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Couriers Cindy Asplin and Christina Bugbee have been hard at work painting this ·
wall mural for courier coordinator, Danna Larson, pictured above. Christina also
sketeched the scene on the front cover. The house, located on Camp Creek, was  
originally built by Jesse Morgan in the early nineteenth century.
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FRONTIER NURSING SERVICE QUARTERLY BULLETIN Ll
US ISSN 0016-2116 i
Published at the end of each quarter by the Frontier Nursing Service, Inc. i
Wendover, Kentucky 41775 *’
Subscription Price $2.00 a Year  
Edit0r‘s Office, Wendover, Kentucky 41775  
VOLUME 56 WINTER, 1980 NUMBER 3  
Second-class postage paid at Wendover, Ky. 41775 and at additional mailing offices l ,
Send Form 3579 to Frontier Nursing Service, Wendover, Ky. 41775 l
Copyright 1981, Frontier Nursing Service, Inc. g 1
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  CONTENTS
  ARTICLE AUTHOR PAGE
{ Education and Service: Becky Beardshaw 2
, The Leslie County Health
° . Careers Program
  Respiratory Care Project Diana Fortney and 7
  Becky Beardshaw
if Memories of Mary Breckinridge Georgia Ledford 9
`· and the Big House
i Being a Courier: Four Accounts Cindy Asplin, Molly Beaver 10
; of a Courier’s Daily Activities Joan Davis, and Nancy Kocer
    Clinical Experience in Mound Marianne Towler and 15
{ Bayou, Mississippi Karen Kudia
l Alumnae News 17
    Staff News 19
  ` Greetings From 23
  - Odette Prunet Foulon
  Courier News 25
  A Tribute to Molly Lee The Class of 1980 28
  New Year’s Baby 31
  In Memoriam 32
i Memorial Gifts 34
  Home Visits by FNS Nurses Lynn Lady 35
if   Urgent Needs 43
  Staff Opportunities 43
l Christmas at FNS Becky Beardshaw 44
{ Field Notes 46
ii Brief Bits
C Congratulations to the Local Advisory Committee 14
FSMFN Graduates 18
i Las Vegas East ll 27
  Letter to the Hazard Herald- Voice 30
[ A Hanging—Just For Fun 42
  Annual Meeting 42
E
 

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2 momisn Nunsmc ssavxcs  
EDUCATION AND SERVICE:  
THE LESLIE COUNTY HEALTH CAREERS PROGRAM ‘
by Becky Beardshaw  
The Health -Careers Program at the Leslie County Vocational 5
School is an excellent example of community cooperation. The sy
program gives interested students an opportunity to explore ;
health care professions and get a practical taste of the field at an R;
early age. At the same time, the students provide useful services to  
the people of Hyden and, more specifically, to the Frontier  
Nursing Service.  
The program is open to any eleventh and twelfth graders who ,
wish to join, and this year there are thirty-six students enrolled.  
(For the first time since the program began five years ago, three of g
the students are male.) 'I`hey spend half of the school day at the Q
high school, following the standard curriculum, and half at the  
Vocational School, under the supervision of Mrs. Betty Huff,  
coordinator of the program.  
The Health Careers room is large and sunny and, like the  
program itself, seems to be a blend of classroom and practical {
learning ground. Hospital beds and rubber dummies line one side A1
of the room, while more traditional desks and a blackboard fill the ‘
other. Here, students learn the procedures of a Nurse’s Aide and {
study basic sciences, including elementary Chemistry, Anatomy Y
and Physiology. They are also given exposure to the various
careers that exist within the health field and the training required ...
for each. H
A great deal of leaming takes place outside of the classroom. q,
One day a week, they work either at the Mary Breckinridge ii
Hospital, the Leslie County Health Department or at Hope House, .
the center for mentally and physically handicapped adults. In the  
hospital, their work covers many different departments ranging  Q
from the Med-Surg floor to Medical Records. They rotate from  n
place to place, so that by the end of the year they have gained  
experience in a variety of areas.  
The students participate in many other community activities  
— often filling a little-noticed yet very necessary role. At the FNS  
Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic which took place during the fall, the  
Health Careers Students spent long hours at the hospital, doing  ·
everything from transporting patients to and fro to checking vital >

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  signs in ENT patients and caring for non-ENT patients. Led by
` County 4-H Agent, Russell Kenefick, they are currently carrying
Z out vision screening in area grade schools. They recruit students
{ to give blood in County Blood Drives, as well as donating
i` themselves, and this fall they had the chance to experience the
i ` medical world from the other side — by acting as the "victims" for
  the h0spital’s disaster drill! Probably their most valuable service
ji takes place on snow days when school is not in session and
•l?` transportation is difficult for everyone. When it is possible, they
ll volunteer their time at the hospital, helping out anywhere they are
li needed. Their volunteer hours mount up and, at the end of the
L year, the student who has completed the most hours receives an
{ award.
l There are currently live girls enrolled in the second year of the
g program, which is new this year. Like the iirst year of the
{ program, half of their day is spent at the high school and half
  under the auspices of the Vocational School. These students,
_: however, spend all their Health Careers’ time working in a l
  specific area: physiotherapy, dietary department, the lab, the
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* Sharritta Coots in Physical Therapy

 4 FRONTIER Ntmsmo smwioia »
sterile supply room or Hope House. These students gain practical
experience in their area and of working life within the field of y
health care. They also play an integral part within their depart-  i
ment. For Kathy Farmer, in sterile supply, a typical shift includes ;
operating the autoclave, packing instruments, filling orders, {
answering the telephone and observing surgery. It gives her an Q
opportunity to become familiar with medical instruments and  
procedures. She is also a great help to the staff; in the words of her Y,
supervisor: "We couldn’t do without her." °
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Carol Collins, james Sizemore, Gwynn Nantz, and Health Careers’  
Coordinator, Betty Huff  
5

  
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 i Sandy Begley filing in X-ray
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 6 Fnomma Nunsmo smwicr .
After completing the first year ofthe program, students receive J
the qualification of Nurse’s Aide; after the second, they become
certified as Aides in the department in which they worked.
Because of their wide range of abilities, students go on to use their
experience and qualifications in many different ways. For some, it j
provides an excellent basis as they become wives and mothers.  
Others go on to work as Nurse’s Aides. Others pursue further  
training: many attend the L. P.N. program at Hazard Community  
College. A recent graduate, Robin Holbrook, studies medicine at ~'
the University of Kentucky. Currently there are two Health
Careers’ graduates employed at the Mary Breckinridge Hospital V
as L.P.N.’s and six as Nurse’s Aides.
Betty Huff — teacher and coordinator of the program, career
advisor and role model for all her students — has had a varied .
background and a long connection with FNS. She has worked as a ‘
RN in a small hospital, as a public health nurse, a home health
nurse, a pediatric home health nurse and a psychiatric nurse. She
is a founder-member of the FNS Local Advisory Committee and
serves on the advisory committee of the FNS Home Health
Agency. She is also a member of the Leslie County Board of A
Health. She openly admits that because of her own background, p
the program tends to stress careers in nursing. In the four years
that she has been in charge, however, the program has expanded r
greatly and so have the kinds of careers that graduates have gone j
on to pursue. ‘
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Angie Westerfield in Pharmacy

 QUARTERLY BULLETIN 7
RESPIRATORY CARE PROJECT
  by Diana Fortney and Becky Beardshaw
A The Respiratory Care Project — a new service for people with
'A lung problems —— opened December 1, 1980, at the Old Hospital.
V - The program is funded by a grant from the Department of Health
- and Human Services, subcontracted through the Appalachian
1 Regional Hospital in Hazard. Dr. Tim Carey is serving as Medical
.e Director, and Diana Fortney, a Respiratory Therapist from Leslie
County, is the Program Coordinator. Ms. Fortney comes to FNS
from the Appalachian Regional Hospital in Hazard and has
directed respiratory care projects both there and in VVhitesburg,
Kentucky.
For the most part, lung problems are chronic, which means
that they can never be completely cured. However, with a
comprehensive program of health care and education, it is
possible to control and alleviate many of the symptoms of lung
disease and learn how to live with the least possible discomfort.
This program is designed to teach each patient to understand his
condition completely and to introduce self-help techniques which
will help him in all activities of daily living.
After a patient has a physical examination and the physician
fills out a plan of care, the patient is enrolled for education
sessions. When enrolled, the patient is advised to bring a family
  member with him to each session since a great deal ofthe material
{ ·¤— covered will apply directly to his home life. There are five sessions
X € in all: the first three take place on consecutive days, the fourth one
id week later and the fifth one month later. They last approximately
r !» one hour and are broken down as follows:
Session One: The patient receives instruction in basic anatomy
= and physiology and is taught general health measures for
 i pulmonary patients. These include fluid intake, control or preven-
1 tion of pulmonary infection, cessation of smoking and diet
 ` instruction. He is also encouraged to increase physical activity
. within the guidelines set by his physician.
Session Two: After the reinforcement and evaluation of the skills
learned in the first session, this hour focuses on breathing
retraining. The patient is taught diaphragmatic breathing,
pursed-lip breathing and prolonged exhalation.

   ·
Session Three: Patients are given instruction on their medications Q
and -the proper use of their home therapy equipment.
Bronchodilator therapy and chest physiotherapy is given where
applicable.
Sessions Four and Five consist of review ofthe self-care measures
learned in the first three meetings, and reinforcement and _ »
evaluation of the patient. The patient also receives a home visit by
Ms. Fortney or a Home Health Nurse between the fourth and fifth ._. 
sessions. This is to give insight into any problems in the home ,·-
environment that would hinder his progress. The patient will
have follow-up checks approximately every three months after he
completes the program.
Every patient will receive a workbook designed at his own ,
level. It will reinforce his self-care skills and will contain his
individual needs: his medication sheet, physician’s phone
number, literature that is applicable to his situation, such as, anti-
smoking pamphlets.
The program is designed to improve the patient’s activities of
daily living in a practical way, not merely to improve his
knowledge. If patients can learn to dress themselves, walk, do
simple chores with a minimum of difficulty, this will in itself
improve their mental attitude and ability to cope with progressive
lung disease.
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Diana Fortney
l

 QUARTERLY BULLETIN 9
' MEMORIES OF MARY BRECKINRIDGE AND
THE BIG HOUSE
by Georgia Ledford
[Editor’s Note: Georgia Ledford has been actively involved in FNS
~ ‘ committee work for many years, following in the footsteps of her parents
` who were charter members of the Flat Creek Committee. Currently she
_ serves as a member of the local Advisory Committee and the committee
 A at Community Health Center. The upcoming restoration of the Big
}" House prompted her to write this article expressing her feelings about
Mrs. Breckinridge and her home.]
r In those early days of the Frontier Nursing Service, members
of the local advisory committees were, shall we say, privileged
V people. We weren’t quite as structured as we are today nor did we
have the need to be. If you were fortunate enough to be in these
groups, you had "The Invitation" on occasions to come to the Big
House for lunch. I, for one, felt as if I was entering a king’s palace:
' tables set with flawless linens, glistening glassware, and sparkl-
ing dishes and the warmth of the crackling fire were the event to
happen in winter. Having lived in a log house almost all of my
young years, I could appreciate the sturdy and peaceful building
that was home to that great and beautiful lady, Mary
Breckinridge.
On these occasions, Mrs. Breckinridge would be the first to
I greet you at the door and extend to you the handshake that said
  "we are friends together for a worthy cause.” Ofttimes that
{ handshake was accompanied by the hearty laughter that fairly
' _ shook the rafters when she was happy. Sometimes the sadness
¢’i also showed in her whole being as she expressed concern for
 I families in need, a concern that was always in her thoughts.
There are eons of memories and stories; however, for now, I
 A shall say the restoration of the Big House at Wendover would
. surely meet with her approval were she still with us. Her ideas
 . were so instilled in all of us here in our Kentucky mountains that
  we want to further her cause more than ever. You cannot go to
§ Wendover even yet and not feel that lasting warmth and
  determination she left us and this land. She is so dearly loved.
l

 10 FRONTIER NURSING SERVICE
BEING A COURIER . . . FOUR ACCOUNTS OF A I
COURIER’S DAILY ACTIVITIES A
by Cindy Asplin, Molly Beaver, Joan Davis, and Nancy Kocer -
The Tennessee Walker of yesteryear has been replaced by the  
Dodge Colt of today, yet the life of a courier remains somewhat _
unchanged.
For four senior nursing students from the upper Midwest, the 4
so-called dirt "roads" might well have been horse trails. Riding I
the bucking Colt (the bucking having nothing to do with our lack
of experience with stick shifts and clutch coordination) back into
the hollows, we soon discovered that a sense of adventure and a
sense of humor are a must if one is to survive as a courier. Under
the fearless leadership of Danna Larson, we blazed our trail each ~
day and kept the following records of our experiences. ·
Joan Davis  
Today I might have tended the hospital gift shop or worked as ¢
a nurse’s aide on the medical-surgical floor. Time flies by so fast
and our activities are so varied that it is difficult to keep the ,
memory from becoming a blur. .
I enjoy minding the hospital gift shop, meeting and talking _
with hospital employees and the local people. Feeling somewhat ,
obviously foreign due to my mid-western drawl, I spend a lot of
time watching, listening, and learning. The weather is always a ‘f
popular topic of conversation among the older crowd, and there   ?
are always one or two children being chased across the floor by E  
their mothers. Never a dull moment in the stream of traffic going A
to and fro in the lobby. I
The traffic pace quickens on the medical-surgical floor as the  I
doctors and nurses scurry about meeting the patients’ needs. After 5
working in a 1000-bed hospital this summer, it was quite a switch A
to work at Mary Breckinridge Hospital with such a variety of
cases in a total of forty beds. Being accustomed to a battalion of
support staff as close as a phone call, I was amazed at the scope of 1
the nurses’ activities. The experience proved to be valuable — `
nurses really can function as an independent entity. Unfortunate- ,
ly, the nurses are doing double duty due to a shortage of staff. I
That’s when we were called in. We did our best to help out in any  
 4

 QUARTERLY BULLETIN 11
 i way we could, even if if did mean working midnight to 8:00 a.m.
occasionally!
Unfortunately, like most experiences, I realize I will not fully
- recognize the value of this one until time passes and Ihave had an
 _ opportunity to reflect back on it.
i Nancy Kocer
` Today Liz McKendry (courier from New Hampshire) and I
  went on short rounds to the district nursing centers at Pine
Mountain and Beech Fork. After breakfast, we drove to the
° hospital to pick up the supplies and mail for the clinics. Our first
stop was the Pharmacy where we found only two boxes waiting
for us. Next we went to Sterile Supply where we picked up four
bottles of water, to the Lab for a small envelope for Pine Mountain,
and to Purchasing which needed several boxes delivered to the
clinics. Our last stop was the mailroom, and, by 10:00 a.m., we
were on our way.
i The drive to Beech Fork is a beautiful one up long, winding »
: roads which creep back into the mountains. The clinic itself, with
‘ the old stable still standing, makes you believe, at least for a
, moment, that you’re still living in the days of the nurses on
I horseback. The sound of hammering as men build the new clinic
~ soon brings you back to reality. After delivering the supplies to the
, nurses, Ellen Hartung and Laura Pilotto, we continued on toward
Pine Mountain.
{ The road to the Pine Mountain Clinic winds through some of
ll the most beautiful countryside anywhere. It seems as though
2   changing times have not left their mark on the clinic — nestled
qa into the hillside, it is surrounded by tall trees whose tops seem,
, literally, to vanish into a layer of mist. After a few exchanges with
Nurse Kim Beck-Wooton, Liz and I turned around and started the
1 hour-long drive back to Hyden.
 i Lunch at the hospital was very good today — chicken and
l dumplings, one of my favorites. Liz and I parted after eating —
she went to work in the Education Department and I was assigned
 . to x-ray. Dr. Brandon, the radiologist from Pikeville, Ky., flies his
` helicopter to a small landing pad outside Hyden where couriers
 g often pick him up. Today it was my turn, and by the time we got
  back to the hospital, a number of patients were waiting in the
 . corridor. I spent the rest of the afternoon in a dark closet

 12 FRONTIER NURSING SERVICE  
developing x-rays — an easy and enjoyable task. By 3:30, I was l
ready to go home. Q
Barbara Post offered me a ride to Wendover (courier cars are
always in short supply so the logistics of traveling must be .
carefully planned). On the way, we stopped for a cherry coke at
Campbell’s Drug Store, a favorite place of the couriers. The drive  
to Wendover was uneventful — we only had to pull over and stop  Q
once for one of the coal trucks that usually dominate the roads.  .
Evenings at Wendover are special. At supper, everyone shares  
the day’s events along with "Pass the salt", "Pass the beans", and A
"Pass the milk, too, please." After eating, we congregate around
the fire in the sitting room of the Garden House, where we watch
TV, read a book, or just sit and talk. As practical jokes have
become quite common lately, we always check our rooms before
going to bed.
As I lay in bed and think back on the day’s activities, I {ind
myself not feeling tired, but feeling glad for the chance I’ve had to
learn a new way of life here in the mountains and to also learn _
more about myself.
  sk`- K I   I F.
    - wl l e l
Z V . l f
»:~ " "Q; ¢_es ,
s j  ptr  .
Couriers Ruth Pershing, loan Davis, Molly Beaver and Cindy Asplin ·

 .  
Molly Beaver
_ Odd jobs at Wendover were assigned to me today. We tore down
* an old chicken coop — a very good way to let off steam as well as ‘
become experienced with a hammer and crowbar. The coop didn’t
Q take long to tear down, but taking the nails out of the boards took
  forever! I also spent time typing some of Sister Adeline’s letters to
  Mrs. Breckinridge. Sister Adeline was a very supportive friend to
e  Mrs. Breckinridge, and her letters need to be typed before they’re
`  ' too old to read.
` This afternoon, Nina Redman (a fellow courier) and I visited
Mallie and Ray Pennington. What an experience — it took us 2%
» hours to get there and only 30 minutes to get home! First, we took
‘ the wrong turn onto Route 80. Next, we missed the turn onto Route
p 169 — that was easy to miss since there’s no sign. Then we missed
our next two "signs" to turn: a lumber company and a "smallish"
 . bridge. We were shooting 100% — missed every turn possible.
Finally, a man sent us in the right direction. The trouble was well
; worth it as we really enjoyed our visit. Mallie and Ray were really °
1 nice and showed us some beautiful quilts.
Q Tonight was great as we shared our story at supper. Living at
L Wendover can be very special because you can get close to new
`, friends. We couriers feel like a family now. However, everybody
J says Nina and I can never go anywhere together again — but
· that’s okay. Nina went to the store tonight and she’s not back yet.
 . She’s probably in Tennessee by now!
··i
 5 Cindy Asplin
 ` $ I assisted as a nurse’s aide in the Oneida Clinic today. My jobs
_ varied from taking temperatures, pulses, and blood pressures to
lab work, filing, and cleaning thermometers. The day was busy
` and went by very fast. I enjoyed the work very much and it was
truly an eye-opener to see the flow of patients in a clinic run by two
nurse practitioners, two secretaries, a pharmacist, a nursing
assistant, and one housekeeper. Everyone had to work together as
a team and I made the most of the chance to join in with them. In
looking back, what I enjoyed most at Oneida was the contact I had
 ° with patients, their families, and the staff. The Kentucky people
A have been very friendly and helpful to me — a stranger. I love the
I soft Southern accent and the use of words such as "you a1l" and
Q "honey". I have felt very welcome and at home.

 14 FRONTIER Nunsmo smvxcs I
After a good day at Oneida, I journeyed back to Wendover for a
"umm-um good" supper. Needless to say, couriers are very .
susceptible to weight gain, especially this one! Later in the V
evening, a group of us visited Cecil Morgan’s home and we had a Y
good time as Cecil played some of his famous mountain music for `
us. It was a good time for foot-stomping and singing along. Cecil’s  .
family is very talented in many mountain crafts and his home is ,,
filled with bright quilts and beautiful handmade furniture. If I  
had time enough to spend here, I’d love to take banjo, quilting, and I J
carpentry lessons! I have met so many special people here and I’m if 
going to miss them all when I leave. I’m very thankful for the time
I’ve had here and for the many new friends I’ve made. _
After the exciting day we have all just experienced, we A
appreciate not having to feed and groom the horses, but rather
just to park the car and head to the Big House for a delicious
Wendover dinner. Of course, company for dinner is not uncom— I
mon, and we cherish the opportunity to meet someone we have or
have not been introduced to. Everyone is always so friendly and ;
all are eager to exchange tales of their experiences with us.  
The tales we carry with us back to the lVIidwest will include our  i
experiences with the southeastern Kentucky mountains and their  {
people — their culture, lifestyle, and generosity. Folklore says that  `
once you have drunk from the lV[iddle Fork of the Kentucky River,  1
you will return. That sounds promising to us as we hope to return  '
some day to Wendover. _,
QQ
Our congratulations to the new officers of the Local Advisory  
Committee, who were elected at the December 1980 meeting. They A
are Alden Gay, Chairman; Jean Elam, Vice-Chairman; and p
Nancy Dammann, Secretary. We also extend our sincere apprecia-
tion to Bill Pollard, Alden Gay, and Betty Jean Roberts for their
service as officers during 1980. Throughout its five-year existence,
the Committee has fulfilled the extremely important role of I
serving as the liason group between FNS and its patients. The
qualifications of the newly-elected officers insure the continua- _
tion of the Committee’s tradition of fine leadership.

 I QUARTERLY BULLETIN is
R CLINICAL EXPERIENCE
l IN MOUND BAYOU, MISSISSIPPI
· by Marianne Towler and Karen Kudia
 ‘ The Delta Health Center in Mound Bayou, Mississippi,
il primarily serves the indigent population of a five county area of
i the Delta. Within the past year, an affiliation was formed between
i _' this center’s very active midwifery service and the FSMFN. Eager
‘ for a respite from schooling and a varied experience, the two of us
applied and were accepted for a family nurse internship there.
 , Arriving in the heat of September, we were almost immediately
. overwhelmed by the differences between family nurse practice at
FNS and that at Mound Bayou. Only as we worked more and mor