xt763x83jq0s https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt763x83jq0s/data/mets.xml Lexington, Ky (Fayette County) University of Kentucky 19581959 The University of Kentucky catalogs contains bound volumes dating from 1865 through 2007. After 2007 course catalogs ceased to be printed and became available online only. course catalogs  English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky course catalogs, 1865- Bulletin of the University of Kentucky, Volume 26 (1958-1959) text Bulletin of the University of Kentucky, Volume 26 (1958-1959) 1958 2012 true xt763x83jq0s section xt763x83jq0s gif Q   A5   11 `   _ ~i ·I   --
BULLETIN OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
General
Catalog ,
A
1958-59 LHBI
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E v0LUME 51 MAY, 1959 NUMBER 5

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i UHIVCYSICY of Kentucky
\ LEXINGTON,KY.
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i
é Announcements 1959- 60
 
@1 A bulletin published monthly, Ianuary to September inclusive, by the
University of Kentucky, Lexington. Entered as Second-Class Matter at the
E Post Oilice, Lexington, Ky., under the Act of August 24, 1912.
il Vol. 51 May, 1959 N0. 5
I.
E

 
 BOARD OF TRUSTEES
Ex-Officio
Albert B. Chandler, Governor
Robert R. Martin, Superintendent of Public Instruction
Ben Butler, Commissioner of Agriculture
Members
Wood Hannah, Sr., December 81, 1959, Prospect
William F. Foster, December 31, 1959, Mayfield
\Villiam C. \’Vilson, December 31, 1959, Henderson
Mrs. Paul G. Blazer, December 31, 1960, Ashland
R. P. Hobson, December 31, 1960, Louisville
Harper Catton, December 31, 1961, Madisonville
Paul B. Hall, December 31, 1961, Paintsville
Clifford E. Smith, December 31, 1962, Frankfort
Floyd H. Wright, December 31, 1962, Lexington
Alumni Members
. Ralph Angelucci, December 31, 1960, Lexington
]. Stephen Watkins, December 31, 1961, Lexington
Robert Hillenmeyer, December 31, 1962, Lexington
Officers of the Boord
Albert B. Chandler, Chairman
R. P. Hobson, Vice-Chairman
Frank D. Peterson, Secretary
Executive Committee
R. P. Hobson, Chairman
Ralph Angelucci
Harper Catton
]. Stephen Watkins 4

 I
, ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION
j GENERAL
l Frank Graves Dickey, M.A., Ed.D., LL.D., President
. Herman Lee Donovan, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., President Emeritus
I Leo Martin Chamberlain, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., Vice President
I Frank Dewey Peterson, A.B., LL.D., Vice President (Business Administration)
William Robert Willard, B.S., M.D., Dr.P.H., Vice President of the Albert B.
Chandler Medical Center
Bruce Frederick Denbo, M.A., Director ot University of Kentucky Press
  Charles Fowler Elton, M.A., Ph.D., Dean of Admissions and Registrar
  Thomas Lee Hankins, M.S., Director of Northern Kentucky Center
E H. Clyde Lewis, M.A., Director of Ashland Center
I Leslie Leon Martin, M.S., Ph.D., Dean of Men
I Doris M. Seward, M.A., Ph.D., Dean of Women
  ]ohn Sprague, B.S., M.D., F.A.C.S., Director, University Health Service
· Lawrence Sidney Thompson, M.A., Ph.D., Director of Libraries
, Raymond Wesley Wild, A.B., Ph.M., Director of Public Relations
  THE COLLEGES
Martin Marshall VVhite, M.A., Ph.D., Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
~ ]acob Robert Meadow, M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Dean, College of Arts and Sci-
ences
` °Frank ]ames Welch, M.A., Ph.D., Dean of the College of Agriculture and
Home Economics; Director of the Experiment Station; Director of Agri-
cultural Extension
Hugh Bruce Price, M.A., Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Agriculture and
Home Economics, Director of the Experiment Station and of Agricultural
Extension, first semester, 1958-59
Maurice Stanley Wall, M.S. in Ed., Ed.D., Associate Dean, College of Agri-
culture and Home Economics
\Villiam Albert Seay, M.S., Ph.D., Vice Director, Experiment Station
Robert Ezekiel Shaver, C.E., Dean of the College of Engineering; Director,
Engineering Experiment Station
William Lewis Matthews, ]r., A.B., LL.M., S.].D., Dean, College of Law
Lyman Vemon Ginger, M.A., Ed.D., Dean of the College of Education
Cecil Clayton Carpenter, M.S., Ph.D., Dean of the College of Commerce
Earl Platt Slone, Ph.G., M.A., Dean of the College of Pharmacy
\/Villiam Robert Willard, B.S., M.D., Dr.P.H., Dean of the College of Medicine
Richardson Kilbourne Noback, B.S., M.D., Assistant Dean, College of Medicine
Marcia Allcnc Dakc, M.A., Ed.D., Dean of the College of Nursing
Arnold DeWald Albright, M.S., Ph.D., Executive Dean, Extended Programs
Raymon Dudley johnson, M.A. in Ed., Ed.D., Associate Dean, Extended Pro-
grams
Herman Everette Spivey, M.A., Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School
° On leave.

 CONTENTS
Page
Publications and Sources of Information ........................................................ 4
Special Information ..,.......,............................................................................... 5
Calendar for 1959-60 ...................................................................................... 6
University Calendar for 1959-60 .................................................................... 7
Registration Schedules for 1959-60 ................................................................ 9
Part I. General Information of Special Interest to the
Prospective Student .........................,.......................................... 13
Origin, Purposes, and Accreditation ................................................ 15
Admission to the University ............................................................ 16
Fees and Expenses ............................................................................ 20
Residence Halls for Women ....................,....................................... 24
Residence Halls for Men .................................................................. 25
Opportunities for Financial Help ................................... . ................ 26
Special Services for the Student ...................................................... 27
Veteran Afiairs ..................r............................................................... 28
What Is Expected of the Student .................................................... 29
Opportunities Outside the Classroom ........................................,..... 36
The Alumni Association ...................................,................................ 40
The Plant of the University ............................................................ 41
Part II. Educational Opportunities at the University of Kentucky ............ 47
Degrees and Curricula ..........,........................................................... 48
College of Arts and Sciences ............................................................ 52
College of Agriculture and Home Economics ..........,..................... 89
College of Engineering .................................................................... 110
College of Law ... ............................................................................... 124
College of Education ........ . ............................................................... 130
College of Commerce ...................................................................... 153
College of Pharmacy ........................................................................ 163
College of Medicine ....... . .................................................................. 166
College of Nursing ............................................................................ 50
Graduate School .............................................................................. 167
Extended Programs .......................................................................... 186
Part III. Statement of Courses Oitered at the University ............................ 189
Part IV. Special Services at the University ........................,......................... 341
Part V. The Academic and Administrative Staff of the University .......... 349
Index ................................................................................................................ 401

 I PUBLICATIONS AND SOURCES OF INFORMATION
Several publications are issued by the University of Kentucky for the pur-
‘ pose of giving prospective students and other citizens information about the
institution. The offices from which publications may be received are listed
below.
Bulletin of General Information ................ University Registrar’s Office
General Catalog .......................................... U niversity Registrar's Office
Agriculture and Home Economics
‘ Bulletin ...................................................... College of Agriculture and
1 Home Economics or Uni-
versity Registrar°s Office
T Arts and Sciences Bulletin . ......................... College of Arts and Sciences or
` University Registrar’s Office
` Campus View Books .................................... Department of Public Relations
U Commerce Bulletin ..............,.,..................... College of Commerce or
University Registrafs Office
Education Bulletin ...................................... College of Education, or
University Reg'istrar's Oflice
Engineering Bulletin .................................... College of Engineering or
University Registrar's Office
Graduate Bulletin ........................................ Graduate School
Law Bulletin ................................................ College of Law or
University Registrafs Office
' Pharmacy Bulletin ...................................... College of Pharmacy or
University Registrar's Office
College of Medicine, How to Apply
for Admission ..........................................., Available from Committee on
Medical College Admissions,
Office of the Registrar
Summer Session Announcement .................. University Registrar's Office
Extension Bulletins ..................................... Extended Programs

 SPECIAL INFORMATION
In order to assist those who may wish special information about some part
of the University's program, there are listed below the members of the adminis-
trative staff to whom inquiries of various types may be sent. In each case the
University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, is the post office address.
The general policies of the University ...... President of thc University
General information, all admissions,
and transcripts of credits ........................ Dean of Admissions and
Registrar
Living accommodations, student Dean of Men or
help, social affairs .................................... Dean of Women
A particular college and its program ........ Dean of the College
Graduate work ...................................,,....... Dean of the Graduate School
Summer Session .......................................... Dean of Admissions and
Registrar
Class extension and correspondence
study .......................................................... Dean of Extended Programs
Agricultural cxtcnsion .................................. Dircctor of Agricultural
Extension
Facilities for veterans ................................ University Counseling Oflice
General information about the University .... Director of Public Relations

 l CALENDAR
I  
v 1959 1960 1960
1 July Jonuury July
` S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
` 1 2 3 4 1 2 1 2
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
26 27 28 29 30 31   25 26 27 28 29 30   25 26 27 28 29 30
     
August February August
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 6
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
, 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 28 29 28 29 30 31
. 30 31
September Murch September
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
27 28 29 30 27 28 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 30
October April October
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 1 2 1
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 30     25 26 27 28 29
November Muy November
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
29 30 29 30 31 27 28 29 30
     
December June December
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
l 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 1 2 3
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
27 28 29 30 31 26 27 28 29 30 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
 

 UNIVERSITY CALENDAR FOR THE YEAR 1959-60
(All times Central Standard)
Summer Session 1959
l959
]une 8 Monday—Classification tests and advising of all new students.
]une 9 Tuesday, 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.—Registration and classifica-
tion of all students according to an alphabetical schedule.
]une 10 Wednesday~—Class work begins
]une 13 Saturday—Last date one may enter an organized class for
the full Summer Session
]une 20 Saturday—Last date one may drop a course without a grade.
]uly 4 Saturday—Independence Day holiday
Aug. 3 Monday—All grades due in RegisLrar’s Oflice by 3:00 p.m.
Aug. 15 Saturday-Last date to submit application and transcripts to
Registrar’s Ollice for admission to the Fall Semester of
1959-60
Sept. 13 Sunday—Opening of Fall Semester of 1959-60
First Semester
Aug. 14 Friday—Last date to submit application and transcripts to
Begistrar's Oliice for admission for the First Semester of
1959-60
Sept. 13-19 Sunday through Saturday-Orientation Week for all new stu-
dents
Sept. 13 Sunday—President’s reception for new students
Sept. 14-16 Monday, 6:45 a.m. through Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.—Orienta-
tion activities for all new students
Sept. 17 Thursday, 7:00 to 10:00 a.m.—Registration and classification
of new freshmen
Sept. 17-19 Thursday, 12:30 p.m. through Saturday 10:00 a.m.—Registra-
tion and classification of all other students
Sept. 21 Monday—Class work begins
Sept. 26 Saturday-Last date one may enter an organized class for
the First Semester
Oct. 1 Thursday—Last date one may drop a course without a grade
Oct. 1, 2 Thursday and Friday-Last days for filing applications for
degrees in College Dean’s office
Oct. 10 Saturday—Last date on which photographs will be taken for
ID cards
Nov. 17 Tuesday, 8:00 a.m.—Midsemester grades due in the Regis-
trar’s Oflice
Nov. 26-30 Thursday, 7:00 a.m. to Monday, 7:00 a.m.—Thanksgiving
holidays
Dec. 19 Saturday noon—Christmas holidays begin
Dec. 31 Thursday—Last date to submit application and transcripts
to Registrar’s Oflice for admission to the Second Semester
of 1959-60
1960
]an. 4 Monday, 7:00 a.m.—Christmas holidays end
]an. 18-22 Monday through Friday—Final examinations
]an. 22 Friday—End of First Semester
Ian. 25 Monday-All grades due in Registrar’s Otlice by 4:00 p.m.

 Second Semester
]a.n. 30 Saturday, 6:45 a.m.—Orientation activities for all new stu-
. dents `
: Feb. 1, 2 Monday, 7:00 a.m. through Tuesday, 4:00 p.m.—Registrati0n
~ and classification of all students
t Feb. 3 Wednesday—Class work begins
` Feb, 9 Tuesday—Last date one may enter an organized class for the
‘ Second Semester
Feb. 13 Saturday—Last date one may drop a course without a grade
Feb. 15, 16 Monday and Tuesday—Last days for filing applications for
degrees in College Dean’s oflice
March 31 Thursday, 8:00 a.m.—Midsemester grades due in the Regis-
trar’s OH;ice -
Apr. 7-19 Thursday, 7:00 a.m. to Tuesday, 7:00 a.m.—Spring vacation
May9 Monday—Correspondence and Extension grades for seniors
due in Registrafs OfHce by 9:00 a.m.
May 14 Saturday—Last date to submit application and transcripts to
Registrafs Ollice for admission to the 1960 Summer Ses-
sion
May 23 Monday—Senior grades and reports of comprehensive exami-
nations due in Registrar’s Oilice by 9:00 a.m.
May 28 Saturday-Alumni Day
May 29 Sunday—Baccalaureate Services
May 30 Monday—Ninety-third Annual Commencement
May 31-]une 4 Tuesday through Saturday—Final examinations
]une 4 Saturday—End of Second Semester
]une7 Tuesday-All grades due in Registrar’s Ofiice by 4:00 p.m.
]une 7-11 Tuesday through Saturday-4-H Club Week
~ Summer Session 1960
]une 13 Monday—Orientation activities for all new students
June 14 Tuesday, 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.—Registration and classifica-
tion of all students according to an alphabetical schedule
]une 15 Wednesday—Class work begins
]une 18 Saturday—Last date one may enter an organized class for
the full Summer Session
]une 25 Saturday—Last date one may drop a course without a grade
]une 28,29 Tuesday and Wednesday—Last days for Hling applications
for degrees in College Dean’s OHice
july 4 Monday—Independence Day holiday
Aug. 5 Friday—End of Summer Session
Aug. 8 Monday—All grades due in Registrar’s Oflice by 3:00 p.m.
Aug. 15 Monday—Last date to submit application and transcripts to
Registrar’s Oiiice for admission to the Fall Semester,
1960-61
Sept. 11 Sunday—Opening of Fall Semester of 1960-61

 REGISTRATION SCHEDULES FOR l959-60 (Central Standard Time)
` Summer Session l959
]une 8 Monday-—Classification tests and advising of all new students
]une9 Tuesday—Hegistration and classification of all students ac-
cording to the alphabetical schedule below:
Tuesday Forenoon Tuesday Afternoon
7:00- 7:50-A through Cuni 12:30-1:20-Mev through Siz
8:00- 8:50—Cunj through Hess 1:30-2:20-Sj through Z
9:00- 9:50-Hest through Meu 2:30-3:00—Miscellaneous
(Incl Mc) A through Z
10: 00-10 : 30—Miscellaneous
A through Meu (Incl Mc)
june 10 Weduesday—Class work begins.
June 13 Saturday—Last date one may enroll for the full Summer
Session.
First Semester
September 14-16 Monday, 6:45 a.m. through Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.-Classi-
Hcation tests and advising of all new students.
September 17 Thursday, 7:00 to 10:00 a.m.—Registration and classification
of new freshmen.
September 17-19 Thursday, 12:30 p.m. through Saturday, 10:00 a.m.-Regis-
tration and classification of all other students according to
the alphabetical schedule below:
Thursday Afternoon Friday Afternoon
l 12:30-1:20-Sv through Z 12:30-1:20-Dem through Gor
1:30-2:20-Rot through Su 1:30-2:20-Bus through Del
2 : 30-3 : 00—Miscellaneous 2 :30-3 :00—Miscellaneous
` Rot through Z Bus through Z
t Friday Forenoon Saturday Forenoon
; 7:00- 7:50-Nf through Ros 7:00-7:50-A through Bur
8:00- 8:50-Loo through Ne 8:00-9:50—Miscellaneous
9:00- 9:50-Hue through Lon A through Z
10:00-10:50-Cos through Hud -
September 21 Monday-Classwork begins.
I
, September 26 Saturday—Last date one may enter an organized class for the
First Semester.

 Second Semester
]anuary 30 Saturday, 6:45 a.m.-Classification tests and advising of all  
new students.  
i i
Q February 1, 2 Monday, 7:00 a.m. through Tuesday, 4:00 p.m.—Registxati0n  
V and classification of all students according to the alpha-
betical schedule below: Z
(
Monday Forenoon Tuesday Forencon
7:00- 7:50-A through Bur 7:00- 7:50-Nf through Ros
8:00- 8:50-—Bus through Del 8:00- 8:50-Rot through Su
9:00- 9:50-Dem through Gor 9:00- 9:50-Sv through Z
10:00-10:50-Gos through Hud 10:00-10:30—Miscellane0us
A through Z
Monday Afternoon Tuesday Afternoon
12:30-1:20-Hue through Lon 12:30-3:00—Miscellaneous
y 1:30-2:20-Loo through Ne A through Z /
2 : 30-3 : 00—Miscellaneous /
A through Ne Z
February 3 Wednesday-Class work begins.
February 9 Tuesday—Last date one may enter an organized class for the
Second Semester.
Summer Session 1960
]une 13 Monday, 6:45 a.m.—Classi{ication tests and advising of all
new students.
june 14 Tuesday, 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.——Registration and classifica-
tion of all students according to the alphabetical schedule
below:
i Tuesday Forenoon Tuesday Afternoon
7:00- 7:50-A through Com 12:30-1:20-Pb through Sta
8:00- 8:50-Con through Gre 1:30-2:20-Stb through Z
9:00- 9:50-Grf through K 2:30-3:00—Miscellaneous
10:00-10:50-L through Pa A through Z
]une 15 Wednesday—Class work begins.
]une 18 Saturday—Last date one may enter an organized class for the
full Summer Session. .

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9 ‘ /

 
 PART I
GENERAL INFORMATION OF SPECIAL INTEREST
TO THE PROSPECTIVE STUDENT

   A 1
1
1

 ORIGIN, PURPOSES, AND ACCREDITATION
The University of Kentucky, a state-supported institution, is located at
Lexington, an urban community of over 100,000 population. The Board of
Trustees includes the Governor, the Superintendent of Public Instruction, and
the Commissioner of Agriculture, ex oilicio, and twelve members appointed by
the Governor, three of whom are alunmi of the University. The University is
one of a number of institutions known as land-grant colleges, which were
established by the Morrill Act of 1862, and which have continued to receive
federal assistance under provisions of this and subsequent laws relating to
the teaching of agriculture and the mechanic arts and the provision of agri-
cultural experiment stations and extension services in agriculture and home
economics.
The University of Kentucky began as a part of Kentucky University under
a cooperative plan authorized by the legislature in 1865. The purpose of this
plan was to unite sectarian and public education under one organization. This
experiment was tried for a number of years. In the meantime, the federal funds
authorized under the Morrill Act were used to develop agriculture and mechanic
arts in Kentucky University. In 1878, when the people of Kentucky decided to
establish a state institution of higher leaming, the College of Agriculture and
Mechanic Arts was separated from Kentucky University and reestablished on
land given by the City of Lexington and the County of Fayette. Thirty years
later the legislature changed the name of the institution to the State University
of Kentucky, and gave it additional financial support. In 1916 the name was
again changed, this time to the present title, and additional maintenance was
arranged by legislative act.
The major function of the University is that of instruction. For the per-
formance of this function it is organized into the College of Arts and Sciences,
the College of Agriculture and Home Economics, the College of Engineering,
the College of Law, the College of Education, the College of Commerce, the
College of Pharmacy, the College of Medicine, the College of Nursing, the
Graduate School, and Extended Programs.
In addition to giving instruction to its student body, the University con-
tributes to the welfare of the state through research, experimentation, and pub-
lic service. VVhile all departments make important contributions along these
lines, certain divisions and bureaus have been established specifically for these
purposes. Included in this group are the Experiment Station and the Extension
Division of the College of Agriculture and Home Economics, the Bureau of
Business Research, the Bureau of Government Research, the Bureau of School
Service, the University and Educational Archives, the University Placement
Service, the Radio Studios, the Home Study Program, the Extension
Class Program, the Evening Class Program, the University Centers, Com-
munity Services, the Audio Visual Services, the Department of Public Relations,
the Engineering Experiment Station, the Child Guidance Service, the Industrial
Psychological Service, the Social Research Consultation Service. The Medical
Center to includc the University Hospital and related services, the Bureau of
Community Service, and \Vorkshops and Conferences.
The University of Kentucky is a member of the Southern Association of
Colleges and Secondary Schools and the Kentucky Association of Colleges and
Secondary Schools. It is accredited in its respective colleges or departments by
the Association of American Law Schools, the American Bar Association, the
American Association of Collegiate Schools of Business, the American Associa-

 16 UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
tion of Schools and Departments of Iournalism, the American Library Associa-
tion, the Association of Research Libraries, the National Association of Schools
‘ of Music, the Engineer’s Council for Professional Development, the American
` Chemical Society, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, the
` American Council on Pharmaceutical Education, the American Association of
Colleges for Teacher Education, and the National University Extension Associa-
, tion. The University’s Department of Social Work is a constituent member of
the Council on Social Work Education.
ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY
Students are admitted to the University of Kentucky as freshmen, as stu-
dents with advanced standing from other institutions, as graduate students, as
special students, as non-degree students, and as auditors. Admission to certain
p colleges is governed by special regulations.
‘ Applications for admission to the University should be made to the Uni-
versity Registrar on forms furnished by the Registra.r’s Oflice. In order for the
1 application to be considered these forms must be received in the Registrafs
1 Ofhce at least 30 days prior to the opening of the term in which the student
‘ desires to enroll. In addition to the application form, oilicial transcripts of high
school credits and of work done in other colleges or universities should be sub-
` mitted before the dates given above. All admissions, including those to the
professional schools and the Graduate School, must be passed on by the
i Registrar°s Office.
Applications for re-admission must be filed by former students who have _
been registered elsewhere since registration at the University of Kentucky.
Applications for re-admission must also be filed by former students who have
not been registered at the University during the previous two consecutive
semesters except that this shall not apply to students who enroll only in con-
` secutive summer terms.
Applications for re-admission must be supported by transcripts of all college
work attempted elsewhere.
Admission to the Freshman Class
Admission to the University does not necessarily qualify a student for ad-
mission to a particular college. In every case the student must meet the ad-
mission requirements of the college in which he is to enroll.
Resident students
Applicants who are graduates of accredited high schools will be admitted
to the University on certificate, provided they have at least fifteen units of ac-
ceptable high school work. A unit represents the study of any subject for a
school year of at least thirty-two weeks, with five recitation periods a week,
each of at least forty-five minutes in length, or the equivalent thereof. Double
periods are required in shop, drawing, typewriting, and all other courses which
demand no out-of-class preparation. One unit is the minimum credit accepted
in any foreign language, and one-half unit the minimum in any other subiect.
While the University does not prescribe a pattem of work for admission,
it recommends that at least ten of the units presented be chosen from English,
the social studies, mathematics, the foreign languages, and the laboratory
sciences, and that within these ten units the student oifer at least three units
in English, one and one-half in algebra, and one in plane geometry. Should a

 GENERAL INFORMATION 17
ja- student lack these courses as prerequisites for any of his college work, he will be
,0ls required to take them in college without credit, thus delaying his graduation.
xm Applicants who have graduated from unaccredited high schools and those
the not graduated from high school may be admitted as freshmen if, in addition
of to presenting the fifteen acceptable units, they successfully pass the University
eia- classification examinations.
of Non-resident students
Any student who graduates in the lower one-half of his high-school class
may be refused admission. Students who fall in this category may qualify for
admission by passing the University classification examination.
;u—
as Admission to Advanced Standing
nn The applicant for admission must present evidence that he is in good
_ standing in every respect in the institution he last attended. At no time shall
u' college or university records be disregarded to admit an applicant solely on the
llc basis of his high school records. He must have maintained a grade point aver-
fs age of 2.0, or an average of C, in all previous college work. Only credits
nt earned with a grade of C or higher will be accepted.
gh VVork done at a fully accredited college or university is recognized credit
b' hour for credit hour. In order to be classified as fully accredited, a college
lc must be a member of a regional accrediting association. Advanced standing
lc from an unaccredited college may be obtained by special subject examinations.
Credit hours accepted from junior colleges will be limited to a maximum
"C . of 67.
E; Written applications for admission with advanced standing should be
submitted to the Registrar’s Oflice on fomis furnished by that oflice.
fe
I- Admission as a Special Student
C6 A student may be admitted as a special student if he does not have a high
school diploma, is at least 21 years of age, and is fully prepared to do the work
required.
A special student may become a candidate for a degree in any under-
[ graduate college in either of two ways:
I; 1. Satisfying the entrance requirements for admission to the freshman class.
2. Completing in residence sixty-seven credit hours with a grade point
average of at least 2.5 in all work attempted
1 Admission as a Non-Degree Student
J Persons who desire University instruction without wishing to become
` degree candidates may be admitted as non-degree students. Such students
J must present satisfactory evidence that they are prepared to take the work
J desired. Before enrolling in a particular course, however, such a student must
1 . . .
I obtain the permission of the instructor and the dean of the college.
No one may enroll as a non-degree student in the University for more than
` two years except by special permission of the dean of the college in which he is
' registered.
; Non-degree students may become degree students after meeting regular
_ admission requirements; however, work taken as a non-degree student will
’ not, in itself, qualify a person for admission as a degree student. Only credit
i

 18 UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
earned after a student meets admission requirements will be counted toward a S'
degree.  
Admission as an Auditor 8
. By payment of the required fees any person may be admitted to a class or·
classes as an auditor. A student regularly enrolled in any college must apply Q
` to the Dean of the College in which he is registered in order to be an auditor. I
` Other persons should apply to the Registrar’s Office for admission. No credit f
can be given for a class audited, nor is the student permitted an examination (
for credit. No instructor is authorized to admit anyone as an auditor to any of
his classe