xt75dv1cnb2d https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt75dv1cnb2d/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19620329  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 29, 1962 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 29, 1962 1962 2015 true xt75dv1cnb2d section xt75dv1cnb2d Editor Discusses

Today's Weather:
Cloudy, Windy, Warm;
High 70

Boxing Incident;
See Page Four
V
Vr;l. LI II, No. 89

PW

nivertity of Kentucky

LEXINGTON,

...

.

MARCH 29, 1962

Eight Page!

Court Ruling May Affect
Legislative Apportionment

tew

..

KY., THURSDAY,

e
by the U. S. Su- - before Kennedy began his
Court may cause rural PaiBn 'or the presidency.
The case was before the courts
areas to lose some of their
representation in state senates. in December, 1959.
Such a ruling by the Supreme
In a six to two decision, the Sucourt could be justified on the
preme Court rules that lower fedgrounds that legislative apporeral courts now can decide wheth-

A ruling

er city voters are being discnmi-'nate- d
against in representation in
state legislative seats.

'T

..as.;:

JU.

V

V
0- - v

iiV

LA

K.

N

Dr. Roy More-land- ,
left, professor of law, watches Gov. Bert Combs
sign a legislative measure which he did research for while State
Richard L. Frymlre, right, looks on. Frymire sponsored the
Rep.
measure establishing and defining the crimes of involuntary
manslaughter in the first degree and in the second degree, and
specifying the penalities.

Prof Does Research
For Legislative Change

Research by Dr. Roy Moreland, professor of law, aided in the
recent revision of Kentucky's involuntary manslaughter laws.
Dr. Moreland said the purpose of the new bill "turns negligent
offenses to involuntary manslaughter in the first degree."
At the present time, negligent killings are punishable as voluntary
manslaughter. Dr. Moreland said this concept is unrealistic because
"manslaughter is not voluntary."
Gov. Bert Combs signed the bill on Monday. The final measure
is the result of three years of research.
When asked his reaction. Dr. Moreland said, "You bet I was
happy. Legislation is very difficult."
A revised criminal code of practice, the first revision in one
hundred years, was also adopted.

Historical Hallmark

tionment

which tends to favor

rural areas has failed to keep
pace with the population swing

from farm to city areas.
Prof. Reeves said yesterday that
although Kentucky is still only 40
percent urban, the state definitely
is growing in its urban population.
There is a difference, he explained, between the rural vote and the
farm vote. Today many large companies are locating plants in rural
areas to avoid high taxes in the
Concerning the argument that cities.
such a ruling would infringe upon
He explained this as one of the
states' rights, Mr. John E. Reeves, reasons for the
great suburban
assistant professor of political scipopulation we have today. The
ence, said:
The ruling grew out of a Tennessee reapportionment
suit in
which a district court dismissed
the case saying it had no jurisdiction.
Although the ruling applies to a
particular case in Tennessee, it
can be applied to Kentucky and
most other states in the country.

"I don't hold the position that
states' rights should be able to
prevent good services from reach
ing the people."
He continued by sa
the states certainly
ritiht to act. but Ten nessee fail- ed to do this in its reapportionment.

S

rural

vote will tend to

non-far-

be the same as

the urban vote.
the Department of

At present
Agriculture expenditure is second
only to expenditures for defense.
Although the farming population,
is certainly becoming smaller and
smaller each year. Prof. Reeves
said he doesn't expect the relative
position of the agriculture expenditure to change.
"After all the farmer has to have
protection also.'
However, the political scientist
said, the court decision does leave
some of the questions unsolved.
Among the problems he cited
were how and where the popula
tion line will be drawn so as to fa- rilitflfp rpHitripfincr nf rpnmctinti.
'
tion line will be drawn so as to fa
equal representation to geographic areas, and will the states be
compelled to redistrict every 10
years as is now common.

Debate Team Students
Enter Speech Tourney
A.

The University debate team and 10 .speech students will
participate in the annual Kentucky Intercollegiate Speech
any Tournament this weekend at Moreheail State College.

Prof. Reeves discounted
skepticism concerning the application of power politics to this
court decision. He referred to the
idea that the deci.sion might be an
outgrowth of the recent Urban Af- fairs Bill which failed to pass Con- gress.
He pointed out that the Tcnnes- see case was on its way to court

Two teams

will debate in the events are James Stephens.
Those on the varsity fort after c!lUner speakir.a: Marv
are t't'uye cnoate. iiernaon, ana Warner Ford and Robert Dietz,
Warren Scoville, London, affirma- - Lexington, oratory,
tive: Paul ChellBren. Ashland, and
Ju.uuta CalT u.iiW.le and
Deno Curris. Lexington, negative.
MonUcello. are
Wayhu,d
The novice debaters are Alvin entered in oral interpietation.
P'k. Louisville, and Phil Grogau, Those participating in discussion
Bowling Green, affirmative; Rich- - are Robert Halihill. Richard Ram- ard Ford. Owensboro, and Donald ey, a n James Scott, allof Lex- Clapp, Lexington, negative.
ington: James Stephens, FrankA public speaking session will fort, and Arnold Taylor, Covington.
be included in the events for the
The group will be accompanied
first time this year. This session by Dr. Gifford Blyton. Dr. J. W.
is sponsored by the Ashland Oil
Patterson, Dr. James Sterrett, and
Company. It requires that the Miss Chloe Beaird.
entrant analyze a public address.
Those entered in this event are
and
Amnon Golan, Lexington,
Sports Bulletin
office he had a keg of gun powgentleman for his abundant enArnold Taylor, Covington. They
Catcher Allen Feldhaus was
thusiasm.
der. A path of gun powder led
represent the Student Forum
from the keg to his desk. On the which marks the first tune forum namt.(1 ytjstt,r(lay captain of
Cassius, a distant cousin of Hen..: .
desk was a lighted candle.
e Wildcat baseball team.
members have been entered in
ry Clay, was born six miles from
Cash was also quite a lover. Re- - this type of competition as repre- the Kentucky River in 1810. He
Thirdbaseinan
Ray Ruehl
was bom at white Hall, the home turning from St. Petersburg (he sentatives of the University.
was named alternate captain.
built by his father, Green Clay.
Those entered
in the other
Continued on Page S
young boy Cash rarely

j

Cassius Clay, Politician, Fighter,
Called The 'Lion Of White Hall'
By STEPHEN PALMER
Kernel Staff Writer

The sleepy South is noted for
colorful politicians and Ken- tucky's most prominent histor- ical hallmark is Cassius Mar- cellus Clay, who historians af- fectionately call the "Lion of company of a young lady.
White Hall."
In a new book by David Smiley
The biography of Cash Clay on Clay's life there is this report of
a fight with a man named Brown:
reads like a novel which carries
"Cassius drew his bowie knife.
At the same time someone in the
rrowd handed Brown a pistol.
Without hesitating Cassius
charged at his opponent. Brown
held his fire until Clay was almost upon him.
"At point-blan- k
range he fired,
and then Cassius closed in, hackand stabbing Brown's unproing
tected face and head. He 'cut away
in pood earnest' until the men in
the crowd could separate them
again.
his right eye; his
"Brown lo.-t
left ear and a piece of his skull
were 'lopped off;' and his blood
.streamed copiously down his face
from a nose 'cleft in twain.' Senseless, Brown sunk to the earth."
CASSIUS CLAY
Another time Cassius was threata rather obscure headstrong man ened with a fig'.it when he was
from
Madison
County,
Ky. printing his newspaper, "The True
through the stormy Civil War American." Clay was an emancipationist in the South. Fearing his
era.
flo.t Via, nin.iv rQllinos nnll newspaper would be destroyed, he
made plans'
tlcian. diplomat,
fighter, lover,
In one corner of his newspaper
orator, Journalist, and cultured

ff iff !
iavy Hand

These Herald. Trumpeters will present the opening
fanfare when the I'nited States Navy Band ap- pears at the Memorial Coliseum on April 15, Palm
Sunday. The Kentucky Kernel and the Lexington
Ilerakl-Leader
are cosponsuring the concert. ThW

To Way

if
llvrv

iil

year the band Is presenting its "swingplionette"
section hit h renders new interpretations of light
opera as well as swing numbers. This will be the
only appearance the Navy Band will make in
Lexington this year.

* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Mardi 20,

12

Club
New Faculty-Staf- f
Air
IP
umy juaciis si ktoij course
1

A

ynr

--

home of the
It also boasts a
organization.
dining room, a ball room, a
game room in the basement, and
picnic facilities.
The dining room, which will accommodate approximately 125, la
often crowded on Sundays for the
noon meal. R. W. Wild, secretary
said there
of the organization,
were 247 reservations for a recent
buffet dinner dance.
The club and its facilities is
available for membership by the
faculty, the staff members, and
the alumni in Fayette County
and the six surrounding counties. Aluir.ni who do not live in
Fayette County or in the six
counties are not
surrounding
eligible for membership.
The dues for the club are $102

n.v ZACTI JUSTICE

Kernel Staff Writer

Spitullftop Hall, the now
lionu' of UK faculty-staff- aluinui club, lads only a golf
the most
course to
luxurious country club in the
JMue Crass.
The facilities at Spindletop
Hall are similar to those at the
nicest country clubs. Included
in the facilities at Spindletop
are a swimming pool that is
twice t'ie size of the pool at the
C'arnahan House, the previous

Kiijnnrt'rinji Prof

A member of the College of En
gineering faculty, has received a
National Science Foundation gran
for the second consecutive yea
Stanley F. Adams, who last wee;;
was named winner of the $500 UK
Alumni Association annual award
Last week the College of Pharfor outstanding teaching, was notified this week that he has been macy became the home of "Poison
chosen to participate in the Sum- Central," the control center for
mer Institute of Advanced Me- seven regional poison centers.
The centers located in Ashland,
chanics for College Teachers at
Bowling Green, Ft. Thomas, liar- -'
the University of Colorado.
lan, Lexington, Louisville, and
Paducah operate under the Kentucky Poison Control Program, a
voluntary organization of professional and state agencies.
.
Each of these centers serves as
a facility for physicians and others
FOR SALf
with a medical interest in poisonLow
FOR SALE 1959 Thunderbird.
ing who need emergency informa2 95. "t
mileage. Excellent condit'on.
after tion. All centers maintain a file of
make reasonable offer. Call
27M4t
6 p.m.
poisons, symptoms, and accepted

YWCA Elect
NcW Officers

YWCA officers for the coming
year were elected last week.
The new officers are Carolyn
for a family the first year and $72
Young president; Becky Groger,
thereafter. The dues for an indivice president; Sue Ellen Gran-ni- s,
vidual the first year, including the
secretary; and Kay Barnett,
entrance fee, are $54 and $30 for treasurer.
The new officers met Saturday
the succeeding years.
and chose YWCA cabinet members
Little renovating was (lone at for next year.
Spindletop Hall for the occupanCommittee chairmen include
cy of the club. In addition to the
Lindsay Snyder and assistant
painting, plastering, and cleantwin sister
Diane MrMahan,
ing, two parking lots were added
program; Sonnee Ptomey, human
for the convenience of the memMJeredith,
relations; Marilyn
bers.
civil liberties; Dorlslyn Wheeler,
Before Spindletop Hall was ofDutch lunch.
ficially used for the organization,
Nancy Nollenberger, seminars;
Mrs. Pansy Yount, Beaumont, Tex- Betty Estes, publicity; Sue Dowas, the previous owner of the farm, ney, faculty
firesides;
Linda
sent furniture valued at $G1,330 to Gohlke. international affairs.
Chaiiman of the Christian Faith
be used for the club and its memCommittee is Chris Broxon and
bership. Much of the furniture was Connie Jo Embry is freshman Y
custom designed for the house.
adviser.
June Bohanan and Nancy
White are rochairmen of the
intercollegiate
promotion committee. Betsy Beecher and Linda
II Heath are in charge of the
service committee,
community
and Virginia Wesche and Glynda
University College of Pharmacy.
Stevens are in charge of the
Detergents, laundry products,
membership committee.
cosmetics, remedies, lawn sprays,
Other cabinet "members include
insecticides, materials used In the
home every day, are included in Cathy Cannon, laison chairman;
Irma Strache, NSAY; and Viv
the display.
ian Shipley, freshman camp
The display, arranged by Dr.
Mark M. Lukens, assistant professor of pharmacy and consulting
state toxicologist, was set up in
Over 25 percent of Chicago's
connection with the current Na- - criminal problem is caused by
tional Poison Control Week.
migrating Kentucky hill people.

Pharmacy College Becomes
Cenler For 'Poison Central'

CLASSIFIED

The centers are located in a hospital close to emergency room facilities. If the regional center cannot be reached or hasn't the information, "Poison Central" may
be contacted.
29M3t
The new home of "Poison Central" has a toxicologist and several
IOST
other experts on poisons and treatLOST Ladies antique diamond ring. ments of poisonings available on a
ext.
At Coliseum March 5. Call
24 hour a day basis to relay infor28M3t
2854 or 2d55 or call
mation to the regional centers.
TRIPLE INDEMNITY
These experts will also be availYOU man qualify for Accidental Death able to run emergency tests or to
Benefit equal to two times the amount
prescribe emergency treatment.
of your lue Insurance policy. Write
A number of household and
I'hone visit Gene Cravens, your .reer
or
New Vork Life agent. Phone
27M4t
personal items containing poisons are now on display at the
FOUND
FOUND One Theta Chi fraternity pin.
call Lynn Miranda
For information

I WANT

LOVE ME!"

3RD BIG WEEK

TIS WE

DE1I0GE

HAVE

TECHNICOLOR

NOW SHOWING
Tony Curtis "THE OUTSIDER"
"WEEKEND WITH LULU"

BttUiOVtN

STRAND

SHOWING!

a side of life you never expected to see on the screen!
WU PKMS

if.
u

I

starring
FONDA

i

FROf.VTHE

niuft mrft

STARTS FRIDAY

n

Jri

nxi n in nn

rn'P
ArxIrlLm IVllLLLrio

BACH SWEATSHIRTS

IN

PHONE

CAPL'CINE--

't

"SERGEANTS 3"

DON'T MISS the fabulous show of
shows at Jovland this Saturday night,
featuring COSMO with Jack Sanders as
27M4t
emcee.

LOT HOT

;

-

BEETHOVEN. BRAHMS, AND

Frank Sinatra
Dean Martin
Peter Lawford
Sammy Davis, Jr.
Joey Bishop

TYPING Will do all kinds of typing In
my home at reasonable prices. Call
27M4t
after 5:30 p.m.

'

IE

A BOLD VIEW OF LIFE FROM

THEATRE

are available for
MUSIC
places
Spring Social Events. This combo 20M12e
emphasis on variety. Call

a new kind of

K-

YOU TO

Kentucky
HELD OVER!

MISCELLANEOUS

ALTERATIONS Dresses, coats, skirts.
348 Alyesford
Place, Phone
15M18t
Mildred Cohen.

EN ALI

fo

YOU TO
HOLD ME!

Terry Tomas

Switow't NEW

27M3t

TTir

MAKE MINE MINK"
"I WANT

-

n

BAXlEl

'

-

hwkis

CM

(OiWlS

In keeping with the avant
garde tradition of Maxson's
Kentuckian Shop we are
elated to show this latest
cultural item to the highBe the
brows of Endsville.
first to make the scene with
one of these tremendous
sweatshirt finds. Ideal for
status seekers, bird watchers, folk singers, music lovers and other assorted big
cats.

$400

TJurOC
mm

nrra ra nsm

SQBBE
iirJlSlA,

v

f

f

'

'

,f

L v.

t
"

Ai

"
--

V"

it
I
1

Jim Piersall's wife asks:

"Why do they call
my husband crazy?"
To

the fans Jim Piersall is a
screwball. But to his
he's "calm and sensible, an
understanding husband." In this
week's Post, Mary Piersall tells
how the fans made Jim "a marked
man." Says how close he came to
a breakdown in 1960. And why
she's confident about this season.
Thr Saturday Evening
wife,

TIPS

ON
TOGS
By

"LINK"

2ND FEATURE

FIRST RUN

treatments.

CLEARANCE SALE Everything in good
condition: L. C. Smith typewriter. $15.
Textbooks and others, ask for list. 1948
Chevrolet. $125, with snow tires, $150.
after
1952 Cadillac, $250. Call
28M4t
S p.m.
FOR SALE 1954 Chevrolet Bel-A- ir
sedun. standard shift. In good condition. $475. Phone UK ext. 3300 or

8358.

A9D0?

LKI) Race
residents of the Men'
Residence HalLs who desire to
enter bicycle teams In the Little
Kentucky Derby race please eon-ta- ct
Skip Stigter, Men's Residence Halls Student Intramural
before 4 p.m.
Director, at
today.
All

Wm

DENIM Is a cool move for spring
and sunshine time (especially if
you are Florida bound). Cotton
denim is taking the fashion bows
this season. Like casual (but casual) sport coats made of faded
blue denim with double stitched
seams, broad flapped patch pockets and white pearl buttons can
be worn with a suggested navy
colorful
buttoned
blue tie a
down sport shirt or an ascot. They
are cool to wear and cool to look
at. Bickie Scott, Arts and Sciences,
is hoping the weather will shape
up so he can wear his, and John
Walden (Eastern State College) is
waiting for his size to arrive as is
(of University
Andy Williams
High). Jim Cheaham (UK Kitten) has his heart set on a handsome sport coat of navy and olive
plaid man this is the sport coat
year!!
DENIM
Has influenced other
fields
ponchos that reverse" to
noisy sport shirts with BD. collars
and smartly tapered to give the
tailored appearance.
In Banlon
SOMETHING NEW
fabric sport wear
Banlon knit
shirts in the popular cardigan button up style with short sleeves
don't say I didn't tip you!!
WHAT NEXT??
I went through
the beer party sweat shirt frenzy
the beatnik sweat shirt and now
the "highbrow" sweat shirt, adorned with blown up images of
Brahms, Beethoven, and Bach emblazoned across the front. I guess
next there will be Elvis, Chubby
Checkers, and Fabian (the chipmunks have already made it!!)
HO HO HO AND A BOTTLE OF
RUM
Captain Kid and all his
will deerstwhile swachbucklers
scend on the good ship Lambda
Chi this Saturday night with an
elaborate Pirates Party (where is
my cutlass?). Twisting and stomping music will be by the "Rejects"
(does that mean they will walk the
plank?). Have been invited and
will wear my pirate costume
a
black business suit, a black eye
and carry a money bag to
patch
receive children, to receive, not
give! Congrats to Bill Bluitt and
Anne Catina married you know-- let
the bells ring out.
Determined to cut this
WAS
poor man's "Moot" short this
week (budget) but again here is
the bottom of the page so
So long for now,

'LINK'
ot . .

* .THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Manli

Youngsters Are Maturing
Too Fast, Experts Say
By VIVIAN BROWN
AP Newsfeatures Writer
Are we pushing youngsters into
maturity too fast? Some experts

think so.
"The average Junior high school
student is pushed into an adoles-

cence

with
formerly associated
later college years," says Oraenum
on community
Berger, consultant
centers and camps for the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies.
"We should slow them down even
though it seems against the current of our times."
If a youngster doesn't date by
the time he is 11, some parents
consider him backward because
"everybody is doing it." This early
encouragement
given to children
for heterosexual relations is puzzhe says, because obviously
ling,
parents should want to protect
their offspring from unfortunate
experiences.
But parents no longer trust their
own Judgment.
"It isn't their fault. Everywhere
they are advised that their problems can be solved by out.side
sources. If a child doesn't have
friends or doesn't play with others, parents are told this situation
can be solved by some agency.
a
They don't give themselves
chance to cope with it."
The situation was different a
ago.'
"Homes were more static and

New Spring Hats
Accent Femininity
The traditional spring tonic, a
new hat, be it coverall, flipup,
beret or skimmer, is sure to alleviate your spring fever.
Femininity, the keynote of this
season's styles, is accented by
hats emphasizing either flower
trim or silhouette. Full skirts and
waists set the pace for
nipped-i- n
windswept, brims and little hats
on the back of the head.
perched
You will find hats ranging from
very big to very small and from
one flower to a whole hat full.
Brims turn every which way and
are deeper, wider and giant sized.
They frame the face, have high
rising crowns and are often tilted
to one side.
Red. white and blue, spring's
traditional temperature raisers,
are joined by everything from the
new soft shades of rose, blue and
mint to black, navy and beige.
Straws appear in crisp new
shapes with limitless crowns and
emphasize textures and weaves.
Pillboxes are important, whether
draped or in straw, trimmed with
patent leather bows and bands.
Reminiscent of the old West are
wide skimmers with their elongated
side brims and flipups turned
in every direction. The flipups are
often found rolling to one side or
as large as cartwheels.

youngsters more dependent on the
family. Parents were responsible
for the total development of their
children, easing their roles with
the opposite sex, academic life,
future employment. The teacher
was a neighborhood friend who
dropped in occasionally and offered council. People kept family
problems to themselves, a few
close friends, perhaps a doctor.
Together they solved them."
Schools have become convenient
scapegoats, he says. "Parents leave
solutions of many of their youngsters problems more and more to
the school. The home no longer
offers vocational guidance either,
he says.
"Time was when a son wanted
to be a bricklayer like dad or he
moved into father's footsteps on a
little higher plane. But now he
may want a field in which the
family has no connections, and
doesn't comprehend. He turns to
vocational guidance, school officials, employment agencies for information, once again making a
sharp break within the family,"
he says.
"The family has broken the
young person into a lot of little
pieces. So he looks to cults and
follows patterns distinctive for his
own group."
When he rebels, he turns to
gangs or beatniks. Few younq;
Americans are ever political radicals, he points out. Although it
might be good if he were. Then
he would think for himself.
"As it is now, he doesn't know
who he owes his highest loyalty
to," says Berger, who spoke recently at the 38th annual conference of the Child Study Association of America.
"The family must have tried to
solve a problem before turning it
over to someone else, to give the
children a sense of belonging.

Social Activities
Meetings

Philip Randall, a senior engineering student at Georgia Tech, from
Columbia.

41.

Our new Italian imports
of wear
without worry. All this
and molte bella too! If travel
is your cup of

are impressarios

. . . pack your
kit with something
lovely in cotton knits

espresso

Lowen

I
has

MAIN AT WALNUT

7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Sandwichei and Short Order

WILL DUNN
DRUG COMPANY
Lime and Maxwell
55

TOMORROW NIGHT
FOLLOW THE CROWD TO
On the Old Frankfort Pike

...

CHARLIE: BB5HOP
And His Band!
COUPLES ONLY

sVitfi

f

by Sue McCauley
Do ycu like to do things that are
different? Do you think it's fun to

disrupt classes, make people stare,
and run away from little men in

'

.

I:--

V

I'

,

'

J A h ri

1

t) KKJITS

RAPID
DELIVERY
SERVICE

lie

k
HAVE A
"ROAM 10 fOl-!OA- y

Prompt
Reliable

Fountain Service

A Bitter Pill

Kennedy sums up his
first year in office

"I don't think most Americans realn
ize," says JFK, "the way the
has changed." In this week's
in an authoritative article
Post,
based on talks with the President
and hischiet advisers, Stewart A I sop
tells how Kennedy has revamped
U.S. strategy. What was behind his
struggle with the Pentagon. And
how the new plans are working out.
Th Saturday Evening

if

Open

LOCKPORT, N. Y. t,V) A woman responding to the advertisement, "Pillboxes, all colors, $2
each." went into the store to buy a
hat. Instead she was offered boxes
for pills.

i

-

PRESCRIPTION
SERVICE

Engagements

TWIST to

MISS KATE WILSON
Pi Beta Phi Sorority
Kate is program chairman of her sorority
and a member of Boyd House Council,
Stars in the Night Committee, and the
SUB Recreation Committee. As a freshman major in retailing, she has a standing of 3.3.

fart

-1

Dunn Drugs

Pat Nahlik, a senior education
student from Atlanta, Oa., to

A

I
r
I-

V.W1-

Fashion & Campus News

rA
'

The Philosophy Club will meet
4 p.m. tomorrow in Room 128
of the Student Union Building.
Movie
The movie, "The Diary of Anne
Frank." will be shown at 7 p.m.
tomorrow In the Ballroom of the
Student Union Building. It Is sponsored by the Student Union Board.
Admission price Is 25 cents.

at

Links
Links, national scholastic honorary for Junior women, will meet
at 4:30 p.m. today in the Student
Union Building.
Dutch Lunch Club
The Dutch Lunch Club will meet
at noon today in Room 6 of the
Donovan Hall Cafeteria.
The meeting place has been
changed for this week only.
Archaeological Society
The Kentucky
Archaeological
Society will meet at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow in the Anthropology Museum.
Dr. Dewey Steele will present an
illustrated talk about Guatemala.
The public is invited.
Beta Alpha Psl
Beta Alpha Psi, national accounting honorary, will hold its annual spring banquet at 7 p.m. tomorrow at Levas' Restaurant.
Sam Lyuerse, partner in Yeager,
Ford, and Warren public accounting firm, will be the guest sneaker.
SIB Publicity Committee
The Student Union Board Publicity Committee will meet at 2
p.m. today in Room 206 of the
Student Union Building.
SI B
The Student Union Board will
meet at 5 p.m. today in Room 204
of the Student Union Building.
Luncheon
The Microbiology Department
will hold a luncheon at noon today in Room 205 of the Student
Union Building.
Kappa Delta Pi
Kappa Delta Pi, national education honorary, will meet at 5 p.m.
toady in the Music Room of the
Student Union Building.
Philosophy Club

20,

IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE
IN THE KETUCKY KERNEL

white couts?
If your answers to the above questions were mostly yes, then here is
whot you should do.
First, call an unsuspecting freshman and ask her if she would like
to model in a fashion column. Then
proceed to select a very cold March
day for taking the picture.
Of course, you must take the picture in a public place like near the
Fine Arts Building near the middle
of the afternoon so that plenty of
students will be in class.
When you are standing there by

the photographer holding the
trenchcoat of the model and she is
standing there shivering in the cold
wind that is b'owing about thirty
miles an hour, THEN you can think
"This is CRAZY!"
Of course, it is very advisable to
get a nv .del with a sense of humcr
like did or
well, don't knew
exactly what wjuld happen.
Kcte wears a Rose Marie Reid
bathing suit wi!h t Ho new relaxed
look. This is achieved with gathering at the wes; and a small bow.
The bodice of the suit has the covered-Lip
lock. It is in an eye catching shade of blue.
Don't you love that big, shaggy
beach hct that she wears? It is the
perfect camouflage if your hair often looks less than perfect at the
beach.
.

I

* University Soapbox

The Kentucky Kernel

Always A Democrat

University of Kentucky

Entrred t the pot nffic at I.xlnton, Kentucky ai urcnnd class matter under the Act of March S, 1879.
Published four times a week during the regular grhool year except during holiday! and cxama.
SIX DOLLAHS A SCHOOL, YEAR

Ed Van Hook, Editor

Kerry Powell, Managing Editor
Ben Fitzpatrick, Sports Editor
Dick Wallace, Advertising Manager
Bill Holton, Circulation Manager

Wayne Gregory, Campus Editor
Jean Schwartz, Society Editot
Susy McIIuch, Cartoonist
Bobbie Mason, Arts Editor

THURSDAY NEWS STAFF

Mrn Fearing,

Kyba Hackley, Associatt

Sews Editor

Carl Modecxl

Sports

Pro Boxing's Dilemma

The terrific beating suffered Saturday by boxer Benny "Kid" Paret has
d
investigabrought on a
tion by Gov. Nelson Rockefeller of
New York and less necessary comments from Sen. Estes Kefauver of
inTennessee calling for a
vestigation of boxing.
Paret remains in critical condition
after being carried from the welterweight title fight in Madison Square
Garden with Emilc Griffith.
much-neede-

full-scal- e

Griffith landed 20 to 23 punches
before referee Ruby Goldstein stopped
the fight. Goldstein has been criticized for not stopping the fight sooner, but Goldstein said he thought
Paret was only rolling away from the
punches. Goldstein's record as a referee is unblemished and he is held
in highest esteem in boxing circles.
An investigation, such as the one
planned by Gov. Rockefeller, is warranted. Indeed, it is mandatory. Perhaps the investigation will expose corruption in boxing. Boxing, in the past,
has had its share of scandals.
Sen. Kefauver cried out this week
for a
investigation of the
sport. He declares boxing is riddled
with the disease of corruption. Gang

sters and other, evil people are involved in the sport, he claims.
Perhaps the Griffith-Pare- t
fight
possessed an undesirable undercurrent. Perhaps Goldstein was at fault.
Perhaps Paret was not physically fit
for the encounter since he fought only
a short time ago. But we will have to
wait for the New York investigation
to reach a verdict.
In the meantime, perhaps Sen.
Kefauver can manage to restrain himself and let Gov. Rockefeller find
the cause of this unfortunate incident,
unless he wants a
investigation of tennis, swimming, baseball,
basketball, football, soccer, ping pong,
and lacrosse.
full-scal- e

Kernels
The trouble with hitting the jackpot at Las Vegas is that it takes so
long to put the money back into the
machines.

Catholic Digest.
"In a war wherein words are the
weapon, one need not be concerned
with the inarticulate, hence the unarmed." John Kenneth Gailbraith.

full-sca-

He has a wonderful
sight. Catliolic Digest.

20-2-

0

hind-

Campus Parable
By MRS. SON DR. A RICKS

Director, YWCA
Many times conversation between
two persons is
one person
thinking of his own next comment
while his companion is earnestly
speaking to him, or both talking
apparently to each other about different subjects entirely. These are examples of what too often happens between people. We don't really listen
to eac h 'other.
Such incidents emphasize our sel
one-wa-

fish, unloving natures and would
cause us to feel, if we become objective, that we have "acquaintances,"
but not friends.
Thoughtlessness can be rationalized away or deeply regretted, but it
is a widespread sin. Perhaps we can
concentrate on really getting to know
our acquaintances and on humbly believing that they also have had significant experiences. Richer, more
earnest friendships can develop which
make the effort worthwhile.

By ROBERT
To The Editor:

E. CATO

In regard to your article entitled
"Voting is Held Under Protest" in
the Tuesday, March 27 edition of the
Kernel, I would like to reiterate the
fact that I am a democrat first and
always.
.t Upon deciding' to run for the of- fire of presidency of the Young Democrats Club, I asked my friend, Bill
Kenton to act as campaign manager,
as I knew of his active experience
in other Yoflng Democrat Clubs.
Drafting a plan of action, we decided
to stand on the platform of
within the Young Democrats Club.
Having gathered my supporters,
I took note of an article on page 9
of the March 8 edition of the Lexington Herald in an article entitled
"Hubbard to Speak to Young Democrats." The article stated, and I
quote, "Carroll Hubbard Jr., state
Democratic college chairman, will
speak at 7 o'clock tonight to the
Young Democrats of the University of
Kentucky. The meeting will be at
the Student Union Building.
"Bill Jones, president of the UK
Democrats said yesterday that officers
will be elected at the meetfor
ing."
After learning of the cancellation
of the March 8 meeting, I attended
the rescheduled meeting Tuesday,
March 13, and at that time I was informed of the cancellation of the election. President Bill Jones announced
that proper notification of the next
meeting and election of officers would
be given.
The next notice appeared in the
March 20 edition of the Kernel. It
stated there would be elections that
evening in the Student Union Building. Upon investigation I found this
announcement to be unfounded.
After the two previously publicized election announcements the elections were held on March 22 at 8
p.m. in Room 200 of the Funkhouser
Building.
At this point, might I interject
that I feel this election was, in lieu
of the other notices, not properly publicized in regard to the