xt75dv1cnb4k https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt75dv1cnb4k/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19620313  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 13, 1962 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 13, 1962 1962 2015 true xt75dv1cnb4k section xt75dv1cnb4k r-

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Vol. LI

1

1,

No. 79

University of Kentucky
LEXINGTON,

KV., TUESDAY,

MARCH 13,

12

Eight Pages

Four Seniors Win
W ilson

Parking Problem Solvedsolved
have finally
of
Chi

the parkThe pledges
Sigma
fraternity
ing problem. Early Sunday morning, they moved Jim Todd's
small foreign car Into the entrance hallway of their fraternity
house. Standing from the left are pledges Don Yopp, Don Young,
Jim Duvall, Fete Kurarhek, Bob Catlett, Frank Blaekard and Tom
Ressler. Leading on the car is the owner, Jim Todd.

Steal Safe

Employees Break In
Wildcat Bowling Lanes
Fred Bingham and James Conway, Wildcat employees,
admitted Sunday to breaking into the Wildcat Howling Lanes.
Approximately $225 was taken between 1 and 2 a.m.
A safe containing most of the
Sunday.
City Detective John Hiteri said money was taken to Jessamine
the men confessed after they County and broken open with a
were confronted with cigarettes
taken from the vending machine. Several packages of cigarettes and some change were
found in their possession.
Bingham and Conway appeared
In a preliminary hearing yesterday
at 1:30 p.m. Detective Hiten said
the case will probably be held over
to the grand jury.

Lillle Kentucky Derby
Tha Little

Kentucky Derby
publicity committee will meet at
7:30 tonight in Room 206 of the
Student Union Building. All persons interested in working on
this committee are invited to

sledge hammer. The Jessamine
County sheriff found the safe and
notified Lexington police. A vending machine was also broken into.
Major Perkins, manager of the
Wildcat Bowling Lanes, reported
the breakin to the Campus Police at 10 a.m. Sunday. The Lexington Police were notified.
Detective John Hiten of the Lexington Police Department said the
men entered the building through
the back door. They had wired the
door before closing Saturday night
so that it could be opened under
pressure from the outside.
The two employees were picked
up at their homes at noon Sunday
and taken to police headquarters
for questioning.

Fellowships

Four seniors have been
awarded Woodrow Wilson Fellowships for a year's graduate
study at any university of their
choice.
The four students are Stead-ma- n
T. Bagby Jr., mathematics
major; Mary Ellen La Bach,
Michael
musicology
major;
Morgan, English major, all
from Lexington; and Judith
Stewart, Soviet studies, North
Charleston, W. Va.

study, and in UV30 studied at Colorado College with violinist Paul
Doktor.
Tom Bagby, also a graduate of
Henry Clay High School, won UK's
Freshman Achievement Awards in
both mathematics and physics. He
is a member of Phi Eta Sigma, PI
Mu Epsilon, Phi Beta Kappa,
ct
president of the Bluegrass
of the Methodist Youth
and has maintained a
Fellowship,
3.96 during his four years at UK.
At Henry Clay he was president
of the National Honor Society, a
member of the
Orchestra,
Student Council, Beta Club. He
received the Harvard Book Award,
Mary La Bach Is a graduate
Eta Sigma Phi award, Kiwanis
.Cup, and Henry Clay Scholarship
Medal.
J-Sch-ool
Michael Morgan, a native of
Dublin, Ireland, is a member of
Phi Beta Kappa and has a 3.95
standing. He served in the U.S.
and became
Navy from 1156-5- 8
an American citizen last year.
Awards for outstanding achievement in high school
These fellowships pay tuition for
papers were presented Friday at the annual Kentucky
School Press Associatioi Publications Clinic sponsored by the a year's graduate study plus living
expenses of $1,500.
School of Journalism.
High schools receiving awards
"The Echo," Trinity High School, in the following catagories inSt. Matthews; "Lafayette Times," cluded :
Lafayette High School,. Lexington;
Front-pag- e
makeup "The Echo,"
"Smoke Signals," Clark County
and Trinity; "Lafayette Times," and
School, Winchester;
High
"Beechbark,"
Beechwood, S. Ft.
;
"Panther
were recognized by the Kentucky Mitchell.
Editorial page "The Defender," One-Acchapter of Sigma Delta Chi, professional journalism, fraternity, as Biyan Station, Lexington; "The
Crimson Record," DuPqnt Manual,
the top four newspapers.
Students from 24 Kentucky high
Lanschools will present one-aCertificates for excellence in six Louisville; and "Lancastrian,"
plays
caster.
J2th annual State
in the three-da- y
phases of newspaper publication
Headline writing "Smoke Sig- Drama Festival which opened yeswere made' to 19 high schools by
nals," Clark- County, Winchester; terday in the Guignol Theatre.
the Lexington Herald-Leade- r.
"Brook 'N' Breck," Male, LouisThe plays are classified accordville; and "Panther Prowler,"
ing to division. Schools having an
Elizabethtown.
.
enrollment of 500- or more stuSports page "The Falcon," dents in grades 10 through 12 are
Franklin County, Frankfort; classified in "A" division; those
"The Chit Chat," Waggener.
with an enrollment between 250-5Louisville; and "Harrison
are placed in "B" division; and
Harrison County, Cynth-ian- a. those with less than 250 in . the
"C" division.
behind Holmes Hall between the
Photo editing "The Delineator,"
The State Drama Festival is one
women's dormitories to Harrison Durrett, Louisville; "The
Tiger,"
School Speech
of the
Avenue and behind the Wildcat
Central phase Drama High
Murray; "The
Activities Program
and
Grill to Memorial Coliseum.
and "The Pow Wow," MadiCity;
sponsored by Extended. Programs
The parade will enter the Coli- son Central, Richmond.
in cooperation with the nine reseum from the rear corner. The
Sports coverage "Henry Clay gional managers and institutions
University band will lead the paHenry Clay, Lexington; which they represent. Dr. Denver
rade.
"The Record," Ahrens, Louisville; Sloan is the state coordinator for
All organizations and individuals
and "Tattle Tale." Montgomery the high school speech and drama
Continued on Page 2
County, Mt. Sterling.
piogram.
Henry Clay High School, where
.she was president of the Latin
Club, a member of the Beta Club,
National Honor Society, Central
Kentucky Youth Orchestra, and
received a certificate of merit for
Latin studies.
At UK she is a member of
Phi Beta Kappa, ranks in the
upper three percent of her class,
a member of Alpha Lambda
Delta, Links, Mortar Board, Chi
Delta Phi, SuKy, Philosophy
Club, University Orchestra, Central Kentucky Philharmonic Orchestra, and Chi Omega sorority.
She received the Ralph Mc-- ..
for music
of Cracken Scholarship

Awards
Senior High Papers

High Schools
Present 24
t
Plays

Rally, Parades Send
'Cotton-Picker- s

9

To NCAA

The University "Cotton-pickerThe parade will form at 6:55
will be spurred on to victory and p.m. Wednesday between Kin-kea- d
Hall and the physics-chemistthe NCAA championship title at a
torch parade and pep rally tomorbuilding. It will then prorow night and send off parade
ceed up Rose Street towards
Donovan Hall, turn up towards
Thursday morning.
with Jack Fraternity Row, circle and pass
SuKy, cooperating
and come out on
the
Hall, director of men's residence
Clifton Avenue to Rose Street.
halls; the men's and women's residence units; the Interfraternity
It will then proceed down Rose
and Panhellenic
will Street to Euclid Avenue, and turn
Council;
sponsor the event.
up Limestone Street. It will pass

i-

Girl Leaves Home;
Student Loses Job

-

A teenager's desire to run away from home has cost a
University student his job.
William Secrest, 21, has been fired from his position as a
Fayette County school bus driver for "fraternizing" with a
bryan Station High School coed.
said he gave the girl,
Bailey, a ride to down- Lexington Friday morning
auer sue roae me scnouj ous 10
Bryan Station
"I let the girl off at Main and
Upper Streets and drove away,"
Secrest said.
The whereabouts of the girl remained a mystery until yesterday
afternoon when her mother found
her downtown.
Mrs. Bailey said her daughter
had taken a bus to Cincinnati,
became
homesick,"
"apparently
and returned to Lexington.
Mrs. Bailey charged Secrest Sat- Secrest

town

urcIay wlth contributing to the
nnqueiicy of a minor by giving her
tne rido. ne was scheduled to ap- -

pear j coul t Wednesday, but Mrs.
Bailey said she would drop her
charge against him, now that her
daughter had been found.
Secrest was fired by Carl
Spivey, county school transportation supervisor, fur "fraternizing" with the Bailey girl.
Spivey said that school. regulations prohibited fraternizing of
bus drivers and students. "The fact
that he took the girl off school
Riouncls was the reason I had to
let him go," Spivey said, "whether
she wanted him to or not."

Fk.

$

;;;wv;-

.....

-

7

.

s-

Vm Next
players, Cotton Nash, left,, and I.arry
lursuui sign auiugrapus ior pari oi over zuu
school journalists who interviewed the two
high
players as part of the School of Journalism pub- Basketball

lications clinic. Questions ranged from Nash's
enrollment in the predrntal curriculum to 1'urst-fill- 's
shooting accuracy.

,

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, March

2

13, 1962

Lecture
On Science And Religion

Parade
Planned
For Cats

WBKY Extends
Music Program

Continned from Tage 1
are asked to carry signs and banners. There will be an organization
roll call during the program at
which time organizations can prove
their presence.
Coach Adolph Rupp will introduce the team. Dick Rushing and
Robert F. Stephens of the Athletic Board will also speak.
The pep rally will begin at 7:40
p.m. when the parade arrives at
the Coliseum, and end at 8:15 p.m.
Thursday morning a send-o- ff
parade will go to the airport to see
the Cats off to Iowa.
Cars participating in the parade will line up In front of
Jewell Hall at 9:45 a.m. They will
leave at 10:00 a.m. with a police
escort.

Theologian To

Faculty at 4 p.m. In the St'B
Musk Room on "The Science of
Religion," and will speak to students and the public at 8 p.m.
in Memorial Hall on "The Religion of Childhood and the ReThe spenker is Dr. Samuel Sandligion of Maturity."
of Bible and Helmel, professor
Dr. Sandmel has written several
lenistic literature at the Hebrew books. Including "A Jewish UnderInstitute of standing of the New Testament"
Union College-Jewt- st
Religion. Cincinnati. Dr. Sandmel and "Philo's Place in Judaism."
is also provost of the school.
The talks are sponsored by the
He will address the Inlversity UK Office of Religious Coordina- -

A specialist in Now Testament studies and its relation to
Judaism will speak here twice
on March 27.

.

A&S Dinner

Set Tonight

Sima

Tan

Kaleidoscope, WHKY's special program of uninterrupted
background music, increased its broadcasting time another hour
yesterday morning
whnt came next.
anticipated
WBKY announced Feb. 9 that Therefore, WBKY now has two
Kaleidoscope would go off the air tapes poing at the same time and
jumps back and forth every other
permanently the following week. song.

After this announcement so many
listeners offered to support the
program that enough funds were
raised to broadcast on a half-tim- e
basis!
Kaliedosrope was on the air
from 12-- 4 p.m. for about three
weeks. Additional funds then
made it possible to add another
hour. The staff also changed
scheduling to 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The addition of one more hour
yesterday changed the time from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
was
When the announcement
made that Kaliedoscope would
leave the air, a group of listeners
In a
range organized a
"citizens committee for WBKY."
Matthew I. Barrett, 248 Holliday
Rd., Lexington, Is chairman.
So far, the largest individual
check' contribution has been $55.
The. largest contribution on a
'continuous basis is about $30 a
month.
WBKY' has received several
complaints that the music repeats
too often. To remedy this, they
built up their library to 45 reels
or 50 to 60 hours of music.
Listeners also complained they
could recognize the sequence, and

tlon and the student Interfalth
Council.
A graduate of the Hebrew Union
College where he was ordained In
1937, Dr. Sandmel was appointed
to the faculty there In 1952, and
named provost in 1957. Earlier, he
served as Hillel professor of Jewish literature, taught at Vander-bi- lt
University, and served as director of the Hillel Foundation at
Yale University.
He served for four years as a
Navy Chaplain during World War
II.

Friendly Service

Tau Sigma, I'niversity modern
dance group, will present "Creative Dance" at 7 o'clock tonight in the I.uclid Avenue
Ruilding. The group will give a
in crea pantomime,
ative
dance;
"Bubble Gum:" interpretation
of the work, "Green;" and an
abstract number interpreting the
poem, "Hollow Men," by T. S.
Elliot.

t Upper
Short at Mill

.....

By

Phon

VC1I1

4TH WfceM

i

RockH'Jdson

MORS.

ym

ITfi'tW- -

DOWSUAY

low Randall
LrJJ

KlHTUCrtT

...

PHON

NOW

r

1
Webs

Holder-Clifto-

14 Academy Award

SATAN

Nominations!

NEVER

Southland
Eastland

SHOWING

A Beautiful But
Violent Story!

William

STARTS TOMORROW

SIFFPS

Paul Newman

'The Hustler"
f

AND

TRUST COMPANY

Audrey Hepburn

MEMBER FDIC

.

FOR

MARK

LAST TIMES TODAY

First Security
&

NATIONAL BANK

tlXIWOTOW

"The King of Kings"

SIX LOCATIONS
North Broadway
Chevy Chase

WATCH

PORTRAITS

REN ALI

X

AND THE MOST COMPLETE, TOO!
Main

Chi Delta Phi
Applicant for Chi Delta Phi.
women' literary honorary, must
enter not less than two and not
more than five submission.
These should be turned In to Dr.
Maurice Hatch by noon, March
19. Entries may Include prose,
poetry, short stories, essays, or
drama.

FRAME

Pi(

'

'Breakfast. at Tiffanys'

....

iL

JL

Tareyton
delivers
the flavor
I

JVs

.iff

I

DVAL

v

FILTER
DOES
IT!

The 15th annual dinner of the
College of Arts and Sciences will
be held at 6:30 p.m. today in the
Ballroom of the Student Union
Building.
Dr. M. M. White, .dean of the
college, will review the accomplishments of the college and discuss
its pioblems with Arts and Sciences faculty members.
Dr. Jucob II. Adler, associate professor of English, will serve as
master of ceremonies. Guests will
include the Board of Trustees.
Entertainment will be provided
by the University Opera Workshop,
which will do a selection from
"Trouble in Tahiti."

I

mm u

.

JUMBO SAYS:
HAVE FOOD
WILL TRAVEL

Tareyton's Dual Filter in duas partes divisa est!''
Slugging Junius (Pretty Boy) Cassius takes off the brass

We Deliver
l :00 p.m.
(No Charge On

5p

m.--

knucks to enjoy his favorite smoke.
Says Pretty Boy, "Ecce Tareyton, one filter cigarette

Orders $2.50
and Over)

"

It's On the
Menu It Can Co"

99U

I

ACTIVATED CHARCOAL
NNER FILTER

i

j
!

that

really delivers de gustibus. Try Tareytons. Next time you
buy cigarettes, take a couple of packs vobiscum."

PURE WHITE
OUTER FILTER

DUAL FILTER
COFFEE

500 Rota St.

SHOP

Phon.

iPivJud

Tareyton

f JiC jmtUv

X

y

ux it our

mulJlt namt

04.ru,

* KENTUCKY

TIIE

y.,t :h a

Social Activities
Desserts
Sl;ma Nu
Sigma Nu fraternity entertained
Delta Delta Delta sorority Thursday night with a dessert at the
chapter house.
ATO
Alpha Tau Omega fraternity will
entertain Alpha Delta PI sorority
with a dessert tonight at the chapter house.
Jam Session
Delta Tau Delta fraternity entertained its sister sorority, Delta
Delta Delta', Saturday with a jam
session at the Congress Inn. y
Slumber Party
Kappa Alpha Theta and Delta
Delta Delta sororities held a slumber party Friday night. Half of
the actives from each house spent
the night at the other sorority
house.

Elections
Lambda Chi Alpha Pledges
The pledge class of Lambda Chi
Alpha fraternity recently elected
Gary Pardo, president. Other officers include:
Fields,
Stephen
vice president; Roger Ewing, sec-

retary.

Gerald Patterson, treasurer; William Baxter, social chairman; nnd
"William Frazier, athletic director.
Sigma Alpha F.psilon Pledges
The newly elected officers of
Sigma Alpha Epsilon pledge class
include: Darrell Hill, president;
Don Coffman, vice president; Dave
Clarke, secretary; Carl Hurst, correspondent.
Mike Cox, song leader; Warren
Ilougland, social chairman; and
Robert
Rankin,
Interfraternity
Council representative.
Alpha Gamma Delta
.
Diane Marek, was recently elected president of Alpha Gamma

Delta sorority. Other officers include: Martine Noojin, first vice
president; Irma Strache, second
vice president; Jerry Sue Sanders,
corresponding secretary.
Margaret Ann Brown, recording secretary; Laura Webb, treasurer; Sara Jane Byers, rush chairman; Carolyn Young, chairman of
names; Helen Wilson, house president; Anne Todd, librarian.
Sue
Marilyn Dixon, chaplain;
Ellen Grannis, altruistic chairman;
activities chairman;
Inga Riiey,
Carol Wasson, editor; Judy Clift,
scribe; Shearer Hart, public relations.
Nancy Nickell, art chairman;
Lois Garnett, guard; Linda Moran,
song leader; Ann Neurath. intra -murals chairman; Pauletta Owens,
social chairman; and Phyllis Howard, standards chairman.
Sigma Alpha Epsilon
Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity
recently elected Joseph Sprague,
president. Other officers include:
Philip Hutchinson, vice president;
Michael
Jim
Ertel,
secretary;
Thomas, treasurer.
Marvin Dunn, correspondent ;
s,
Joe Strong, warden; David
chaplain; Gregg Bailey, assistant treasurer; Robert Pinson,
social chairman; John Paul Brod-erso- n.
pledie trainer.
intramural
Philip Hutchinson,
manager; Charles Kirk and Robert Roach, Interfraternity Council
representatives;
Woody Reynolds,
song leader;
McBrayer,
Philip
house manager; Gary Williamson,
publicity chairman.
Charles Russell, scholarship
chairman; Charles Kirk, rush
chairman; Mark Steele, steward;
and John West, house committee
chairman.
Tau Kappa Epsilon
Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity
recently elected Joseph Oatson,
president. Other officers include:

SUB Activities For Today
Room 206 Faculty Committee on
6
Committees,
p.m.
Room 204 Student Union Personnel Committee, 5 p.m.
Room 128 YMCA Election of
Officers, 5 p.m.
Room 205 LKD Steering Committee, 5 p.m.
Music Room Fine Arts Festival:
SUB Topics Jazz, .4-- 5 p.m.; Lecture, Dr. Arnold Blackburn.
Room 204 SUB Topics Committee, 6 p.m.
6
Room 12a SUKY Tryouts,
p.m.
E."rcj:n College of Arts and
Sciences Banquet, 6:33 p.m.

C- -

i--

C

Room 128 Stars in the Night
Committee, 6:30 p.m.
Room 204 Lances, 8 p.m.
Music Room Society for the
of Management,
Advancement
7:30 p.m.
Room 206 LKD Publicity Committee, 7:30 p.m.
Room 205 Delta Sijjma Pi, 0
p.m.
Social Room Young Democrat:.,
9

p.m.
Y Clinpel

Christian

4

Engagements
Jerry Sue Sanders, a Junior

M.im.?

p0'sti,mwiis

1:1,

I2

, mnJ

Key Clubber" of tho
e
Kentucky-Tennesseof
District
is a lad who didn't make
Key Clubs
the convention. The Kiwanis-spon-soie- d
hinh school service organization voted the honor to Fred Fly,
16, of Shelbyville, Tenn., who was
killed in a traffic accident three
days before the district
convention began.
all around

Don Myer Shoe Store
In

Physics Club

Southland Shopping Center

The Physics Club will meet at
tonight in Room 208 Penre
Hall.
Nominations for next year's
officers will be held and a film
l.
on
Glen Shrpard's flight
will be shown.

HAPPY HIKER
VELVET STEP SHOES
For Ladies and Girls
CITY CLUB
WESTBORO SHOES
For Men and Boys

CLASSIFIED

OPEN

FRIDAY

NIGHTS

'TIL

9 P.M.

FOR RENT

foil

RENT Km nished apartment. Large
bedroom, kitchen, private shower luitli,
graduate students or married couple
preicrred. Apply 2t0 S. Limestone. 2Ht xt

Ml BAY

WANTED
WANTKD

e
appliance and TV
salesman. Salary plus commission. Car
necessary. Apply in person. Master's
Radio and TV. 816 Euclid Ave. See Mr.
Abbott.
7M4t
Part-tim-

MISCELLANEOUS

ALTEKATlOiNS Skirts, dresses, coats.
Reasonable rales. Phone
or leave
at Kobert'i House, 1U9 Cooperstown.
9M20t

MONDAY THRU FRIDAY
NO ADDED COST

For The Finest In

CONTACT
LENSES
See

KRAUSS
OPT

LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANING
Thcr.c
265

15V?

1766

By A.ppoir.t:vcnt

cZ'

j-

M

&

Carry

Read

H:.rr;.i-.burf.

Disccunt

Cosh

Cucl id Aso.
Next to CUiiLum

183 N. UPPE3
Fnono

vi Street

p.m.

m en recommend it Mr

Friday
At

MjS

sh,t;,,

NEW YORK (.V) Cathryn Damon emerges from standby assignments with a role of her own in
"A Family Affair, " musical due on
Broadway in January.
The titian-tresse- d
actress previously has been utilized as a substitute for Ethel Merman, Gwen
Vcrdon, Florence Henderson and
Julie London.

7:30

:

1

Eng-

lish major from Lancaster, and a
member of Alpha Gamma Delta
sorority, to Marshall Johnson, a
Junior premedical student from
Lancaster, and a member of Siyma
Alpha Epsilon fraternity.
Betty Smith, a junior English
major from Cumberland, to Bob
Gamble, a sophomore mathematics
major at the University of Virginia, from Appalachia, Va.

Pcii'iice

Group. 7 p.m.
Ticket Eooth Sell tickets an'!
vt.ting for Military Ball queen, 3
;i.ni.--

Bruce Gaddie, vice president; John
and
Carnot, secretary-treasure- r;
Charles Palmeter, historian.

KERNEL, Tius1.iy,

ij

to other men

MM

KENNEDY'S

Large Enough to Serve You . . .
Small Enough to Know You
Complete

All Account

Banking
Service

Insured
Te $10,000

Short end Upper

tool,

clean Old Spice After Sliavc lot. on always
gets you off to a fat, smooth start. Feels just as
pood between shoves as it " docs after shaving
'
with dates.
Rates

5

HU LTO N

7)i

(J.

owe

:

SHAVE
LOTION

AFTER

* The Kentucky Kernel
Univfusity of Kentucky

Entered tit the pout office at Lexington. Kentucky as second class matter under the Act of March I. 1870.
Published four timet
week during the regular school year except during holidays and exams.
SIX DOLLAHS A SCHOOL YEAR

Ed Van Hook, Editor

Kerry Powell, Managing Editor
Ben Fitzpatrick, S porta Editor
Dick Wallace. Advertising Manager
Bill IIolton, Circulation Manager

Wayne Gregory, Campus Editor
Jean Schwartz, Sixiety Editor
Rick McRfynoldh, Cartoonist
Bobhie Mason, Arts Editor

TUESDAY NEWS STAFF
Junk Cray, Sens Editor

Bill Martin,

Nick Pope, Associate
Sports

Different Kind Of War
Talks of nuclear weapons stores,
nuclear tests in the atmosphere, and
nuclear test ban treaties have turned
thfe thoughts of many people to the
problem of surviving with military
mfght.
William L. Shirer, author of "The
Rise and Fall of the Third Reich,"
hinted in his lecture here that the
Russians probably do not want war
any more than we do. He seemed
to think we will have our biggest
problems in learning to live at peace
with the Russians.
The Russians show that they realize the futility of total war in a nuclear
age by the ideas set forth in the
Communist Tarty program adopted
last fall for the ideological guidance
of all communists.
In this program, these words are
found:
"Peaceful coexistence serves as a
basis for the peaceful competition between socialism and capitalism . . .
and constitutes a specific form of class
struggle between them. As they con- -

sistently pursue the policy of peaceful
coexistence, the socialist countries are
steadily strengthening the positions of
the world socialist system in its competition with capitalism.
"Our effort, whose, main content
is the transition from capitalism to
socialism, is an effort and struggle
between two opposing social systems
an effort of the transition of more
and more people to the socialist path,
of the triumph of socialism and comscale."
munism on a world-wid- e
The implications in these paragraphs of the party program are
simple. They 'rededicate the Soviet
Union to the struggle between communism and democracy. The ultimate
aim of the Soviets is still to control
the w orld. They do not propose peace
when they speak of "peaceful coexistence." They simply propose war
without guns.
As students, we have the best opportunity now that we will ever have
in our lives to learn to deal with the
communists in "peaceful coexistence."
Will we waste our opportunity?"

...

Campus Parable
THE REV. ELMER MOORE
Newman Club Chaplain
Maturity is not something that
arrives overnight. It doesn't come in
the mail in a package from home.
It is not given in classroom lectures.
It is something that is often tested
By

and all those with whom we come
into contact are grading us constantly.
Religious maturity is no exception.
It doesn't arrive spontaneously overnight. It does not come in the re- -

ligious package of family tradition
that comes from home. It does not
come with hearing a sermon or reading a book. Yet, it is often tested
tested and rated every moment in
our personal efforts and social relationships. How is it achieved?
(This week I want to present you
four related considerations that I hope
will build to a climax and a rich
conclusion that is easy in application
but difficult in achievement.)

Suay McHugh

..

What Hallucinations?1

..

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traffic

Suggestions made by the University's coordinator of campus planning
to close Rose Street to through-traffi- c
seems to have merit from one
point of view that of the University.
As much as we would like to see the
day when UK personnel and students would not be forced to contend with the bothersome Rose Street
congestion, it hardly seems feasible
to expect such a thing because of the
kinks it would throw into the Lexington master traffic plan.
Lexington Traffic Engineer J. M.
Heidenreich thinks Rose Street widened to four lanes would help alleviate
the tangled traffic conditions near the
campus. But Lawrence Coleman, UK's
campus planner, wants to close off
Rose from Washington Avenue to
the Limestone confluence, making
Rose the main artery to the campus.
We do not see that this plan would
in any way solve the problem of

Lexington's
tieups, bottlenecks,
and
traffic, although
certain problems at the University
would be solved.
v Mr. Coleman's plan would make
it necessary to rearrange the entire
traffic plan in the University area.
Even though Mr. Coleman's plan
would be beneficial to the University, we contend such an arrangement would foul Lexington's master
traffic plan. The only workable solution seems to be a Rose Street
widened to four lanes.
slow-movin- g

Kernels
so

Tis not the dying for a faith that's
hard . . . 'tis the living up to it

that's difficult.
Thackeray.

William

Makepeace

He is stupid, like all heartless people. For ideas do not come from the
head but from the heart. lleinrich
Heine.

University Soapbox

Liberal, Conservative Views Need Explanation
By JIM SVARA
To The Editor:
The discussion of conservative and
liberal political philosophies initiated
in Tuesday's (March 6) Kernel is a
commendable project. A great amount
is written and spoken about this subject, but unfortunately most of what
both conservatives and liberals say
is aimed at each- other.
If the series in the Kernel rises
above mutual aggravation, perhaps
we can have some clear statements
about the positive viewpoints of each
side. If this is to be accomplished,
the topics must be limited to more
specific areas of disagreement, and
these must be discussed on a rational
instead of an emotional basis.
Prof. P. L. Mellunbruch's article
introduced the subject of major disagreement between the two philosophies; however, it contained some
conservative emotional lines which
must be challenged at the outset of
this discussion.
In the first place, it seems the conservatives have gotten enough mileage from the "individual freedom and
individual responsibility" cliche. In

deed, this ideal lies at the foundation
of democratic political philosophy.
However, some people no matter how
much responsibility they have are unable to succeed because of conditions far beyond their control.
There is a current joke in which
Barry Goldwater is walking through
a slum and approaches a miserably
bedraggled woman holding a baby
in ragged clothing. "Woman," he said
to her, "if you had any initiative, you
would inherit a department store."
Fundamental changes in the nature of industry and agriculture have
displaced thousands of people from
the only kind of work they are able
to do.
Prof. Mellenbruch demonstrated
the deftness which conservatives have
in offering simple patriotic answers
to complex problems. Liberals, on the
other hand, must find practical answers to these problems since they
are in power, and in so doing they
have tended to consider centralized
programs the most effective (or most
expedient) way to solve some problems.
The question of centralized versus

is
the
decentralized
government
fundamental point of disagreement
between the two groups.
Prof. Mellenbruch and one school
of political scientists believe that a
bureaucracy is not the answer." There is a strong case for
this viewpoint. But needless to say
there is an equally strong case for
centralized government.
In "American Democracy in Theory and Practice," the problem is
summed up as follows:
"The question is how to preserve
the vitality and competence of local
governments and, at the same time,
improve the nation's capacity to deal
with national problems." (page 115)
This problem should be discussed by
experts in political science, and I hope
that future issues will carry such
a discussion (including, for heaven
sake, the relation between centralized
government and individual freedom.)
Besides this topic, there is another which should be discussed.
Frank S. Moyer in the Feb. 27 issue
of Natoinal Review charges that liberals, by. the nature of their political
philosophy are unable to combat com
"left-win-

g

munism as' they did fascism before
and during World War II.
Since this charge is being hurled
quite often from the right, it needs
to be debated on the basis of such
definite charges as those made my
Mr. Meyer.
If future dsicussions contain claims
and charges substantiated logically
and factually, the Kernel will have
taken a step in clearing up the
muddled confusion about liberalism
and conservatism.

Kernels
A man who was far behind in his

car payments received a letter from
the finance company. "Dear Sir," it
said, "What would your neighbors say
if we came and repossessed your car?"
Back came the reply: "Dear Sirs,
I took up the matter with my neighbors and they all agree it would be
a pretty rotten trick." Catholic Digest, from Wall Street Journal.
Truck drivers know that they always have the right of weight. Cath-oli- c
Digest.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL,

'Realistic ' Liberals
CONSERVATIVE: Called Conservative
By MR. E. E. EVANS

Instructor Political Science
The diversity of attitudes withliberals
in the ranks of
and conservatives
alike should
alert us to the need for caution
in assigning people to either group.
A case In point is the first statement of the "liberal" position appearing in this aeries; for it identifies views that I would ascribe to
conservatism as "realistic liberalism." Now, to an avowed conservative, such a term seems a contradiction, or perhaps a tacit admission that realistic liberals are
But, granting
the difficulties involved, it is still
to make meaningful dispossible
tinctions.
Of particular interest to the student of politics is the conservative
view of human nature. Notwith-standin- g
"realistic liberalism"
which, I again suggest, appears to
be conservatism marketed under a
private brand), a distinguishing
characteristic of conservatism is

the acceptance of the fact of
human frailty. The conservative
knows that, though we are capable
of virtue, we have a propensity for
evil, and that our conduct is more
apt to be characterized by egoism
than altruism. Further, he realizes
that our reasoning capacity is likely to be Idle a good deal of the
time that we are more inclined to
rationalizing than to rationality.
Thin Judgment causes the conservative to be chary of political
power. Like most, the conservative believes that the purpose of
society Is to enable its members to
lead "the good life." to be happy.
But, says the conservative, the
standards of "the good life" should
be largely a matter for Individual,
not social determination. The community is composed of individuals
and associations having different
legitimate lnteiests and opinions,
all with the right to have certain
expectations relative to the benefits to be derived from society. The
conservative "would say some at

tempt should be made to allocate
the rewards of society on the basis
of merit, that is achievement or
contribution.
then
Government,
should see to it that there is an
opportunity for the realization of
these various legitimate claims.
However, human behavior being
what it is, there is the danger that
those possessing political power will
use it to exploit those who do not.
The conservative sets great store
by the lessons of history, and recorded human experience clearly
demonstrate