xt75mk656s3r https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt75mk656s3r/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19690915  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September 15, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, September 15, 1969 1969 2015 true xt75mk656s3r section xt75mk656s3r rrn

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Monday Evening, September

15,

19

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Vol. LX1, No. M

Demonstration
Planned By SDS

i
t
UrClSS JXV(1T(1

By JIM FUDGE
Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) has called for a demonstration during the Board of
Trustees meeting scheduled for
1:30 p.m. Tuesday. The main
issues will be the new Student
Code, student rights and academic needs and freedom.
The Tuesday demonstration
is planned as a picket line around
the Administration Building,
with the hope of "greeting" the
board as members enter the building after lunch.
There is no concrete plan of
action yet, but several plans are
in the works, each based mainly
on the number of students who
attend the protest.

Pat Vogel, Maysville Student Government President, accepts award for
service to the community college, as Governor Louie B. Nunn, UK
president Otis A. Singletary and Maysville College Director Charles
T. Wethington look on.

Maysville Community College Dedicated
system to instill this' intangible
substance of creativity in our
college youth so these young
people can move with us into

By DICK ANDERSON
Kernel Stan" Writer
Covernor Louie B. Nunn and
UK president Otis A. Singletary
were featured speakers at dedication ceremonies held for Maysville Community College Friday

tomorrow."
Nunn praised UK's new president, saying "I believe the new
afternoon.
president will strive to serve the
In addressing the crowd of University and community and
over 350, the governor stated serve them well."
He asked the academic comthe states higher education system "must strive to be relevant munity to "look to the president
to the needs of young people of the university, not the govand the problems of society." ernor," when it comes to acaHe implied that in order to be demic matters, stating that there
effective, the training given in is "no place for politics when it
colleges must relate to todays comes to education for our chilsocial and economic structures. dren in this state."
UK president Otis A. SingleCovernor Nunn also stated
that "creativity must be in- tary, speaking at a dinner given
grained into our educational sys- that evening, said the new 2
million dollar facilities will open
tem."
"We look to the educational the door to higher education for

many ycung people who might
not have been afforded the opportunity otherwise.
Singletary praised the community college system, calling it,
"not Just an adjunct, but a valuable and integral part of our
system."
He cited the community college system as one of the most
important movements in higher
education today.

The UK community college
system has a present enrollment
of over 10,000 students.
The Maysville college is in its
second year of operation. Prior
to the completion of the new
facilities on the 120 acre site this
fall, classes were held at several
nearby sites, including a Presbyterian and a Methodist church.
Enrollment at Maysville is presently 357.

:

SG Proposals Blast

Forth, Trustees
A bill which condemns the actions of Dr. Stuart Forth, acting
vice president for student affairs,
for his refusal to recognize the
Free University will be presented
to the Student Government Assembly tonight.
The bill which Is being sponsored Jointly by four Student Government representatives, also
asks "that President Otis A. Singletary reconsider the decision
made concerning the Free University and make available the facilities of the University of Kentucky
to this organization."
A related resolution sponsored
by Steve Bright would invite the
Free University to the campus
and would reserve University facilities for the Free University
in the name of Student Government.
Another resolution will express disapproval of the New
Code
of Student Conduct
adopted by the Board of Trustees at its meeting July 28.
The resolution specifies the
failure of the Board of Trustees
to include two provisions which
were recommended by the University Senate.
The provisions recommended
by the Senate, but rejected by
trustees, wti elimination of
"double Jeopardy" and a requirement for the University to act
on any disciplinary case within
43 hours.

The recommendations by the
University Senate grew out of
last
spring's demonstrations
against the suspension of four
University students arrested on
drup charges.
Other resolutions which will
be brought before the Student

One of the reasons cited for
the demonstration included recent revisions in the Student
Code.
SDS charges that the changes
made by the trustees have little
or no resemblance to the revisions
originally proposed by the ad hoc

student committee during the
demonstrations last spring. SDS
says the code itself is a threat
to students and University morale.

Another reason cited for the
planned demonstration was the
Board of Trustees itself. SDS
notes there still are no voting
faculty members or students on
the board.
Cross-Sectio- n

SDS claims the board should
be composed not only of businessmen, but should also include
a
of the community.
It also proposes that members
of the Board of Trustees not be
appointed, but elected by members of the University community.
The group has asked interested students and faculty to take
part in the protest, adding that it
could be used by other groups as
a vehicle for their "particular
protest" to the administration or
the Board of Trustees.
cross-sectio-

n

AAMC Offers Aid To Minorities
By RAY HILL
black child from a rickety tenement in .the
ghetto isn't likely to grow up to be a doctor. At
least not as likely as a child from a warm, comfortable middle class home in suburbia.
To help balance the scales, The Association
of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) has formed-Committee on Medical Education of Minority
Croup Students. Dr. Roy K. Jarecky, associate
dean of admissions at the Medical Center, has been
named chairman of the committee.
Through a program of research and publication on the national level and more intensive
recruitment, selection and education on the local
level the committee hopes to increase the number
of minority group members in the health professions.
The program is funded by the Office of Econom
A

ic Opportunity (OEO). An OEO grant of $32413"
will be used to increase educational opportunity
in the health professions.
Medicine Gets Emphasis
Effective through August 1970, the grant is
intended to encourage access to the health professions

American

by

In-

dians, Mexican Americans, poor whites and others
who, according to AAMC studies, have been
"inadequately represented" in the past.
The fields of medicine and dentistry will receive primary emphasis in the project, but provision is made also for participation by the allied
health professions, hospital administration, nursing, osteopathy, pharmacy, public health and
veterinary medicine.
Continued on Page

7, CoL 2

Government include:

A proposal that Student Gov- emment ask that the search for
a permanent vice president for
Student Affairs be accelerated,
and "that the Student Govern-ment state its oppositlo to any- one now in the Student Affairs
Office for the position of Vice
President of Student Affairs."
A proposal that the Student
Services Committee investigate
and report to the assembly the
reasoning behind the present regulation preventing the students
who live in dorms from having

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refrigerators.
A resolution recommending
that the committee which was
appointed byCov. Louie B. Nunn
to study the revised Code of Student Conduct be retained through
academic year to "rethe 1009-7view amendments of the code
proposed by faculty and students" and recommend "appropriate action to the Board of Trustees."
The meeting will be at 7 p.m.
tonight in Room 422 of the Com-

11

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merce Building.

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Football?

We are not sure just what it is they are playing. Our photographer said
it was football but isn't that a basketball? The shot was taken during
the Graduate Student Association picnic at Maine Chance farm. Storv
on page 8.
Dick UxuUUoui
Kernel Photo

* 2

-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Sept. 15,

19

'Popi' Is Funny, Emotional

By DAHLIA IIAYS
Kernel Staff Writer
Those of you who last saw
g
Alan Arkin as the
villain in "Wait Until Dark" are
in for a surprise when you see
him as "Popi."
"Popi" can best be described,
as a sentimental comedy-drama- .'
(We doubt if you'll cry, but you
might have to put up several
coughing spells.) It's all about
a widowed Puerto Rican father
who schemes to get his two sons
out of a New York ghetto by
passing them off as Cuban refugees "shipwrecked" on the coast
of Florida.
Pretty good idea the only
trouble is that Popi is an un
knife-wieldin-

believably thorough character
who doesn't like to do anything
Just halfway. Result: by the time
the boys are picked up by the
Coast Cuard, they could pass as
fugitives from Cape Horn. In fact,
the two are so dehydrated that
there's doubt for a while whether
they'll live. Meanwhile, Popi uses
a trunkful of disguises to sneak
into the hospital and keep constant watch over the boys, who
are by now national heroes.
It is Popi's hope that his sons
will be adopted by a wealthy
family who will give them all
the benefits they would never
receive in Spanish Harlem. But
Popi has overlooked the fact that
d
love is usually a
phe- two-side-

Sunday 'Jams' Return

nomenon. When he sneaks into
the boy's hospital room for one
last goodbye, they plead with
him to reunite the family and
return to New York.
It's hard to find fault with
such an entertaining and original
plot, and even harder to criticize
the actors. Arkin is his usual
faultless self; Rita Moreno, Arkin' s girl friend in New York,
shows the same stuff for which
she won an Oscar in "Westside
Story." As for the boys (we wonder if their names are really
Miguel Alejandro and Ruben
Figueroa), they play much more
than a couple of "cute" kids,
and kind of renew our faith that
the future will produce its share
of Arkins and Hoffman s.
By the way, "Popi" leaves
town Tuesday, so you'd better
hurry while the supply lasts.

GAS

SAVE
FARiwlER

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31.9c

OCTANE Ethyl ....Vgal.

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94 OCTANE Regular
100

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p.m., Mon. thru Sat.

MAIN STREET
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Hours: 6:00

EAST

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SALTY TOM'S

Oyster Bar
LEXINGTON'S FINEST SEAFOOD RESTAURANT
FRESH OYSTERS and CHERRYSTONE
CLAMS now in season.
Service
Also Fast Carry-Ou- t
Facilities Available
Banquet
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Phone

252-950-

6

By DOB VARRON

"I'm building a bridge to the sky and this is just another
prop."
That was how Al Crabtree expressed what he and his group
were trying to do at the campus Jam-ibehind Memorial Hall
Sunday.
The Jam-i- n is an outgrowth of a Dillard House
that was shut down by the local authorities. It has since become
a University organization and goes by the totally understandable
name, The Extemporaneous Pleasure Rebellion.
The expression was free and at one point, extemporaneous.
Robert, a
spectator, vaulted onto stage and delivered
his version of "I'm So Clad." His bravado got more applause
than his voice.
The two scheduled acts, Al Crabtree and Croup and Tijim
Dust, were competent considering the format they performed under.
Crabtree, lead guitarist, awed the crowd of over 500 with several
solo runs that make hard rock the pulsating music it is.
"I jammed with the Vanilla Fudge and the Buddy Miles Express
this summer and that's how I really got interested in hard rock,"
said Crabtree.
Forum U neon fined
The really refreshing aspect of the whole idea is that anyone
who likes music or performs can share what he has to offer with
others in an
situation.
The forum is not confined to music any other vehicle of
is welcome. Sunday afternoons are dull by nature. The
Extemporaneous Pleasure Rebellion is malting them interesting,
and honestly, pleasurable.
n

er

uni-nam-

easy-goin-

g,

low-pressu- re

The schedule for the 1969-7- 0
Season:
Oct. 20 Mantovani and his Or-

CONCERT and

chestra.
Nov. 3 Stockholm University
Chorus.
Nov. 7 Irving R. Levine, NBC
European correspondent, lecture.
Nov. 11
Scott Carpenter, astronaut and aquanaut, lecture.
Nov. 19 Osipov Balalaika Orchestra with Bolshoi singers and
dancers.
Jan. 22 David
recital.
Feb. 25 Danzas Venezuela, folk

dancers.

March 5 Sebastian Cabot, television personality, actor, lecture.
March 21
Detroit Symphony Orchestra, with Ivan Davis, paino
soloist.
April 6 Rotterdam Symphony

Orchestra.

April 10

Pauline Frederick,

NBC

United Nations correspondent,
lecture.
April 16 Anna Moffo, soprano,
and Franco Bonisolli, tenor, in

operatic; duo:recital.

.

LECTURE SERIES
HERE AT THE UNIVERSITY
ALL FULL TIME STUDENTS

admission by I.D.

and Activities Card.

SPOUSE MEMBERSHIPS $5.00
Available to
e
students for
husband or
wife at Room 206, Adm. Bldg. TaJte I.D. and
full-tim-

non-stude-

nt

Activities Card.

SEASON MEMBERSHIPS $10.00 for all others.
By mail from Mrs. Burton Milward, 440
Andover Drive, Lexington, Ky. 40502. . . . Make
check payable to Central Kentucky Concert

Association.

All programs will be at the University of Kentucky's Memorial
Coliseum on Euclid Avenue, beginning at 8:15 p.m..

WHY SHOULD YOU
Tutor the disadvantaged?
Assist the poor in Appaldchia?
Help the mentally ill? ;
Work with the juvenile delinquent?
Serve in the neighborhood centers;
;
program?
.

;

;

-

stuFind the answer through
dent volunteer projects designed to bridge
the gap between the privileged and the
poor the advantaged and the disadvantaged by working with various community
social agencies. Under professional guidance you will have the opportunity to gain
an intimate insight into the "Other America." You will acquire a realization that you
can make a contribution to solving the
problems of society. For further information contact the Newman Center, 320 Rose
Lane (phone
or
Tram-Actio-

255-046- 7

n,

254-174- 0.

APPLICATION FORM

I

pf

Trans-Actio-

n

Newman Center
320 Rose Lane
Name
Lexington

Address

Home Address
Phone

Car

Class

Major
MAIN INTEREST AREAS:
Appalachian work projects

Tutoring
Serving in

low-incom-

e

centers

Helping the emotionally ill
Working with disadvantaged youth

* 15, 1000- -5

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Sqt.

'Hey Martha, Isn't That Guy Our Waiter?

'Mary9 Actors Beat Script

Dy DAN COSSETT
Arts Editor
As you walk into the Barn
Dinner Theatre near Winchester,
you see a handful of hosts or
hostesses hovering around the
tables, bringing coffee and Ailing
water glasses. Before long it occurs to you that these people
look more like actors than they
do waiters. Well, they are actors,
but until at least half the play is
over you are firmly convinced
that they should have stayed with
the dishes and coffee pots.
That sort of thinking is not
entirely fair to the actors, for several reasons. For one thing, the

I
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N,

I INCINSI,

STATIONUYIjl
MADRAS

trmADS-l-

I LEATHER
Ulastic

'

GOODS,

t

INFLATAILIsSxSSBW
HIASUMJ TO PUR61
AND MAKI
MORI tMJOYAILI!

MELANCHOLY

y.lM

C

current
production,
"Mary,
Mary" by Jean Kerr, is a bad
play from the word go. It is one
of those cutesy deals that depend
on unbelievable situations for its
plot and humor.
It is also obvious that the actors are not very well paid. (There
are little placards on the tables
to remind you to leave monetary
s
who
gratuities for the

o

eS&s
dyT

I

actor-host-

have done so much to please
you.)
As the play progresses, the
acting fortunately progresses
along with it. In the first act,
the performers have a tendency

to overplay their lines and exaggerate their comedic movements.
The only really consistently funny performance is given by
Sanders as a wiseacre tax
lawyer. Cranted that Sanders has
the best lines in the script, but
his delivery and voice (which is
reminiscent of a Dallas hairdresser) lends additional credence to
Bur-re- ll

his performance.

The title role is played
sporadically by Judy Rosenblatt
who obviously has a great deal of
talent, thespian and anatomic.
Unfortunately, she trys to
both.
Walking
around with her shoulders drawn

veloping into hilarity, ending
with warmth and a beginning
step toward human understanding and honesty, "The Owl and
The Pussycat," the current production at Beef 'n' Boards in
Simpsonville, offers a night of
delightful entertainment.
Jack Heller and Joan Lancaster had the difficult task of
portraying the only two characters in the three-ac- t
play, a job
which they completed with what
can only be called smoothness.
Although Heller and Miss
caster had both been in previous
productions of 'The Owl . . .
this was their first experience
working together.
Not only are the actors to be
congratulated, but also director
Storer Boone and production
manager Ed Mohler, for keeping
the
comedy moving
through the many entrances and
fast-pace-

d

exits.

The Plot Thickens
Jack Heller as Felix, a

psuedo-intelligen-

psuedo-write- r,

Apt)

v,fefs-s- gs

top-lin-

n,

'Owl And Pussycat
An Adult Jab At Sex
By CAROLYN DUNNAVAN
Women' Page Editor
Breezing in with laughter, de-

If

way back, she looks like an advertisement for Maidenform.
In the early stages of the play,
her acting gives the same impression. She plainly just tries
too hard. Miss Rosenblatt gives
the impression, however, that
with time she will develop into a
e
comedic actress. The
signs are already there. Since
Mary is a sarcastic wench to begin with, Miss Rosenblatt's
clipped dry delivery finally makes
Mary a believable character,
which is no mean accomplishment considering the shortcomings of the script.
The rest of the cast gives decent performances with the possible exception of Kathleen
who is extremely miscast as the 'other woman.' Miss
McMahon is just too fresh and
pretty to be a blase health food
nut.

t,

book- -

mi

store clerk, does his duty as an
American by reporting to the
apartment manager next door
that he has seen Doris, played
by Joan Lancaster, accepting
money from several men. Doris
is thrown out of her apartment
and, as the play opens, she is
beating on Felix's front door,
demanding vengeance and a
place to sleep.
The temporary arrangement

of Doris's sleeping quarters turns
into a permanent situation, Felix'
overcomes his sexual hangups,
and their love affair turns into
love.

Intellectuals Jabbed
Bill Manhoff, author of 'The
Owl . . . ," uses Doris to poke
fun at the whole socity of
s.
At one point
Felix admits that he cares for
Doris. Doris responds with a
cry of "See, you said it. You
admitted it. What was so hard
about admitting it?" Felix
doesn't know, says he has
to "think about it" for a while.
pseudo-intellectual-

Doris then says, "If thinking
messes you up so much, perhaps you shouldn't do it so often."
The whole play is full of
cliches, but used so often and
usually at such an inappropriate
time that it points out the sillin
ness and emptiness of a
cliche-ridde-

Ut&PBiiBE
HEAP BEEF
COMBO
Includes

o HEAP BEEF
SANDWICH
CRISPY FRIES

M
Ir-f- i

cut of Levi's new
has your campus
buzzing in, both, the flare and
straight leg styles. And what
patterns! Look great with the
one guy's Norfolk jacket? And
how about the combo of Levi's
small check with the striped
mock-necsweater?

("CREAMY

The
fall slacks

k

lftltmucr5itiJ?op

7i

That all new cordless corduroy
outfit gives the posh look to the
gal who cares. This one's a
set off with a printed
full cut blouse. Kicky, what?

lffl

wS.UMST0Ne

one really is.
A light comedy, reminiscent
of the Dick Van Dyke style of
humor, "The Owl and The Pussycat" is a must to see if not
for enjoyingthe delightful humor,
then for the thrill of seeing two
truly professional performers at

work.

-

-

The Kentucky Kernel

only

two-piec- e,

'

It's just something people say."
Acting On High Plane
As the play ends, Felix and
Doris decide it is time to start
over, this time without pretending, this time being what each

COLE SLAW

up-tem-

IrV

language. When Felix asks
Doris what one of her cliches
meant, she replies, "I don't know.

Wl;'

BEVERAGE OF YOUR
CHOICE ON THE HOUSE
WITH UK I.D.

ill

The Kentucky Kernel. University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington. Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five timet weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4ttJ.
Begun as the Cadet in IBM and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising published herein is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION

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Phone
233-048-

RATES

Yearly, by mall
Per copy, from files
KERNEL

Editor, Managing tailor
Editorial Pag Editor.
Associate Editors. Sports

News Desk

9.10

TELEPHONES
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* Iernel

The Kentucky

University of Kentucky
1894

MONDAY,

SEPTEMBER

15, 19G9

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
James W. Miller,

Editor-in-Chi-

George U. Jepson, Managing Editor
Itolwrt Duncan, Advertising Manager

Bob Drown, Editorial Page Editor
Dottie Bean, Associate Editor
Dan Gossett, Arts Editor
Don Rosa, Cartoonist
Bill Mathews, Jean Rcnakcr

Chip llutchcson, Sports Editor
Carolyn Dunnavan, Women's rage Editor
Frank Coots, Mike llerndon, Jeannie Leedom,
Assistant Managing Editors

.

Death Of A Dream?
The UK administration's

deci-

sion to exclude the Free University from the campus is unparal-le- d
in its lack of rationale and
its total disregard for student rights.
This is no time for the UK community to arouse itself to the point
of frenzy; however, the issue should
not be allowed to die.
For those who are not aware of
the events leading to the present
situation, a brief history is in order.
The Free University is a group of
people dedicated to establishing an
opportunity for students of all varieties to share in the joys of pure,
'simple learning learning as its
own reward. The Free U desires to
offer, alongside the present University, a program to encourage a
"student's quest for knowledge,

insight, understanding, and awareness," not his "scramble for grades,
credits, honors, and degrees."
The Free University applied for
recognition as a student organization after having conducted enough
classes to determine that there was
legitimate interest in their concept.
The UK administration refused
their application on .the grounds
that it represented a "continuing
instructional body" which was contrary to the purpose of UK. The
Student Affairs vice president, Stuart Forth, contended that there were
a number of technical points in the
application that could be worked
A

out, but the basic issue was that
of the Free U's right to function
within the UK community. The
refusal of recognition had the effect of denying the Free U access
to any University facilities, thereby forcing it underground and out
of sight of many UK students.
Since the initial announcement
of refusal, the Free U has tried
unsuccessfully to change the administration's mind. Dr. Forth' s
office has refused to budge.
Some feel the administration
was right in refusing recognition.
Many feel it was a violation of the
student's right to education and a
violation of the right of a group
of
people to assemble;
like-mind-

ed

themselves.

These are the facts. If the University community agrees with the
action which has been taken, there
is nothing further to do. There
are those who do not approve of
the decisions. If, after becoming
aware of both aspects of the issue,
these people are still convinced
that an injustice is being committed, it is their obligation to
demonstrate this conviction : by:
meeting with the Free U people
at eight o'clock tonight in the
Student Center ballroom.
A strong show of support is
necessary for the life of the Free
U. Surely such concern has not
vanished from our University.

"But sir, you

and the accompanying protection from
double punishment for the same offense.
Ignoring their own rhetoric as published
in the UK catalogue and the reasonable
demands of both students and faculty,
the Board of Trustees, with the quisling
cooperation of supposed student spokes- man Tim Futrell, has instead imposed
upon us the new, revised student code.
This code limits every student by giving
the Administration the power of dismissal
for offenses that are rightfully the sole
concern of outside legal authorities, (such
as the alleged drug offenses of last spring)
and the power to abandon the avowed
educational and service functions of UK
by denying facilities for students to seek
knowledge in directions determined by
himself (i.e. , the Free University).
This Board of Businessmen, who rule
our lives, obviously cannot be concerned
with academia. It must instead concern
itself with the care and feeding of technicians to fit the round holes of the business world. This' concept was not fundamental to the founding of UK, but one
that has been impressed upon us.
We, the Students for a Democratic
Society, do not believe that suppression
need be tolerated. We call now for the
resignation of the entire Board of Trustees
if they continue their disregard for the
needs and rights of the people of our
We call also upon all members
of the university community students,
faculty, and staff to Join us in a peace- ful demonstration of our concern and dis- satisfaction with the Board's actions. We
are to gather outside the Administration
Building before tle meeting of the Trustees
at 1:30 on Tuesday.
If you can give a few moments in the
interest of your freedom, please be there.

uni-versit- y.

Kernel Editors
In times past when students carne
to the conclusion that the administra-- .
tion had done them dirty, they wrote it
off to bureaucratic inefficiency Lately,
however, students are coming to realize
that administrators go out of their way
occassionally to drop a little excrement
on the student's body.
Concerning the recent whomp on the
Free University and the student code, it
seems that the popular duet of Single- has picked a most oppurtune
time to display muscle and force for an'
appreciative political audience. In other,
words if Stu and Otis- - wanted a safe
issue on which to make a firm
stand. Free University would be just
a dandy place to start. Interest was
waning in Free U., and it has all of the
features that irk our Frankfort patrons.
orMainly, it is an
ganization plus the fact that it's membership includes that
fright
factor,
personnel.
Student reaction to the barring of Free
U. from campus is not based primarly on
the act itself, but on the heavyhanded
'Big Daddy' tactics that the administration has displayed in strangling Free U.
When Free U. applied for consideration
as a student group, the powers that be
completely abandoned their usual practice of counselling the group on University requirements. Then when Free U.
fell short, the administration
and emphatically said no, as if
it never had any intention of allowing
Free U. on campus.
e
tacCoing along with the
tics, Vice President for Student Affairs,
Stuart Forth has been strangely hard to
contact this weekend. It could be conjectured that he will meet with the Free U.
.members on Monday Just, in time to
invalidate possible charges of refusing
contact and conversation with the student

Administrators must be made to rethey serve the function of
managers, not masters. The taxpayers
of Kentucky, among them a large majority of the student body, have intrusted
the mechanics of running the University
to them. It is an abomination and transgression of that commission when students
are not allowed to take definitive steps
toward expanding their education within
the physical limitations of their own University.

It's all a matter of conditioning. The
administration is going to have to learn
that students , are not going to continue
serving as slit trenches for the front
office. From now on when the administration drops a load on the students, they
may find that it will be thrown right
back at them smeared in their faces.

er

ever-effecti-

ty

perfunc-toriall-

front-offic-

leaders.

."

alize that

tary-Fort- h

;

..

The administrations ot colleges all
over the country haven taken the attitude that the University belongs to them,
and by their grace, students are allowed
to come and grovel and suck up the
swill that is passed off as education.

By DAN GOSSETT
AND
FRANK COOTS

To The UK Community

study, so

Staff Soapbox

AVAV.j.v.AAVAV..VLv..

Letter From SDS

It has been a consistent demand of
the Board of Trustees that UK's academic
life be geared not to the search for knowledge, but rather to the rigid structure of
business life. The student's quest for knowledge and truth cannot be confined by
a society unwilling to acknowledge that
perfection in our educational structure
has not yet been achieved.
Last year, the students of this university asked the Board not only for the necessary academic freedom, but also for a
right supposedly granted all Americans:
the right to due process in criminal cases.

won1 t let us

y

:

The reaction of violence on the. students part is not advisable at this time.
It would hurt both the student and the
administrator. When alternatives run out,
restrained rational leadership becomes
crippled and the baton passes to the
shooters and burners.
For those among us who wish to take
some concrete action in regard to the
Free U. mess, it seems that a demonstration within view of cameras that will
football
regionally televise the
game would be an effective tactic.
What it boils down to is this: most
animals, including students, are basically
passive creatures; they will not attack
until cornered and helpless.
The administration of this University
should proceed with extreme caution. The
students are only inches away from the
corner, and are capable of attacking with
UK-India-

terrific ferocity.

The situation could get hairy.

* 15.

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Sept.

Student Loans, Rate Hike Attacked

The Associated Press
Foes of high interest rates
and of student dissenters may
make it liard for Congress to
administration leaders'
keep
pledge to bankers to raise the
interest on government-guarantee- d
student loans.
Hanks across the nation are
reported to he pouring out loan
funds to students on the promise of an increased return, hut
the bill that would give it to
them is under a double attack.
One group objects to giving
the banks an interest rate in

crease above the 7 percent now
fixed for the student loans. The
bill would permit an adjustable

rate up to 10 percent.
The other group wants to add
a provision that would withdraw
federal financial support from
any student involved in a serious
campus uprising, but it faces
a procedural roadblock.
In an effort to keep the bill
out of the student unrest controversy its manager, Hep. Carl
chose tobring
I). Perkins,
it up Monday under rules pro- D-K-

Black Manifesto Answered
Ind.
Protestant and Orthodox leaders have outlined their
answer to the Black Manifesto
they'll put big money into black
economic advancement, and let
black churchmen decide who uses
it and how.
"Black
and "trust in out black brethren" were cited as keynotes of
the approach. Its lack of limitations was sharply criticized by
some whites.
It was hammered out Thursday in a sometimes heated session of the general board of the
National Council of Churches,
which embraces 33 denominations with a total of more than
42 million members.
INDIANAPOLIS,

(AP)-Amer-

ican

Reject Ideology
Their top leaders make up the

Some white delegates here, including leaders of the Christian
Church Disciples of Christ,
pushed unsuccessfully for amendments aimed at prohibiting use
of church funds to support groups
advocating violenc