xt769p2w448p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt769p2w448p/data/mets.xml Lexington, Ky (Fayette County) University of Kentucky 19421943 The University of Kentucky catalogs contains bound volumes dating from 1865 through 2007. After 2007 course catalogs ceased to be printed and became available online only. course catalogs  English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky course catalogs, 1865- Bulletin of the University of Kentucky, Volume 19 (1942-1943) text Bulletin of the University of Kentucky, Volume 19 (1942-1943) 1942 2012 true xt769p2w448p section xt769p2w448p Y Bulletin of the ·
A UNIVERSITY OE KENTUCKY
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Y GENERAL CATALOG p
 , 1942- 43
Y Announcements ' e
K 1 9 43- 44 J
_ Published monthly, January to September inclusive, by the Uni- lb
versity of Kentucky, Lexington. Entered as Second-Class Matter at
the Post Office, Lexington, Ky., under the Act of July 16, 1894.
Acceptance for 'mailing at special rate of postage provided for in i Z
Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized June 30, 1920. I
. Vol. 3,5 _]UNE No. 6

 BOARD OF TRUSTEES
_ 1 1943
EX OFFICIO MEMBERS - `
j Keen Johnson, Governor A
John Brooker, Superintendent of Public Instruction
W. H. May, Commissioner of Agriculture _
`  
FROM THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE  C
Robert Tway, Louisville, 1948
Harry W. Walters, Shelbyville, 1946 .
H. S. Cleveland, Franklinton, 1944
MEMBERS AT LARGE { L
Richard C. Stoll, Lexington, 1948
R. P. Hobson, Louisville, 1948
John S. Cooper, Somerset, 1946
Harper Gatton, Madisonville, 1946
Mrs. Paul G. Blazer, Ashland, 1944 · ~ _
. Lee Kirkpatrick, Paris, 1944 .  
ALUMNI MEMBERS
H. D. Palmore, Frankfort, 1948
James Park, Lexington, 1946
Marshall Barnes, Beaver Dam, 1944
OFFICERS OF THE BOARD
Keen Johnson, Chairman :
Richard C. Stoll, Vice Chairman ‘
Frank D. Peterson, Secretary
John Skain, Treasurer
n EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
. _ Richard C. Stoll, Chairman C j
H. S. Cleveland `
R. P. Hobson `
H. D. Palmore · _
James Park I
— i

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GENERAL CATALOG y
For IQ42-43
./4TLYLOLL77,C€T}'l€7'LTZS I
1943-M

 ` 1 oonranrs
  Page
· __ A   Publications and Sources of Information ......................................r. 6
I V   Calendar .................................................................................................... 7
’ l
Q University Calendar ....................»...,..........».....................»............l......e.. 8
  A p `   ` Registration Schedules, 1943-44 ............·.....-.......»·--.---».---·--··--·-..A..»»... 9
I . 1 Part I. General Information of Special Interest to the
I Prospective Student ...........................»............................ 11
p Z The University of Kentucky ...........................................r 13
i   Admission to the University ......................................., 14 H
p   Fees and Expenses ...,..............................................i......... 17 L`
1 Residence Halls for Women ,......................................... 21
1
{ Residence Halls for Men .............................................. 23 T
  Opportunities for Financial Help ...1...............i...............1 23 if
1 What is Expected of the Student .1.............................. 23 M
1 Opportunities Outside the Classroom ....,...................,. 31
1 L
7 The Facilities of the University ..................................., 36
? Part II. Educational Opportunities at the University of
I Kentucky ...».1.................................».................................... 41 P
1 Degrees and Curricula .....................................,........,..... 43
; College of Arts and Sciences ...,.........,............................ 46 T
College of Agriculture and Home Economics .............. 62 J
l College of Engineering ...».......,......_........._,........__.........,.... 74 A
College of Law ..1...............__.......,__.._....,__.__.,_,___.__._...______.... 86 W
p College of Education .....,_.._...............,................................ 90
  College of Commerce ..,._._.......__._...,_.....,.....,___,_._..._..__...... 97 E1
  Graduate School ......................................,..........»..............,. 106 W
  Department of University Extension .,.,......_............. 117
· § Part III. Statement of Courses Offered at the University ...... 119
i Part IV. Special Services of the University ..........r.....r......,.......... 297
I Part V. The Administrative and Instructional Personnel of
, the University .................................................................. 303
Part VI. Statistical Summary .......................................................... 339
Index .......................................................»................................................t. 347

 ?age I
6
7 .
8
9
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS .
11
13 GENERAL
14 Herman Lee Donovan, M. A., Ph. D., LL. D., President _ ·
17 Leo M. Chamberlain, M. A., Ph. D., Dean of the University and
21 Registrar _ ‘
23 T. T. Jones, M. A., Ph. D., Dean of Men
23 Sarah Bennett Holmes, M. A., Dean of Women
23 Frank D. Peterson, A. B., University Comptroller
Margaret Isadora King, A. B., B. S., Librarian
31 Louis Clifton, M. A., Director of University Extension
36
THE COLLEGES
41 Paul Prentice Boyd, M. A., Ph. D., LL. D., Dean of the College of
43 Arts and Sciences
46 Thomas Poe Cooper, B. S., D. Sc., Dean of the College of Agriculture
62 and Home Economics and Director of the Experiment Station
74 James Hiram Graham, C. E., Dean of the College of Engineering
Alvin E. Evans, M. A., Ph. D., J. D., Dean of the College of Law `
86 William Septimus Taylor, M. A., Ph. D., Dean of the College of
90 Education
Q7 Edward Wiest, M. A., Ph. D., Dean of the College of Commerce `
106 William Delbert Funkhouser, M. A., Ph. D., D. Sc., Dean of the
H7 Graduate School
119 A
297 · [
303
339
347

 1
, l
\ -
_ _ PUBLICATIONS AND SOURCES OF INFORMATION
- " I l 1 The following publications are issued by the University for the P
i j purpose of giving prospective students and others necessary informa- :
7   tion about the institution and its various divisions. Opposite each
,, _   publication is listed the office or offices from which it may be ob- 1
, ` E tained. i
` V   Bulletin of General Information ........ Registrar’s Office A l`
l General Catalog ...................................... Registrar’s Office 1
. Summer Quarter Bulletin .................... Registrar’s Office 2,
_ ~ ` Law Bulletin ............................................ College of Law or ;
  Registrar’s Office _
l Graduate Bulletin .................................. Graduate School or _
3 Registrar’s Office
_ · Commerce Bulletin ...l............................ College of Commerce or 1]
I Registrar’s Office  
Q Agriculture and Home Economics 21
  Bulletin ................................................ College of Agriculture and Z
  Home Economicsor
j Registrar’s Office G
i l
In order to assist those who may wish special information about li
~ some part of the University’s program, there are listed below the ll
f names of officials to whom inquiries of various types may be sent. Q
I In each case, the University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, is
the post office address. —
The general policies of the Univer- $
sity ...............,..........l............................... President of the University  
General information, all admissions, gi
and transcripts of records ,..l............ Registrar 3Q
Living accommodations, student I
y help, social affairs .............................. Dean of Men or Dean of
  Women ` B
§ Information about a particular 7
I   college and its program .................... Dean of the College gi
{ Graduate Work ........................i............... Dean of the Graduate gi
  School I
~ Summer Quarter ..................,.,......._......_ Registrar
Class extension and corre- 1
spondence Study ................................ Director of University A 5
Extension  
Agricultural extension .......................... Director of Agricultural 2;
Extension  

 { CALENDAR
° th€ 1943 1944 1944
Fmu‘      
each July January July
’0b` SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS
____   _,,.   1 2 3 ....   ....   ....   1 ....   ....   ....   1
45678910 2345678 2345678
111213 14 15 16 17 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 9 10 11 1213 1415 _
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
_v__   __..   ....   .... 30 31 ....   ....   .... 30 31 ....   ....   ....
August February August `
1234567 .... ....12345 .... ....12345 .
891011121314 6789101112 6789101112
or 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
29 30 31 .,..   ....   27 28 29 ....   ....   27 28 29 30 31 ....  
d      
Sa; September March September
....   .... 1 2 3 4 ....   .... 1 2 3 4 ....   ....   .... 1 2
5678910115678910113456789
bout 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
. the 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
Sent 26 27 28 29 30 ....   26 27 28 29 30 31 .... 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 ·
y¤ is October April October
....   ....   .... 1 2 ....   ....   ....   1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
3456789 2345678 891011121314
.t 101112 1314 15 16 9 1011 1213 14 15 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 `
TS1 y 1718 19 20 21 22 23 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
g4 25 26 27 28 29 30   24 25 26 27 28 29 29 30 31 ....   ....  
n of November May November
` .... 123456 .... 123456 ....   .... 1234
78910111213 78910111213 567891011
1415 16 17 18 19 20 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 ‘
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
28 29 30 ....   ....   28 29 30 31 ....   ____ 26 27 28 29 30 ....   I
December June December
--Y-   .... 1 2 3 4 ....   ....   1 2 3 ....   ....   .... 1 2
* _ 567891011 45678910 3456789
1213141516 1718 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 1011 121314 15 16
al 19 20 2122 23 24 25 1819 20 2122 23 24 1718 19 20 21 22 23
26 27 28 29 30 31 ..., 25 26 27 28 29 30 .... 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
....   ....   ....   ,..,   .,_.   ....   ....   31 ....   ....   ....  
 

 i
l
, ‘ , Ju
· V   Ju
V ¤ Ju
. l UNIVERSITY CALENDAR J
l ` - 3 1943-44 Ju
` I
7   Fall Quarter  
l 1943 Ju
J ' ‘ . g September 24-25 Friday and Saturday—ClassiHcation t e s t s a n d
1 5 physical examinations for all new students Ju
· - { September 27 Monday—Freshman advisory conferences
· € September 27 Monday afternoon—Freshman registration A1
r l September 28 Tuesday forenoon—Freshman classification
, September 28-29 Tuesday afternoon and Wednesday—Registration
‘ . ‘ and classification of upper classmen
j September 30 Thursday—-Class work begins
1 October 7 Thursday--Last date on which one may enter an
e , organized class
-» October 25-26 Monday and Tuesday—Period for filing applications
,1 for degrees
’ l November 25 Thursday——Thanksgiving holiday
· December 14 Tuesday-—Meeting of the Board of Trustees
  December 16 Thursday, 8 a. m.—Quarter ends
] S8
` J Winter Quarter
1944
A January 4 Tuesday-—-Classification tests, physical examina-
- tions, and advisory conferences for all new
¤ students
’ January 5 Wednesday——Registration and classification for all
“ students
January 5 Thursday—Class work begins SE
l January 13 Thursday—Last date on which one may enter an Se
organized class
January 31 Monday—Period for filing applications for degrees Se
March 18 Saturday noon——Quarter ends S6
` Spring Quarter
~ March 20 Monday—ClassiHcation tests, physical examina-
§ tions, and advisory conferences for all new
‘ l l students
{ March 21 Tuesday——Registration and classification for all
‘ · students
Mfifch 22 Wednesday—Class work begins
March 29 Wednesday—Last date on which one may enter HU
~ _ organized class
April 4 Tuesday—Meeting of the Board of Trustees
April 17 Monday—Period for filing applications for degrees
May 24 Wednesday evening—Military graduation exer-
cises
June 1 Thursday-—Baccalaureate services 1
June 1 Thursday-—Meeting of the Board of Trustees
June 2 Friday-—Seventy-Seventh Annual Commencement l
_ June 3 Saturday—Quarter ends S9
June 5-10 Monday to Saturday-Junior Club Week I

 Summer Quarter _
June 12 Monday—Registration for first term A .
June 13 Tuesday—Class work begins ,-
June 19 Monday-—Last date on which one may enter an or-
ganized class
June 23 Friday—Period for filing applications for degrees
July 19 Wednesday—First term ends
July 20 Thursday—Registration for second term
July 21 Friday—Class work begins _
July 24 Monday—Last date on which one may enter an
and organized class
ts July 27 Thursday—Last date for filing applications for
degrees
August 26 Saturday-Quarter ends » _`
ation
er an 1
tion REGISTRATION SCHEDULES FOR 1943-44
s .
Fall Quarter
September, 1943
September 24-25 Friday and Saturday—All freshmen and all other J
new students will report in Memorial Hall for
classification tests and physical examinations.
All freshmen and all other new students, except
nina- those enrolling in the graduate school, must
new have the tests and examinations completed be-
fore they will be permitted to register. The 1
ar all student will find it advantageous to report as
early as possible after 8 a. m.
September 27 Monday forenoon—Freshman advisory conferences.
>1‘ HH September 27 Monday afternoon—Freshman registration accord-
ing to an alphabetical schedule.
grees September 28 Tuesday forenoon——Freshman classification
September 28-29 Tuesday afternoon and Wednesday—Registration
and classification of all upper classmen accord- .
ing to the following alphabetical schedule:
nina- ` September 28
new V
Tuesday afternoon
F all 1:30 to 2:20—T through Z
2:30 to 3:20-S I
gran 3:30 to 4:20—P through R
grees Wednesday morning Wednesday afternoon
exer- 8:00 to 8:50-M through O 1:30 to 2:20—C through D
J 9:00 to 9:50—K through L 2:30 to 3:20-A through B
10:00 to 10:50-—H through J 3:30 to 4:30—Miscellaneous
ment HZO0 to 1l:50—E through G A through Z
September 30 Thursday—Class work begins.

 V l
  Winter Quarter
3 January, 1944
‘ i January 4 Tuesday—Classification tests, physical examina-
_ tions, and advisory conferences for new stu-
·. . · dents. All freshmen and all other new students, i
; V · 5 except those enrolling in the graduate school,
I must have the tests and examinations com-
7   pleted before they will be permitted to register,
,_ * All new students should report to the Regis-
. g trar’s Office for these tests and examinations.
1 January 5 Wednesday——Registration and classification of all
‘ Q students according to the following alphabetical
‘ ` schedule:
t ,   Wednesday forenoon Wednesday afternoon
  8:00 to 8:50-A through B 1:30 to 2:20-—O through S
»   9:00 to 9:50-—C through F 2:30 to 3:20-T through Z
  10:00 to 10:50—G through K 3:30 to 4:30—Miscellaneous
  11:00 to 11:50—L through N A through Z
l January 6 Wednesday—Instruction resumed.
  Spring Quarter
‘ March, 1944
. March 20 lVlonday—Classiiication tests, physical examina-
  tions, and advisory conferences for new stu-
; dents. All freshmen and all other new students,
1 except those enrolling in the graduate school,
` . must have the tests and examinations com-
i pleted before they will be permitted to register.
~ All new students should report to the Regis-
trar’s Oifice for these tests and examinations.
l March 21 Tuesday—Registration and classification of all stu-
, dents according to the following alphabetical
; schedule:
  Tuesday forenoon Tuesday afternoon _
  8:00 to 8:50-L through N 1:30 to 2:20-C through F
‘   9:00 to 9:50-O through S 2:30 to 3:20-—G through K
g 10:00 to 10:50-T through Z 3:30 to 4:30—Miscellaneous
5 11:00 to l1:50——A through B A through Z
* March 22 Wednesday—lnstruction resumed. _

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PART I
GENERAL INFORMATION OF SPECIAL INTEREST
_ TO THE PROSPECTIVE STUDENT
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THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY AND THE WAR Wh
. ; cor
The University of Kentucky, like all colleges in the country, is thi:
  doing its utmost to aid the nation to win the war. To military service Hm
{ and related work have gone several thousand of its former students Sm
ig and more than a hundred members of the instructional and research
i ` staff. Curricular adjustments have been made with a view to lending
‘ the most immediate and direct aid to the war effort and many special ASE
J research projects have been established. At the time the copy was SOI
  prepared for this bulletin, the University was operating an engineer- K9]
  ing specialists’ school for approximately 900 soldiers, and several HFC
’ hundred more enlisted men to be trained in other types of work tm
were expected daily. By fall it appears probable that the University lggj
will be training perhaps as many as 2000 soldiers. xg
` It should be emphasized, however, that these special programs Com
“ will operate without detriment to the regular schedule of classes.
A complete program of studies will be operated for girls and for men For
not in service, utilizing the regular instructional staff. Rooming and legf
boarding facilities will be as adequate and as carefully supervised as ECO
usual. It is the purpose of the University to maintain its program of CO]
liberal education and its professional schools at the same high level Sch
on which they have been operated in the past, while at the same time mst
_ meeting in every way possible the immediate demands of the nation
Q for trained military personnel. WK
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the

 THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY `Q
The University of Kentucky is located at Lexington, an urban °
community of about 65,000 population. It is a state-supported
institution operated under the direction of a board of trustees of
fifteen members. The membership of this board includes the
Governor, the Superintendent of Public Instruction, and the Com-
missioner of Agriculture, ex officio, and twelve members appointed
by the Governor, three of whom are alumni of the University and
three, members of the State Board of Agriculture. The University
is one of a number of institutions known as land-grant colleges A -
which were established by the Morrill Act of 1862 and which have
continued to receive federal assistance under the provisions of
U, is this and subsequent laws relating to the teaching of agriculture _
vice and the mechanic arts and the provision of agricultural experiment
ents stations and extension services in agriculture and home economics. .
  The University of Kentucky is on the approved list of the
.9 Association of American Universities, and is a member of the
acm , southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and the
gig? Kentucky Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. It is
rem, accredited in its respective colleges or departments by the Associa-
Umk tion of American Law.Schools, the American Association pf Col-
rsity legiate Schools of Business, the American Association of Schools
and Departments of Journalism, the American Library Association,
the National Association of Schools of Music, and the Engineers’
rims Council for Professional Development.
$$6** The major function of the University is that of instruction.
men For the performance of this function it is organized into the Col-
md lege of Arts and Sciences, the College of Agriculture and Home ·
das Economics, the College of Engineering, the College of Law, the
H of College of Education, the College of Commerce, the Graduate
gud School, and` a Department of University Extension. Residence ' -
mm instruction is given through four quarters of approximately twelve
mm weeks each, the summer quarter being divided into two terms.
In addition to giving instruction to its student body, the Uni- V
versity contributes to the welfare of the state through research,
experimentation, and public service. While all departments make
important contributions along these lines, certain divisions and l
bureaus have been established specifically for these purposes.
Included in this group are the Experiment Station and the Exten-
sion Division of the College of Agriculture and Home Economics,
the Bureau of Business Research, the Bureau of Government
Research, the Bureau of School Service, the Bureau of Source
Materials in Higher Education, the Personnel Bureau, the Teachers
Placement Bureau, the Department of University Extension, and
the Department of Public Relations.

 `   14 UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
_ ‘ The University of Kentucky began as a part of Kentucky Uni- p]
  versity under a cooperative plan authorized by the legislature in ht
? 1865. The purpose of this plan was to unite sectarian and public SL
. I , education under one organization. This.experiment was tried for p,
. · ~ ' 2 a number of years. In the meantime, the federal funds authorized th
1   under the Morrill Act were used to develop agriculture and
1   mechanic arts in Kentucky University. In 1878, when the people
__   of Kentucky decided to establish 'a state institution of higher gl
I ·   learning, the College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts was
` i separated from Kentucky University and reestablished on land ot
§ given by the City of Lexington and the County of Fayette. Thirty
1 years later the legislature changed the name of the institution to St
_ 1 the State University of Kentucky, and gave it additional financial St
‘ support. In 1916 the name was again changed, this time to the W
; present title, and additional maintenance was arranged by legisla-
. tive act.
.· sc
_ ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY as
L Students are admitted to the University of Kentucky as fresh— ur
. men; with advanced standing from other institutions; as special
T students; and as auditors. Admission to certain colleges is also th
i governed by special regulations. 19
I Aprflications for admission to the University should be made to
the Registrar on forms furnished by the Registrar’s Office. Certified K·
copies of high school credentials and of work done in other institu— fc
tions should be submitted to the Registrar’s Office in advance of the Wt
~ registration period. Failure to file credentials in time for checking
before the registration period will delay the student in arranging his
program. All admissions, including those to the professional schools
and the Graduate School, must be passed on by the Registrars
Office. Students who come to the University without having had ad
their admission approved, do so at their own risk. The Unive1·sity th
reserves the right to refuse consideration of applications not made at
before the beginning of the regist1·ation period. Q);
sta
V `   Admission to the Freshman Class mj
j Resident Students. Residents of Kentucky who are graduates th
* of accredited high schools will be admitted to the University on cer-
tificate, provided they have fifteen units of high school work chai`- C9
acterized as follows; S0-
At least ten of the units presented must be chosen from tht?
English studies, the social studies, mathematics, the foreign lan- h€
guages, and the natural sciences, the last to include not more than 80
one unit of general science. Within these ten units, the student
must present three units in English, exclusive of journalism, public me
speaking, and dramatics. It is strongly recommended that the 3P' ap

 GENERAL INFORMATION 15 l
Uni- plicant present one unit each of algebra and plane geometry, since _
ie in he may wish to take many courses in the University for which these _»
iblic sub'ects are prerequisite. Should the student lack these courses as
J
l for prerequisites for any of his college work, he will be required to take
rized them in college without credit, thus delaying his graduation.
xaid One unit is the minimum credit accepted in any foreign lan-
ggei guage, and one-half unit the minimum in any other subject.
was Double periods are required in shop, drawing, typewriting, and
land other courses requiring no outside preparation.
YUYYY Admission to the University does not necessarily qualify a ` _
'¤_t0 Student for admission to a particular college. In every case, the
110131 Student must meet the admission requirements of the college in
’ the i which he is to enroll.
r' I . _ ‘
’]S 8 Resident students who have graduated from unaccredited high
schools and those not graduated from high school may be admitted
as freshmen, if, in addition to presenting the iiiteen acceptable n
[E h units, they successfully pass the University placement examinations. —
Qcial Students may be admitted either under the above plan or under
also the regulations previously in force through the first quarter of
1944-45.
ie to _ Non-Resident Students. Students who are not residents of
tiiied Kentucky may be admitted when they meet the above requirements
mtu. for resident students and when in addition they rank in the upper _
f the two-thirds of their high school graduating classes.
zking
g his Admission to Advanced Standing
h I . .
t1_(;_,; Resident Students. A resident of Kentucky who applies for -
_ had admission with advanced standing is expected to present evidence
Tsity that he is in good standing in every respect in the institution last
émde attended and in general is required to have maintained a standing .
of l.0 in all previous college work. Where all circumstances seem
to warrant, the student may be admitted on probation when his
standing is below 1.0. In no case, however, shall a student be ad-
mitted whose record is such that he would have been dropped at ·
uatgs the University of Kentucky.
lcer- The University does not disregard at any time or under any I
char- conditions college or university records in order to admit applicants
solely on the basis of their high school records.
1 the A transfer student is allowed only as many advanced credits as
lan- he can present quality points. Otherwise, work done at a fully
than accredited college or university is recognized credit for credit.
ident In order to be classified as fully accredited, a college must be a
»ubliC member of a regional accrediting association or it must be on the
e ap- approved list of the state university of the state in which it is

 r i .
  16 UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
’   located. Advanced standing from an unaccredited college may be
  obtained at the University only by special subject examinations. t
. o
V _ Non-Resident Students. A non—resident who applies for ad- C3
. `· · ‘ Q mission with advanced standing must in all cases have maintained S(
‘ ` ~ j a standing of 1.0 in all previous college work. In other respects, the St,
·   requirements and conditions of transfer are the same as for resident ad
W   students. th
`   Written applications for admission with advanced standing
. Q should be submitted to the Registrar’s Office on forms furnished by LE
. ? that office. tic
Admission as a. Special Student th
‘ _ · th
A graduate of another university or college may enter the Uni- UC
; versity as a special student. Other persons may be admitted as ta.
` » special students provided they are fully prepared to do the work pl.
Y desired and provided they are at least twenty-one years of age. in
· ` Before a special student can become a candidate for a degree re.
  he must have his status changed to that of a regular student. This
. may be done in one of two ways: CC
  1. Satisfying the requirements for admission to the freshman th.
_ class. fe1
“ 2. Completing in residence one hundred quarter hours of credit an
with a standing of at least 1.5 in all work attempted. Og
a
W Admission as an Auditor
l By payment of the required fees any person may be admitted CO
to a class or classes as an auditor. A student regularly enrolled in th]
any college must apply to the Dean of the College in which he is ap
registered in order to be an auditor. Other persons should apply UT
to the Registrar’s Office for admission. No credit can be given for
a class audited, nor is the student permitted an examination for UO
credit. No instructor is authorized to admit an auditor to any of UD
. his classes except on presentation of an auditor’s card from the EF1
Registrar’s Ofnce. be
. , I ob
  Admission to Colleges and Schools hg
A College of Arts and Sciences. Admission to this college is  
governed by the general admission requirements of the University Hg
outlined on the preceding pages. fu]
College of Agriculture and Home Economics. Admission to fm
this college is governed by the general admission requirements of ai
the University outlined on the preceding pages.
College of Engineering. Admission to the freshman class Of
the College of Engineering is limited to students rated in the upper
_ three-fourths on the University placement tests. am

 GENERAL INFORMATION 17 _
be In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission 4:
ms' to the University, ‘the high school credits presented by the appli- I
ad" cant shall include one unit in Plane Geometry, one-half unit in
ned Solid Geometry, and one and one-half units in Algebra. If the
the student lacks only the half unit in Solid Geometry, he may be
.ent admitted, but this subject will be added to the requirements of
the freshman year.
ing College of Law. An applicant for admission to the College of
by Law must offer ninety quarter hours (exclusive of physical educa-
tion and military science) completed in residence in colleges other ‘ _
than Law, nine of which must in English. A standing of 1.0 is
the minimum qualitative requirement, but in other than excep-
ml- tional cases an applicant will not be accepted unless he has main-
35 tained a standing of 1.3 on all previous work. While there is no `
0Yk prescribed pre—law curriculum, the applicant’s record is evaluated V
ig€· in terms of its relationship to the study of law, and in terms of the -
gree requirements of the Association of American Law Schools.
This College of Education. Admission to the freshman class of the
College of Education is limited to students rated in the upper
mm three-fourths on the University placement tests. In order to trans-
fer to the College of Education from another institution or from
Edit another college of the University, a student must have a standing
of l.0 or higher. The freshman applicant must meet the general
admission requirements of the University. _
College of Commerce. Admission to the freshman class of the
md College of Commerce is limited to students rated in the upper
im three-fourths on the University placement test.- The freshman
E is applicant must meet the general admission requirements of the _
my University.
for The Graduate School. A graduate of a fully accredited institu-
fm- tion of higher learning may be admitted to the Graduate