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11.    14 STUDENTS ELECTED TO SENATE

       Fourteen students, winners in the spring elections, will
take their seats in the newly-formed Student Senate at the opening
of the fall semester. SG President Scott Wendelsdorf said the
students will serve not only as members of the University Senate,
they will form the legislative branch of Student Government. The
new senators, the college they will represent in the Senate, and
their hometowns are: Larry Noe (Agriculture), Campbellsville; Nancy
Totten (Allied Health), St. Albans, W. Va.; Lewis Colten (Architec-
ture), Lexington; Howell Hopson (Arts & Sciences), Cadiz; Paul T.
Ferrell (Business & Economics), Lexington; Dennis D. Stuckey (Den-
tistry), Frankfort; Pam Sallengs (Education), Radcliff; Damon
Talley (Engineering), Magnolia; Al Sharp (Graduate School), Pitts-
burgh, Pa.; Cynthia Watts (Home Economics), Brandenburg; Ronald D.
Weddle (Medicine), Liberty; Kathy Liedtke (Nursing), Lagrange, Ill.;
Dan Daffron (Pharmacy), Monticello, and Franklin W. Nooe (Social
Professions), Harrodsburg.



12.   OVER 100 STUDYING AT HCC FOR HS DIPLOMA

       Henderson Community College is successfully fulfilling one of
the major functions charged to the community college. The Adult
Basic Education Program enrolled 129 adults in classes last November,
and 104 were still active in May. Many of these were high school
dropouts who hoped to successfully complete the General Education
Development (GED) test and thereby earn a high school equivalency
certificate. A number of them then plan to enroll in such programs
at the college as social work technology, forestry and wood tech-
nology, management technology, accounting, professional secretary-
ship, laboratory technician, and nursing. Classes also were organized
in Union and Webster counties, and supervised by the college. In
Union county, 42 persons met each Thursday in the high school building
at Morganfield, and in Webster county, there were 15 in the class
meeting each Wednesday at the Dixon H-U-W Center. The program pro-
vides a general education class aimed at providing the basic skills
in math, reading and English that will enable a high school dropout to
pass the GED test. Once the student obtains the GED certificate, he
is eligible to enroll in any class at the Henderson college.



13.    TWO COLLEGES CONDUCT SEMINARS FOR OLDER PERSONS

       Programs aimed at older persons have been held at two com-
munity colleges. A six-session seminar concluded in May at Ashland
Community College for residents of that area, with discussion topics
including social security benefits, taxes, citizenship responsibili-
ties, and contemporary art and literature. A total of 67 persons
took part in a Living and Learning School at Somerset Community
College last semester. The Rev. L. D. Fisher, local minister, and
Kenneth Bean of the college were commended on their "outstanding job"
in conducting the program at Somerset.