xt75tb0xq18m https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt75tb0xq18m/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19181011  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 11, 1918 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 11, 1918 1918 2012 true xt75tb0xq18m section xt75tb0xq18m THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON. KY., OCTOBER Jl, 1918

VOL 'XI
T
AT TRACK NETS

NOTICE TO STAFF

(210

NOTICE TO STUDENTS
'

There wll Ibe an Important Ker
ncl staff meeting Saturday morning

at

Headquparters Now Being
Equipped in Ag.
Building

11:45 In the Journlalsm room
Every member of the staff must be

present.

Cross Unit, formed last spring. During
the short time of their work, about
fifty pairs of socks were made and
several dozen garments; much more is
expected of the chapter this coming
year.
Miss Louise Turner, the president,
reports the sale of a handsome sap
phire and diamond ring that was do
nated last March by Mrs. Stoner, of
Mt. Sterling. This ring was sold at
the trotting track October 3, bringing
$210. This fund will serve as a financial foundation, but the enthusiastic
members are planning other ways of
increasing the fund.
Dean Cooper has given over to the
unit the largest room in the Agriculture building, which is situated on the
third floor. It is for the sole use of
the girls for the duration of the war.
President Frank L. McVey allowed ?50
for decoration and furnishings and
Miss Madge Lamareaux, who has had
training in interior decoration, has
agreed to help Miss Turner furnish the
room as an attractive headquarters,
where the girls can gather to sew and
knit, or even rest during the day. The
exact location will be advertised by
Red Cross flag floating from one of
the windows, while posters will be put
up over the campus, made under the
supervision of Miss Beak, of the Art
Department.
All he University leaders are deeply
interested in this organization and
have been most generous to the girls
in their efforts, but the
of each girl in school is necessary
for good work. Moreover, while ?50
is a generous allowance, it can hardly
be expected to suitably equip so large
a room. Comfortable seats are needed
for the workers and there must be
work tables and drawers for storing
materials. Every Lexington girl and
those girls who have friends living in
Lexington are urged to borrow rockers, rugs, attractive pillows, etc. Many
people who usually store their porch
sets for the winter, might bo glad to
lend them for such a cause. All donations will bo welcomed, but furniture
lent to the girls will bo appreciated
and well cared for.

Students not members of S. A.
T. C. or residents of Patterson Hall
and Maxwell Hall, must not attend
University classes until order of.
State Board of Health is rescinded.
FRANK

ELIZA SPURRIER,

DOCTOR

L. McVEY,

President

Managing Editor.

WORKERS ARE NEEDED
One of the most Important war-wor- k
ing bodies on the campus is the Red

No. 3

MIL TELLS

QUARANTINE

CATS TRIUMPHANT

OF WAhVAIMS

COURSE

Classes Open to S. A. T. C.

Head of History Department Explains Work in
Conjunction With Government's Demands
MATRICULATION
TALK IS OFF

"War Alms," is a course of required
study for all S. A. T. C. men in every
University, ordered by the War Department August 27, 1916. About 800
for this
students have registered
course at the University of Kentucky,
constituting about twenty sections,
which means a class in "War Aims"
every hour of each day. President
Mc.Vey has entrusted the organization
of this course to a committee consisting of Professors Tuthill, chairman,
Wiest, Calhoun and Butt.
Doctor Tuthill Explains.
Doctor Tuthill is quoted as making
the following explanatory statements
regarding the purpose of "War Aims."
"The general order, divided the year
into quarters of twelve weeks each,
the first, or fall term, devoted to the
background of the war, including both
the remote and immediate causes of
the war; the second term devoted to
the progress of the war or current
events, and the third term to be devoted to the study of physiological
aspects of the war with emphasis on
government and the principles of government. However, the War Department has not been exacting in defining
these divisions, but allows each institution to present the subject in the
manner best suited to Its conditions.
University The Instrument.
"Quito rocently a further order
classified the registrants according to
ago, apparently with the idea that
those who have passed thoir twentieth
birthday may be called sooner than
those eighteen years of age. This
consideration has made use of the University of Kentucky in an endeavor
to present all three phases of study
in a concise manner boforo the Christ
mas Holidays, since it was impossible
to reclassify the sections containing
older men.
KAPPA DELTA DANCE
"Wo think that this requirement is
IS POSTPONED both unique and significant. Never before in the history of tho world has any
Kappa Delta Sorority announces that
government, ancient or modern, retheir danco which was to have been quired its prospective soldiers to study
given Saturday evening, October 12,
its recent history, nor with such a
at Patterson Hall has been indefinitemotive. Tho decision to require this
ly postponed, in compliance with the
study In our colleges has, perhups,
regulation of the State Board of
(Continued on Pago Two.)
Health.

STUDENTS

and to Patterson and
Maxwell Hall Girls

AWAIT

U.

S.

ORDERS

According to a statement made by
President Frank L. McVey, all stuJ. G. Heber, Captain of the 'Cats
dents who are not In the S. A. T. C.
He is a Junior in the College of En- or in Patterson and Maxwell Halls
gineering, a prominent and popular must not attend classes until notice is
student, and a member of the Sigma given by the University authorities.
President McVey wired Washington
Nu fraternity. Heber hails from
concerning the boys of the S. A. T. C,
who live in town, but no reply has
been received as yet.

S. A. T. C. MEN DRILL

Miss Katie Henry has influenza and
in Patterson Hall. The
two halls, however, have not yet been
quarantined, and it is thought that
they will not be as long as the disease
does not spread.
is quarantined

Cases of Guns
Received at University
For Young Student
Soldiers

Thirty-si- x

With rifles and bayonets manufactured for the Russian Government, on
a contract made when the soldiers of
Russia and the United States were
fighting as allies, S. A. T. C. men are
drilling in preparation for delivering
the bayonets in person, not into the
hands, but the heart of the Bolshevik!
regime..
Thirty-sicases of these arms have
been received at the University and
have been issued. Uniforms have been
Issued to A and B companies, complete,
and partial equipment for the S. A.
So many
T. C. has been delivered.
articles are missing, however, it is
probable that S. A. T. C. uniforms will
not bo issued for several weeks.
Bya recent order of Major Justin W.
Harding, tho Quartermaster's Department will bo moved from tho Surgeon
General's office, into temporary quarters, until thoir now building is
x

SENIOR CLASS MEETING
Members of tho class of 1019, are
hereby called to meet in the rooms of
Dean C. R. Melchor, in tho Administration Building Friday aftornoon at 4:30
o'clock. This meeting will be tho first
assembly of the class for this year.
Senior class officers will bo elected.
Alex Hall, president of last year's
Junior class, will preside as temporary cliulnnuH. Many Seniors seem to
be In favor of Hall's

OPENING BATTLE

BIG

Brilliant Strategy and Bull
Dog Pluck Brings Conference Team Into
Camp

OUTCLASSED

INDIANA

Snap Character
izes Kentucky's Struggle
to the Tune of 23 to 7

Mid-Seas-

BARS TOWN'S

IN

on

Sterling coaching and perfect team
work showed its effect Saturday, when
the Wildcats triumphed over the powerful Indiana team by the score of
23 to 7, in the first Western Conference game Kentucky has played since
the Perdue game of 1915. Kentucky
played with midseason snap and
punch, and altho outweighed fifteen
pound to the man, the result was nev
er in doubt. Every man on the team
played splendid ball, the entire line
holding at all times like a stone wall.
Riddle handled the team well and
played the same class of ball that won
him a place on the 'varsity in his
freshman year, while Shanklin, Bart-leand Bland never failed to do what
was expected of them.
tt

First Quarter Scoreless.

Kentucky won the choice of goals
and kicked off with the wind at their
The barracks are being rushed to
backs. The first quarter was scorecompletion, and the boys will probless, the ball being in the middle of
ably be moved in next week.
the field most of the time. Both teams
were somewhat nervous and fumbled
MANY MEN OUT FOR
the ball several times.

ARMY & NAVY TEAMS

Much enthusiasm is being aroused
over the series of football games between the Army and Navy sections of
the S. A. T. C. Over thirty men have
reported for each team and both sections declare they will walk rough
shod over the other. The officers are
showing great interest and will do all
they can to get a winning team for
their section.
Practice will be held on Monday,
Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons at
4 o'clock, and those wanting a suit
should report to Athletic Director
Boles. No men who are on tho 'varsity
team will be allowed to play, but if
any new men show first team caliber,
they will be transferred to tho 'varsity. Tho games will start as soon as
tho teams are in tho proper condition,
ami will be played on Monday afternoons.
Sinco there aro many men in both
sections who have formorly played
football, first class teams should bo
turned out, however tho lack of experience should keep no one from coming out, as thoro will bo a chance for
everyone to play and to mako tho team.

On the first play of the second quarter, Riddle carried the ball around end
for thirty yards. On the next play,
Riddle hurled a forward pass to Bart-lebehind the end zone, who eluded
several tacklers, and placed the ball
between the goal posts. Bland missed
goal. In less than two minutes, Kentucky scored again. Indiana received
the kickoff, was hold for three downs,
then punted to Kentucky. Riddle got
away for a wide run, then shot a forward pass to Dishman, who dodged
several Crimson tacklers and made a
beautiful run for thirty yards for a
touchdown. Bland kicked goal. The
quarter ended with tho ball in Kentucky's possession on her
line. Score 13 to 0.

tt

thirty-five-yar- d

Kentucky Holds on
Line
next quarter, Indiana played
In the
her best game. Kentucky kicked off
to Indiana, who made two first downs
and was then hold. Kentucky took
the ball up tho field to Indiana's thirty-yarlino and attempted a forward
pass, which was intercepted by Faust,
of Indiana, who ran seventy yards to
Kentucky's
line, whore ho
was tackled by Shanklin and Riddle.
Kentucky's lino hold hero like a stone
Ho: And how are you gottlng on wall, and Indiana was unable to gain.
with your collecting for tho soldlors? Bland punted out, and Indiaim reSho: Splendidly! I've had my nanto turned tho ball to Kentucky's twenty-yarin tho papers four times already.
lino. Kentucky was horo penalized for illegally interfering with a for- Sidney Bulletin.
One-Yar- d

d

four-yar-

d

d

3

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 2

with Lambda Alpha at the luncheon,
which wns a strictly Hoovorlzcd affair.
In Washington the same day tho hundred or more Chi Omegas who are
there engaged in war work held with
the national officers of the organization, a Baby Bond Contention, where
each chapter of the fraternity was rep
resented by a Baby Bond. The bonds
will be applied to the Chi Omega service fund which is to be used for reconstruction work In France.
Those present for the luncheon Saturday were: Sarah Harbison, Eliza
Plggott, Catherine
Tucker, Nancy
Buckner, Ethel Fletcher,
Roberta
Blackburn, Helen Skaln, May Barnes
Browning, Nancy Innes, Mary Parker,
Anna Young, Luclle Young, Ida Moore,
Honeywood Parrish, Elizabeth Thomas, Frances Dixon Ball, Anna Howard Harbison, Mrs. ,Adolphus Rico,
Mary Adams Talbott, Catherine Foreman, Bettie Davis.

(Continued From Pngo One.)
the ball wns plnccd on
hor
lino. Hero Indiana wns
hold for four downs and tho ball went
over to Kentucky. Blnnd punted out.
Tho quarter ended with tho ball In
Indiana's possession.
wnrd

pnHR nnrt

onc-ynr-

Indiana Scored
On tho first play of tho fourth quar
ter, Indiana completed a forward pass
for a touchdown nnd kicked goal, mak-.intho score 13 to 7. Kentucky then
received and took the ball to Indiana's
d
line, when Bland
dropped back for a goal from placement, and sent the ball square between
the goal posts. Indiana received and
was held for downs. Kentucky took
the ball down the field by a long run
by Bartlett and line bucks by Bland
and Shanklin. Shanklin was then sent
thru the lino for a touchdown. Bland
kicked goal. The game ended with
the ball in Kentucky's possession in
the middle of the field.
Line-uand summary:

g

twenty-five-yar-

HORACE MANN HOLDS

p

Indiana (7)
Hess
Espenlaub
Julius
Pierce
Ducomb
Howard
Donovan

Faust

Position
L. E
L. T
L. G
C

R. G

WEEKLY MEETING
Kentucky (23)
Dishman
The Horace Mann Literary Society
Baugh
Murphree held its weekly meeting October 4, in
Professor Noe's room in the Educa
Kelley
tion Building.

R. T
R. E
Q

Dalzell
F. B
Cunningham
L. H
Dean
R. H
Score by periods:

Moore

Bastian
Heber (C)
Riddle
Snoddy
Bland
Shanklin

0
0
Indiana
0
7
7
Kentucky State ... 0 13
0 1023
Scoring Touchdowns Bratlett, 1;
Dishman, 1; Dean, 1; Shanklin, 1.
Goals from touchdown Bland, 3; Julius, 1. Goals from placement Bland, 1.
Officials Bemdt, referee; Kase, umpire; Rathbun, head linesman.

A new feature introduced by the
program committee is a war discus
sion to be held every meeting, before
the regular program. This discussion
is to take in all the important details
of the week's war news.

Miss Lucile Dean read a paper which
covered the important war news of
the previous week.

The topic for discussion was the
Life and Works of Robert W. Service.
Miss Elizabeth Davidson gave an Interesting talk on his life. Miss Inna
Wentzell read "The Call of the Yukon"
and "The Crimation of Sam McGee."
The Bolshevik! will be the topic for
(Indiana) Kyle Tor
Substitutions
discussion at the next meeting.
Dalzell, Kilpatrick for Cunningham,
Maloney for Donovan, McLain for Howard, Maynard for Ducomb, Stahr for MRS. McVEY HONOR
(Kentucky
Faust.
State) Bartlett
GUEST AT TEA
for Snoddy, Herndon for Moore.
Time of periods Twenty minutes.
A delightful tea was given in the
parlors of Patterson Hall by the old
girls, Monday afternoon in honor of
CHI OMEGA BUYS
$50 LIBERTY BOND Mrs. McVey, and the new girls of Patterson and Maxwell Halls. Mrs. HarPurchase of a Liberty Bond of the bison, Mrs. Smith, Miss Crane, Miss
Fourth Loan, and a luncheon at the Stevens and Miss Collins formed the
Phoenix Hotel Saturday, October 5, receiving line.
marked the celebration of the Greek
Music was furnished by Camp Buell's
harvest festival, the Eleusinia, by quartet of stringed instruments. Serv
Lambda Alpha chapter of Chi Omega ing at the
were Misses Edna
at the University.
Berkele, Virginia Croft Edyth Wil
Chi chapter of Transylvania united Hams and Margaret Woll.
.

s

WeAre Headquarters
For Military Supplies and other articles you may need
while here in College, and hereby submit a partial list:
Safety Razors, Comfort Kits, Sewing Kits, Trench.
Mirrors, Money Belts, Tooth Brushes, Knee Desks, Wrist
Watches, Rubber Set, Shaving Brushes, Registration
Card Cases, Infantry Drill Regulation Books, Stationery,
Shaving preparations of all kinds, Razor Strops,
man Fountain Pens, Pencils, Ink.
We carry the most complete line of candy in the city
packages ; always
in half, one, two, three,
fresh and kept in refrigerator case.
five-pou-

nd

FAYETTE DRUG CO.
Main and Limestone

Phones

3305-2- 1

DR. TUTHILL TELLS
(Continued From Pago One.)
saved tho perils of very Binnll attend
anco and in many cases the probability
of closing tho doors. It shows that
tho government Is not only friendly
toward colleges of this country, but
that it expects them to provide a vast
number of intelligent officers for the
huge army which it Intends to organize
for the overthrow of autocracy In Europe.
Compared to Crusaders.
"One cannot refrain from comparing
our young soldiers with the Crusaders,
who went forth eight centuries ago to
champion tho cause of Christianity
against tho Turk. By similar coincidence the foe in one Instance happened
to be the same, and the United States
Government evidently Intends that our
soldiers shall have the zeal of the Crusader, together with the skill that
comes with college training."
Matriculation Lectures was a course
of study open to the freshman class
of the University at the beginning of
the fall term. Since the members of
the S. A. T. C. found it impossible to
arrange their schedules in accordance
with the hours outlined for this course,
after the recent classification regarding young men twenty years of age,
the following notice posted on various
bulletin boards about the campus,
"Matriculation lectures for arts and
science students are postponed until
further notice," announces the fact
that the newest additions to the student-body
have yet to look forward to
this study of campus knowledge and
college life.

BOTTLED IN BOND

I)

ADA MEADE
THREATRE
THE HIME OF SUPERLATIVE ENTERTAINMENT
OFFERING THE WORLD'S BEST

VAUDEVILLE
OF SUPERB
MOTION PRICES
PICTURES
daily

AND A SUMPTUOUS PROGRAM
3 ehowa

Afternoon,

-

20c.

War
Tax
Included

Nlfht,
Plcturta shown in this Theatre are positively first run in Lexington
" COME TRY TO PET IN"
2-7-

-9

20c.-30- c.

Chas. Reeder's
BARBER SHOP
is now equipped to do your

Cleaning and Pressing
DONE RIGHT - RIGHT NOW
164

EAST MAIN

PHONE

3743

ORPHANOS BROS.
We clean all kinds of Hats; Military Work a Specialty;
Hat Cords

Metropolitan Restaurant
All the Delicacies in Season.

McGURKS
THE POPULAR
AND

CONFECTIONARY

BARBER SHOP
HAIR CUT

LUNCHES

HAY NOT GO WEST

W. B. MARTIN'S
25c

SHAVE

S. A. T. C. Status Not That

of Military Camp

Everything Good
to Eat

UP TO JUSTICE DEPT.

Call On Us

Cheer up boys, for there are now indications that no dry zone will be
established around military training
units in Lexington. The decision rests
upon the Department of Justice. The
Commission on Training Camp Activities will put before the Attorney General and the Department of Justice,
the question as to whether such training units as the S. A. T. C. constitute military camps. Altho appealed
to before, this department has, as yet,
issued no orders to establish dry zones
around these camps.
District Attorney Thomas D. Slat-terstated Saturday, that should the
dry zone be established, all saloon
keepers will be given reasonable notice by the Department of Justice.
Such a zone would close nearly every
saloon in Lexington. It is the general
belief that student training units will
not be classed as strictly military
camps. The character of the college
is a big factor in the determination of
the nature of these training camps.
Since all saloons must be closed July
1, of next year, the Department
of
Justice Is rather lenient towards the
saloon-keeper-

Unable Seaman: When I come to
the surgeon 'e says to me, "I'm bloom
ing sorry, mate, I don't know what I
was thinking about," he says, "but
there's a sponge missin', and I believe
It's Inside yer."
"What's the odds?' I says. 'Let it
be.' And there It Is to this day. No,
I don't feel no particular pain from it,
but I do get most uncommonly thirsty."
Cassell's Saturday Journal.

15c

SHAMPOO

25c

TONIC

15c

153 S.

Limestone St.

Lex., Ky.

Warren Bros,

BUY LIBERTY BONDS

GROCERS

PRESCRIPTIONS
SODA WATER
CANDIES

Corner Limestone and High

BUY LIBERTY BONDS

Victor Bogaert Co.
Leading Jewelers

Established 1883
"The Hallmark Store."
133-13- 5

W. Main St.

..

Lexington, Ky.

John's Drug store
The Post Office Pharmacy
MAIN & WALNUT
BUY LIBERTY BONDS

PHOENIX
TAXI CAB CO
INCORPORATED.

PHONES

1854-368- 0

DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE

Becker

Dry Cleaning

CITY RATES 50 CENTS

Co.

Phoenix Hotel Lobby

R B-

-

Robards

COLLEGE BOYS' TAILOR

C. R. McGoughey,
Proprietor

AND

SUITS
PRESSED
Suit
Suit

$1.25
Cleaning,
Cleaning,
11.60
10.50
Suits Pressed
ALTERATIONS A SPECIALTY
ALL WORK GUARANTEED

PHONE
152 S. Lime.

1550--

WE CLEAN, PRESS and REPAIR
ABSOLUTELY.

Y

Lex., Ky.

BUY LIBERTY BONDS

Phone

621--

Cor. Lime and Hlflh

BUY LIBERTY BONDS

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
MARTIN &
STOCKWELL'S
RESTAURANT

L. H. BELL
THE COLLEGE

FRUIT STORE

ALL THE DELICACIES OF THE

SEASON
Lxlnten, Ky.
111 S. Llmettene.

We cater to college patrons

FRUITS, CANDIES, CIGARS AND TOBACCOS
A.

Mugione

Prog ressive Shoe Hospital
My work and prices always
keep me busy
140 South Limestone
Shoes repaired while you
wait

UNIVERSITY VIEWS
COLLEGE NOVELTIES

Athletic Goods

PENS

FOR

FALL AND WINTER

Hay Hardware Co.
West Main Street
Look for the Iron Dog
139

University Book store
233

WEST

Caden Drug Co.

SHORT

PHARMACISTS
Lexington, Ky.
Both Phones 123
Main and Lime

Kaufman
Clothing Co.
Military Headquarters
We have long been known as headquarters for

Military Equipment in Central Kentucky
ARMY UNIFORMS
ARMY OVERCOATS
ARMY RAIN COATS

FLANNEL SHIRTS
ARMY SWEATERS
ARMY HATS
ARMY GLOVES
ARMY

HOE

CANVAS BELTS
ARMY TIES
Copyright 1918 Hart Schaffncr

c

Marx

PULLIAM BROTHERS
ARE

EXPERT FLYERS

Captain Keeling Jr.'s Article
Made Part of

Matthew

FOUNTAIN

PAGE 3

Out stock is now complete with everything
you may need in the military line.
S.

Everybody EATS at

UNCLE CHARLIE'S

0. s.

"Get Acquainted With Us While In
Town."
Pay Kentucky's Noted Candy 8hop
a Visit
HOME MADE CANDY EXCLUSIVELY
Made and Sold Only By

Sch&nge's Candy Kitchen
115

8. Upper St.,

Just around corner from

Main Street.

BOTH ARE IN FRANCE
Former Commissioner of Finance K.
O. Pulllam and Mrs. PulHam, of 505
East Main street, have two expert fly

era in the aviation service of the
United States, and both are now on
the fighting front in France, where
they are rendering valiant service.
They are Captain K. O. Pulllam, Jr.,
J. M. A., United States army, com
mander of the Third Aviation Center,
now stationed at Issoudun, France,
and Ensign Harold Pulllam, formerly
instructor in the aviation branch of
the naval service at Pensacola, Fla.,
who is also now In France ready for
duty. Both are graduates of the University of Kentucky and have made
splendid records.
In a recent issue of the Plane News,
published by the United States Air
Service of the American Expeditionary Force, Captain K. Q. Pulllam, Jr.,
writes on "Acrobacy or Trick Flying,"
together with an elaborate chart show-ln- g
all of the "curves of the aviation
game," which Is receiving most favor
able comment from all of the Allied
aviators and which has been adopted
as part of the curriculum for the instruction of American flyers.
The editor of Plane News prefaces
the article with this comment: "Captain Pulllam's article is herewith
printed by authority of Air Service
Headquarters and is considered probably the most complete and compre
hensive treatise on acrobacy yet pub
llshed."
Captain Pulllam says: "Acrobacy
or trick flying is as necessary to the
fighter of the air as a knowledge of
his gun mechanism is to the infantryConsequently such trick flyman.
ing has been found necessary to pre
pare a flyer for combat and is now
taught in the training schools.
"The object of acrobacy is to pro
duce each dangerous condition of
flight that a pilot may be expected
to encounter and to teach how to meet
them. Only in this way is It possible
for a pilot to become the master of
his machine. Thus in a short period
devoted to intentional acrobacy, a
pilot acquires the confidence in his
ability to meet all emergencies that
no amount of ordinary flying can produce, and as a result he finds it possible to devote his entire time to his
work of warfare, the function of piloting being performed instinctively.
"At a field where trick flying Is
taught every student is given individual attention and instruction. Only one
'stunt' at a time is explained, which
must be ropeated by the student, and
unless every movement is thoroly understood, ho Is not permitted to attempt the work."
Captain
Pulllam
describos
the
"Vrille," "Roversement," "Immediate
Turn," "The Barrel," "Vertical Virago," "Slide Slip," "Vrille Turn," "The
Loop," "Tail Slide," and other phases
of trick flying.
Captain Pulllam, who is a master
of all of those features of acrobacy,
uses a French monoplane, which has
a speed of 153 miles an hour. As com
mander of the aviation instruction cen
ter, ho has some thirty or forty of
ficers and men uuder him, and tlioy
are put thru n course of instruction
intended to make them expert flyers.

part of his duties is laying out the
work for tho flyers, and leading them
in airscoutlng expeditions, which ho
frequently does. Prior to going to
France, Captain Pulllam did air patrol duty over London and along the
English coast, when German raiders
were engaged In bombing English
towns, but for the past year, he has
been in actlvo service in France.
Quite a number of times he has been
on air raids over the German lines,
and according to information received
by his family here, has been in his
fast monoplane as far over German
or 100
battle front as seventy-fiv- e
miles.
A

His intensive study of all phases of
airplane service and his Initiative In
working out and putting into practice
many of the best features of acrobacy,
has made him an authority on aejial
.fighting, and his ability as an Instruc
tor is regarded very highly by the
commander of American Overseas Air
Service.
Both Captain Pulllam and his brother, Harold, are members of the American Aero Club.

TABER COMMISSIONED
SECOND LIEUTENANT
J. Branch Tabor has received a second lieutenancy in the Quartermasters'
Corps, and has been assigned to Camp
Meggs. Lieutenant Taber, who was a
member of the S. A. E. and Alpha Zeta ,
fraternities, was one of the most popular members of the senior class of
last year. Among other members of
last year's class who have lately
joined the service are: Everett Bleidt,
who is stationed at Camp Buell; J. C.
Melvln, who is at Camp Meggs, and
Russell Hunt, who is In Service company No. 3, Camp Joseph E. Johnson,
Florida.

WORKMEN SCARCITY
DELAYS IMPROVEMENT
No doubt it is very apparent to the
faculty and the students that the work
of remodeling and making Improvements on and In the various buildings
on the campus has been progressing
somewhat slowly. On inquiring into
the matter the Kernel learned that
the lack of progress was due entirely
to the lack of workmen and the scarcity of material needed in the making
of the much needed improvements.
Nevertheless within the past week
many improvements have been completed, and no doubt, within a very
short time the whole work of remodeling will have been finished. The
main building, in which most of the
work of remodeling is being done, will
be finished within the next three
weeks, and from all indications many
improvements are in the course of
construction. The barracks and buildings connected with the barracks, will
bo completed, ready for occupation,
within one week. The construction of
tho fourth barracks is now well under
way and tho few smaller buildings
adjoining tho barracks have practically been completed. Work on tho central heating plant will bo started this
week and it Is tho Intention of those in
chargo of this work to have the heat
ing plant ready for operation before
tho cold weather sets in.
ILL WITH
"FLU" AT WINCHESTER

MISS BEDFORD

Miss Henrietta Bedford, a member
of the Freshman class, is ill with Span-

ish Influenza at her homo in Winches- tor. Miss Bedford's Lexington resi
dence is Patterson Hall.

* PAGE 4

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
Published every Thursday thruout Iho Collogo year by the student body
of tho University of Kentucky, for the benefit of the students,
alumni and faculty of the institution.

It

TUB KENTUCKY KERNEL is the official newspaper of the University.
is issued with a view of furnishing to its subscribers all the college news

of Kentucky, together with a digest of items of interest concerning the
Universities of other States and Canada.
SUBSCRIPTION, ONE DOLLAR A YEAR. FIVE CENTS A COPY
Entered at Lexington Postofflce as second-clas- s
mail matter.
EDITORIAL STAFF
THORNTON CONNELL
Miss Eliza Spurrier
Miss Eliza Piggott
I. N.

EDITOR-IN-CHIE-

Managing
Associate
Military
"Squirrel
Sporting

Editor
Editor
Editor
Food"
Editor
Editor
Home Economics
Patterson Hall
Philosophian
Law
Engineering
Literary Societies
Club Notes

Parrlsh

Miss Katherino Weakley
Gavin Norment
Miss Mildred Graham
'Miss Austin Lilly
Miss Virginia Helm Mllner
Miss Louise Will
Cecil Heavrin
N. D.

"Co-ed-

Witt

R.J. Raible
Adele Slade

"

REPORTERS.
H. G. Bryan, Katherlne
MeGibben, Frances Marsh, Margaret
Smith, Roberta Blackburn and Margaret McClure.
BUSINESS STAFF
Edwin T. Tapscott
Business Manager
J. P. Barnes and Carl Dlnker
Assistant Business Managers

THE VICTORIOUS WILDCATS
(o)
"We came, we saw but Caesar said it, so you know
the rest," is the thot of the telegram sent back to the
University by the Wildcat coach at the end of the game
with Indiana last Saturday afternoon. The story of the
victory and the team is published in other columns of
the Kernel. Here, credit is placed where credit's due.
In the vernacular of the gridiron, the basic elements
of a good football team are beef, speed, courage, and intelligence for the individual players. Teamwork, which
cements eleven men into one team, and' a driving, intelligent coach, who can bring out the best that is in each
man, are absolutely indispensable. Kentucky has that
coach. He is Andy Gill, recently of a northern university, but now a
Wildcat. Kentucky has that
team. It is easily the best in the State and should not
shy at anything in the South.
To defeat a football team representing the University of Indiana, a member of the "Big Nine," is a victory
which does the Wildcats proud. Yet the team does not
appear too confident of future victories. Each man
knows, however, that fight and spirit such as that displayed last Saturday in Indiana will not be denied victory. How many students now in this University saw
that memorable defeat of Purdue in the fall of 1915?
The Indiana game, the writer hears, was just as good.
full-fledg- ed

NO DELAY IN S. A. T. C. TRAINING.
(o)
America is in the clutch of influenza. The hiss of
the kaiser snake is heard. Poisoned fangs ready to
strike are hid behind a thin peace "offer."
As to influenza authorities of this University and
officers of the S. A. T. C. are making an earnest effort to
wipe it out. Male students not members of the S. A.
T. C. and girl students
to Patterson or
Maxwell halls have been ordered by President Frank L.
McVey to discontinue classes in the University until the
disease has been erased in Lexington. All S. A. T. C.
men are regularly inspected in an effort to detect at once
any cases of "th'flu."
Instead of a let-u- p in S. A. T. C. training, however,
there is an increase in intensity. Work is beginning to
go faster and easier. Drill is getting sort of snappy.
Raw recruits are in the first stage of "soldieritis."
To put a finish to the kaiser, members of the S. A.
T. C., ignoring the peace plea for beggar's peace plea it
truly is, continue to train. Each wants to be a spike in
the heel of the boot which is going to crush the serpent
head and shut the wicked, gleaming eyes forever.
non-reside-

WAR

FUND

PLAN

jgPP

STOOD

Private Zimmio Zane, the Kentucky
wise owl of the S. A. T. C, Bays: "This
U. K. campus is a dangerous place for
young ladies at night. The other night
soldier's voice in the darkness
shouted out to the new guards Just
going on duty: 'There ain't nobody
what's got no authority over you
Every man is master of his own post.' "
Be careful Freshmen If their guns
don't hurt you, their language may.

WORKERS

STATEJAMPAIGN

Twenty-fiv- e

Thousand

As-

signed as University of
Kentucky's Quota

way to do it, I found that potatoes
have to be planted in hills, and our
yard Is perfectly flat."

DISCUSS

WAR FUND

Tho majority of the colleges in Ken

at the meeting here Saturday night to discuss the
tucky were represented

A GENTLE RETORT.

Camp Buell Officer Well, come on Allied War Fund Campaign among the
with that truck. What's the matter colleges. Heads of the seven allied
with you, anyhow?
organizations of the State campaign
Truck Driver Oh, (I'm all right,
were present.
thanks, but me engine's dead.