xt75mk655j0m https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt75mk655j0m/data/mets.xml   Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station. 1962 journals 124 English Lexington : Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station Progress report (Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station) n.124 text Progress report (Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station) n.124 1962 2014 true xt75mk655j0m section xt75mk655j0m Results of the
KENTUCKY SOYBEAN
_ VARIETY PERFORMANCE
  TESTS- 1962  
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
AGRICULTURAL ExI>EIzIMENT STATION
DEPARTMENT OF AGRONOMY

 RESULTS OF THE KENTUCKY SOYBEAN VARIETY
PERFORMANCE TESTS - 1962
Recommended Varieties: ·
Clark and Shelby — Northern and Eastern
Kentucky.
Clark, Hood, Kent and Perry — Southern
and Western Kentucky.
Clark is a fairly early-maturing variety
with a high-yield record where it is adapted.
It has good resistance to lodging and good oil
content. The pods are brown,and the seeds are
yellow.
Shelby is the earliest maturing of the
recommended varieties. It lodges very little,
has brown pods and yellow seeds.
Hood is a late-maturing variety, especially
suited to the Delta area of western Kentucky.
It is resistant to several diseases, has gray
pods, and yellow seeds. This variety should
replace the green-seeded Ogden variety.
Kent is a medium-early—maturing variety
which has been superior in yield near the Ohio
River when planted early. It lodges very little,
has brown pods, and large yellow seeds.
Perry is later maturing than Shelby and
Clark but earlier than the other recommended
varieties. It yields well, has gray pods,
and fairly large yellow seeds.
(2)

 Thg Soybean Tests:
The soybean variety tests reported herein
` were designed to evaluate varieties which are
commonly grown or appear promising for use in
Kentucky. The 1962 results of the Uniform
b Group IV and Group V tests of experimental
strains of soybeans conducted at Henderson in
cooperation with the U.S. Regional Soybean
A Laboratory, Urbana, Illinois are reported in
the current progress report of the laboratory.
The Henderson county tests were located
in the main soybean—producing area of the
state on bottomlands of a stream which is
tributary to the Ohio River. The able
, assistance of Henderson County Extension Agent
Stuart Brabant is gratefully acknowledged.
Methods Usedi
The variety tests were planted in 4-row
- plots with three replications and in a ran-
domized block design. The rows were l9 feet
long and 36 inches apart. A l6-foot section
was harvested from each of the two center rows.
U Beans were planted at a rate of l2 seeds per
foot of row. The plants were cut by hand and
, the beans threshed with a nursery thresher.
Field losses of seed from this method of
harvesting are less than those sustained in
combine harvesting methods.
The attempt was made to follow best
cultural practices.
Yields: Seed weights were recorded
_ after the seed of all plots had reached a
uniform moisture content. Then weights were
calculated to bushels—per—acre basis.
(3)

 Oil content; Percent of oil was determined ·
from a composite sample of seed from all repli-
cations in each test. Analyses were made at
the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station
chemical laboratory. Percent oil is expressed
on moisture-free basis.
Seed size is reported as weight in grams _
per lOO seeds.
Damaged beans per lOO represents those
beans which were affected by purple stain and
downy mildew.
Lodging notes were recorded at or near
maturity according to the scale shown in foot-
note to each table.
l Height of plants was determined as the
average length of plants in a plot from ground
to the top extremity at time of maturity.
Maturity is taken as the date when the
pods are dry and most of the leaves have
dropped. It is expressed as days earlier (-)
or later (+) than Perry as a reference variety.
Seed guality is rated from l to 5 according
to the scale shown as a footnote to each table.
The factors considered in estimating seed quality
are development of seed, wrinkling damage, and
brightness.
Interpretation of Data:
The difference in yield between varieties `
necessary for reasonable assurance that such
an inherent yield potential exists, has been {
calculated and is given in a footnote to each
table. Unless the yields of the two varieties
(4)

 or the two row spacings being compared differ
by as much as or more than the figures shown,
little confidence can be placed in the apparent
· superiority of one variety over the other under
the conditions of the particular test.
Data On agronomic characteristics other
_ than yield have not been analyzed statistically;
however, small differences between any two
‘ varieties are likely to be of little importance
and should not be considered strongly indicative
of a true difference.
Duration of tests: The results of
evaluating varieties over a period of several
years are more trustworthy than those from a
, single year. A given variety may be outstanding
in performance one year and show less desirable
characteristics another year. Results over a
period of years tend to average these fluctuations.
Performance data for more than a single year are
given in the tables that follow the table for
1962.
X
* Recom ended Soil Treatments:
If soil tests indicate that the soil is
moderately or strongly acid use ground limestone
_ at rate of 2 or 3 tons per acre respectively;
if low in available phosphorus use fertilizers
to supply up to 80 pounds of P205 per acre; and
if low in available potassium use fertilizers
to supply up to 80 pounds of KZO per acre.
Apply limestone and fertilizers either before
_ or after plowing. To avoid injury to seedling
soybeans, do not drill fertilizer in contact
with the seed. Soybeans respond well to the
use of needed lime and fertilizers on other
crops in the rotation ahead of the soybean crop.
(5)

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