xt75qf8jf68m https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt75qf8jf68m/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19320401  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April  1, 1932 text The Kentucky Kernel, April  1, 1932 1932 2013 true xt75qf8jf68m section xt75qf8jf68m Best Copy Available

I.

KERNEL

SEMI-WEEKL-

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, FRIDAY, APRIL

VOLUME XXII

On U.

Approximately 3.500 Persons
Arc Exported nt University During Period

University

PROGRAM DIRECTED BY
PROF. LOUIS R. CLIFTON

By A. A. DAL'GIIKRTT

"Nav. nay." quoth Eleanor Smith.
the old horsewoman, when asked if
she had ever been victimized on All
Fools day, the anniversary of which
Is observed at the university today,
April 1.
J. Delmar Adams, on tne otner
hand, even gets caught on the
venerable gag that "Professor Zilch
will not meet his class today you
needn't come." Adams is good at
fooling others, too.
When In high school he once
gave his geometry teacher candy
with red pepper in it. mere is
no connection between that and
the fact that she flunked him in
the finals.
Professor Portmann. boarding
house monger of the old school, recalls being served with pancakes
fried after the manner of batter
smeared on either side of a circular piece of cloth. Flannel cakes,
as 'twere.
Justine Cook this story Is very
culinary reports having switched
soda and baking powder, vice versa-in- g
their containers, the night of
one March 31. Next morning. April
1. her biscuits were not any worse

Rands. Glee Clubs To Compete In Memorial Hall, Gym
Today, Saturday
h.

al

nation-wid-

celebra-

e

tion of George Washington's birth.
The college contest was won by J.
R. Gillespie. Asbury College, and the
high school contest by Virginia
Second and
Gibson, Montloello.
third places in the college event
were won respectively by Predericka
Purvear, Nazareth College, and Sam
Beckley, Eastern State Teachers'
college: and in the high school event
Maysvllle,
by Martha Valentine,
second and Mildrod Coley, Shelby-vill- e,
(
third.
Wednesday's program opened at 9

extemporo'cock with discussion,
aneous sneaking, and oratory events.
Public discussion contests were held
in Frazee hall. Sam Milner, Paris,
was awarded first' place, John
Newport, second place:
and David Maloney, St. Xavier, and
Rosamond Bayne Middlesboro tied
for third place.
Extemnoraneous speaking contests
were held in the Training School
library. Joe Greer, Paris, was awarded first place; Harold Walker, Danville, second: and Billy Locke
Dudley Watkins. Clarkson,
and George Braden, Male, tied for
le,

third.

Howard Smathers, Heniy Clay
High school, Lexington, won first
place in the oratory contest. Second
place was won by Maxine Mason,
West Point High school, and third
place by Hoyt Parsley, Kyrock. Winners of discussion, extemporaneous
6peaking and oratory spoke again
on the Wednesday night program in
the Training school auditorium. story
Finals in declamation and
telling events also were held

(Continued on Page

4)

ANNUAL BUSINESS
MANAGER NAMED
Jobn Ewing To Succeed Finch
nilliard; Editor Will B
Elected by Members of
Junior Class
John Ewing was declared business
manager of the 1933 Kentuckian at
a meeting of the Board of Student
Publications Tuesday afternoon.
Only one other petition was submitted to the board and the candidate
was disqualified.

Four students will run for the poof the ansition of
nual, it was announced following
the meeting. They are Horace Helm,
John M. Kane, Horace Miner, and
editor-in-chi-

ef

I. C. Evans.
Ewing Is a Junior in the College
of Agriculture and a member of Pi
Kappa Alpha fraternity. He is captain in the university R. O. T. C.
unit, a member of Scabbard and
Blade honorary military fraterntly,
Alpha Zeta, honorary agriculture
fraternity, BuKy Circle, the Men's
council, and the Men's
Student council. His home is in
Louisville.
The editor and business manager
of the annual are elected each year
by the Junior class and have complete charge of the work of proyear book.
ducing the university
The board of publication passes
upon the qualifications of the candidates and the Junior class makes
the final selection. The date for
the election will be set by Malcolm
Raster, president of the class.
Prank Stone is editor and Finch
Hilllard is business manager of the
is being
1932 Kentuckluii, which
printed In The Kernel plant.
ic

F unds

Recall

Personages
Them

JOHN EWING

SENT

BY LIBERAL CLUB

Communications Addressed to
Social Problems Clubs of
Five Colleges in
than u&.ial.
Uncle Enoch Grehan reminisces
New York
he was duped, when about 16
that

COOPERATION ASSURED
Letters regretting the action of
Bell county authorities in refusing
admittance to representatives of
five Eastern colleges for sociological
research in Eastern Kentucky coal
fields have been sent to the social
problems clubs of the five colleges
by the university Liberal club ac
cording to Richard Weaver, presi
dent of the club. The communica
tions follow a telegram sent Sat- turday by the organization sympathizing with the party of 40 students which was turned back at the
Tennessee-Kentuck- y
state line when
it sought entrance for Investigation
of conditions in the mining region.
At least five representatives of
the club also are planning to accompany the party from Commonwealth College, resident Labor col-

lege in Mena, Arkansas, which is on
its way to Kentucky to distribute
relief supplies to the miners, it was
revealed yesterday by the Liberal
club president.
The names of the
delegates were not made known.
Copies of the letter are being
sent to the social problems clubs.
which correspond to the university
Liberal club, of Columbia Univer
sity, New York University, the Col
lege of the City of New York, Hunter College (a girls' institution in
New York City), Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, and
Union Theological Seminary, New
York City.
The letter, which assures the Na
tional Students' league and mem
bers of the investigating party of
the cooperation of the Liberal club
In further efforts, was written to
tell the party that "the state of
Kentucky is not unanimous in its
opposition to students of social phenomena who come to it from outside."
Although the letter was signed by
Richard Weaver, president of the
Liberal club, approximately 20 uni
versity students consented to sign
it before that method was abandoned, Weaver said in an interview
Wednesday. He previously received
a reply to the first telegram from
Donald Henderson,
instructor of
economics at Columbia and faculty
leader of the group of Eastern college students, expressing appreciation of the club's interest and soliciting further aid from students
and faculty members of the university and, other Kentucky educational institutions.
The Liberal club was organized
on the campus three years ago with
a membership of approximately 13
students, but never was recognized
officially by the university. The organization was disbanded shortly after, but because of lack of student interest, has been inactive
for several months. Its first cause
of organization was In opposition to
compulsory military training.

45

Frankfort Authorities See Little
K. Campus Danger that U. K. Will Be Without

Pranks Foisted on

LETTERS

NEW SERIES NUMBER

1, 1012

All Gowks9 Day
Produces Ha-H- a

Business Manager

HI SCHOOL WEEK

Augusta Tilgham High school,
and Holmes High school.
Covington, were winners In the
semi-finround of the debating
tournament, hold at 1:30 o'clock
yesterday afternoon In the Training
School auditorium as a feature of
the twelfth Annual High School
week program which Is In progress
under the sponsorship of the extension department and directed by
Prof. 'Louis Clifton, assistant director of the department. Approximately 3.500 students, principals and
superintendents from all parts of
the state are ejpected to visit the
university during the period, which
began Tuesday, March 29, and will
close Saturday, April 2.
Paris High school came first In
both public discussion and extemporaneous speaking events and Lexington won the contests In oratory.
Harlan won first In boys piano,
Sulphur In violin finals, and Shawnee In cello.
High School week opened at 1:30
o'clock Tuesday afternoon with the
first round of the debate tournament. Winners were Bowling Green,
Somerset. Augusta Tilgham, Lancaster, St. Xavier, Middlesboro, Caney-vill- e,
and Holmes High school, Covington.
The George Washington oratorical contest was held at 8 o'clock
Tuesday night In the auditorium
of the Training School. Although
not a regular part of High School
week the contest was held In connection with it in observance of the

HIGH SCHOOL W EEK
PARTICIPANTS

KENTUCKY

OF

FINALS REACHED
IN 12TII ANNUAL

WELCOME

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
UNIVERSITY

FRIDAY EDITION

i

years old, by a newspaper story that
a street car had "fallen In" on
West Main street and had completely disappeared.
Great crowds,
said the story, were congregating at
the place in awe and wonder.
Gathering up his dogs and laying
them down in rapid succession,
Uncle Enoch, then nepotal instead
of avuncular, was the first and only
crowd to visit the spot .
One of Jack Griffin's students
announced his Intention of fooling
his prof today by not answering
roll call when he goes to class.
Another has indicated that he will
do something Just as good by going
to a class from which he has been
excused for today.
fishy
There may be something
about the notice on the Commons
announcing that
board
bulletin
those men seeking summer employment should see Mr. W. C. Price
today at the Lafayette hotel. Today is a bad day for placing de- pendence In ambiguous notices, but
naturally no one would think of
trying a trick like that hinted at.
Tmnprinl Rcrivpner T.arrv Herron
recounts that he rang his land
lady's doorbell once with the idea of
fooling her. When she had finished toneue-lashin- g
him she was
no landlady,
'cause ladies don't
talk that way.
Colonel Shells, the old Frankfor-te- r,
used to think it great fun to
leave messaees for wayward roommates to telephone certain numbers when they came in. Fried, the
college witcracker, says that people don't wait for April 1 to work
that trick on him it is a year-rouJob of his to call police stations, courthouses, and the like.
Which is phoney if not funny.

and U. of L.
To Debate by Radio

U. K.

Each Team Will Broadcast
From Own Studio; Contest
To Be April 18
With

each team

broadcasting

from its own university studio, the
University of Kentucky and the
University of Louisville will participate in a debate by radio, Monday, April 16. The university team
will uphold the negative of the
question,
"Resolved:
That the
Democrats Should Be Returned to
1932."
Power in
The debate will be broadcast
from 1 until 1:50 o'clock and loud
speakers will be installed in each
of the studios so that the debaters
may listen directly to the speeches
of their opponents. Each team will
present two principal speakers and

a rebuttal

According to plans announced
by Prof. Elmer O. Sulzer, director
of the Rtudio, the broadcasting will
directly
from one
be switched
studio to the other and a poll of
the radio audience's opinion of
the success of this type of broadcast will be made by the announcer of the Louisville studio. If this
from a
debate proves successful
standpoint of a broadcasting fearepeated, Professor
ture, it will be
The news plant of the Louisville Sulzer said.
Courier-JournThe advantages of this plan Inwill be Inspected
Saturday by the copyreadlng class clude the total reduction of trans- g
of the department of Journalism of portation expenses for partlclpnt-inteams and the expansion of
the university, under the direction
of Prof. Victor R. Portman. The stu- the audience to include radio
throughout the state.
dents will leave Saturday morning
at 7:30 o'clock from the ulumni
FKATFRMT1KS TO PI IUGE
gymnasium.
Approximately
35 students will
Pledging exerciser bv Al'iha Zeta
muke the inspection trip. A special
agricultural fraternity
bus has been chartered for the trip honorary
and will leave the university at and Block mid Bridle club will b"
7:30 o'clock Saturday morning. The features of the "As" society party
news plant of the paper will be the to ! held at the Jud"ln pavilion
station farm
llrst place visited, after which a on the
trip will be made to a rotogravure P'idav nleht. Anrll
The
plant in Louisville. The second In- will be held from 8 o'clock to 10 :i(l
spection trip Is optional, according and there will be music and danelwr
to Professor Portmann.
Admission for agriculture students
The group will return to Lexing- will be their Agriculture society
ton about 6 o'clock Saturday night. membershlij cards; for others
hen
The trip is compulsory for all stu- accomnanled by a society member).
dents in the copyreadlng cluss.
25 cents.

Copyreadinff Class
Will Inspect P'ant
al

exix-rlme-

1

CUT MAY DEPRIVE

W. A. C. ttanquct
All Women Invited to

TEACHING

An-

nual Affair Monday

ALL-AMERIC-

CaDtain-Ele-

Salaries Will Not I!e Paid Before Board of Trustees
Holds Meeting
TUITION FOR SUMMER
SESSION INCREASED

University Is $200,000

AN

Is Chosen on
Humor's

College

Quintet

as Outstanding Forward in
South
Sale, captain-eleWildcat basketof the
ball team, was selected as forward
of College Humor magazine's
team. Ellis
basketball
Johnson, captain of this year's
team, was mentioned as an outstanding guard.
selections apThe
peared in the May issue of College
Humor and were written up by Les
Oage, sports editor of the publication. Selecting five players for the
honor is no small task, Gage says,
and eliminations were in order until the last week in February, when
100 men remained on the list. It
was from the remaining 100 players
that Mr. Gage made his selections.
In explaining his choice for center Mr. Gage says. "There were not
so many outstanding centers in the
recent basketball campaign. Krause,
of Notre Dame, was the class of

Forest

"Aggie"
1932-3-

the

Middle-Wes-

t,

ct

3

outranking

any-

one in the Big Ten. Sale, of Kentucky, and Stewart, of Auburn, were
the best in the South.
"Both Krause and Sale were
awarded positions on the first team,
the latter being placed at a forward berth as running mate of Lou
Bender. Columbia's captain. It was
Impossible to choose between the
pair, so the lanky Kentucky center
was shifted to forward, where he
has played at times during his caDixie
reer with the
high-scori-

quintet.
"Forest Sale was the leading
scorer of the Southern league, averaging nearly 15 points per game
although having to overcome the
handicap of being a "marked man".
He was the star offensive player of
a great scoring machine. The Kentucky center, a six foot, four inch
boy, was not outjumped all season.
k
He was a fighter, a
and
an untiring worker on defense.
Coach Ray Ellerman, Washington
and Lee, said of him. 'Sale was the
best rebound man in the conference, and never failed to score
heavily though all of Kentucky's
opponents pointed their defensive
efforts for him'."
The All -- Americans, in Les Gage's
own words, are, "And so, our nombasinations for the
ketball roll of honor have been
completed for another year and
may we be spared the haunting
cries of the wolves.
First team:
Bender (Columbia) and Sale (Kenball-haw-

OPTIMISTIC VIEW

Killed in Plane Crash

TAKEN

Doctor Hutchinson
Is Guest Speaker
Pi Mu Epsilon to

Hear

Ad-

dress by Former Univer-

sity Student

Pi Mu Epsilon. honorary mathematics fraternity, will meet Monday afternoon, April 4. at 3:30 o'clock in room 109, McVey hall. The
sneaker for the meeting will be Dr.
W. R. Hutchinson,
head of the
mathematics and astronomy departments at Berea colege. He was
in 1922,
tucky), forwards:
(Notre graduated at the university degree
Krause
in
Dame, center; Wooden (Purdue) and received his master's
1924. After several summers spent
(Maryland),
and Berger
guards.
Chicago in research work, he took
Second team: Louchlln (Navy) and in
(U. C. L. A), forwards; his doctor's degree from Cornell in
Llnthlcum
8tewart (Auburn), center; Spahn 1931.
The subject of Dr. Hutchinson's
(C.C.N. Y). and Tackett
(Butler,
address will be "Maps and Certain
guards. Third team: Relff (NorthCyclic Involutions on Two Dimenwestern), and O'Learv
(Kansas),
forwards;
Schmidt (Kansas State sional Curriers." The speaker Is an
Teachers), center: Llcht (Minneso- eminent mathematician and is
ta), and Sexton (Arkansas), noted In the Held of geometry. He
at the meetiug
will read a pain-guards."
of the
of the Kentucky section
American Mathematics association
COSMOPOLITAN CLI H MI ETING in Richmond In May.
Each year PI Mu Epsilon brings
Mrs. Edna M Giles, house mother
of Boyd hall and a native of En- some outstanding person to speak
gland, will entertain members of at the university. Last year Prof
Unithe Cosmopolitan club of the uni- Maynie I Lndgson from the guest
versity with a dinner at 8 o'clock versity of Chicago was the
tonii'.ht in the dining room of Bovd speaker.
The meeting will be presided over
hall. The dinner will be followed
by a business
meeting, and all bv Dr. 11 H Downing, president of
the organization. Before the meet-lu- g
members are ure.ed to uttend.
an election of new members wil1
be held Outstanding graduates
KOTAHIINS UK tit ADAMS
mathematics and undergradu 'es
Dr. Jesse Adams spoke before the with a standing of 1 8 or beite ..ml
Richmond Rota v club at 615 o'- special ability In mathematics are
clock Tuesday night In celebration eligible for membership. The
chapter has approximately
of "ladles' night " Ills subject was
25 members.
"Personal Relationships."
r

VETOINGOF BILL
i

,5

v

;

'

tf

t

f

'

f

Court Action Required For
Schools To Receive Money
Provided in Budget

1

1.

'

REMEDYING DECISION
IS EXPECTED SOON

1

Situation Caused by LafToon's
Unintentional Vetoing of
Millage Tax Measure

k

Checks due members of the teaching staff of the university today
will not be paid until after a meeting of the Board of Trustees on
April 14, It was announced by Pres.
Frank L. McVey at the university
assembly.
Salaries of the teaching staff of
the university for the months of
March, April, May and June, or un
til the close of the present school
year, will be cut deeply but Presl
dent McVey expressed the hope that
teachers would receive at least half
of their salaries for the four months.
The cut does not affect members
of the experiment station and Agricultural Extension personnel, nor
will it affect the janitors and laborers employed at the university,
according to the president, who explained that the federal government
makes appropriations for the payment of these.
Although the state appropriations
for the summer school have been
reduced, the summer session will be
held as usual, but to offset the reduced appropriation tuitions will
have to be increased in order to
raise sufficient revenue. Teachers'
salaries for the summer session will
not be reduced more than 10 or
15 per cent, the president said. Tuition for summer school will be increased from $18.25 to $22.50.
"The university, like life, must go
on," Doctor McVey declared, adding that he believed that conditions
should be regulated so that next
year the personnel would not be reduced materially and salaries would
continue at the present 10 per cent
reduction, which went into effect in
February.
Action taken in regard to the cut
in salaries was made necessary by
a decline In Income from inheritance
and personal property taxes.
At
present the university is $200,000
behind on funds It ordinarily would
have received by this time of the
year.
Doctor McVey pointed out that
the depression which has been
sweeping the country since 1929 is
Just now striking the colleges and
universities throughout the nation,
and that other universities are in
the same condition as the University of Kentucky.
"The blame for existing conditions
cannot be laid to any individual,"
said President McVey, "but it is the
fault of forces over which we have
no control. I see no reason why, in
two years, the university cannot
come forth as strong as it has been
in the past."

DESPITE

;

Be-

hind in Collection of
Revenue

SELECTED

ct

STAFF

Next Biennium

OF MONTHLY PAY

The annual banquet sponsored
by the Women's Administrative
council will be Held at 6.30 o'clock Monday night at the
Phoenix
hotel. All university
women students,
faculty and
stall members and wives of faculty members are invited, according to notices issued by Dean
Sarah O. Blanding.
The banquet program Includes
stunts by women students and
members of the faculty, with an
award scheduled to be made to
the group presenting the best
stunt. Presentations which will
be made are the Mortar Board
award to the two girls in Patterson hall who have kept the
neatest room, and the Alpha
Gamma Delta cup to the outstanding freshman woman.
Other features will be the announcement of new officers of
the Y. W. C. A. and pledging by
Phi Upsilon Omlcron, honorary
home economics sorority. Elizabeth Poole, W. A. C. president,
will preside.

SALE

1 hroughout

;

v"-

(Special to The Kernel)

4

f

'

'

W

f

y

,

I

-

MARIOV STANLEY
Marion Stanley, 20 years old, son
of former Governor A. O. Stanley
and sophomore In the College of
Engineering, was fatally injured
late Monday afternoon when the
airplane In which he was making
his second
went Into a
dive as he was preparing to land
at the Halley airport, near Lexington. He was taken to a hospital
and died less than an hour later
without regaining consciousness.
Burial services will be held in
Harrodsburg at 2:30 o'clock this
All members
afternoon.
of the
Kappa Alpha fraternity of which
he was a member, will attend. He
is survived by his father mother,
and two brothers.
solo-flig- ht

CLASS IN SINGING
TO BE CONDUCTED
Frantz Proschowski, Head of

Frankfort, March 31 Little danger ultimately exists
that the University of Kentucky will be without fund?
throughout the next biennium although a clause in the
state budget bill repealed
continuing existing appropriations, authorities believe.
Nevertheless, the necessities
growing out of the situation
and Governor Laffoon'a unintentional vetoing of the bill
placing the millage tax in the
general fund will call for a
decision by the courts to permit state educational institutions to receive the money
that has been provided in the
reduced budget bill.
Governor Laffoon In signing the
reduced Kentucky budget bill, unwittingly approved a clause that repeals the millage distribution to the
schools. The clause provides that

"all annual and continuing (the
university's income rests on this
latter source) appropriations not
provided for in this act and all other
laws and parts of laws in conflict
herewith are hereby repealed."
Therefore, if the conditions of the
bill were allowed to exist unchanged
the instructional institutions would
be confronted
with the possibility
of facing the next two fiscal years
any available sources of
without

revenue.
The possibility of this contingency
early today caused a furor among
educational officials throughout the
state. Later, however, the scare was
somewhat lessoned as the educators
TO LECTURE TONIGHT
were assured that court lntenention
could ease the situation.
(Continued on Page 4)
Frantz Proschowski, head of the
voice department o the Chicago
Music college, will be at the university today under the auspices of
the university department of music. He will hold a master class in
singing this afternoon and at 8
Organiaions of
o'clock tonight in the Training
School auditorium he will deliver
University To Hold Ana lecture, which the public is innual Election of Officers
vited to attend.
Early Next Week
Each person who registers for the
The Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A.
singing class will be given a try-oand personal instruction by Mr. of the university will hold their anProschowski. The class will be held nual election of officers early next
at 3 o'clock in the training school week, with voting limited to memThe
auditorium and a registration fee bers of the organizations.
n members
of the Y. M. C. A. will
will be charged. Prof. Roy E.
by ballots which are being
and other members of the vote
music department are in charge of mailed to them . In the Y. W. C. A.
registration.
election each member will report to
Proschowski is a native of Copen- the cabinet member in charge of
hagen and is of Hungarian parent- voting, where she will receive her
age.. Oalli Curci and Tito Schipa ballot and have her name checked;
are numbered among his students, the voting will take place from 9 to
and he is recognized as the trainer 12 noon, and from 1 to 3 p.m.,
of many of the world's most famous Monday, in the lobbies of the Adopera singers. In connection with ministration building,
and Boyd
his work as head of the. voice de- hall during the lunch hour.
partment of the Chicago Music
For the first time in school hiscollege, he is the author of several tory, the names of three sophomores will head the list of Y.M.C.A.
of singing.
books on the art
Mr. Proschowski's visit to Lexing- nominees. Richard Fuller. Clar- ton at this time was arranged in ence Moore, and John Carter are
order that visitors to the annual the candidates for the office of
High School music might have an president of the organization.
Other nominees for the various
opportunity to hear him. and his
lecture tonight at 8 o'clock in the olfices of the Y. M. C. A. are
training school auditorium will be Thomas Posey and Jame Miner.
vice president; Truett Miller and
of especial interest to them.
Hugh Stewart, secretary; and Ecer-ie- tt
Lall and Robert Trigg, treasurer.
The list from which the et"ht
members of the Y. M. C. A. advls-- !
Lieutenant-Colone- l
ory board are to be selected include
Howard Theis. John St. John, Cum-jerCoffman, John Carter. WilMajor Owen R. Meredith,
of the university R. O. T. liam Bell. Kenneth Marquette. T, J.
C. unit, has received notification Horlacher. Morton Walker. A. Van-- I
of his promotion to the rank of denboseh. and W C. MeCarter.
Due to complications. It has been
lieutenant-colonfrom the United
States war department. The promo- necessary to make modification In
the list of nominees for the Y. W.
tion was effective March 1.
Lieutenant-ColonMeredith Came C A officers. The present list Includes Katherlne Jones, president;
to the university In July, 1928, when
Lancaster and Emily
lie was transferred from the Puna-m- a Mananna
Canal zone. He served with the Reeves, vice president; Wins'on
chemical warlare sen ice for sever- llvron and Charlotte Redman,
Clam Margaret Fort and
al years after the close of the Wo: Id
War. His army record includes ser- Rita Wathan. treasurer.
The nominating committee
is
Islands,
In
vice
the Philippine
. 'anee.
Panama, and ether po.-t-s comnosed of senior members of the;
rouehout the United States. When Y. W C A. cabinet, including Eleaio L'lutcd Stales entered the World nor Smith, retiring president. M iry
Helen Darnell,
War he was stationed at the Uni- Allison Threlkeld.
versity of Minnesota on R. C). T. C. Lillian Clooeli. Iva liianhaiu. and
Alice Mae lUirhng.
The results of
duty.
Lieutenant-colonMeredith grad- the election will be formally an
nounced at the W. A. C. banquet to
uated from the University of Nebraska and the United States Mili- be held at 6 30 p in., Monday, at
the Phoenix hotel.
tary academy at West Point.

Chicago Music School
Will Lead Master
Group

Y. JL, Y. W. HEADS

WILL BE CHOSEN

Religious

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Jar-ma-

Meredith Appointed

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* Best Copy
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The Kentucky Kernel

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HERB SHALL THE KERNEL rilKS.1
BTtTDENT RIGHTS MAINTAIN
.
LAWRENCE HERRON
I OUIHC THOMPSON
.
.
MART ALICE SALVERS,

.

ALL

KUtnr-ln-Chl- tl

Mnnocltif Edlfnr
An$octatr Fdltor

Atsittati Edttort
Marvin C. Wachi
Robert Hauler

John M. Kanr
BIIm Warrm
Anirelo J

Tomaxulo

RALPH C. JOHNSON

.

.

.

Sporti

fidor

Writrn
J. Del mar Adam
Norbert Campbell
Bunny Day
S octet)

tdilori
Eleanor Smith

Fmlly Hardin

Writer
Bteabrth Hardin

Lois

Orubb

Special Wrttcrt
Jacq Roby
Webrter H Casa
Marvin Markman
Robert H MrOauvhey
Art

JOHNNIE CRADDOCK
DOROTHY

tutor

Literary editor

TANNER

GILBERT KIN06BURY . . . New i editor
AiHttatt Newt Edttort

Mary

Terrell
Oeorge M. Spencer

Herman Oraham
Jamet Palmer

C.

Reporter
Joan Carlgan
John St. John
PhU Ardcry
Charlton Wallace
Mary Caldwell
fiumam Pearlman
Mar'orle Welst
Jane Hamilton
Betty Dlmoek
Mary Agnea Brend
Betty Boyd
John Potter
Polk
Sarah DrLong
John C. Miller
. . Amines Afanoper
Afitatantt
John Oood Ned Turnbflll

COLEMAN R SMITH
Evelyn Treabes.s

Advertising Staff
Bill Durrett
Oscar Haiutit
CAMERON COPPMAN.

Circulation Monaaer

COURAGE, KENTUCKY
The test of a great leader is the
confidence vested In him by his
subordinates;
the salvation of an
institution, the confidence
of its
leader. Such confidence and cooperating and persevering spirit as
that revealed by both the faculty
and President McVey in facing,
squarely and unafraid, the present
unstable financial condition of the
University of Kentucky can lead to
nothing other than the readjustment of immediate prospects and.
in the near future, the
of a more favorable situation.
President McVey, speaking of the
university's financial problems, addressed, Wednesday, in Memorial
hall the assembled faculty group.
The substance of his talk is detail
ed in other columns of today's
Kernel. In renewing the troublous
phases of the university's income
struggle during the last fiscal year
and e:plaining the difficulties in
counterbalancing the decreased revenue, not once did the president
evince a pessimistic outlook. The
deflation in value of taxable properties from which the university has
derived the bulk of its income, the
legislature's reduction of the proposed budget and its failure to provide the state with a suitable revenue measure, Governor Laffoon's
subsequent resort to his veto power,
and the consequent reinstating of
the millage system as the university's only available source of revenue all have been disheartening.
as President McVey
Nevertheless,
outlined these conditions, only too
well known by him and by the faculty, and revealed the severe cut in
.salaries that he had recommended
as the only possible escape from
the mounting deficit already confronted by this institution, the faculty did not signify the slightest
dissension. On the (contrary', the
president's words were met with

In the columns of each

I

.iif

to more The Kernel appenr advertisements,
pre en! ing in attractive form the
comnvxlilies or the services whlrh
many Islington firms ofTcr to the
HIGH SCHOOL WEEK
public.
High School week hns romp find
It is nlmost axiomatic In business
with it. some 3 500 young persons that advertising Is an accurate indi
gathered from all parts of the
cation of the progrosslveness of va
state musically, or orntorically, or
cholastically inclined youths, each rlous firms; that such firms by their
representing the best talent of his progressive policies are able to offer
school in his particular line. All better values to those whom they
about us are eager, excited young serve; that truthful advertising impersons, filled with the hope of suc- plies honest merchandising.
The
cess not only now but for the years
tendency of the Amerthat stretch ahead.
ican people to shop in advance by
The Jaded college student, travel- means of advertisements is sufficient
ing his weary way from class to ground on which to base these as
class is prone to disregard the sig- sumptions.
nificance of this week, to dismiss It
Advertisers In the The Kernel
with a shrug of the shoulders, as if demonstrate their interest In the
to say, "What's it to me?" Little student body of the university as
as It may mean to him, to several well as their full support of student
thousand boys and girls it is the publications In thus rendering their
very breath of adventure.
Behind existence possible. At the same time,
it lies a wealth of pathos, of ro- they make it easier for the students
mance, of
"human inter- to fill their wants intelligently and
est." Weeks of breathless anticipa- profitably. They merit in return the
tion, days of patient practicing, full Interest and support of the stu
hours of anxious preparation all dent body.
lie behind it. To many a parent It
means scrimping and saving to buy
the new spring clothes that daughter felt she must have for her "trip
to t