xt766t0gxh92_1 https://exploreuk.uky.edu/dips/xt766t0gxh92/data/mets.xml https://exploreuk.uky.edu/dips/xt766t0gxh92/data/2020ms105.dao.xml Lou Emma Wilson Mexicana Endowed Fund archival material 2020ms105 English University of Kentucky The physical rights to the materials in this collection are held by the University of Kentucky Special Collections Research Center.  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Lou Emma Wilson Mexicana Collection Inquisition -- Mexico Pulque Domingo Pantaleon Alvares de Abreu, Arzobispo Obispo de la Puebla de Los Angeles, del consejo de su Magestad, assistente del Sacro Solio, &c.: por quanto conviene el que se averigue, y justifique con la mayor claridad, y distincion las personas de razon, Españoles, Mulatos, Mestizos, y demàs que no son Indios, que tratan, y comercian la bebida del Pulque text 0.1 Cubic Feet 3 items Domingo Pantaleon Alvares de Abreu, Arzobispo Obispo de la Puebla de Los Angeles, del consejo de su Magestad, assistente del Sacro Solio, &c.: por quanto conviene el que se averigue, y justifique con la mayor claridad, y distincion las personas de razon, Españoles, Mulatos, Mestizos, y demàs que no son Indios, que tratan, y comercian la bebida del Pulque 2021 https://exploreuk.uky.edu/dips/xt766t0gxh92/data/2020ms105/Box_ms_48/Folder_1/2020ms105_0001.pdf circa 1750 1750 circa 1750 
  Scope and Contents
  

Decree regulating the sale of agave and pulque. An effort to regulate commerce in pulque, the traditional alcoholic beverage made from agave sap, particularly as conducted by non-Indians. The decree is undated, but dates from Alvares de Abreu's term as bishop of Puebla (1742-1763). The regulations apply to those cultivating maguey (agave) on their own lands or on leased plots and sell their produce to Indigenous people, who then extract pulque for their own benefit and enjoyement. The regulations also apply to those who sell (but do not cultivate) agave. According to John Kicza, even as late as 1784 Puebla and Oaxaca were the only cities in Mexico other than Mexico City with pulque trades large enough for the Spanish to regulate.

Brief translation: Domingo Pantaleón Alvares de Abreu, Archbishop of the town of Los Angeles, at the recommendation of his Majesty, assistant to the Sacred Throne, etc.

In so far as it pleases he who verifies and validates, with the greatest clarity and distinction, people of reason, Spaniards, Mulattoes, Mestizos, and others who are not indians, who work and deal with the pulque drink, and who cultivate maguey on their own land or land that they lease on farms, ranches, plots, or gardens within these lands: We grant to the Priest, and to the Ecclesiastic Judge of [lacunae] so that in light of this office, he shall perform (by himself, and not by delegating it to his vicars, so long as he is not legitimately impeded) the verification and secret validation of all persons, who are not indians, who grow maguey on their own land, or leased land, in the area of his curacy, or who sell maguey to indians for their own benefit and enjoyment...

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