xt766t0gv96z https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt766t0gv96z/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19581113  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 13, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 13, 1958 1958 2013 true xt766t0gv96z section xt766t0gv96z 15 Christmas Seal Candidates Nominated
Fifteen UK students have been and Triangle; Jtrkle Toolll, Royd
selected as contestants in the Miss HalL
Christmas Seal
contest, which
Ann Woodward. XO. KA and
starts tomorrow on campus.
ATO; rcKy OlrruMead. DUD. SN.
The annual contest, sponsored by and FiKA: Margaret Wyse. DZ.
LexinRton-Fayett- e
the
County PKT. and Farm House; Oretta
Tuberculosis Association, is design- Hode, Holmes Hall; Janice Troop.
ed to interest University students Jewell Hall; Nancy Iowe. KAT.
to contribute to the campaign.
LXA; and TSK; Marilyn Muc.
Contestant are Laura Lee Vry. KU. SAE and TKE.

MM:
iU-

1,

rnn

5

'

r

'

.

-

:".

Sludent will receive Chrlstmav
SeaU and ballot by mall lomor
row. I'.aeh atadent may tote for
".MN Chritma
hl cholre for
Seal" by rontributinf a dollar U
the Tuberruloi AKlatlon.

a

i

-

Turner. ZTA,

Tlie contest will clw at midrepresenting; Ann.
I.ucy Alexander. KKO. KS and night. Doc. 18. Tlie winner will bs
and
riT,
TCI); Dee Dee Leet. AC.D. ACK ZHT; Phyllis Laffrrty. Kcenrl.ind gien a trophy by the TU
and SX; Nancy Foter, AXDrsrr ITall; Sue
Robinson. Pattersin Hon.

Y

f

Hall; Mona Fa ye
DTD and ASP.

;v.;

w

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

,v

UK's 15 NOMINEES TOR "MISS CHRISTMAS SEAL"

ttptnt-t-

Vol. L

LEXINGTON, KY., THURSDAY, NOV.

1:1,

1?)8

No. 31

UK Debaters Win
Match With Oxford"
By MEREDA JEAN DAVIS

The UK debate team won a 2
decision over the Oxford University
debaters Tuesday night.
An overflow crowd at the Guig-nTheatre heard two sides to the
question of banning further development of nuclear weapons by
international agreement. UK defended the negative and Oxford
the affirmative.
Thomas Griffiths, Oxford, said
an international agreement should
be made that would prevent nuclear development by any nation.
"France is not so inclined to the
western world because of her colony entanglements
if she begins
the development of nuclear weapons, she may swing to tlie side of
the Soviet Union," he stated.
"The western world would not
stand a chance in a nuclear war . . .
Soviet Union has more troops . . .
the idea that any war could be
limited to the use of tactical weapons is terribly naive," he argued.
Brian Walden, Griffiths' partner
in the debate, continued the defense for banning all nuclear testing by arguing that the Soviet
Union would not use "clean, tactical weapons in war Russia has
a very effective dirty bomb and
she would not be so hesitant in
using it."
"Thinking is more muddled on
the question of war than any other
thing," Walden continued. "If we
fight any major war with Russia,
it is going to be a war of extermination. Scientists are capable of
going further in the development
of nuclear weapons.
"When both sides have reached
a balance of power, there is a
balance of terror. America has not
shaped her military policy to win
a war against Soviet Russia," he
stated.
Tex Fitzgerald, UK, argued that
Continued on Page 8
3--

ol

...

-

I:

?;.T'f

.

j

;

'k

r

n

!

Council, is shown with Dave
Avniis Haws, adviser to the Inter-DorLarry Iloffmeier, presidential candidates for the council,
Bauer and
and George Ganter and Bob Scott, vice presidential candidates.
m

Inter Dorm Council
--

Elections Are Today
The president and vice president
Residence Halls
the Men's
Governing Council will be elected
today.
Willis IIaw, student adviser to
the council, announced the elections will be held from 10 a. m.
to .5:30 p. m. in Bowman Hall
lounge. At 5 p. m. an election
booth will be moved to Donovan
Hall. Voting will be by ID card
only.
Presidential candidates are Larry Hoffmeir and ' Dave Butler.
Iloffmeier, a sophomore Ag major
served as chief Justice of the dorm
of

....

--

council last year. He is from Butler
and a member of Pershing Rifles.
Butler, a freshman from Hamilton, Ohio, is a graduate of KMI.
He is a phyics major and a Kappa
Sig pledge.

George Ganter and Bob Scott
are candidates for vice president.
Ganter served on the inter-dorm

year. A commerce
council last
he is a
major studying pre-Iamember of Phi Sig fraternity and
Alpha Phi Omega. He is Com
w,

Frankfort.
Bob Scott, from Hickman
on Page 8

Coun-Continu- ed

"Who hath not proved how feebly wordi essay to fix one spark of
beauty's heavenly ray?" We agree with Loid Byron: no word are
needed to describe this week's Kernel Sweetheart. She Is l.indA
Thompson, a freshman dramatic arts major from Lexington.

25 College Unions
Meet Here Today
The Ninth Annual Region IV
Conference of the Association of
College Unions will be sponsored
here by the UK Student Union
Board today through Saturday.
Approximately 110 students and
staff members representing 25
colleges and universities from nine
states will be present
States represented are Alabama,
Florida. Georgia. Kentucky. North
Carolina. South Carolina. Tennessee. Virginia, and Louisiana.
The purpose of the conference is
to exchange ideas between college unions,
programs
between unions, stimulate interests
in college union activities, study
philosophies of college union programs, and improve operations of
the regional organization.
The keynote address, "Look to
the Future." will be given by C.
Shaw Smith, regional adviser, who

End To SuKy's Homecoming Role Asked
Panhellenic Council, the
sororities'-- governing body, has
recommended that sponsorship
of Homecoming be taken away
from SuKy and assumed by
Student Congress.
The council's recommendation
was made yesterday in a letter to
Student Congress and the Kernel.
The letter pointed out several
weaknesses in this year's program,
sponsored by SuKy, student pep
organisation.
A controversy
arose prior to
Judging cf both the Homecoming

queen and decoration contests. It
was alleged that Chi Omega sorority, winner of the decoration contest, had used professional help In
building their display.
A Cht Omega member, also a
member of SuKy, was charged with
attempting to influence voting in
the queen contest Jto favor a Chi
Omega contestant.
Jan Oover, Panhellenic president, said the dispute involving
Chi Omega and five other sororities had been settled privately at
a recent meeting of the council.
Panhellenic letter stated
The
that "It Is our policy to evaluate

all campus activities in which our
groups participate. After the most
recent disturbances
over Homecoming, we felt that a more critical
evaluation of the event was In
order.
The letter gave these six reasons
"that were evident to us as weaknesses In the organization of SuKy
In the planning of this year's
Homecoming."
1. Lack of unity in the group, including lack of a common goal
2. Lack of balance in membership.
2. Lack of communication between SuKy
and Homecoming

participants.
competant leadership.
body
5. Not giving the student
opportunity to voice opinion or
reconynendation.
6. Not having a clear understanding of rules and regulations
as set up by the organization itself.
"Due to these reasons." the letter
concluded, "it Is the Panhellenic
Council's recommendation that all
events of Homecoming be taken
over by Student Congress, because
it is more representative of the
student body at large."
4. Lack of

is director of the Davidson College
Student Union. Dr. Leo M. Chamberlain, UK vice president, will
welcome the delegates.
Gerald T. Erdahl. director of
College
Union. North Carolina
State College, will speak at a banquet at 5 p. m. Friday. His topic
will be "Hie Quick and the Dead."
Following the banquet, the delegates will be the guests of the
University at the Fred Waring
show in the Coliseum.
A series of 12 topics selected
by student union directors in the
region will be discussed in group
sessions Friday. Among the topics
for discussion are the value of
student opinions and student interest polls, the role of the college union on a college campus,
and the value of expanding the
union program with unique ideas
and "gimmicks" for publicity and
decoration.
The conference planning committee is composed of the UK
Student Union
Board and four
formers
board members.
Jack
Tuttle, Joanne
Zuverink. Joan
Brown, and Barbara Pickett
The regional officers are :" Paul
Adamson, chairman. Auburn; Harvey Jefferson.
vice
chairman,
Florida A&M; Dave Page, arrangements chairman, UK; and Barbara
Pickett, secretary-treasure- r,
UK.

Yearbook Prices
Go Up Monday
The 1959 Kentuckian may be
purchased at the price of IS until
Nov. IS, after which the price
will go up to $6.

* 2

-- Till: KENTUCKY KERN EL, Tluirsd.iv, Nov.

Artist To Speak
To Art Club
Iron Oolub. rrsWltnt. pointer at
Indiana University, will ?irnk
tlio
rbout the "Inconoldiy of
meeting
Tnlntfr" at the Art Club

Friday.
professional artist, lie has had
ene-ma- n
exhibitions nt the InContemporary Arts, Lonstitute of
don; Indiana University; Pasadena
Art Institute; Purdue University;
rnd Artists Gallery, New York.
He has taught evening division
classes in
art at Northwestern
University,
Illinois Institute of
Technology, Contemporary
Art
Workshops, Chicago; and Wright
nt

1

p. m.

A

Junior College.
The artist will meet with the

13, 19.18 -

Infirmary

Debaters To Atleinl
Carolina Forensic

Thursday:

UK debaters will attend two deAdmitted: Susan Freeman.
bate tournaments this week.
Dismissed Bob Cult on.
Michael Drown, Tex Fitzgerald. Friday:
Omicron Delta Kappa, senior
I)( no Curris and Kichard Roberts
Dismissed : S u s a n Freeman, men's leadership fraternity, has
will participate in the Carolina Charles Daniels, Ronald Ooebel
established a set of cash awards
Foten.vics at the University of and Tommy Simpson.
for distinguished work appearing
South Carolina.
Saturday:
in Stylus, campus literary magaLesley Decker, Ronald Tolly.
Adimitted: Elizabeth Ebley. Bet-ti- e zine, totaling $100.
Lowell Thomas, and Henry Ilawkcn
Renaker and John Vander-poo- l.
With the addition of the ODK
will debate at Purdue University.
prant to awards already existing,
Dr. Gilford Blyton will attend the
Dismissed: Larry Oibson, Robert prose and poetry writers for the
Purdue meet.
Larson and John Vandcrpool.
magazine now stand to receive as
Both debates will be Friday and Monday:
much as $30 for a single story,
Saturday. UK did not attend either
Admitted: Isabella Lycon. Slier-ry- e essay or poem.
of these tournaments last year.
Wilson, Phyllis Blair and Mel-vi- n
The grant also provides for a
Ashby.
$25 prize to be given to the artisU
Dismissed: Elizabeth Ebley and
Combs
whose work published In Stylus is
Bettie Renaker.
concerned distinguished by the cdi- Law Club Meet
At
:

Tuesday:
Admitted: Sirous Game, Ruth
Ann Oliver, Sally
Hudson and
Anne Richards.
Phyllis Blair and
Dismissed:

Shenye Wilson.

Wednesday:
Admitted: George Kyle, Henry
Yonts and Heather Conn.
Dismissed: Ruth
Ann Oliver,
Isabella Lycon and Melvin Ashby.

Congressional Fellowships
Offered Political Scientists

HEATERS!

Open 6 p.

begins 7 p. m.

m.

HELD OVER

THRU SATURDAY NITE
'The Defiant Ones"
"Jungle Heat"
(Adm. 90c)

Congressional Fellowships for tists.
1959-6- 0
The 1959-.5- 0 program will be the
for political scientists and
journalists have been announced seventh year the American Politiby The American Political Science cal Science Association has sponsored the Congressional Fellowship
Association.
Each .winner receives a $4,500 Program. Nearly 70 Fellows have
been in Washington under the
stipend, most of which is
plus traveling expenses, program.
stay in Washfor a nine-monApplications must be submitted
ington to work as a staff member by February 15, 1959. Application
in the office of a Senator, House blanks and further information
Member, or Congressional Com- may be obtained from The Amerimittee.
can Political Science Association,
Besides .their practical working 1726 Massachusetts Avenue, X. W.,
experience in Congress, Fellows are Washington 6, D. C.
introduced to Washington and
Congress through an "orientation
program" arranged by the associa- WIDt
tion. They will also meet with a
VISIOh
SCREEN
11
number of leading Washington
CMtiawov
Iron J PM
group conferences.
figures for
to
.. Fellowships - are - available
political scientists and political
WED., THURS., NOV.
journalists between the ages of
"Voice In The Mirror"
23 to 35 who have had advanced
Julie London .
Richard Egcn
experi- training combined with
nation-wid- e
compe- ence. After a
Also
tition, final selection cf the win- ners is made by an Advisory Com- "Wee Geordie"
mittee composed of members of
Eill Traves - Alcstair Sims
both parties in Congress, Washington journalists and political scien
tax-exem-

pt,

th

STARTS SUNDAY
Marlon Brando - Vivien Leigh
In Tennessee Williams'

"A Streetcar Named Desire"
(Winner of 5 Academy Awards)

trial basis.
Manuscripts for the fall issue of
Stylus will be received until the
Nov. 15 deadline. The magazine i.s
scheduled to appear on campus
about
mid-Decemb-

er.

Speaks

Bert

1

"IN-CA-

torial board of the magazine.
The ODK awards will be in effect lor the next two years on a

j

Bert Combs, Democratic candiSenior Seminar In a "bull session"
date for governor, spoke to memJn the University Art Gallery at
bers of Phi Alpha Delta, law fra2 p. m.
ternity at a luncheon meeting in
the Kentuckian Hotel' Wednesday.
Outlook 31?m1ers
In his talk on the practice of
law, he told of his experiences as
To Meet. Tonight
a young lawyer and warned of the
pitfalls young lawyers
Members of Campus Outlook ut common
face.
psked to meet at 6:30 p. m. in
Room 211 of the Journalism Building for Kentuckian pictures.

ELECTRIC

Stylus May Pay Up To
$50 For Stories, Poems

i

Links Meets Tonight

FRI.

Links, junior
girls honorary
society, will meet at 6:30 o'clock
in Room 201 of
the Student
Union Building. Betty Allison,
president of the group urges all

OPEN

SUN.

SAT.

COMING FRIDAY
M. Brando - M. Cliff

D.

Martin

"The Young Lions"

members to attend.

SPECIE OFFER
Get a WINSTON or SALEM

Ogairette Lighter
Bring 10 Empty Winston or Salem

-

Packages and 50 cents to

j

Open 6 p.

Admission 65c

m.

ENDS TON1TE
Dick Powell's Celebrated
Jet-Ag-

Spectacle

e

...

"The Hunters"
(Color Scope)
Starring
Bob Mitchum - Robert Wagner
(Also) Tropical Passions . .

"Paradise Lagoon"

Hi

-

12-1- 3

'

111

...

XfJEW

OLD FRANKFORT

9

PIKE

HIGH-STYL-

TV ORIGINAL

E

BY

brings you New "LIVING IMAGE" PICTURE
and amazing BALANCED FIDELITY SOUND

THIS FRIDAY
MUSIC BY

$1.00 PER COUPLE

1

ALSO AVAILABLE FOR PAKTIES

;

$159.95 ! $194.95
Lightweight,
RCA Victor portables
with
all UHF and VHF channels.
Clear sharp reception on
both local and distant channels.
easy-ta-carr-

And His Five Thunderbirds

-

17 INCH

14 INCH

CH&RtllE iOSIHlOP
9 TO

Offer has been extended to Dec. 15,. 1958

DANCE LAND

X

y,

SOLD ON EASY TERMS

The
that Gives
more
of Yourself
..

McVEY HALL

j

Dance At

'v

Campus Boole Store

that s your portrait, in
color if you wish. Your gift
portrait sajs, more than any
.

"NEW STARS

THIS WEEK'S BEST SELLERS!

And

TOP FIVE

NEW LOVE"

BEST-SELLIN-

GOT STUNG
by Elvis Presly
O LOVE IS ALL WE NEED
by Tommy Edwards
I GOT A FEELING
by Ricky Nelson
THE END
by Earl Grant HIM IS TO
TO KNOW

STARTS TODAY

O

Bfl888888BS9DB0MM

rU

2a

IFDPV

Ull n'C

.

LOVE AND UAH

"POPS"

G

( If

other

I

.

)ou." It's the gift that's most
treasured,

for-

-

it's the gift

only jou can give!

NOW SHOWING
SHOW 12:10, 3:05, 6:05, 9:00

Your Portrait Deserves.
The Very Best!

Adam Pepiot Studio
510

E.

MAIN ST.

PHONE

2-74-

66

Cill today, or stop In to arrange an
appointment for your gift portrait
. ... nd tvoid the last minute rusnf

LOVE HIM

PboneT
ft

by The Teddy Bears
II

X

IMP TON

MINT UC N

V

OPEN NITES 'TIL 9, MONDAY THRU FRIDAY

in TECHNICOLOR

IMS

TECHNIRAMA

mm m

if FOR

FAMOUS

THE"l2!S

0

COUNTRY
tm
til

v

imh

ymn

CS

669

NOVflTVCONC

FAMOUS BRANDS

v

S. Broadway

2 BLOCKS WEST OF CAMPUS

* Till. KI.N1I

( KV KI.UM

SUB Serves 15,000 Weekly
n.T

ALLEN TYAVIS

Irrla-ifoer-

j iv;". ::

l"

That's the story from Miss Betty
Gault. director of Student Union
O.fetaria operations.

For ALL Occasions
.1

CENT'S

Miss Gault also directs the SUB

1

the
Donovan Dormitory Grill. She has
worked with cafeteria operations
Icr 39 years.
When Miss Gault came to the
Vniversitjr the cafeteria was located in the basement of the Administration Building.
From 1928 to 1938 operations
Tcre on the third floor of McVey
Kail. For the last 20 years the SUB
h.is housed the cafeteria and the
trill and in that time the Wildcat
nr.d Dormitory grills have been

n

:71
-

A

TEL. 4

6500

Dare ChacVick Campus Representative

This UIMSTMAS (;ivGift - The Gift That
-

,

PART OF THE roOIKSEKYINC; PROCESS

The student Union Cafeteria is
a scnice entcrprise. Management
flnandal operatlon ls undcr
the supervision of the University
Business Adminstration and Con- trol. Miss Gault, as director of the
sUB cafeteria, supervises all ac- tivities including the serving of
food and errmlovment and man- agement of help.
Employed ai the SUB cafeteria
e
employees. From
are 40
15 to 20 students work part time

Tin-Person-

al

hours.
Tllt largest snigie serving
nt tne cafcteiia is potatoes.

proximately

TOMORROW NIGHT

;uv

"j.ooo

tan Kent'

beverages.

Dam Drv

AT

ANADARKO. Okla. (AP
It
was so dry near this western Okla-

homa town that an earthen dam
had to be wet down. To meet
Bureau of Reclamation construction standards, soil being tamped
In the dam was moistened first.

mi

PARKING
:

CITY BUS

SIRVICt

Prompt Reliable Prescription Service

MOVIE GUIDE
'

FOUNTAIN

Ap- -

pounds are en- -

week. Over

Phone 26672

sold

eaten each week. On the menu
cach L,y are " choice of time
meats and a wide selection of
vegetables. salads. deserts and

A Profession"

DUNN'S DRUGS

2500

SERVICE

SANDWICHES AND SHORT ORDERS

ON THE PARIS PIKE

ASHLAND "Voice in the Mirror.
2:15, 5:50. 9:25.
"Wee Geordie," 4:05. 7:45.
BEN ALI "In Love and War.
12:34. 2:49, 5:09, 7:19. 9:34.

'

CIRCLE

25

"The Defiant Ones,"

7:00, 10:35.

OPEN 7:30 A.M. TO 10 P.M.
j

j

"Jungle Heat." 9:10.
"The Hunters," 7:00.11.
"Paradise Lagoon." 9:15.

FAMILY

C

VP

Orchids, Card. mas, Roses
Flowers For All Occasions

lv

I

KENTUCKY "Another Time, Another Place."
'STRAND
"The Big Country."

DRUG COMPANY
LIME AND MAXWELL
4-42-

55

LEXINGTON

f

f

12:40. 3:35. G:35. 9:30.

(

Bouquets, cor- -

Always a

V

won- -

YELLOW CAB
"

Inc.
'

STUDIO

N. E. Cor. Main & Lime

mr's work and pay for additional

I

"Where Pharmacy Is

.SPENGLER

rrrehing a meal for one

usually

full-tim-

I

Dial

'......!.v..v.v.

2-22-

il

TO THE MOST SPECTACULAR
FESTIVAL OF IMPORTED
CARS IN THE BLUEGRASS AREA.

ASHLAND FLORIST

)

656

E.

Tel.

Main

'"'A
t--

'foci
SPendunl

COMPARE BEFORE YOU BUY!

Jt :f

i.

T

$1B"
NY' '

let

MQ50

'i

'

'mw

with

flashing
Diamond.

NO MONEY
DOWN
Convenient
Credit
Ayailible

e,

79 50
:'"

pdanlt

(of

nfaQ

Hand craftsd

Lit.
l1195t

559'5

J39"
U

V

y

V- -

G.ftthrilf.
tuiy Let t
with brilliant
Diamond.

.o,f.)

tjllniialiiteb

financing.
Complete parts and servicing.
12 months warrantee.

4-61-

r

All MAKES AND MODELS!

ot

or

3-22-

KIRK JEWELERS

Continuing the rest of the week under the big
top. All cars sold still remain on display for you
to see.

Sprite, Jaguar, MG, Morris, Hillman, Austin Hcaley,
Bentley, Riley, Alfa Romeo, Sunbeam,
Isetta, Fiat, Borgward

i'

Free delivery

I

30

Radio Equipped

on-the-sp-

WEAR

Only You Can Give
Your PORTRAIT

a.

Bank terms and

MEN'S

120 S. UPPER

i

i

In addition to the Student Union
Cafeteria. Donovan Hall, a resi- dence hall for men completed in
has a cafeteria.
Each of the eating places has its
An kitchen. The SUB cafeteria is
the largest and serves approxi- riately 2.300 persons a day. Nor- mally about twice as many meals
ric served at dinner as at break- l ist and lunch. Only two meals
.
ncu on ounaay and the
Sunday noon meal is usually the
Jargest of the week

Rolls-Royc-

1

RENTAL SERVICE

s.

drill, the Wildcat Orill and

IMV- S-

1:1.

COMPLETE

15.000 mrah arr
ffrvrd each week in thr Sl'B
(Afrtrria and approximately 5.250
jntatops are consumed by thf I'K

off

N.

IImi.mI.ix.

.

GO FORMAL

than

More

I

y

M

'

The hand set fiery diamonds enhance the natural boauty of the
Pendants. All Pendants and
chains arc 14 kt. vhite gold.

N.

HARRY ALDRIDGE MOTORS
(Representative

133 MIDLAND

Classic styling

of "The British Motor Corporation, LTD")

TEL.

63

lifetime

enhanced by

treaure

Diamond

dazzling
Diamond.

a fiery

ithafine

--

3 Diamonds

set with
lustrous
culturedpearls- -

EXqUiSlte

-

heart

setthlZ
-

brilliant
DiamornJi.

see: THEM TODAY AT:

Kirk Jcwclcds
220 W. Moin

Phone

2-36-

65

* The Kentucky Kernel
University of Kentucky

ccond c1a
mutter nndrr tri Act of March 3, 1879.
Filtered at the Frwt Office at Lexington, Kentucky
Publmhrd lour timri a wn k during the rrguUr m hnol year except bolnltayi and exam.

'..

1

,i

SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

Jim Hampton,

Eilitor-ln-Chi-

in

"

ef

Larivy Van Hoose, Chief Sports Editut
Antjt Epfebson, Chief News Editor
Ann Roberts, Society Editor
FrnHT Ashley, Business Manager
Norman McMlllin, Advertising Manager
Mitchell, Staff rhotographer
John
Marilyn Lyvcrs and Judy Penncbaker, Vroofreaders
THURSDAY'S NEWS STAFF
Jim Hudson, Editor

Nancy Meadows, Associate Editor

Bill

A!

Nf.iiuuc, Sports Editor

The Unions Convene
The ninth annual Hegion 4 (Southeastern, Student Union Conference is
being held here today through Saturdaythe first time the conference
lias met at the University. This year's
conference theme is "Look to the
Future."
The student unions at colleges
throughout the nation do much to
promote the general welfare of students. On our own campus, the Union
is regarded as one of the more active
organizations by the students and
University administration alike. Proof
of the latter's feelings is obvious in its
plans to enlarge the SUB in the near
future.
UK's Student Union, through the
versatility of its governing board,
takes a great active part iu campus

novated that gala bit of entertainment, the "Gold Diggers' Ball." The
annual Hanging of the Greens, the
biggest production staged in the SUB,
iVinade successful through the hardworking help of the Union members.
However, not only the big events
are given a boost by the Union. It

.

also sponsors many daily services for
the students. This is quite evident to
anyone who has seen the notices of
jam sessions, dance lessons, informal
discussions, and so forth on the campus bulletin boards.
It is a privilege for the University
to be host to a gathering of representatives from other student unions
as meritable as our own. As the conference delegates "look to the future,"
they may justifiably pause and "look
feelto the past" with a
ing of accomplishment.

doings.

It

rs

several of the
dances and last year it in
all-camp-

well-deserve-

us

If

:ij

By

GURNEY NORMAN

line of the
nieaked into tire
alumni and student tea. The police were
hot alter
in'' . for vou see. he wore no
tie and it was Homecoming.
Irving sloocl in the long, gray line a
finally the E
vciy long time until
irv. There weie
Checjuer came into
several hmk minutes o standing aiouml
;unong the intimate' little group "1 V""
and students, u t at last liing
was 'brought laTc- lo face with the lady
who introduced him to the lady who introduced him to the l. Chequer.
"1 his is Mi, Irving Smith.' the lady
paid as she courtsied, and the llx Checjuer
paid. "Why yes. Mr. Smith, glad to have
you back. Why, 1 remember vou. You're
the Smith who ran for student governand almost
ment in
"My name is Sniythe, Ex, and I flunked
cuta this plate in VJ 10," Irving said, and
when they shook, hands Irving pulled
h."
- the hairs on hisicrisrand made him
lett-pu'oi-

1

i

1

4

I

;il-um-

-

Ill

..."

wy-Out-

On went Irving down the reception
line. There were many, many people to
thake hands with standing there, all with
chest out and chin in and feet apart at
a
angle. T hey all called Irving
Mr. Smith. Schmidt, Smittz or Smithey,
and not once did they get his name right,
idl of which irritated living no little bit.
Their hands were of varjing tvpes.
kome thin, scaly or sweaty, and once, alter
Irving had withdrawn his hand fiom the
clutch of a little old lady whose hand h it
choplcts ol moisiuie on his own, he was
Jorccd to pull out his led bandanna and
wipe oil his hand. .
lint soon living was again lost in the
intimate little gioup ol 7), and all w.is
calm and buy with convc isation. Then
living spied the idle dimcnt table, alar
ell in a noiiluily dilution, and he immediate lv sii out on loot in said direction.
"This vheie )a' stive lea, huh? Cot any
tea"-- Cimme some lea." living said, loudly
enough to i.iuc heads to tuin, and he
e

.

-

;

v

;I

V

:.
Engineers Storm The Newsroom
Engineer Ronald Stewart, left foreground,
writer of letters threatening to flog the
Kernel staff to death with slide rules,
stormed the Journalism Tluilding Tuesday
morning, accompanied by engineers
Lionel Trais, left center, and Norman

Cravens. Alter a pitched batile, during
which the Kernel stalf fought off the
slide rules with paste pots and art
gum, both sides withdrew' to map out
plans for their next encounter. Witnesses
said the fracas ended in a tie.
10-fo-

d

Ado-- ."

Irving evaded the campus police and

'

j
j

L:

"Much

i

took out his. red bandanna and made it
into a napkin about his neck. He picked
up a tiny tup,' dropped it and broke olf
the handle, picked it iq again and asked
lor tea.
"We haven't any tea. sii. but this punch
i. mighty
"No lea? said living. "No tea at a
Tea? How ridiculous. This isn't a l'unth.
vou know. Ridit here, on this sign, it
I
savs, "Alumni T ea," and by damn,
want some TEA."
Pul the lady explained that at teas
punch is served, and that theie was no
such social lunction as a punch, and that
if Irving wanted some refreshments, he
would just have to lake punch or do
without. So Irving took a tup, started to
think, then gasped; and fairly shouted: "A
hair! A hair in my plinth."
It was too ninth for Irving. First, no- body could get his name straight, and
then the lady had gotten sweat-on-hand, anil now tea wasn't even being
served and what was being served was
all hairy.
In anger, Irving pushed people out of
the way, vaulted on top of the serving
table, knocking over the punch bowl and
sending iie tubes down the front of
Homecoming Queen, 1909, and causing
much distui haute, over which he had to
veil loud and long to be heard: "It II me. Is anvbody enjo)ing this?"
There were murmurs, then a voice, and
then in unison, "No, tome to think of

'':WMy' .':'Mfi.

i'tr'ihifir'

tig P
r

-

person

--

four

(4)

romkne

hi

it."

"Isn't this pretty sill)?" Irving shouted.
"Yes," tame the leply.
Well, the lest was easy, Irving quitkly
organied the intimate little group of 7()
into lour teams, aimed them all with
gillon of punch and cookies, and time
lollowt cl the wilde st, su ingingest Homecoming mike iu all the rich history of
the school, and tveivonc had such
a
gocnl time that living was pieseuttc! will)
an honoiaiy dotloi'h degitc.
-

i

1

1

1

.

OSF

Tonight
Only

myi 730

--

9:307?M.

ot

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, TIiuimI. Nov. It.

Bombs

Home-Bui- lt

on the SPOT
With

rich

iiy ii.iKKi
Kfrnrl Demolition

DAN MILLOTT

-

December.

There are several iactors which
could effect the size of a party's
vote next week: The type of race
v.ill have a big effect on the voter
turnout, as there should be wider
interest in races which have sev- nal candidates. Another kind of
r.ce which would draw wide in- tu-esis one in which an SC in- cumbeht is being challenged by a
t

f.n, Jl.J mmKOP
ill.lllKV
Did last spring's election

Jt

J

W

1

... ""'
thai

amniuons mis
.nrlnr. Anvone of several candi- dates running this fall could have
his eye on the spring conventions.
However, when the parties ptcK
their nominees next SDr ne. neither
of them will have a ready-mad- e
presidential candidate. Conceivably
the next SC president and vice
president could be someone not in
the assembly now someone who is
making a bid this fall,
have presidential

l.xprrt

,

I.........
jm n snon ai.Tsmfffabulous
.

exhibition of IntuiHon that resulted in a very effec- Hvf bomb raid, the IMowum To- nas aveiopea the new

"

no - It - loursclf

u"l"Trarmra
womb-K-

-

it

This bomb kit has been made
to suit the typical college student
in PVprv wav. It is lieht and rasilv
portable. Most important of all,
Its parts are simple enough so
that even the person who has be- pi
come Scotch by consumption, on
1
oCllOOl I
a Saturday, will have no trouble in
.
.
assembling the little gem himself.
i
rti
I3C I lllCJjf fcllCCl In fart, in years to come it will
.
rrobahlv herome known as the
KUlle .m
w.ifo
"typical bomb kit for the typical
Ion!?er be evaluated separately by
the state committee of the South- - collcRe student.
'
cm Association of Colleges and
A word is in order for the one
.,
.
,
u ,.1C
CnA,nr,, 0,,
t
closed yesterday.
this new development." This man
Dr. Morris Cicrley, chairman of is Dr. Fenimore Sneaker who. is
the committee, said, "We can no on the research committee of the'
longer justify handing in two l' Blowum Tobitts Co. Sneaker'
ports for the schools, as they are graduated from State Penn in
judged by the same standards and 1939 with a first degree in nuclear!
must pay the same dues."
safecracking.
on me issue was unani- The vote
Dr. Sneaker has worked for none
mous.
but the best since he got out of1
The state committee will hand in school. The Mafia and the Black
its report to the Southern As- - Shirts of Italy commended him,
Mnu-Maas did
of
Ration at its annual convention highlj. when hethepresented them
Africa
Dec.
in Louisville.

lC)OriS

lO

.

.

Sin

The fourth

nn1 final
'MCA Ieailershtp Trainir

Tio- -

with explosive wiuhr.td.s for thrir
tonufit
Kiam will lr hrM at 7
in the .Social Itimin of thr FA', fl.
I)r- Snrakrr Ur
In a modrt
A panel
It
will
bungalow with hU wife .1,.. .,., i..,,.of
'"0ni
.,
.
m.
.
iro.r- 11 .1.111
Irml.l.n ......r...
,)r- Sneaker Mill has a lnC rareer
"
l- "of ,,im having Juot rrlr- - ;.uin to
of lr.u!er
hf1
rolri
his 31st birthday. The Sreat ship alter ml lose.
j
Taking part on the program ar:
Bll
rora
Pr. Steadman H.Kbv. p.i.s'. r of tho
plrte lark of
Thc
(,WUI" Tobitts Co. owns Pirt Meth.Hlist Chunh: J Van
,,s ris0 from comparative oh( ui it v Meter Alforil.
l.i'er;
to complete oblivion largely to the I. Hoy Miles, president of thFirt
ci ions oi ur. sneaker.
National IVv?ik and Tru' Co ntal
So you can see for yourself, Col. HntxMt Haui;iton.
AUtOl'C.
typical college students, a do-it- yourself-ki- t
with a background
such as this is bound to Ih a it wtu!d make ' line
,,y.
f
success. It comes m all Iy League one wl;o
to k.'I
c.oini:
ti
colors, with or without filter tips. Thanksitn in,- tuikey. Wi v tio'
Iit
ll:,s built-i- n
miklncs.
to carve th tur;ev ul.en
"i
'il
Hypnlermically Fpraklnn. II m
pi
him a pa 1
i

Ah. rnllruf drive and Invrntivr- nc5s have led to another new de- -

This week the Campus and Stu.
par
im hUh ,,,r
preparation for the Nov. 19
in
Conrress primary.
Unlike In past years the two
ratios atll nnmlnntP IhHr randi- rates by popular vote rather than
ly caucus. This change in itself
brings about still another outlook
rn the camDus political scene,
What it will mean is more gen- ual interest .in the nominees of
the parties.
Both parties will put on a big
elfort to get a big vote next
Wednesday. Because the primary
ly.
open to all students, it might
te interesting to watch the com- r native total vote for each party
in each college.
iexi weeks primary could pro- .
v.de a preview of the compara- live strength of the two parties
when they oppose each other in

Grap

Leadership

JiiXplained JJy Expert

l!VH- -5

-

i

w--

11,-- 1-

.

-

tudent

"""'"""

-

-,

1

--

m--

-

iw

,

--

1

-

.

us

RAIN OR SHINE
FOR THE COEDS WHO PINE
Successful care of your hair and skin is our business.
Personalized styling at its best
Milkmaid coscmctics is our exclusively at
" ' MR.
SALON

FRANK'S

Phone

287 South Lime
OPEN TUES.

&

THURS. EVENINGS

show

any trend of strength? Decidedly
il did. The Campusites ran strongest in Engineering and Commerce,
while the Students ran very well
in Ag and Home Ec and Arts and
Science. The Education College
was pivotal last May. Donna Law-se- n
of the Students' Party won out
by 3G votes. A comparison of the
primary