xt75tb0xs619 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt75tb0xs619/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19660908  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September  8, 1966 text The Kentucky Kernel, September  8, 1966 1966 2015 true xt75tb0xs619 section xt75tb0xs619 Inside Todnys Kernel

KIEIRmE
University of Kentucky
1906
KY.,
SEIT.

Vol. 58, No. o

LEXINGTON,

THURSDAY,

ITT' II

8,

Student Center opens mogoiine stand:
Poge Two.

Experimental Film Societf entering
fourth semester at UK: Page Three.

Twelve Pages

UK dramatists kept busy through the
summer: Poge Eight.

Wo, Beadles vie for storting quarterback slot: Page Ten.

Former UK student tells of experiences in Viet Nam: Poge Seven.

Student handbook headed for changes:
Poge Twelve.

College Building Site

Discussed By Officials
By GENE CLABES
Kernel Managing Editor
COVINGTON
University
officials discussed here Tuesday
the possibility of moving Northern Community College to a
suburban Boone or Kenton

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.

County site, but decided the
present site was adequate for
future building.
Meeting with Northern Community College director, Thomas
Hank ins, and a local advisory
board were UK President John
VV. Oswald, Dr. Ellis Hartford,
director of the community college system, and Robert Kerley,
vice president for business affairs.

"No

V
--

decision" was made,

Our Most Important Product
Rubble, broken concrete

becomes common on UK's changing
scene. Whether for new walks or new buildings, you must break
some eggs . . . This scene is near McVcy Hall.

Sororities Pledge
389 In Fall Rush

The University's sorority population reached 1,189 as 14 UK
sororities pledged 3S9 women during the formal fall rush which
ended last night.
The total increased by SS Chi Omega and Gamma Phi
women from last year's sorority
Beta.
membership although there were
Of the 650 women who atapproximately 35 fewer women tended the oix'U houses, 60 perparticipating in rush this year. cent were pledged. The sororities
The increase is attributed to and the new pledges are:
the presence of two new sororiContinued On Page 9
a
ties in formal fall
rush-Alph-

Dr. Hartford said
the University officials visiting
here were satisfied the present
college site will handle the 3,000
students expected in the next
few years.

"Hough land," Hankins says
the problem facing builders
at the college s present site.
The University is currently
involved in planning and instituting a
building program that will add two buildings
to the Northern Community Colis

long-rang- e

lege.
Dr.

JOHN ZEH

mm

"this will probably be

a

r

four-yea-

school", someday. There
is no blueprint lor such action
but it "lias been suggested,"

he said.

The establishment of

a

four-yea-

r

college here would be
On Page

12

No fatalities have occurred in Lexington, but
elsewhere, Dr. Sprague emphasized, half the
deaths were caused by head injuries which could
have been prevented by helmets.

In a car, the driver's entire body is covered
by a "helmet" of steel, but on a cycle there
is no protection, he said. Safety experts like
to use the stone wall example:
A driver in a car hitting the wall at 15 miles
an hour will probably escape unharmed, but
a cycle rider? "It will be human flesh and bones
and brain tissue against steel, concrete or dirty
gravel," says Traffic Safety magazine.
d
The danger involved in riding
vehicles, unless customers are ignorant of that,
apparently has not hurt the cycle business.
Registrations in the nation and in Kentucky
have doubled since 1963. Honda has become
a household
word, and other companies have
changed their design and promotion to imitate
the successful Japanese firm.
What causes motorcycles accidents? Many

times it is the other driver, a person unfamiliar
with the fast, maneuverable vehicles.
Continued On Page 6
m

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Iff

7

if.

ra

Hankins.
"Any further action is up to
the President," he said.
Hankins said one reason
a move might be desirable is

Hankins said there is
enough space to build at the

Kernel Associate Editor
Tuesday afternoon a University student wound
his new Honda around curvy Cooperstown streets.
Someone threw a walnut, striking him in the
head. A little later he was released from the
Health Service with a sore eye.
That's the most serious motorcycle accident involving a UK student treated at the Medical
Center since last fall, according to Health Service surgeon Dr. John S. Sprague.
"We've been lucky," he admitted. Injuries
and fatalities to drivers and riders in most cities,
like cycle sales, are booming.
Last school year, the University Hospital operated on 27 students injured in motorcycle accidents, while only 54 underwent surgery for automobile accident injuries.
"That becomes very startling," Dr. Sprague
said, "when you compare the number of cars
around here to the number of cycles."
In Kentucky last year, there were 1.5 million
automobiles registered, compared to 15,160 cycles.
More students with minor hurts might have
been treated at other Lexington hospitals without his knowledge, Dr. Sprague said. Surgical
cases are usually referred to him.

VaeMcaaf.
i

college.
However,

present site but the terrain is
not one of the assets of the
site.
present
No other meeting concerning
the building or moving the campus has been set, according to

Motorcycles Cause Menace,
icZ- Need Safety Improvements
By

items

Hankins told the Kernel today
concerning the movement of the

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if i t

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These are a few of the 3S9 happy coeds pledged to
University sororities Wednesday night. The additions

brought total membership for the campus to 1.IS9,
an increase of SS over last vear. The increase is attri- -

buted to participation by two new sororities in fall rush.
KenciPhoty

I

* 2

-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Sept. 8,

lOfifi.

SC Rooms

MAGAZINE STAND OPENED
Demand To Determine Stock, Says Harris
ly SUSAN I1LYTIIE
Kernel Staff Writer
The

Student

She said business

Center

ha

s

opened a magazine stand off the
Grand Hall and plans to use

free

for

profits

telephones

throughout the building.
Frank Harris, student center
director,
explained that the
newsstand is set up on the basis
of demand.

"Wc will stock what the students request," he said.
So far the stand is selling major magazines, cigars, tobacco,
and a few UK post cards and
dccals.

Other items will be ordered
according to demand, he said.
"However," Harris added, "we
do not want to compete with
the bookstore." No pencils,
theme pads, or other school supplies will be handled.

has been

but attributes this to lack

slow

of publicity.
Most students arc surprised to
sec magazines for sale when they
come to the desk for information, she said.
"Wc haven't completely set it
up as we would like to have it,"
Mrs. Blanton said. "'We don't
have a very good way to display magazines."
Magazines are now shown in
glass front shelves and Mrs.
Blanton feels that racks arc
needed for display.

l

--

Available

for use by all recognized
Student Center rooms are available

The stand, which will be open
at night and on weekends, is
not expected to carry newspapers.
that
Mr. Harris explained
these arc available in nearby
racks and will not be stocked
unless there is a "reasonable
demand."
Twelve major magazines are
now available, such as Post,
Look, Time, Newsweek, Popular Mechanics, two fashion magazines, and even Mad.
The first order included Playboy, but "it sold out in no time
flat," Harris said.

stude.tur.nps,aeeor(lintotlKMlireet)rlliee.

These rooms may lie used by all recognized student groups
whenever needed Tree of charge. Also specially invited groups
may use these facilities.
groups
On occasions these rooms are availaole lor
. The rental
that are a member of the University cominmiit)
small rooms to $30 per
costs range from S6 per section lor the
lor the Ballroom.
section
who would like to use these
Any recognized student group
a reservation at the Director's Office in the
facilities can plate
Student Center.
non-stude-

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A STORY OF FEAR.L0UE AND ADUENTURE

EftUTIFUL

The profits are expected to be
fairly small, especially at first.
Harris said he hopes to use
the profits to install four or five
additional free phones in the
next month or so.

At 2:45, 6:10, 9:30
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the magazine
At present
stand is combined with the Central Information Desk.
"Its primary function is still
an information desk," Harris
said. He added that if business
becomes too great the two will
be separated.

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BETTY

Mrs. Clyda Blanton, who was
previously a hostess at the West
Information Desk, now serves
as saleswoman and receptionist
at the combined newsstand-informatiodesk.
n

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SKATING

Fri. and Sat. nights
7:30 'til 10;

10 'til Midnight

Sunday night
10
7:30
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The Kentucky Kernel
The

Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, 40506. Second-clas- s
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except
and exam periods, and during holidays
the summer semester. weekly during
Published for the students of the
University of Kentucky by the Board
of Student Publications, Prof. Paul
Oberst, chairman and Linda Gassaway,
secretary.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894, became the Hecord in 100, and the Idea
in 1908. Published continuously as the
Kernel since 1915.
SUBSCIUPTION RATES
Yearly, by mail $8.00
Per copy, from files
$.10
KEKNEL TELEPHONES

Advertising, Business, Circulation

much-i- n

o

v.o.

j

wc Uavu

tnem

ail... right

together... to classes
irrr' L t Y
TAnvniTo
this minute.
FLORIDA U.
MIAMI U.

OHIO STATE U.

2321
2319

and movies and oicnle
common.
The wonderful

OHIO U.
PURDUE U.

Editor, Executive Editor, Managing
Editor
2320
News Desk, Sports, Women's Editor,
Socials

ancTdaleterias
have-s-

r

(0.)

EASTERN KY. U.
WEST VIRGINIA

U.

UNIV. KENTUCKY
BOWLING GREEN U.
UNIV. CINCINNATI

5V

C

J

* Till:

KI.KMX, TI.u.mI.u, Sept.

H, I'HWi- -.l

Experimental Film Society Enters Fourth Semester
CHRIS EVOLA
Kernel Arts Writer
This fall will matk the louitli
semester lor the UK lixpcti-inenta- l
Film Society. The society was organized in YJGi by
Dr. Guy Davenport, associate
professor of English, shortly after Gregory Markopolus showed
his movie, "Twice a Man," to
the English Club.
Hasically, what all of the artists who arc working with motion pictures as an art medium
have to say is that their films
are actual experiments with the
audience, sound, image, all as

pects of the motion picture.
Since movies use elements of all
the arts there is quite a large
range of experimentation.
in his
Stanley Brakagc, on the
tries to show
"Songs,"
screen "the pictures you see
when you dose your eyes," a
somewhat physiological approach.
Similarly, Markopolus believes the rate of perception of
the audience may be increased
images on
by flashing
the screen.
(One frame lasts
of a secabout
This short exposure
ond.)

Ity

one-fram- e

h

Membership Drive Opens
For Concert, Lecture Series
The annual membership campaign for the 1966-6season of
the Central Kentucky Concert and Lecture Association will open
aept VZ and close Sept. 24.
Room 207 in the Administration
The schedule this year includes eight concert attractions Building.
The schedule for this season
and four speakers. Admission will
be by membership card only. No includes the following concert
features: Oct. 18, Richard Tucker,
tickets will be sold for individual
and Phyllis
tenor,
Curtin,
programs.
of the Metropolitan
soprano,
All programs will be held at
the UK Memorial Coliseum and Opera, in a joint recital; Xov. 22,
will begin at 8:15 p.m. There Mantovani and His Orchestra;
7

Dec. 9, DeCormier Folk Singers;

will be no reserved seats.

Jan. 17, Philharmonia Hungarica
Orchestra with Ludwig Hoffman,

Memberships may be obtained from Mrs. Burton
executive secretary, at $8
per person ($5 for children under
Mil-war-

d,

piano soloist.

Feb 13, St. Louis Symphony
Orchestra with Sidney Harth,

14).

University of Kentucky students will be admitted on their
ID cards. Student wives may
purchase memberships for $5 at
the Office of Student Affairs,

violin soloist; Feb. 23, Anna
Moffo, Metropolitan Opera and
concert soprano; Mar. 1, Andre

Watts, brilliant young piano
soloist; Apr. 5, Ballet Folklorico

of Mexico.

TryoutsScheduled
For Guignol Play

Speakers scheduled for the
season are: Nov. 2, Dr. Leonard
Reiffel, deputy director of sciences for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's
Apollo (moon-sho- t)
program and

TheCuignol Theatre ill hold
7 p.m. Friday in the
Cuignol Theatre for the fall
production of "The Time of Your
Life," by William Saroyan. Anyone interested is invited to
audition.
The east will include IS men
and 7 women. Directing the play
vv

trouts

method, by the way, is used in
several current television commercials.
In the highly popular film,
"Scorpio Rising," Kenneth Anger uses satire by having a sharp
between
contrast
image and
sound. Your eyes are seeing a
rough group of motorcycle fanatics while your cars are hearing sweet rock 'n roll songs,
such as, "I Will Follow Him."
This is a rebellion against the
popular grade movies in which
love music is played behind a
love scene in order to promote
empathy with the characters.
Andy Warhol is the maker of
the controversial film, "Sleep,"
in which an actor goes to bed
at the beginning of the movie
and gets up at the end eight

hours later.
Another film by Warhol is
"Scotch Tape," which is nothing but blank celluloid. The

time on this film is,
of course, up to the individual
viewer.
Some of the films are not

running

quite

be Wallace Xeal Ihiggs,
chairman of the Dept. of Theatre
Arts.
The play will open Wednesday. Oct. IS and run to Saturday, Oct. 22. This year plays
will not run on Sundays.
Three other plays will be
given by the Guignol Theatre:
Nov.
3, "The Glass
Menagerie", by Tennessee Williams, to be directed by Charles
Chekhov's
Dickens; Feb.
"The Seagull," to be directed
by Wallace Xeal Hriggs.
A fourth play, not yet selected, will be given Apr.
during the Spring Fine Arts
Festival. The director will be
Haymond Smith.
Two laboratory theatre productions will be given in Nov0
ember. Nov.
workshop productions will be given of two

"far out". In "To

Par-

1

CHEVY

JN

American

-

"

PUN

look,

in

tradition.

campus

or

cardigan
front.

And

PHONE

THIS WEEK
PERFECT

NEW CLAIROL

HAIR

CARE

(Including 1000 staples)
Larger siza CUB Desk
Stapler only $1.49
No bigger than a pack of gum-b- ut
pack
the punch of a big deal! Refills available
everywhere. Unconditionally guaranteed.
Made in U.S.A. Get it at any stationery,
variety, book store!

MAKE-U-

PIERCED LOOK

EARRINGS

duty at

alt timed

Discount on Prescriptions to Students

grosgrain

Oxford
wool

ribbon

Sfifi-fio-

A

want

j
I

USHD

Microbiology 200 Book . . but
were sold a new one?

1

KY. 40503

Shetland

Pod you

I

LEXINGTON.

in cotton

the

with

collector's

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Tot Stapler

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the

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on

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and
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2?

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2 Take two
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from three
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EH

OF SERVICE

PIERCED AND

(
i

9ias

to

PICTURE

.1

xxhal

I If )ll
of id isclosth watt liiiiv;
the nex- Mentis in film making,
joscph 1.. I. exine tillers a piie
each year lor the best aniatcui
film produc tion. ('.ail Kmc in. in
in "'I he Victors" used the- same
method as Anger in "Scoipio
Rising." In "The Victors" a sol
clier is shot for desertion xvhile
Frank Sinatra sings. "Ilaxe
Yourself a Merry Little Clnist-nias.in the background.
As nutty and as "far out" as
the experimental films seem to
be, they are actually a preview
of the future. Richard Lester is
already finding success in the
wild techniques in his movies,
"Help" and "The Knack."
The only major shortcoming
of the experimental films is that
they are for the most part made
by amateurs who do not have
the money to invest in the
equipment they really need. To
substitute for this, they spend
hundreds of extra hours trying
to perfect what they cm produce with their limited apparatus.
Within a few weeks a poster
will be put up in the Student
Center announcing which films
will be shown this semester.
For information concerning seaWilliam
tickets contact
son
Cute bins or Diane Carrico.

li

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now.

in England?

the

operas, "Solomon and lialkas,"
by Handall Thompson, and
"Hita," by Donizetti.

THE

in

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llntfU
to hi- list (I depends upon llit ii
it siilts in the t pt i hnt nt.il lilm

(Answers below)

1S-2-

FEATURING

tiic

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Do they have
a 4th of July

The entirely

11-1-

YOUR PHARMACY

Ifi

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THE DOOR TO FASHION
81? EUCLID AVENUE

NBC News.

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Swifljgline

internationally known science
consultant; Dec. 6, Gen. Maxwell
Taylor, former chairman of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff, former
ambassador to Viet Nam; Feb. 1,
Dr. Margaret Mead, curator of
ethnology, American Museum of
Natural History, renowed anthropologist and author; Apr. 1,
David Brinkley,
reporter and commentator for

will

so

sifal" the music of Wagner is
put to film. Kenneth Anger explores the passions of homosexuality in "Fireworks." A film by
Fred Sauls shows the chaos of
the recent happening in the
UK Fine Arts Building. Salvador Dali, in an experimental
film classic, "Andalusian
Dog,"
uses surrealistic
techniques in
Markopolus alcinematography.
lows the audience to be soothed
by several minutes of the sounds
of rain before anything appears
on the screen in his "Twice a
Man."
In the motion picture, science
enters the domain of art, two
areas sometimes considered to
be at opposite poles. No matter how great the theme, the
acting, or the directing, the

movie is entirely dependent upon the lens, the chemicals in the
(clltiloid, and the operational
gears of the camera. A skillful
cameraman can woik with all
these elements to produce the
best image for the screen.
The soundtrack is composed
with an orchestra but then must
be put out) the film by mechanical means. Lastly, the infixing
images on the screen must Input into a sequence in concord
ante with the music. Then the
motion picture is shown to an
audience.
This is the general background for the movies xve see in
the theaters downtown. The experimental film makers challenge each aspect of the film.
For example, most movies are
edited into a logical sequence of
events, so the new film makers
see what happens with an illogical, chaotic sequence of events.
In popular grade movies a
soundtrack is written to fit the
pace and theme of the movie,
but in "To Parsifal" the movie
is filmed to fit the music of
Wagner. The acting element is
even challenged. It has been a
point of dispute as to whether
the main character in Warhol's
"Sleep" is acting or actually
sleeping. However, one element
remains the same for both types
of movies; they must be shown
to an audience.
The worth of a motion picture is as much dependent upon the reactions of the audience
as it is upon the mechanical tac- -

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* Uphill Battle
Under the framework of a new
constitution, Student Government
at the University will attempt to
lift itself from a sleepy lethargy
that has almost become legendary.
While a conclusion on the incoming
SG's activities and progress cannot
be made until after the academic
year is completed, the first chapter
in the report will begin to be
w ritten within the next two weeks
when the first meetings are held.
Most assuredly, SG administrators realize any progress will be
an uphill battle. Perhaps one of
the larger hindrances to be coped
with is the new constitution.
Organizationally the new charter is a more logical, clearcut document than SG's predecessor, Student Congress, had. Although it
enumerates powers and responsibilities of the government, its
framers so hamstrung future operations by failing to provide for
close examination of key issues
and problems facing the contemporary campus that even the best
selection of representatives would
be hard pressed to act effectively.

"Anv Time You're Heady'

Such a provision apparently is
sorely needed.
Nonetheless, the organization
will have to work with the new
charter, but it will not have to
limit itself to provisions of the
charter. Either it can continue
in

the

hear-no-evi- l,

see-no-ev- il,

tradition of Student
servicemen or it can take
Congress
direct action on campus problems.
Hopefully, SG will open its
floor to debate, and assume the
role it has so long run away from:
investigating the problems and
needs facing students, pressing
strongly for the alleviation of these
needs, and entrenchingitselffirmly;
in the position of helping or at
least counseling, administration of
University affairs.
Chances for Student Government to tackle problems and assume its responsible role, however,
appear to be slim. The new SG
president was a member of a largely
useless Congress which passed
numerous bills and effected few
results, a trademark of former Student Congresses. And the membership of the new body, while different individually from past years,
has the usual Greek representation
that has left Congress stymied for
years.
Undoubtedly Student Government is at a breaking point. Perhaps a precipice. For indeed if it
fails to act, it will set the same
sort of precedent its predecessors
have followed that of inconquer-abl- e
inertia. Should it find inself
at the foot of that precipice, hopes
for a resurrection are no more
likely than that President Patterson's statue should rise from its
stone pedestal.
speak-no-ev- il

More To Change

The enforcement of this ruling
The Interfraternity Council
ad- serves a two-fol- d
d
made a wise and
purpose. It rejustment in its nish program by quires each rushee to go to all
p
method the houses, preventing him from
instituting the
for rushees.
having less than a full picture
The stamping procedure, which of the University's entire
fraternity
much-neede-

card-stam-

requires each rushee to have an
official IFC card signed at each
house before he can be considered
for pledging, is a more feasible
method of rushing.

Another Plea
While campus planners have
assured us that Splinter Hall will
be removed, the World War II
structure still stands. Each year
the unsightly gray structure continues to deteriorate and undoubtedly remains the most dangerous
fire trap on campus.
From a sentimental viewpoint,
it is time to retire Splinter Hall
known also as the Social Sciences
building. The building dutifully
served as "quaint" housing for
many World War II v eterans during
the sudden influx of G. I. students
following the war. Many years later,
it is now being used as a classroom building.
While other pleas for action have
gone unheeded, the Kernel, only
out of respect, reiterates its call
for action.

system. And it also prevents fraternities from grabbing up prospects
before the bus trips and isolating
them until bid night.
Certainly a salute is due IFC for
this move toward improvement in
a somewhat-biase- d
set of rush rules.
However, officers of the group
should now step back and take
a firmer look at the way rush is
being conducted.
Despite the recent ruling, for
the most part IFC, which is to
act as watchdog during rush, has
made an about face when confronted with strong decisions concerning enforcement of fines and
handing down of probation rulings
in past years.
For too long members of the
council have been concerned with
their own interests instead of the
interests of the entire fraternity
community.
Until these members are willing
to sacrifice some of their personel
gains for betterment of the system,
rules such as the one set up for
the upperclass rush will be of little
benefit.

Letters To The Editor

Chastity And The Dean
To the Editor of the Kernel:
I have followed our beloved
Dean of Women's actions with
interest for some time. Her latest
mandate forbidding female art students to work in the Reynolds
Building after dark is another blow
against the creeping heterosexual-ity- .
Everyone knows you can only
become pregnant in the dark.
I wish to bring to her attention
several disgusting incidents. Several times I have noticed couples
on campus holding hands, and
with people of another sex. Four
times I have seen people of opposite sexes kissing on campus.
Students are even allowed to sit
among persons of the opposite sex
in classrooms. Well, we all know
what that leads to.
The Dean of Women should
make it mandatory for every female on campus to be fitted with
a chastity belt to insure the proper
moral attitude. Some cur has made
a statement that those with a
puritanical attitude of sex are
usually married, are permitted to
have it, or are so old they are not
influenced by it. I take this as a

definite slur against our Dean of
Women.

Carl R. Seider
A&S Senior

'Honored'
I

deeply appreciated your
gracious editorial on my leaving
the University. Few things are more
gratifying to a teacher than the
acknowledgement of his work and
ideals by the student body. I hope
I shall have some measure of com-

munication with the students at
Stony Brook, too.
It is a privilege to serve on
the faculty of a University so
rapidly assuming a position of the
highest respect in this country. I
feel especially honored to have
served as chairman of the Senate
Council, a position which has
brought me the advantages of close
contact with the total University.
The University is headed toward
the highest goals. The departure
of faculty members for positions
of high responsibility elsewhere is
as much a tribute to the University
as it is to the individual.
E. D. Pellegrino, M. D.
Chairman, Department of Medicine

The Kentucky Kernel
The South's Outstanding College
Daily

University of Kentucky

ESTABLISHED 1891

THURSDAY, SEPT. 8, I960

Waltkh

M.

Chant,

Editor-in-Chi-

Iehence Hunt, Executive Lditor
John Zeii, Associate Editor

lene Llabes,

Judy Chisiiam, Associate Editor
1

Lahhv box. Daily Neus Editor

,UL

Straw,

Managing Editor

Fmvir IShowntnc, Associate Editor
Sports Editor
Hon Hehhon. Dully Neu Editor

Bahhy Cobb, Cartoonist

William Knapp,

Business Manager

Ed Campbell, Circulation Manager

* V

.THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Sept. 8,

l'mb-- ."i

Washington Insight

U.S. Should Support Two China Theory

Ky JOSEPH KRAFT
WASHINGTON The lunatic

behavior of the Red Guards in

China has at least one direct
and immediate
bearing on
American policy. It affects what
is known in Washington as the
Chi Rep question, which means,
in English, the issue of Chinese
representation at the United
Nations.

At the present time, the Chi
Rep question is up for reconsideration at the highest levels.
Probably in the next 10 days,
and certainly before the convening of the General Assembly
this month, a decision will be

"Inside Report"

made by President Johnson and
Secretary of State Dean Rusk.
Precisely because of the foolish things now being said and
done in Peking, the temptation
is strong to stick to the old position of barring the admission
of Communist China to the
United Nations. More so than
at any time since the Korean
War, it can now be argued that
Mainland China is no fit member of the international community of nations.
That moral argument goes
hand in hand with sheer inertia, the immobility that comes
naturally to any country with
as many conflicting internation

al bonds as the United States.
Given the complex interplay of
these different claims, the instinct of the United States is to
stand pat on positions already
blocked out. With China in turmoil, it is even easier to wait
and sec before taking any new
decisions.
Inertia in this case, moreover,
is reinforced by short-tercalculation. No one knows exactly
how the African countries which
hold the balance of power in
the United Nations General Assembly are going to vote. Rut
they will not be uninfluenced
by the recent turn of events in
China.

The likelihood is that more
African states will be against
Chinese admission this year than
last. And that means that the
United States tan, once again,
get by with the old position.
Impressive as these arguments
may sound, however, it seems to
me that there can be marshalled
against them far more weighty
counter arguments. And the case
for a new position takes on special force precisely because it
would be so easy to stand pat
on the old position.
The basic point is that, in
the long run, the old position is
u dangerous position. Everybody
knows that at some time Communist China is going to be admitted to the United Nations as
a member of the Assembly and
with a scat on the Security
Council.

By Rowland Evans and Robert Novak

Nixon's Drive For YAF's Aid
May Result In Tactical Error
-

WASIII OT( ) N Th e rev el
that Richard M. Nixon conferred with top conservative
leaders is only the first surfacing
of a
undercover
effort to enlist the conservative
youth movement in Nixon's presidential drive.
long-buildin- g

That Aug. 23 meeting between
Nixon and some 20 conservativesmost of them conservative
youth leaders was not arranged
overnight. It came about after

months of preparation in the
face of private protests from some
youth leaders against
any intimate association with
right-win- g

Nixon.

Just why Nixon sought the
meeting stems from his desperate
need for a dependable political
base. Although he now leads
the 1968 presidential nomination, that lead could melt
quickly if he has no militant
corps of supporters. Consequently, he is wooing the idealistic
who
conservatives
young
marched for Barry Coldwatcr in
of this
1964. The background
for

effort reveals clearly how gossamer are the threads binding
Nixon w ith the Republican right.

The key figure in all this is
Nixon's new "research assistant" a young man, totally
anonymous to national politicians, named Patrick J.
In contrast to the
pragmatists who
dominated Nixon's staff in the
past, Buchanan is a thoroughgoing conservative with close
ties to the Young Americans for
Freedom (YAF), key organization
in the conservative youth move-

Busher, publisher of the National
Review.

about the same time, an
Esquire magazine survey of 1968
presidential prospects quoted the
current YAF president, Tom
Charles Houston, as saying only
Nixon is generally acceptable
to all kinds of Republicans. Here
was
sentiment seldom
seen inside YAF, and Buchanan
lost no time in exploiting it.
At

pro-Nixo-

First came a luncheon between Buchanan and Houston,
followed by a Houston-Nixo- n
meeting. It was decided that
Houston would invite Nixon for
a private session with YAF's
top leadership.
Yet, there is considerable
doubt how much all of Pat Buchanan's efforts have accomplished in winning Nixon a

following

ideological

however, the Shore-hameeting
is giving the Republican
left
bountiful ammunition to use in
painting Nixon as theColdwater
candidate in 1968. Thus, the early
assessment by Part) pros is that
the Shorehain meeting, so long
in preparation, may turn out
to be a tactical error of major
importance for Nixon.

to please

positions

the Party's moderates.

is

uncertain

Cancelled or Rejected

AL TOBSTRICK
180 Market S