xt769p2w444b https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt769p2w444b/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19240328  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 28, 1924 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 28, 1924 1924 2012 true xt769p2w444b section xt769p2w444b The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
VOL XIV

LEXINGTON, KY.. MARCH 28, 1924

PROMINENT

POETS

HUNGARIAN

YOUR CHANCE

NOW'S

PLAN TO

PENSION

AGED

Professor Enoch Grehcn, to stimuGIVES TWO late interest in popular writing, and PROFESSORS PROPOSED
PROFESSOR
to discover talent on the campus, has
offered a prize of $2.00 to the student
IN
CHAPEL who will submit the best poem to the ON UNIVERSITY CAMPUS
ADDRESSES
Kernel office. All students are eligible to compete.
Poems must be on Each Instructor Would Donate
A Small Sum of Each
European Scholar and Lecturer the desk of the managing editor not
'.atcr than Thursday, April 3. The
Month's Salary
Dwells on Conditions in
winning poem will be published in the
Europe Today
April 11 issue of the Kernel along FIRST PLAN OF ITS KIND
SEES ANOTHER WAR
with the name of the winner. These
University Would Be Asked To
poems may be of a serious or faceContribute a Sum Equal to
Exiled Educator Says Aid of tious nature.

American People Is A
Necessity

V.

--

KERNEL STAFF

Jaszi, Hungarian
Profssor Oscar
political leader and liberalist, spoke in
the chapel of the University of Kentucky Monday and Tuesday afternoons at 3:30 o'clock.
He voiced the idea that Europe is
headed for another war with a termination which will perhaps be more
disastrous than any previous war in
Central Europe. "A new mediaeval
spirit is spreading over the whole of
Europe, which scoffs at all international morality and regards force as
the final tribunal," the speaker said.
According to Professor Jaszi, war
or the adoption of the Anglo-Saxo- n
idea of League confederation of states
by the countries of the Danube, will
be the only way out of the political
and economic struggle in Central
Europe.
Speaking from first hand knowledge,
a Hungarian and living in Hungary
until exiled five years ago because of
political tenets, Professor Jaszi said:
Hungarian Situation is Key
"The situation in Hungary is the
key to the central European problem
and, as such, should be of keen interest to those concerned in the political
and economic welfare of the middle
empires."
In speaking of Hungary's importance
in central Europe, he said that Hungary today is being ruled by the military class which is seeking and hoping
for war and the restoration of the
Hapsiburg dynasty.
The central European trouble has!
its roots in the economic and moral
collapse of its people after the war
and in the tearing asunder of the coun-

AND

Donations

K-

FOR

1924

1925 IS SELECTED

New Officers Take Charge At
Once, Publishing This

Week's Issue
Dwight L. Bicknell, recently elected
of the Kerne1!, has announced the members of the staff for
the coming year.
Those selected are as follows: Ted
McDowell '26, news editor; Louise
Burks, assistant news editor; George
Michler '26, sports editor;Tom Duncan
'25, Eugenia O'Hara '26, Wes Galvin
sports
editors;
'27,
assistant
editor;
society
Kelley,
Virginia
CarDixon Davidson '24, Herbert
ter '25, Mary F. Gorey '24, Eugene
Moore '25, Curtis. Buehler '25, Margaret Chenault '25, associate editors;
J. K. Long '27, advertising manager;
advertising
C. M. Charles, assistant
manager; L. L. Wallace '27, manager
of accounts; William Richards '27,
assistant manager of accounts; William Augustus '27, circulation manager; Thurman Rumberger '27, assistMargaret
ant circulation manager;
Van Meter '25, Rachelle Shacklette '25,
Percy Beards '26, Ava 'Cawood '26,
James R'. Davidson '26, Frances Lee
'25, Nancy Steph
'26, Judith Yungfolut
enson '25, Mary StaUings '25, Lois
Hargett 26, Willie King '27, Frances
Kane '25, Marcus L. Napier '27,
Edna L. Wells "26, F. H. Hoover '27,
Elizabeth Lilleston '26, Amanda Gordon '26, reporters.
Bicknell was elected
of the Kernel at a meeting held last
week by t'he old staff. At the same
meeting J. Sterling Towles was made
managing editor and Kyle Whitehead
was elected business manager.
editor-in-chi-

editor-in-chi-

(Continued on page five.)
--

K-

FOUR MEN PLEDGED TO

ENGINEERnRATERNITY

K

OPENING FOR FLORIST

Tau Beta Pi Selects Four Men
H. M. Hoskins, president of Eastern
From Upper Eighth of
Kentucky Music Company, Pikeville,
Ky., a student at the University from
Junior Class
writes that there is a fine
opening in Pikeville for a good florist.
Mr. Hoskins is willing to go into
partnership witli some person interested in the proposition on a fifty-fift- y
basis. Students interested in the proposition, or qualified as florists and who
wants to enter business of this kind,
should communicate directly with Mr.
1898 to 1900,

Tau Beta Pi, honorary engineering,
pledging service in
fraternity held
UicKer nan, inursuay, aiarcn cm, iur
the following men: Robt. K. Govian-nol- i,
of Lexington; Denzil S. Sample,
Lexington;
Walter F. Manion, of
Mayslick, and Hubert C. Nichols, of
Munfordsville.
Hoskins.
The men pledged were selected from
Kof the junior
the upper
class on account of their high scholasNOTICE!
tic standing.
Preceding the ceremony, Dean Anderson spoke on "The Ideals of Tau
There will be an important
Beta Pi."
meeting of the Kernel staff next
George Russell Page, president of
Thursday at the filth hour.
the local chapter, presided at the
Every member is requested to
meeting. He explained to the candibe present.
dates, the requirements and obligations for membership in Tau Beta Pi.
one-eigh-

pension the professors of the University who arc
compelled to retire from active service
on account of advanced years, was recently started on the campus. The
plan is as yet in its infancy and no definite steps have been taken except a
mere discussion of a means by which
a fund may be established.
The general conception of the plan
is to have various professors donate a
small sum. probably five dollars a
month, to a fund which will be placed
on interest.
As a professor reaches
the age limit this will be used to pay
such parts of the annual salaries as
the plan will permit. Professor Leland,
of Economics Department, has been
asked to work out mathematically a
plan for the best handling of such
funds. The scheme contemplates also,
asking the University to match the
funds thus collected' with the appropriation of an equal sum. The problem is considered by members of the
faculty as one of great interest and
will require considerable study and
work before it can be submitted. It
is hoped that the plan will be ready
to present to the entire faculty during
the current semester.
This is the first plan of its kind considered in any University or College.
A movement to

K

KENNETH TUGGLE, JUNIOR,
TO REPRESENT UNIVERSITY

No. 23

MUSICAL PROGRAM

SUNDAY

SUMMER

SCHOOL WILL

The weekly concert of the Philharmonic Society of the University OFFER LARGER PROGRAM;
of Kentucky will be given Sunday afternoon in the Romany Theatre at 3:30
E
WEEKS'
SESSION
o'clock. The program will be as follows:
1.
March of the
Herbert
Many New Features Added and
2. Andante from Fifth Symphony
Larger Portion Centers
Beethoven
3. a. Valsc
Around Education
Brahms
b. Narcissus
Nevin
MANY SPEAKERS ENGAGED
c. Song of India
Toys-Vict-

or

Aimsfky-Korsako-

w

Bizet School for Citizenship Enlarged;
Selection from Carmen
Trips Through Blue Grass
Soloist Miss Jcanettc Lamport.
4.

firstWoWce

Planned

OF

The summer session of the University of Kentucky is to be greatly exand a larger
STROLLERS IS APRIL 21 panded the College of portion centered
around
Education. The
session, which has been lengthened to
a period of nine weeks, from June 16,
'Seventeen" Will Have Its Ini- to August 15, is under the supervistial Performance At
ion of Dr. W. S. Taylor, Dean of the
Cynthiana
College of Education. Application for
special rates on all railroads in Ken- Rehearsals for the Stroller play, tucky and several southern states has
"Seventeen," are going nicely and the been made to the Southeastern
will be ready for its initial per-- 1 sencer Association at Atlanta, in an.
formance on April 21, at Cynthiana, Uicipation of meeting the financial
according to a statement given out by! needs of persons desiring to attend.
Earl Maxwell Heavrin, director. Plans
Prominent Lecturers Engaged
tor the scenery have been completed
Courses will be offered by five
d
the stage crew will start i4s work leges of the University as follows:
in the Stroller room this week.
College of Agriculture,
College of
Two other names were added to the Arts and Sciences, College of
staff Saturday when Phillip tion, College of Engineering, and the
Rusch was elected assistant stage man-- 1 College of Law. Almost every
and Stanley Griffith was appoint- - partment in the institution is prepared property man. The remaining ap- - ing to offer work, most of them full
pointments for the stage crew have, work for the summer. Besides the
faculty, which has been carefully se- not yet been made.
It will be of interest to students to lected a number of experts in the
know that the government has grant-- , field of education for special lectures
ed the Strollers a redemption in tax, have been engaged for this session,
due to the fact that the organization Among these are:
Dr- - John J- - Tger.t,
United States
is now an educational institution and'
is under the supervision of the business Commissioner of Education, a former
office of the University. Stuart- - Wal- - instructor of this University; Dr. Guy
ker has also given them a great reduc- - M- - Whipple, University of Michigan;
University of
tion in cost of performances which Dr- - Harry A- Barth
amounts to a great deal in the Stroller Pennsylvania; Dr. Floyd H. Allport,
Carolina: and
n
Ttw.v inw
hiwitrt
four. University of North
car which also aids in reducing the
ists'
(Continued on page 5.)
expenses of the organization.
The request for dates of performance
has passed the council and the follow
ing places will be visited:
April 21; Lexington,
Cynthiana,
April 24 and 25; Richmond, May 7; UNIT
FOflJNSPECTION
Harlan. May 8; Pineville, May 9.
Pas-ca-

st

col-an-

Educa-Stroll-

j

j

-

Kenneth Tuggle, of Barbourville,
was selected to represent the Univer
sity of Kentucky in the southern ora
torical contest to be held at the Uni
versity of the South at Sewanee, Tenn.,
April 12, in tryouts held Saturday in
the University chapel.
Five students competed iiv the try
outs. The contest is held each year un
der the auspices of the Southern Ora
torical Association, composed of the
of the south,
leading institutions
among them, Johns Hopkins University, University of Virginia, University of the South, Vandcrbilt and the
University of Kentucky.
Tuggle is a junior in the College of
Arts and Sciences, and a member of
As a
Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity.
freshman in the University of Kentucky, he was a valuable member of
the debating team. In hi sophomo:e
year, he attended Ohio State University, but on account of not being in
college there the previous semester,
was ineligible for any oratorical contests or debates.
--

K-

OUTSHOOT DEPAW

CO-ED- S

i

majootralIsits

K

FIRST CONTEST IN
MEET PLAYED
The first games in the
basketball
tournament were played
Tuesday night between the Alpha Sigma Phi team and the Plii Kappa Tau
Immediately after the opening
five.
game the Sigma Nu fraternity played
the Alpha Tau Omega five. Tin
third and final game of the openin.
day's play was between the Kapp.
Alpha and the Sigma Alpha Epsiloi:
teams.
In the first contest the Alpha Sig
ma iJhi team emerged victorious u.
the score of 15 to 13. The Alpha Tar
Omega five defeated the Sigma X1
aggregation by the score of 14 to 8,
making most of their points by the
long shot method. In the third gaim
of the night the Kappa Alpha frater
nity won from the Sigma Alpha Kp
silon team.
ic

The
rifle team of the University of Kentucky was victorious over
the girls' team of Dcpuw University
by a score of 496 to 485, in a match
last week. The University girls are
making a remarkable record, having
lost only two matches. The scores made
K
by the memlbers of the squad are as
LOST One pair of tortoise she
follows: Mary Louise Norman, 100;
Probably
somewhere
o
Virginia Kelley, 100; Elsie Coleman, glasses.
99; Nellie Clay Corbin, 99; Margaret campus. Reward if returned to Rie'
ard R. Jones or Kernel office.
Doty, 98; Geneva Rice 98.
co-e- d

Chief of U. S. Infantry Spends
Thursday of Last Week on
Campus
Major-Gener-

al
Charles S. Farus-wortChief of Infantry, in the United

States Army, visited the Military Department of the University, Thursday,
March 20. General Farusworth included the University of Kentucky in
his tour of inspection which he is making to all colleges having R. O. T. C.
Infantry units.
The entire morning was spent in
classroom
inspection.
He was a
guest of the Rotary Club for lunch,
returning to the University at 1:30
the rifle range and various
other workings of the Military Department.
At 3:30 General Farusworth met the
regiment in chapel, the plans for review having been changed because of
inclement weather. Colonel Freeman
introduced the General, who made a
short but very forceful address which
was followed by talks by Dean Aiulur
(Continued on pajre 8.)

* V

Page Two

THE KENTUCKY

cd last year to be chairman at the dinner this spring. A number of met
who prepared the first two programs

Alumni Notes
Editor Aluninl Secretary
WHAT THE LEGISLATURE DID FOR US.
Now that the Legislature of 1924'has convened, done its work and adjounv
cci it will he well to call the attention of all the alumni to its work and note just
what' has heen accomplished for cither the good or detriment of the University.
,
Before going- into the work of that legislative hody it will not be inappropriate to say that the alumni of "Old State" who sat in the two houses of the
General Assembly were at all times loyal and watchful of the University's interest so far as has ihccn learned.
,
To Senator H. M. Brock,
and Representatives J. F. Bosworth,
O. C. Gartin. class of '20, Jack Howard, class of '20, J. W. McFarlin class
o: "J3, and Allen B. Cammack, c.J23, the University of Kentucky owes a debt
cf gratitude for interest they took in advancing any thing which would aid
its development. Especially credit should be given to Senator Arch L. Hamilton, and Representatives Harry B. Miller and Sam H. Cole, all three Alumni,
who represented Fayette county at Frankfort. These men were willing at all
times to lend assistance to the University. And to the great number of men
who were loyal to the University because it was simply an institution of the
State, praise is also due.
Late last Monday night Governor V. J. Fields, himself an alumnus of the
University, struck from House Bills 534 and 535 special appropriations to the
University which would have amounted to $105,000 in the next two years. The'
$75,000 wfhich was to have been used to complete Kastlc Hall, the new chcmis- -'
try building, was lost by this action.
The other $30,000 was an appropriation to the Experiment Station for the
purpose of conducting research work in diseases of tobacco.
With this los; what has the University of Kentucky gained by the legislature? For one thing the $75,000,000 bond issue sponsored by Governor
Fields will be submitted to a vote of tihe people. If it passes $5,000,000 would
be available for he University in the next six or eight years. Its passage depends to a larne extent upon the amount of work the alumni do in its be
4,

ex-'8-

half.

With the exception of the bond issue the only other bills bringing aid to
the University are Senate Bill 87, whiah appropriates $25,000 for the establishstation on the Rolbin'son tract of land in Eastern
ment of a
Kentucky, B. S. DO gives the law library .free state reports, H. B. 88 gives the
main library free reports and acts of the assembly and other copies of state
station in Caldwell counpublications; H. B. 277 establishes a
ty and H. B. 318 changes the rate of taxes coming to the University from
Ui cents on the $100 worth of taxable property to 2.130 cents. This is in fact
a considerable increase and should give the annual budget an increase of
according to Rainey T. Wells, of the state tax commission and trustee of
the University. Another bill gives the University 4.16 of all the inheritance
tax of the state. This is but a change of an old provision and will not add
ai.y great amount to the income of the institution.
In all not much has been done for the University of Kentucky. A few
free ibooks, some money to spend in the distant ends of the state and a chance
at the bond issue. They arc all good things but they do not give the University a chance for the immediate expansion so greatly desired and needed.
$75,-00-

CALENDAR
Detroit, March 29. (Last Satur- day Regular) dinner, Dixieland
Inn.
Somerset, Ky.. April 4, (First
meeting. 7:30
Fridayr-Regul- ar)
p. m., Dr. Norfleet's office.
Philadelphia, April 5. (First
Saturday Regular) luncheon at
EngiieeiV Club.
Buffalo. April 10. Banquet tcr
visiting senior engineers and
chemists at 7:30 p. m. (Place to be
given later.)
New York, April 11. Annual
dinner dance, Waldorf Hotel.
Lexington, April 12. (Second
Saturday Regular) luncheon at
12:30 Lafayette Hotel.
Chicago, April 21 (Third Mon- day Regular) luncheon 12:30 p.
Restaurant,
m. Marshal Field's
Men's Grill.
Cincinnati. April 26. Dinner- dance. (Time and place will be
announced later.)
.

NINE CLASSES

TO REUNITE

Program for Banquet During Commencement Has iBwn Made
Nine classes will hold reunions during commencement this year, in accordance with the plan of allowing
each class a reunion every five years.
The classes to hold reunions in June
arc: 1896, 1889, 1894, 1899, 1904, 1909,
1914, 1919 and 1921.
The alumni secretary will soon mail
personal letters to the permanent secretaries of each of these classes urging them to line up all the members of

KERNEL

0,

their c'.asses and see how large a delegation they can show here during
commencement this summer.
The program for the reunion of the
classes has been arranged as follows:
Saturday morning, May 31, the annual business meeting of the Alumni
Association will be held; Saturday afternoon will be class day; and Saturday night the annual alumni banquet
will be held.
The alumni banquet is not only for
the classes holding reunions this year
but for members of any class that has
been graduated from the University;

lucky, he entered the army and scrv- for two years in the Philippine
Returning to the United
Islands.
arc already at work upon plans for the States during the World War he par- affair this year.
ticipated in that conflict. After his
lihe persons invited to attend the return from overseas he was assigned
gridiron dinner arc largely alumni and to duty in Hawaii, where he became
former students of the University.
ill last summer and was sent to the
in San Francisco. His burial
will be in Arlington Cemetery, Wash- Captain White married Miss
Mabel Prcwitt, of Texas, and his wife
ind two children survive him. He
was a native of Olovcrport.

AT GRIDIRON

Alpha Delta Sigma at Work to Prepare Program for Alumni
The members of Alpha Delta Sigma,
who arc already planning for the best
gridiron dinner of all, this year, have
the ambition of entertaining Senator
A. O. Stanley as one of the guests at
the third annual gridiron dinner to be
held during commencement in June.
Last week Senator Stanley was in
Lexington and some of the late active
members saw him in regard to the
possibility of his being present. Owen
Reynolds, class of '10, former national
officer of Alpha Delta Sigma, has writ-- 1
ten Senator Stanley inviting him to be
present.
On the night of the gridiron dinner
Alpha Delta Sigma entertains its
guests instead of asking the guests to
entertain them. But that no man may
feel slighted, after the regular program is completed, everybody that desires to do so is given an opportunity to make a speech.
Tom R. Underwood, of the Lexine- ton Herald,
of '19, was elect-d

cd

Betwixt Us

vine, Ky.
The residence address is
534 Columbia Avenue.
Otis Howard is with the operating
department, Waterside Station of the
Louisville Gas & Electric Co., having
recently left the employ of the B. F.
Goodtich Company, of Aron, O., to
accept his present position. Mrs. How-hospit- al
ard was Clarice Bcllcw '22. They are

living at

725

Dearborn Street,

Louis-ingto-

villc, Ky.

The marriage of James
Donald
Dinning to Ella Nutc Brown '22, was
solemnized March 22, at Hill Crest,
the home of the bride's parents, near
Lexington.
After ft thort wedd
94
'14
Nathan Alexander Newton was a
"We are pleased to send you here- - trip they will be at home in Louis-wit- h
visitor on the campus last week, stopwhat was at one time the price villc, Ky., where Mr. Dimning is prac-o- f
ping over on his way home from a
'four beers for ten men,' which is ticing law with the firm of Humphrey,
to pay alumni dues for Riley B. But- - Crawford, Middlcton and Humphrey,
Building,
Mr. Butler is now in the 1106
trip through the West. For a num- ler
ber of years Mr. Newton was chief electrical department of the Fisher
'22
Body Corporation, located in the Gen- engineer of the National Transit ComTerry E. Wade is now teaching
pany, a subsidiary of the Standard Oil eral Motors Building. His mailing
Company, which furnished that com- address is 5496 Lincoln Avenue, Dc- - in the Vocational Department of the
pany with practically all the machin- troit. Mich." 'Henry J. Beam, Scc'y, University of Tennessee and asks that
his Kernel be sent to 1609 Highland
ery used at its different plants. Since Detroit Alumni Club.
Avenue, Knoxville, Tcnn.
the Standard Oil Company was dis"Find enclosed check for first and
'15
membered by an act of congress, he is
sales manager of the company, now
Louis Joseph Emmert has been in second payments on my pledge to the
known as the National Transit Pump the law practice in Wheeling, W. Va., Greater Kentucky campaign. Sorry to
Hid Machine Company, and sells ma- practically ever since graduating ex- have delayed so long but you know
Wishing
chinery to all oil companies.
Mr. cept for the period of the World War teachers have a hard life.
Newton had the distinction of
e when
he was in the service of his success in the superlative degree to
used in the United States. The country. The mailing address is 1060 the Greater Kentucky movement."
High
ng the first large internal combustion Chaplin Street. With his contribution William B. Howell, Principal
engine was 70 feet long and developed to the Greater Kentucky Campaign School, Milton, Ky.
'23
1,000 horse power, and is still in use. fund last fall were these words "Every
Mr. and Mrs. James R. Leach, 132
Mr. Newton's address is 15 Stout St., good wish for the ultimate success of
Lincoln Avenue, Lexington, Ky., are
Oil City, Pa.
'Old State's stadium."
welcoming a daughter born March 18.
She has been named Margaret Fulton
'16
'96
"I am sorry I don't get to join in in honor of her maternal .grandmother.
Added to the active nicmibership list
Mrs. Leach was formerly Mary Elizarecently is the name of Thomas Ro-- 1 the activities of the University now.
The college football games played beth James, of Louisville.
land Dean, attorney and financier, of
Byron Williams, who is with the
here in Denver always make me home
Miami, Okla.
sick- for Kentucky.
It is queer what U. S. Coast & Geodetic Survey, has
a hold college spirit does get on you. 4ecn transferred! from '.Washington,
'02
D. C, to Alaska, and should be ad"Enclosed find check for first and I am sorry I haven't been able to pick dressed care of U. S. S. Explorer,
second payments on my pledge to the up a fortune in oil but I'm still peg Juneau, Alaska.
Greater Kentucky campaign fund t ging away teaching school. Still
K
have been very busy and overlooked want to do my bit so here it is.
general GOV. FIELDS, PRESIDENT
Hazel
Brown (teaching
sending same. Yours for the GreatMcVEY ON ALUMNI PROGRAM
er U. K." W. F. Hart, U. S. Bureau, science, Grant Jr., and Southside high
of Public Roads, 204 Federal Building, schools), address 1159 Corona Street,
Denver, Colo.
Lincoln, Neb.
Governor W. J. Fields and Dr. Frank
L. McVey will speak at the banquet
'17
'06
of 300 University alumni to be held in
Miss Crawford is teadhing in the
Louisville Friday night, April 24, in
"The Kernel reaches me regularly high school
at Somerset, Ky. For connection with the annual convenand I enjoy reading the news set several years she taught in the Frank-fn- rt
tion of the Kentucky Educational Asforth in each issue. I do not want to
hich srhonl and awhile in Flori- sociation.
miss any issues of it. As I expect to da before
returning to the old home
.,
go abroad within the month, I would
Arrangements are being made for
town to take up her present duties,
you would arrange to
appreciate it
the affair by Prof. Wellington Patchange my address to care of Inter-- 1
rick, head of the Department of Ex,jg
national Western
Electric Co.. Inc..
tension; Deans Paul P. Boyd, Thomas
A recpIlt visitor on the campus was
AM.wh ' t nnitnn '
rnnn,i,f
P. Cooper, W. S. Taylor and AssistWa"tngford, Who is a
C. Hop- - J.ames Stu.art
W. C. 2, England."-R- oy
Leo J.
ant Dean W. E. Freeman.
good. Mr. Hopgood is a patent attor- iicuiciidiu in uic inn uuauiry, u. o. Sandman is in charge of arrangements
A.
Lieut. Wallingford has recently
ney with the Western Electric Co.,
in Louisville.
assigned to duty in Hawaii, and
and the trip to England U in connec been
The University Glee Club will pro
was visiting relatives in Kentucky be-- t
tion with his company's
business
fore sailing. His mailirtg address is vide music at the banquet and all
there.
care of the Adjutant General, U. S. alumni and friends of fhe University
will be welcomed.
A., Washington, D. C.
'07
K
Charles Swift Parriah, B. A., '07 and
Students! Patronize Kernel Adver- '20
B. M. E. '09, is assistant secretary of
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Mitchell, 823 tiiers.
the Hazard Coal Operators Exchange,
Aurora Avenue, Lexington, Ky., are
4
Fayette National Bank Bldg.
Lexington, Ky. Residence address, the parents of a daughter, Annie Warren Mitchell, born March 18. Mrs.
H
206 East Maxwell St
Mitchell was formerly Lela Whalen
Inter-Southe-

ex-1-

design-engin-

....

j

612-61-

'OS

WANT STANLEY

I

Emery Wells is owner and manager
of the Park View Grocery, corner
Kentucy and High streets, Lexington,
Ky. Mr. Wells is one of those who
had eluded the vigilance of the alumni
secretary and had not been located for
some timei After receiving his B. C.
E. in 1908 he was appointed a U. S
engineer. During the World War he
was in service and after his return to
civilian life was associated with the
Turner Construction Company, New
York City, untjl his return to Lexington. Mr. Wells is living at 700
Euclid Avenue.

l9
Frank Finley Cawood has been associated wdth the coal development
in Eastern Kentucky practically ever
since graduating and is now with the
Lena Rue Coal Company, at Lenarue,
Harlan county. He is a life member
of the Alumni Association.
j
'12
Captain William Blackburn White,
U. S. Army, died at the Letterman
Hospital, San Francisco, March 24,
1924.
.
Soon after rcc'viaj; h's "
egree at the University of Ken- -

Dues and The Kernel

ex-2- 0.

One Year

21

Mr. and Mrs. Walter E. Rowe are
the proud parents of a daughter, Jean
Parke Rowe, Ibom Mardh 22. Mr.
Rowe is with his brother, Perry A.
Rowe '14, architect, 304 Fayette Bank
Bldg., Lexington, Ky.
Mrs. Rowe
was- formerly Elizabeth Park, of Ir- -

$2.00
ALUMNI ASIOCIATZON.
University of Kentucky,

Ltxiagtoa.

Carrier Engineering Corporation
750

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MANUFACTURERS OF WEATHER

to make "Every day a good day"
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J. It DtMcaa, '12
W. W. TaHaferre, '13

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W. B. Thentea, 21
N. O. Bek. '22

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Social and Personal
Social Calendar
Friday, March 28 Bcta Nuof Kappa
Sigma district dance at Lafayette
Hotel.
Saturday, March 29 Kappa Kappa
Gamma format dance at the
Phoenix Hotel.
Junior Prom, Keflplemkfit
The ballroom of the Phoenix hotel
was the scene of a brilliant assembly
of Juniors, Seniors and other guests
at the annual "prom" given 'by the
Juniors Friday night at the Phoenix
Hotd. This is always one of the
largest and most prominent dances of
the year and more than 600 guests
were present.
The programs
were small white
booklets1 tied wiHh blue silk cord and
were inclosed in attractive iblack card
cases for girls with "Junior Prom" and
date crribossed in gold. Various colored lights were flashed on during
adding an artistic
the
touch to the gay scene. The booklets
contained the list of class officers:
W. O. Billiter, president; Esther
Gilbert,
An.nel.le Kel-lesecretary; Laymon Mays, treasurer; James Darnell, orator; Herbert
Carter, editor; W. H. Skinner, Jr.,
Manager of Kentuckian.
The chaperons were: Dr. and Mrs.
F. L. McVey, Dean Saralh Blanding,
Dean and Mrs. C. R. Melcher, Dean
and Mrs. P. P. Boyd, Dean and Mrs.
Paul Cooper, Dean and Mrs. F. P.
Anderson, Dean and Mrs. W. E. Freeman, Judge and Mrs. Lyman Chalk-leColonel and Mrs. George Freeman, Mrs. Charles Judson Smith and
Miss Margie McLaughlin.
The Blue and White orchestra and
the Kentuckians alternated' in playing
a speicial program of music.
y,

y,

t""itiin

Members of the Kentucky chapter
fraternity were hosts at
one of the most beautiful formal
dances of the university's social sea
son, Saturday evening at the Phocenix
Hotel. The 'ball room was decorated
with palms and
ferns which were
about ithe punch table. The illumi
nated shield of the fraternity hung on
the wall at the extreme end of the
ball room and during the
dances, the many colored lights were
thrown on it, adding a lovely effect.
The Kentuckians furnished a special
program of music.
Mndamoiscllc Dettreau, of Cincinnati, Ohio, entertained with a group of
ballet dances, "en costume." This
novelty da'ivcc was one of the most
enjoyable features of the evening.
Members of the active chapter: C.
E. Albert, J. E. Barnes, Thomas Benson, Ralph Boren, David Browning,
L. R. Burroughs, Fred Chappell, R.
E. Church, H. C. Coppage, J. E. Colby, R. R. Dawson, C. W. Gray, J.
L. Gray, K. W. Larkin, Arthur Nutting, T. H. Oliver, R. N. Platts, Dell
Ramsey, C. M. Reifkin, W. H. Rice,
R. J. Russell, R. A. Stoesser, A. W.
Stone, Dana Taylor, J. E. True, A. E.
Walker and T. D. Williams.
Pledges: P. A. Barnes, C. E. Far- rington, Austin Griffith, L. E. Grif
fith, S. R. Hemey, J. M. Henry, R.
Hogan, C. K. Hoffman, C. J. Sching- er, J. M. Taylor and F. P. Yarbro.
"

Former University Girl Weds
The marriage of Miss Ella Nute
Brown to Mr. James Donald
Dinning, of Louisville, was solemniz
ed Saturday evening at Hfll Crest, the
home of the bride's parents, Mr. and
Mrs. John Hart Brown, in the coun
try, on the Tate's Creek pike, with

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Rev. Benjamin J. Bush officiating.
This was one of the most beautiful
wed'dings witnessed hcre for a long
time. The bride is one of Lexington's most charming and attractive
girls. She graduated from the University of Kentucky in 1922 and was
a popular member of Kappa Kappa
Gamma fraternity.
Personal
Jack Dahringcr of the class of 1923,
was a visitor at the University this
last week and was with his Alpha
Sigma Phi brothers during his stay.
Miss Katherinc Conroy, '23, was
at the Delta Delta Delta 'house this

Lunch Supplies
Home Made Pies,

Louise Boden, of Louisville,
visited a