Coliseum.
The piano festival will use three
pianos and an orchestra in trying
to imitate the conditions of the
small concert halls of Mozart's
time.
Luboshntz and Nemenoff are a
two piano tram recognized in both
Europe and America and have apsoloists with
peared as
Toscaninl. They have also appeared with the Philadelphia, and
Boston orchestras.

Goldovsdy, the conductor, is the
master of ceremonies of the Metropolitan Opera News of the Air and
director of the New. England Opera
Theatre. He is aljso head of the
Opera Department of the Berkshire Music Center.

All seniors and graduate stir
dents who will complete their
requirements at the close of the
second semester are requested to
apply for their degrees on Friday, March 2, or Saturday,
March 3.
Applications should be filed in
Room 16 of the Administration
Building. -

"Let's Face It" will be the theme oF UK. Religious Emphasis
Week From Sunday, March 4, through Thursday March S. The
central event of the week will be the
University
all-camp-

Convocation, 10 a.m., Monday, March 5, in Memorial Coliseum."
Dr. Vin White, pastor of First

Athletic Group Says No
To Student Request

Only 95 Men
UK Fraternities

request to allow married women students to purchase student tickets For athletic events For their husbands who are not
attending UK was denied by the Athletic Association Hoard oF
Directors.
A

Hernandez
To Go On

Active Duty

The request, submitted by SGA
President Don Whitehouse at the
board's meeting Jan. 17, asked that
these wives be allowed the same
privilege as male students who are
able to buy tickets for their wives
'
enabling them to sit in the stu-- ,
dent section at a special rate.
The board, in denying the request, stated that since these married women represented such a
small minority on the campus, it
felt that if they were allowed to
purchase these tickets, a harmful
precedent would be established.
Thus, other minority groups would
feel they were entitled to the same
privilege and apply presure on the
Athletic Board.
The Board, however, emphasized
the matter
that it will
periodically upon request and will
organize committees for further

pledged

9."

men during spring rush week
which ended Tuesday. This is
five more than pledged last
spring.

study of the problem.
Whitehouse also presented a
resolution to the board, in conjunction with the YMCA and
YWCA, asking them to "control,
or at least reduce" drinking at
football games.
President II. L. Donovan, acting:
upon the resolution, appointed a
committee to look into this problem, with Dr. Lyman V. Ginger,
Dean or the Colloge of Adult and
Extension Education, serving as
chairman.

The. number of pledges for this
year is still about 12 per cent lower
than last year. Last year 456 men
pledged compared to 398 this year.
The new pledges are:
Alpha Gamma Rho: Robert
Kemp, Arthur W. Powell.
Alpha Sigma Thi: James J. Jeffries.
Alpha Tau Omega: George
Jordan, George Niehaus, and Tom- Council, composed of twelve demy Marston.
nominational and "Y" student
movements.
(Continued on Page 13)

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To Be Here
For Pi Week

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1868.

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will be George Rank and his or

Pi Week is being sponsored by
the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity in
celebration of their founding on

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chestra and Yvonne Wilson.

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ti

Pat Boone

Dr. Juan Ei Hernandez, associate proFessor oF Romance
Languages, will go on active
duty on March 1 with the Air
Force ROTC unit at UK. Dr.
Hernandez who is a colonel in Pat Boone, well known
star, will be at UK for an all
the Air Force Reserve' will be
campus dance during Pi Week
For two weeks.
on active duty
Featured with Boone at the dance

During his tour of duty, Col.
Hernandez will familiarize himself
with eery phase of the reserve
program, and he will also teach
classes in air science.
The Air Force reserve program
Is nationwide, and every officer
lias an assigned place to go in the
event of mobilization. Col. Hernandez will serve two weeks a year
actually doing thr duties that
would br required of him in an
emergency.
Dr. Hernandez was appointed as
language instructor at UK in 1936.
In 1941, he entered the military
service. He spent nearly five years
as an instructor in Spanish, Portuguese, and Russian at the United
States Military Academy at West
Point.
He was released from the Air
Force in 1948 with the rank of
lieutenant-colone- l,
taught for three
years at UK, and was recalled to
active duty in 1951. '

Presbyterian Church in Lincoln,
Neb., is to be the speaker for the
convocation.
Other events of thr wrrk will
includr thr appearance of speakers
in classroom, seminars, fraternities and sororities, dormitories, and
denominational meetings.
Steering the week's event is
Patsy Beard. Betty Capehart, Joanna McFJroy, Bill Golton. Don
Clark, and Tom Pruett. Serving as
special committe heads are Nina
Vann. worship: Lois Allen, follow
up: Dr. Merle Carter, faculty; Tom
Parker, seminars; Sue Maggard
and Barkley Beard, organized
houses; Connie Goldberg, clubs and
organizations; Tom Swetnam, publicity; Jack Deacon, assemblies;
Gene Heupel, booksales; and Geno
Cravens, classroom assignments.
Religious
Emphasis Week Is
sponsored by thr Inter-Fait- li

Frats Pledge

By MARNEY BEARD

M

No. 16

J

1

Other events for the

week will be a pie eating contest
and a freshman quern contest.
The dance will br from 8 p.m. to
11 a.m., Friday, March 2, in thr
Student I'niun Ballroom. It is to

(cocktail dresses
for girls and dress suits for boys)
with tickets priced at $3.25 in advance and $3.75 at thr door.
be

semi-form-

al

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HL'

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In an advertisement on page
J

3

Kernel, wr erroneously ran thr date of the
"Pi Week All Campus Dance"
as being March 12. The correct-datfor thr dance is March 2.
of last week's

(Continued on Page

5)

The Very Best
It'll be a long while before the UK campus will

e

wit- -

of a more charming .Kentuckian
Queen with such an outstanding- court. Booker An- drews, thr 1956 ''Queen of Queens" Is seen sur- rounded by UK beauties (1. to r.) Vivian Long,
ness

thr crowning

-

Silvia Jett. Ann Smith. Jane Thornburr. Norma
Jean Brandenburg and Mania Wilder. The queen
-

and her court were presented Saturday night at
thr annual Kentuckian Dancr, jointly sponsored by
Lamp and C ross and thr Kentuckian.

* 2

THK KENTUCKY KERNEL. Friday. Feb. 21.

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Ballroom

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GEORGE
RANK

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With

$'',

YVONNE
WILSON

And His Orchestra

PI

Al

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PI WEEK

MENU:

U

Pic Eating Contest

Trophies Will Be
Presented To
Winners At Dance

SEMI

I

FORMAL

S. U. B.

Thursday, March 1,
4:00 p.m.
Intramural Field

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SELECTED BY BING CROSBY
CROWNED AT DANCE

Advance
Tickets
Now On Sale
$3.25 Per
Couple
Tickets On Sale
In SUB

March

Serenades
All Week

V

1

and 2

* Till: KKNTt'CKV KKUNKI.. Friday.

YMCA Offers

ormer Kernel
Job Opportunities Staffer Named
Positions for colleee students ns
summer counselors are now
Position
able, the YMCA has announced. To A

UK Officials Organist To Gir
Senior Keeital

Heard On

avail-

Men who are skilled in arts and
crafts, tennis, woodcraft, athletics,
riding, business and canoeing are
especially needed.
The camps last from 8 to 10
weeks. Saljries range from $100
to $300 plus food and lodeinir. In
these camps there is opportunity
lor study as well as work.
A few of the camps are Camp
LonfTiew, Longriew, Wash; Camp
Crosley, Munrir, Ind.; Camp
near Louisville; Camp Sequoyah, Wearerville, N. C; Camp
Graylock, Berket, Mass., and Blue
Rldfe Assembly, Blue Ridfe, N. C.
Some of these camps are connected
with the YMCA; some are not.

Frank Borries, former managing

editor of the Kernel, has been appointed agricultural extension editor at the College of Agriculture
nd Hone Economics by the Board
of Trustees. He will assume duties
on April 1.
Borries is associate editor of the
Agricultural Extension Service of
the University of Florida at
Gainesville. Until last May, Borries was the farm editor of the
Lexington Herald, and before that
he was the tobacco market reporter for the Lexington Leader.
He has also worked for Ohio and
North Carolina newspapers. Borries graduated from the UK
Anyone interested in counseling School of Journalism In 1936.
during the months of June, July
The new editor replaces C. A.
and August should call the YMCA Lewis who is retiring after 32 years
Employment Office.
as extension editor.

Radiocasts
The Ashland and Standard Oil
Companies have sponsored talks
given by UK officials between
halves of the Kentucky basketball
games.

These speeches, heard over stations WLAP and WVLK, cover
various aspects of the University
with emphasis placed on the individual colleges.
Speakers heard over the Ashland Oil Station. WLAP, were L.
L. Maratin, Oeorgia Tech; Elvis J.
Stahr, Tulane; Frank G. Dickey,
Louisiana State; Frank J. Welch,
Duke; Herman E. Spivey, Mississippi; Earl P. Slone, Mississippi
State; and Elvin J. Stahr, Vander-bil- t.
Robert L. Mills will speak
during the Tennessee game.
The Standard Oil speakers heard
Mother Nature takes care of her
No man can pun the wool over a
foolish sons by providing wives to woman's eyes without using a over station WVLK were Sarah B.
Holmes, Georgia Tech; Frank G.
watch over them.
mighty good yarn.
Dickey. Tulane; Elvis J. Stahr,
Louisiana State; Cecil C. Carpenter, Duke; M. M. White. Mississippi; Lyman Ginger, Mississippi
State; and D. V. Terrell. Vander-bil- t.
Frank D. Peterson will be the
speaker at the Tennessee game.
Chevy-Chas- e
Ashland
Peo-min-

ro

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Shopping Center

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Studies at Indiana University
indicate
that some accidents
"around jet planes are caused by
workers being stunned by the

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Any question seuied by rorce
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Geographic center of the United
States is in Smith County. Kansas.

55

Your
CAPEZIO HEADQUARTEug

21.

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owers

The UK Music Deportment will
present Charlotte Sidney Lambert,
organist, in her senior recital. Friday. Fib. 24. in Memorial Hall at
8pm.
Miss Lambert, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Charles Lambert of
Louisville, will receive a Hachelor
of Art Degree In Music in June.
She is president of Phi Beta, president and choir director of Wesley
Foundation, and a member of University Choristers. Mortar Board,
and the Women's Administrative
Council-

rh.

FOR

ALL

OCCASIONS
Colt us
we can expertly
fill your needs for that special message.

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Miss Lambert will play a chorale '
variation on "As Jesus Stood Be- side the Crass" by Scheldt, two:
Chorale Preludes by Bach. "So- nata No. Ill" by Hindenmith. and
"Chorale in E Major" by Franck.
j

Michler Florist

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417 East Maxwell
Phone

3-09-

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(Author of 'Dartfoot

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Wtth Ck$k," tte.)

FAMOUS LAW CxSES: NO. 1 GRANSMIRE
vs. MIDDLE ATLANTIC BUS AND DRAY CO.
Gransmire, the plaintiff in this celebrated case, lived with his
'daughter Ernest and a canary named Whirlaway on Kim Street
in Cooch,' Delaware. The Middle Atlantic Bus and Dray Co.
started operating a bus line on Elm Street. The passing buses
causer! a
chandelier in the Gransmires living room
to begin tinkling. The chandelier tinkled in the key of
This so unnerved the canary, Whirlaway, whose key was
that the poor bird moulted out of season, caught a chill,
and died untimely.
Ernest, Gransmire's daughter, was herself so unsettled by
the death of the canary that she flunked her final exams at the
Boar's Head Beauty and Barber College, where she had been a
promising student, majoring in bangs. Now removed, willy-nillfrom the skilled labor market, Ernest found work carrying a sandwich sign for the old Vienna Chow Mein parlor.
cut-gla-

ss

E-fl-

at.

rp,

y,

A (DC

AO
named"' Crunch Sigafoos. Although
Crunch was not especially attractive he had, for one thing, a
large bushy tail he was always clean and neat and kept his

Here she met a

bus-bo- y

shoes shined, and after a decent interval, he and Ernest were

married.

Ernest

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soon learned that Crunch's large bushy tail was not
as anomalous as she had supposed: Crunch was a werewolf.
After a while Ernest got sick of staying homo at night while
her husband went prowling about, so she asked him to change
her into a werewolf too, which he did with an ancient Transyl-vania- n
incantation. Then, together, the two of them would
lope out each night and meet a lot of other werewolves and
maybe kill a few chickens or hear some book reports or just
lay around and shoot the breeze.
Meanwhile, Ernest and Crunch's landlady, a miser named
Mrs. Augenblick, noticed that Ernest and Crunch never used
their room at night, so she, in her greed, started renting it to
transients. One night a Mr. Ffolliett stayed there. In the morning while brushing his hair, he took a bottle that looked like
hair tonic out of. the cabinet, poured some, and rubbed it
vigorously into his scalp. Unfortunately, it was not hair tonic,
but a bottle of glue which Ernest had bought to mend a model
airplane that Crunch had given her for their paper wedding

anniversary.
As a result of Mr. Ffolliett's grisly error, he was unable
to remove his hat and was, therefore, barred from his usual
occupation which was lecturing to women's clubs. He sued Mrs.
Augenblick, who sued Ernest, who went to her father, who sued
the Middle Atlantic Bus and Dray Co. who had started the whole
horrid chain of events.

"Ladies and gentlemen,' said the defense attorney in his
opening address, "this case, though very ramified, is covered
by law. Indeed, every facet of life is covered by law. Law
governs the homes you live in, the cars you drive, the food you
eat. Even the cigarette you smoke is. strictly regulated. The
gentleness, however, is Phijip Morris's own idea. Out of their
vast experience as tobacco people, out of. their profound regard
for the astuteness of your palate, the makers of Philip Morris
have evolved a gentle, new cigarette, with a taste as mild as a
May morn, as subtle as gossamer, as welcome as money from
home. I thank you."
Whereupon everybody rushed to the tobacco counter to buy
bright red, white and gold packs of Philip Morris and were all
rendered so amiable after a few gentle puffs that the whlj
complicated case was dropped. This later became known as the
Delaware Water Gap.
yt
cyt
If'e, the maker$ of Philip Morris, $pomor$ of lhi$ column, rett our
fa$e on our itete, gentle cigarette in our nrr, tmart pack.

* THE KFNTITrKV

4

KFWpi..

via.
7rk

VlClG

Wear dresses and skirts, girls.
This is not advice from a spinster aunt,
but a current University ruling on the attire
of females in UK sororities and residence
halls. It is even more ridiculous than it
sounds.
According to the ruling handed down over
a week ago, UK coeds are considered "improperly dressed" if they show up in their
living quarters in less than dresses or skirts
and sweaters.
This appears to be the ultimate in
A girl in the year 1936 is
by no means considered undressed or "improper" in bluejeans, bermudas, or shorts.
These items of attire arc ino secret; certainly
they are not obscene.
Supposedly the rule was handed down
because the residents of Keeneland Hall( and
other UK coeds) had been seen eating their
lunches in the Student Union in clothes
"not becoming a lady."
It is doubtful whether or not skirts and
sweaters or dresses constitute a lady. It is
also highly doubtful as to whether the
"townspeople" were shocked to see UK
dasmels eating at the SUB and Grill in bermudas ancl other such modern attire.
The rule not only affect the dress of girls
eating in the cafeteria but also the attire in
general of all females living in UK residence
and sorority houses. No longer is it permiss-abl- e
for a coed to do her homework in her
own sorority house in clothes less than a
narrow-m-

indedness.

r.v

msg

o

lITTtt MAN ON CAMPUS

by

Dick Bibler

4

riy

not
skirt and sweater or a dress. A girl
come "downstairs" unless she is attired, in a
fashion, for what would ordinarily constitute
a normal dating attire.
It is to be admired when the University of
Kentucky tries to cultivate "ladylike" attributes. This is beyond question. But when
the University dictates puritanical clothing
for everyday living that's going too far.
Any coed on any campus should have the
right to wear informal clothing to study or
to eat in. She should not be subject to
archaic rules concerning her apparel at such
times.
Scores of UK females have protested
against this latest ruling. They believe that
they arc being neither "improper" nor immodest in wearing informal clothes within
the confines of their particular living quarters. They believe it is idiotic to wear a
dress before they may eat their Saturday
lunches, study in their living rooms, or greet
guests.
Most of the campus feels the same way.
If it is deemed inadvisable to dress informally in the Grill or SUB, one rule should
cover the one situation. Surely the entire
group of coeds should, not be subjected to
a rule covering one fault.
Reports state that the skirts and dresses
attire ruling will be appealed. This is only
logical. It is also only logical to assume that
UK will realize that a girl is no less a lady
for wearing less than a dress in her place of

residence.

Criticised
Now the matter is stalemated. M&O has
Last Jail several fraternities had equipment stolen at the Lance's Carnival. Four absolutely refused to pay any part of the
months have now passed, and still no one loss, and Lances does not feel wholly rehas accepted the responsibility for the loss. sponsible.
The fraternities claim Lances was responsi- Lances cannot be expected to assume the
1
11
l
.i
Men
ii t
Die, i.ances places me uiame on mxkj, anu
entire burden. Actually the fraternities,
M&O says it wasn't their fault.
Lances, and M&O were all negligent. The
Lances gave M&O a work order. In the fraternities should have taken the more
order Lances specified that M&O should provaluable equipment home the night of the
vide police protection for the carnival and Carnival. Lances should have checked with
close the gates to the stadium at 6 p.m.
M&O about the police protection and the
After the theft Maintenance and Operagates, and M&O should have certainly cartions interpreted police protection to mean ried out the work order given them. Lances
only direction of traffic, not guarding the paid M&O over $300 for equipment and
booths. M&O said they couldn't close the labor used on the Carnival. Lances did not
gates because cars were parked under the s get the services they paid for.
stadium. Lances had told the fraternities
Perhaps M&O is not legally responsible
and sororities that must clear their autofor the theft, but they do have a moral oblimobiles out of the area by 6 p.m. or have
gation. The work order might have been
them locked in for the night. M&O's excuse
worded rather loosely, but nevertheless M&O
is extremely flimsy.
knew as well as Lances what the order
Lances has tried to find a reasonable solumeant. A university is supposed to give stution to the problem. They asked the city
dents ethical training. If the school cannot
police to look for the stolen equipment, and
moral standards they have set,
thev have met numerous times with Vice- - abide by the
what can they expect of the students?
President Peterson and Mr. Farris of M&O.

i ONe Nice

THING AfOUTTrllSCOURSE-YO- U

ONLY HAVE ONE

WTO

W

Last Of Stylus
The Kernel has been rather harsh with Stylus tin's year.
UK's literary magazine has been denounced as "obscene, profane, and poorly written". As to be expected half the students
bravely cheered the Kernel, and the other half bitterly deprejudiced, bigoted, and
nounced the Kernel as
generally thick between the ears. Of course criticism of this sort
is the standard defense used by wounded "intellectuals'' so the
KerneJ's feelings weren't severely damaged.
The Kernel condemned Stylus half seriously and half in fun.
The Kernel does not claim to be highly intellectual, but neither
does it belong to the rock and roll, motorcycle boots sctr Its
position 'is somewhere in the great middle class. Consequently
the Kernel believes several of the selections in last fall's Stylus
used profanity indiscrimately.
The Kernel isn't so prudish as to advocate purging all profane passages from literature, but it does believe a writer
should use some discretion. Profanity and sex should Ik used
only when it is directly connected with the action of the story.
Some of the Stylus contributors seemed to be merely showing
"intellectual freedom".
off their
Asone dear old lady said, "Why do people write about dirty
things when there are so many beautiful things in life?" Only
another dear old lady could agree completely with her, but
even Stylus must admit she does have a point.
Basically Stlus is a good magazine. It is a sounding loard
for students with literary aspirations. UK needs a literary magazine. After all a university is supposed to promote intellectual
achievement and expression. And it is not unusual for the
writing in college magazines to be rather abstract. Quite often
intellectual college students revel in exotic and bizarre literawriting is part of literature and should be pubture. Off-belished. A subsidized college magazine is about the only place
it can see the light of day.
However, Stylus went a little too far last fall. This is not a
condemnation of Stylus in general, but rather of a specific issue.
the thought-mak- es
Everyone has his faults. Even the Kernel-peri- sh
non-intellectu-

new-foun-

d

at

mistakes.

Short Shift

SIMILE OF THE WEEK: "as faded out
Florida sun tans."
as one of those mid-term

Quoted from the University of Louisville
"Cardinal," (and this ought to make UK students feel good: "OVERHEARD IN THE
(University of Louisville) SUB any two UK
students make more noise than the entire
U of L cheering section."
Definition of a term paper: an assignment
given by an inferior professor who is afraid
his course will not seem difficult enough
without one.

The UK Grill is a meeting place of two
types of people: those who have already
made their grades and those who don't intend to make them.
A

moron is the
who refuse to register to vote because
twentieth-centur-

y

ld

he believes his vote "won't amount to
thing anyway."

any-

The Kentucky Kernel
University of Kentucky
Entered at the Fost Office at Lexington. Kentucky, as
second class matter under the Act of March 3, 1879
Published weekly during school except holiday
and exams
$1.00 per semester
SUBSCRIPTION RATES

SGA has requested the Athletic Board to investigate exces-

sive student drinking at football games. It's highly probable
that SGA is building a mountain out of a molehill. Naturally
some students make fools out of themselves at the games, but
certainly the majority of the students are well behaved. The
drinking problem doesn't warrant the hue and cry SGA is raising. If anything it will create a bad impression with the Athletic
Board where one is not justified.

-

Jim Crawford
Bill Billiter
Ray Hornback
Yvonne Eaton
Tommy Preston
EEls Easterly
Christie Vandergrift
John Mitchell
Bill JIughes

Editor
Associate Editor
Managing Editor
News Editor
Sports Editor
Feature Editor
Society Editor
Photographer
Cartoonist

Sports Writers
Bill Henry, Robert White, Bo Griffin, Murney Beard
Kernel Reporters
Peggy Joyce Adams, Marvin D. Beard, Elizabeth
Chang. Paul Clay Daniel, Prances G. Edney, Robert T.
Endicott, Orpha Gosser, Lowell B. Griffin. Grayson
Harriet Hatchell. Martha Kuebler. Dayton Matllck,
George M. Mayerchak. Philip Mclntoth, John R. Mitchell.
Ann Mooarvfa. Mulra Quinn, Virginia Snodgrass. David
Walter S wet nam. Jerry Vance,
Stewart. John
Donald A. Wallace. Robert White. Thomas White, and
Nancy Wilder.
Ham-bric-

SU-acha-

The Athletic Board has refused to sell low priced tickets in
the student section to husbands of student wives. The Board
.said it would set a bad precedence. According to the Board
other small minorities would demand cheap tickets. It's hard
to follow the logic of the Board. It seems discrimatory to allow
wives of students in at low prices and not husbands of students.
Isn't it funny that the confirmed
guy knows he is hated by women?

woman-hate- r

is always the

k.

The slide rule is indeed a magical instrument. A recent
port states that "engineers make the best husbands."

re-

* THK KENTUCKY KERNEI- - Friday. Ftb. 21. 19.16

5

The Workshop

Old Proprietor Answers
Personal Problem Mail
By KAY IIORN'n ACK

Each day the Kernel receives
Quite a variety of mail. Much of
It consists of hr.ndouts. pre.ss re- leases and bits of propaganda
which are deposited In the trash
can.
Occasionally v.e receive a letter
of praise, and quite often poison
pen letters rind their way to us.
But recently we have been flooded
with a deluge of personal problem
letters. Some cf them are sad.
some amusing. We'll pass along a
few of them to you here and try
to help the poor souls who seek
aid by giving them what meager
advice we can drum up.
Here's a rather ticklish one we

received
cently

re-

:

Dear Editors.
I hare a
problem. I have
been dating; a

for

boy

0

--

weeks. He now

wants

to nin
But I'm
afraid when he
does he v'll

AV

1

discover me
real me.

What shall I do?
Clarissa Catcall
Clarissa . . . the Itcst advice ice
..
a
II I.I
Tit
is a. (nunc an ohi stn inii
i

7...rU

i.v

iti-s-

policy."

""lfJr1
...v.,.

.

v...

game, I have not been able to
.

Dear Editors.

the

com- -

A,""1;

gestions in regard to what songs
sing?
Brett Birdtone
fircM . . . Yours is truly a worth'

r,J' chest t the replica of an
American beauty rose. Do you
think this proper?
Andorra Agony
Sncor.j . . . In
m world

while project. We suggest you offer
either "Surgery with the Fringe on
Top" fnmi "Medic," or ' Ouch" from
the Bnxulwatj hit "Cat on a Hot
LITTLE

MAN ON CAMPUS

V

i

r

'

the-imn-

udau, ue feel lh,l such

a tutToo1

unquestioned in society. And
wed help in cultivating your

(.,

go

rose

...

panic., please lei us know.

if ,,

j

Y-

'

Dear Editors.
I'm glad the UK campus has
finally come up with a humor
maeazine. Such a publication has
been sorely needed for many years

i

"A

I

Cutie Pics

Candidates for the first Pi Week Queen contest.
Barbara Coffman. KKG; Joan Pittrlko. KD; Yrra
to be held March 2, are: First row, L. to R., Mar- Dean Scott, Hamilton House; Mary Ruth Warner,
.
While you , not jorif. Lawson. KAT; Thyliss Jones. ADP; Madolyn
Dillard House: Joan Reid. I.ydia Brown: Sally Ely.
have a problem, tie feel justified in Gordon. DDD; Edythe Sims. Tatt Hall: Nyla Ilar- Boyd Hall: Joan Hazel wood. ACI); and Dfloret
runuinp your letter in that you have p(.r. AZD; Sue Iledgrr. ZTA; and Judy Ruffner.
Cohen, PSS.
solved a problem uilh
ur XO. Back row, L. to R., are: Jackie Elswick. DZ;
have been toyinp for months. And
that i'a- classifying Stylus. You're
ripht-- it
h a worthy humor mapa- - of some Mft , wouI(J Ikf t bf
queen, but there seems to be no
contest for graduate students,
Friitnrc
j was recently married. My wife What should I do?
Eartha Downta
ancj j are planning to live in a
Eartlia , . . Just tcait around. A
house trailer when we graduate
J,w.J
J
Q
IHIIIISI ...Jlf
Jllll
n.r1
tili III IfHI.
tf c jjiaii w nam aiuunu iUa TT .u. f unit omi Cf,m'
i
By JANE SUTHERLAND
take your ideas and principal
''t' .'s' "f"
f""'''
Would you advise such a move?
from the crowd, unless these things
Do you want to live happily?
, tentucKian
nieen tne uueen ot
About 60 members of the Eng- run In line with truth.
e admire your act- - Queens." But it seems other proup.s lish Club
bap . . .
and their guests heard
"Oct along on your own rertnturwmc spirit. But ue must Jvill
tirc of mmiu, a 7
Chaucer's formula for happiness sources. It's nobody's duty to livo
,.
you nt a rnimle ice once lnctc
uam
,tnrt rim h ,J
..
J
.
- found in his poem, "Truth," as it in poverty, but don't consider
'
It no 1;rrti in a hnncn irauir and freshman tmren trill he nmnrtl Ami was interpreted
by Dr. Hardin wealth as an end in itself. Over- drove each other crazy.
if other -- roups realize that all you Craig, noted Shakespearean
au- whelming ambition is not good.
thority, at a recent meeting held however, for it causes you to inLU1J, mi u i 3('j'M('r'ff"t
Editors.
m.
fringe 'on' the rights of othersr
at McVey Hall.
;
I am a graduate student in .' r , i U Ml ui IKl'l
1 ((
.
U lint
ill
Craijr, a
Owensboro,
"If you take it on yourself to ad
lfl.f. r;.a It faculty pointed out native ofpeople
r
nome uunomick.
i ;r fl graduate uueen,
of the vise others, you must be sure that
that the
the University for five years and uuccn a (,ueen of secretaries
exlife in much your
have just finished my thesis on ((UVCn af ousemothers and a queen Middle Ages looked atwe do today. ample.own living follows this criSimilarly, If you are
the same way that
"Twenty Methods of Tossing a
tj,osc tint acceptable for other
Their civilization, too, was a pre- tical of others. Judge yourself by
Salad." But I have a problem. amtcsts Coo luck Eartlui!
cocious one with Its aggregate the same standards and see how
my girl friends are queens
Most of
knowledge of the ages, and they, you measure up.
too, felt the need of a quiet ra"Don't be so selfish as to thinlc
the world was made for you. Don't
tional doctrine for living.
Dick Bibter
by
Craig's interpretation of Chau-er'- s try to own the world, either, for
poem in plain, everyday Eng- this ambition will only bring you
grief.
lish is as follows:
"Discover what your talents are.
"Serve God, and pray for yourird do something with them. Timv self, of course, but also pray for
To keep alive a long .strinsr of has no importance on
earth ex-- : others.
.Ijshtening articles. Barf will
ept as u