xt769p2w5210 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt769p2w5210/data/mets.xml   Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station. 1969 journals 182 English Lexington : Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Kentucky This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station Progress report (Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station) n.182 text Progress report (Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station) n.182 1969 2014 true xt769p2w5210 section xt769p2w5210 Dependobility of
Monthly Precipitation
in Kentucky
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Progress Report 182
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY :: AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
Lexington

 CONTENTS
Page
Precipitation Having a Set Chance of Occurring ................ 3
Some Applications of Monthly Precipitation Probabilities ........... 4
Limitations of Computed Date — Tables and Derived Figures ......... 4 4
Computation of Probabilities . ......................... 5
References ................................... 5
Monthly Precipitation Totals Less Than Amounts Shown; 10 Years
in 100; 50 Years in 100; 90 Years in 100 (Figs. 1-36) ............ 6-17
Stations From Which Precipitation Records Were Used l
(Locator Chart) (Fig. 37) ........................... 18
Stations From Which Precipitation Records Were Used (Listing) ....... 19
APPENDIX
Probabilities That Monthly Precipitation (Inches) Will be Less Than
Amounts Listed (Tables (35), in alphabetical order by place name) ..... 20-32
2

 DEPENDABILITY OF MONTHLY PRECIPITATION IN KENTUCKY
By Doyle (NMI) Cookl, Clyde B. Leez, Allen B. Elam, Jr.3
A knowledge of the distribution of precipitation over Kentucky is of the highest
importance to agriculture, hydrology, architecture, and other interests. It is difficult
to find an activity that is not affected—directly or indirectly—by the amounts of pre-
cipitation that occur. Since the amount that falls on any one location during any
particular month can vary greatly from year to year, a knowledge of the probability
or dependability of occurrence should be useful. It would seem that anyone in need of
data for applications to specific problems would need to know the variability of pre-
cipitation much as the structural engineer needs toknow the strength of his materials.
This publication is intended as a reference for farmers, engineers, hydrologists
and others interested in the probability of precipitation in any month in Kentucky.
Owing to the variability of applications, application to any one use is treated only
briefly on the premise that each user will be able to make his own application after
the data are made available.
Data are discussed in the text without mathematical or statistical references `
(except briefly in the last paragraph) on the assumption that most users are not likely
to be interested in mathematical derivations. For those interested, the references
provided contain sufficient material for documentation of the mathematical back-
ground and the soundness of the data presented.
Precipitation Having a Set Chance of Occurring
If one could only depend upon average monthly rainfall, it would be a simple
matter to make plans or schedule operations. However, in practice he has to take into
account the extreme variability of precipitation, and a statistical study of many years
of precipitation data allows one to estimate the amount of precipitation having a set
chance of occurrence during a particular month. Figures 1-36 show the statewide
pattern of precipitation dependability for each month. Owing chiefly to space limi-
tations, figures included are for the recurrence intervals corresponding to the 10%,
50%, and 90% probability levels only. See Fig. 37 (locator map) and listing for
specific locations for which these and other (5%, 20%, 80%, 95%) probability levels
have been computed. See Appendix for tables for 35 locations (in alphabetical order)
of Probabilities (%) That Monthly Precipitation (Inches) Will be Less Than the Amounts .
Listed.
The figures show in a general way the precipitation patterns and probabilities
of occurrence. Upon inspection of the figures one will observe several seasonal
1/ Advisory Agricultural Meteorologist, ESSA Weather Bureau Office for Agriculture,
_ Agronomy Dept., University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky.
g/ Meteorologist, ESSA Weather Bureau Office, Louisville, Ky.
3/ State Climatologist, ESSA Weather Bureau Office for State Climatology, Agronomy
Department, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky.
(The authors are employees of the U, S, Department of Commerce, Environmental
Science Services Administration Weather Bureau.)
3

 4
patterns. There is over much of the state aprominent late winter and early spring
maximum, greatest in the south, and a mid-fall minimum. A mid-summer peak in
the east-central portion occurs in the area where rougher and higher terrain begins. .
As examples of precipitation probabilities for specific areas, in Fig. 3 it will be noted
that in January in the southern portions of Christian and Todd counties, precipitation
will be greater than 11 inches (>11) 10 out of 100 years; that in Boone, Campbell,
and Kenton counties January precipitation will be less than 7 inches (<7) 90 out of
100 years.
The tables list probabilities for specific locations thatprecipitation will be less
than the tabulated values. For probabilities greater than these values, subtract the
tabulated percentage values from 100%. Linear interpolation between tabulated values
will supply acceptable estimates of other probability levels.
Some Applications of Monthly Preciprgtion Probabilities
A number of applications come to mind; determining the need for and indication
of type and capacity of supplementary irrigation equipment; estimating the yield of
water from a particular watershed for use in power generation, for design of reser-
voirs for irrigation or for use as municipal or industrial water supply; designing
private and public drainage systems and water retaining structures. Other uses will
occur to those engineers and others having particular problems. The foregoing are a
few of the possible applications. To use the probabilities it is first necessary to
establish the precipitation criteria of importance to the problem at hand, then to
determine the likelihood of occurrence from the appropriate table(s) or figure(S).
This study provides a means of approximating data needed for various planning and
design purposes.
Limitations of Computed Data —- Tables and Deriypd Figures
Past precipitation data for specific locations treated statistically as noted in
the last paragraph provide estimates (tables in Appendix) of precipitation proba-
bilities. Probability estimates for 35 Kentucky locations are presented in the tables.
ln using the tabular data it should be remembered that computed probabilities based
on a long period of record are better estimates than those based on fewer data, i.e.,
30 years of precipitation data would be preferred over 20 years of data. See the
bottom line of each table in the Appendix, labeled YEARS RECORD.
The figures (1-36) in addition to showing precipitation patterns also are useful
in making interpolations ("by eye" estimates) for locations not included in the
Appendix. However it should be noted that these may be approximations or rough esti-
mates because; data available and/or used for the period 1932-61 provided a network
density of less than one rain gage to 1,000 square miles of area; use of data from a
network of this density will tend to smooth the isopleths (lines connecting points of
equal value in the figures); precipitation can vary considerably over a relatively short
distance, especially in hilly or mountainous country.
The analysis in each figure consists of isopleths of a set chance of occurrence,
and is based primarily on data in the tables from locations having 30 years of record.
isopleths are drawn for 1/2-inch intervals for the "10 yearsin 100" and "50 years in
100" figures (top and middle figures on each page); drawn for 1—inch intervals for the
"90 years in 100" figures (bottom figure on each page).

 5
Compu_tat_ion of Probabilities
The 30—year arithmetic average, sometimes called the "normal," is a useful
statistic but more often than not does not indicate the most likely amount of precipi-
tation to be expected. This is because an average computed from monthly precipitation
totals often is weighted too heavily by a few excessively rainy months. A statistical
procedure discussed by Barger et al. (1-3) has been used for computing the proba-
bilities of precipitation. In brief, the procedure consists of fitting a mathematical
function (commonly known as the "incomplete gamma" function) to the tabulated
frequencies of the observed precipitation data, and then computing the probabilities
from this function.
REFERENCES
1. Barger, Gerald L, and Thom, H. C. S. Evaluation of drought hazard. Agron.
Jour. 41:519-526. 1949.
2. Friedman, Don G. and Janes, Byron E, Estimation of rainfall probabilities.
Storrs, (Conn.) Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. 332, 1957.
3. Shaw, Robert H., Barger, Gerald L., and Dale, Robert F, Precipitation
probabilities in the north central states. North Central Regional Publication 115 (Agr.
Exp. Sta., Univ. of Mo. Bul. 753), June 1960.
MONTHLY PRECIPITATION TOTALS LESS THAN AMOUNTS SHOWN; I
10 Years in 100; 50 years in 100; 90 Years in 100
(pages 6-17)

 6
Fig. 1 .-lanuagg. — Monthly precipitation totals less  €   1 -5
than amounts shown Q years in 100 (equalled or    "€ _ _
exceeded QQ years in 100). Inches. (0.5—inch xx gg ....¤i . /_ _ .
interval analysis) 6*>,;_OL " QS émk L'EE.·J Gmh_
BLDHAM     BOVDK
1-O   Q     J.
·<‘ ·° . Yi ’ @4%  ¢&@  
 . ` ’ _ ' Wécd wanna '      ».¤s¤v»l ·
I/`~ H ` USUN mss `RU4,_\u¤\°°"   049q: B   X`,
  - ./
"° ~   $$'   WW   ·"
· ·\. 8      ~¤‘¤*E ir
G"“"“’ mu · _ W ¤..¤.¤.,,.  ¤¤¤¤:~  °“‘"    2 O ·
    ""°°   wm  MN ¤w:.z*·· / M. v ' .//t '
QI:-_}T GmEs wm.!-)·..\___ 1.5 , , .,,.. .__M¤~;=<_5___ _.  w ;Au_ . .b./
Fig. 2.- lanuagg.-— Monthly precipitation totals less {ig?   3-5
than amounts shown _§Q years in 100 (equalled or    °:? _ .
exceeded_§)_years in 100). Inches. (0.5·-inch 3.5    XB 5*)  tim . /.,_ _ ·
interval analysis) 6%};.;..    MASON   wmhf
 
3.5 3   _/.. ....   _
· I { % 1.¤w¤zuc:\_
{3.5 , .\' . *4 ‘   w}' .
· daashu iw *4%%*. WADE       www ,
./`I Dnylggg `;i0'~‘°‘m¤n[ ·     €`,,&°v   X-,
3·5     Q  _   P';./`
_ ·\-       (JA  Lm..;?·,·
 .1.yWV _  ......   L   ,,1  _ M
Q    __.   .   Mi;  as-  ”‘”’"p ~x¤~   1 ,,. .,   ‘L‘‘   · · '
4.0   GRAVES ceLg.!_) ..1.. -1- N ..5,, . · J 4.5
4.5
7.0 _,~. _ 7.0
Fig. 3.- [anua;y.— Monthly precipitation totals less 20%  7°O
tha t 1 g ‘ 00 ll (1 5* . _ _
cxSZ$.$T£Z“1’§sf.`§.Z"€. 10¥>`T“LLZ1}..,(°§§‘Y`$-§..§' mm »»      M»—·\__,— \_ 7-0
interval analysis) At, `•"  N D "`”'$ ¤¤¤¤~¤*’
8,  1 L....  
9_() .,.,Q,.  . . l y ¤<»··¤¤~   * J,
9.0 x,  L"   7‘°
~ Nm mwzss •·l‘¤  I A `·  4%*% B `  
9,0 .-»   ns. '      /
‘ = ‘°*'   "Q *¤~E*  ‘
° \ lg   Q ’ lg LE { 7‘°
GM  ,  ,1g4¤ W ......  A§ _ ¢ ,  , 8 O
, ··—=   M. l L°°‘“   _ \ _/`J ’
swssu sup. ¤~¤ wm. l .?
KL/ auf! ukwuv.-3* ___, . ~ . -"· .t “O“['E__, 1  W ·· KAL. -  · 9,0
`_` >ll .0 l l .0
l0 .0 I `I .0 1O°O

 7
ll OO
-{" .\
Fig. 4.-February.- Monthly precipitation totals less >°°~e   
than amounts shown 1Q years in 100 (equalled or ·    "§. ·
ex e ded_@_ ` 100). In he . (0.5-' ch _ Q,  0 ·—·¤*¤·· · ,-·_ . ·
. ...;.5.. .....Z§Z§S “` ° S “` <1   @ ~¤$»~   GREE  
0 1 |O BLDHAM     BOVDK
1 U P.   BOURBDN   lo
L] .0 ask J soil g   \_AwR[NCE\,
1.0 ·       ,.Etl, .    ..    _ 1.5
. .\. x    W   titcmt Y.
GKLAIU y:¤|¤CK[  CNRISTIM4  BARREN  ADAIR    NARLAN •
../
luuc lilaz mms r¤¤¤ smvsuu nttzu J Cl&?"l°R- ‘”*"lLE' {ll
_ · ,,... . . .,,.. ._  5g_L_ .:2*9**  w .. w_;·;__ _ we/’
‘l\/Dfw.- =·*~ss ¤·.¤m·:.J_`_ l 5
    0.0
Fig. 5.—Februa_ry.·- Monthly precipitation totals less    **0
than amounts shown_@ years in 100 (equalled or .¥  C·¥`___ _ _ , 3 ¤O
exceeded 50 years in 100). Inches. (0.5-inch Glxxlm vv  S  ~·¤s¤~ /"\.J _
interval analysis) 3_() ` `ir @ Lam °" """ _
BLDH ·       §0Y()\ 4 3 IO
3,0   ·     { .
           ¤wnzncc\, 3 O
40.0   V   ~E·»E   @¢._  . `
» QL ' / D#`·V|€$5 gRV·cUNwDG€  c4}9’°4$’   N" . 3.5
3-0 \  gi nlw .·•·~ ‘ _/
- ¤••#··A *` ‘·   [
. ·  QM ‘ l$'9  @  — ‘
(• '\      MUHLENBEN      LElCHC¢(
l ?AI.LlR¤  l  CHRISTIAN LOGAN  BARRE     HARL:\L~
{ 3-5 `  Q ""°° y F ’ wm  0 . . ` I
. .·x;mm   · - MMS; *00*2;..    w ·- em. . we/‘ l 4-0
\\/.c¤.em·._ ¤·¤~$¤ ¤,t£.,_)
4.0
A . 6.0 '
· ~ V . 6.0
Fig. 6.-Februar .- Monthly precipitation 6 O $6 *%
totals less than amoimix shown gl years • *"   ,..¤i¤. · /_· _ .
in 100 (equalled or exceeded@years 6%>¢•?¤0¤ ,§`l ,,.,5,,,,   K 6,0
in 100). inches. (1.0-inch `   "n__   ° "‘‘" “° .
interval analysis) ?>¤>·<·»· I '   ¤0*¤l
»— g .. .... @ - . 6.0
6 O <6 O 6-0 3k IY °''E ma     ,
y_0   ·%      7
` · `\. -0  Y q   fwar ·` ` *"°"‘” '
( .- W · . 7.0
ytunu nm Q   4 BANK,. ·’¤“"‘  ` `· HAMAN .
  M Hb ...... .  ,4 ./"8 O
8•0 ill wwss ¤4·.g·:.)·_`_-I-—· . l "" ‘—  9*9;. £`?"  rv .. ·;¤A;_ . Wh/` ·

 8
1 .5
·  `§.
Fig. 7.—March.- Monthly precipitation totals > Y?. ‘
_ {1.5 .
less than amounts shown_g)_ years 1n 100 ·I 5 * _§»‘ _ _ 2_O
$%%`§a”i? if ""°`i2>‘*‘§?" 22ym in `   ‘“‘°`‘" .;;"·¤-~»‘ 1.
. c es. ( . —inc · 81 °   L"'5 1 _
interval analysis) BLDNAM '  maven Bowl
,. r@ M RBUN   Q <
Ng •.»:rrv:¤S¤N      Awn£N€E\,
f.   -0     % @%$°°"°‘  ‘·  
   @VA»¢·.a % $‘$ »; 1/
. 1,  xw  a~—£~ ¢" ‘$   `iii"i    
BALLARD . ' ADAIR J i 5
(   4 ¤·=¤¤:~ @ & _   wx  -
· nusu:  G LOGAN  WEE  • ' O/J
2_O :\-I: mcxum r V ·_`1·—-. ’¤¤·0 . s¤:¢;i1;u· ALLFLI M¤N5L· I iwfw  yy A EEE- . BEL];-/_ ,
gl/_K‘LL&".._ °""  cg1.}g~_¤g_] A
2.5
-{" ‘. A
Fig. 8.—M_arch.- Monthly precipitation totals     4.0
less than amounts shown Q years in 100 4.0 ' (s  _
(equalled or exceeded §_Q_ years in , \x. {»~ ¤.m». .     4,0
100). Inches. (0.5-meh -  -      ”“°"   .m~..‘ 
interval analysis) IMM  .,.w.s¤~   Bm`< 4.0
4 • O "S |‘Q;ER$0N   BOURBON  
4.4.0  . .·\, · “·   @ — 4.0
• , l '4·:.q: • MEADE     MARTIN
/~. ¤··¤¤~ mss *__£C ‘‘_, ...,a H         sy `
4‘O         ** 4.5
, "°‘" r* f   -
  Q w' /
. ' *7 A \ Lerenti? ’
6LL"° `  mm. M annum °°“'R
4,5 ·—~··¤¤~·¤UQ S " LOGAN 1 ¢  ARLTL.
. L ki   V '   Migv  A I?.] Y
A,.  I ‘··--- · min · · -:2N· mf;. ~¤~:= 5 • O 5 • O O I
. . . . 8.0   7-0
Frg. 9.-March.- Monthly precipitation totals > Q? _
less than amounts shown @ years in 100 _-  g' . _ _
(equallcd or exceeded _Q years in 6 xra v  5 ""°“  
100). Inches. (1.0-` 1 -“», Q ”‘“’" LMS 8..  
l1'lICI'V11l 3.IlZlly5lS) Inc I SUNW   »¤¤ws0,~    novel é 7' O
8 • O Pa ,   BOURBON {
s )i ‘‘‘‘' ‘°“ ; Q   ...... \_
Qk .\, _ 0     7.0
<8·°,—·   "“*·` ,.....     "“"' W ·~·.
8 .0       f      
9.0   W Q W \ @@*R ./·
 @&¢@ 0)M@ 1‘1811 1
 Q  ··‘·‘ \°     W S`""‘"   v "A} 
Q — Eh '”'°° ,...   Mm cna?   . .»· 3 O
_ *   · __,. . . .`,.. ._ ¤•¤~38°O
9_O 8.0 ’

 9
Fig. 10.-April.- Monthly precipitation totals less > ‘ E?
than amounts shown Q years in 100 (equalled _`  5* _ _
or exceeded QQ years in 100). Inches. G xxém »~*  _; ""°"‘" ' /*·\·_/· K
(O.5—inch interval analysis) 2.0  e % M¤$¤~ rms mm?. i
im . $    ¤¤¤~¤\
_r~·   ,,.. RBON   J.
ASM l     g \_AWRENC[\.
_,lQ~- _ _ ak:. M. § ·— Q  mh;
_ nzudsnsou \; * Wg ` ¢ .
/` umass sw-*‘“ “ ` \A_"
W  ,       /·
' ·   ,. '· LETCHER '
  Q   @ we ./-
( ~—   Q @® Q vis ¤
FALLMD Mccuml 7 gumsmm annum °°""R   { _
1  ,·,,_,s,_E  G Loom     Y _ /.
  ‘°°¤ S·~¤¤·s¤~ ALLEN clm*E>R_ wmuzy _/' 2°O
_ _ . ·-`..... .... V. .- ~¤~c·<;..    ·:· .. em, . ¤sLu‘
\\ ___ cnnvgs ;ELl_2A!—; L-
;~. .
Fig. 11 .-April.- Monthly precipitation totals less $0%  
than amcguigssshown Q years in 100 (equalled -  ‘?é_ < 3
. 0 ' 100 . ln h . k S' .m;;» · ·
s $5.‘i¤,’i€ZZh€..;g;.£‘T’§f.§§`y...)’ ° as     ,- s ig-J  x.
I 3 A 5  NMRISOY  GW£ENuP l .
' PJLDMAM ' * _ BOVD\
_»~· _S   ...... w .  w e
"'§L     §    .·.vmrnc:\_
. qt _ an · ..... W i @ 1 -
40 »·   ‘E“t°“ “’ “°“ is g §   ”`”` “~—
umrss .¤v.<»*‘“°`° cu) ’
4,0 Q"'°   Q I   4*+6   mi  
.·-·’ .
 CRIYYENUEN         I 305
'\· .   L[TCN[R(°
<4¤  ALLAN) •A¢CIAC  CNRISHAN  BARREN  DAIR ARLAN • ·
. wom ···’
Imcxmn  .0 GG *000 snwscn ALLEN cL¤E*E’R~ wmTLEV .{·/
. .·\..- "*-·— -··· -· --.~<>~r¤;..    ·¤ -· mu. . war
u/_E‘£E“.;, °“‘V  cutown l
4.0 .—..!
4.0
A. .
'GOO L
§ig.d112.—April.- I\};[onth;)6Precipita;ig>g1 totals 6°O  Q) 6°O 6 O
ess an amounts s own _ years in . ta at ,,c:[» · _ .
(equalled or exceeded LQ years in G xh  gg •  
100). Inches. (1.0—inch ' 4% _   L"'5 <»¤¤  uv. _
interval analysis) brnm.   WSQN   Bm`
P7 BOUNBON (
& ’;[VV£N5ON       Q LAV4  I {
. .¤.’   Q q r\= 
4%. , A,"§’-¤ UEIDE Q   _•"    Inqppi
7 O /5, NUJUEFSON K] QQ MOL; .     Q °\ ·\
' nwnrss mow
7.0   _   4B     7
.-’ I ,· ° ’ ·
  ''‘“ °‘" Jy v . f ». /
<7.O .\.       ....... ( . M
EAU.  ¢€ Q °”°”$"" ` ADW; r nnmm .
. _   G ..... @¢§B @ { 9 ,-
D ms $.....$.,. M ,. °i`i?·%" www _r‘
wl  '°'*\____t,. , . .",, 5 »4()•4:a{&· · EDN 4 Vp I   · BE`;/.
_. "tk “§$ cgt£A!_)
7.0 6.0 6.0
7.0

 10
Fig- 13.-May.- Monthly precipitation totals less   ”" 2·>,; 2 .0
than amounts shown LQ years in 100 (equalled · nh §·‘m;w i _ 2 .0
or exceeded QQ years in 100). Inches. Gxxém V és? M    
(0.5-meh imewai analysis) ·% 6 ` @ I M2   *==¤~~·* _
1 _5 z. L¤...     .¤.D \
r; KHSON Q .. RBGN   ’ 4
`I ,5   lm Q Q é  me~c¤\.
zld _   +°%* .
,/`. MLN E ON DAVPESS `RQCUNRNG  049*9 N"-,
www _ @1 .;*0 me `
?;mvvs~u;». i   ./
" g ' M  Q '/
( .\- ·  . ’   Q   E.cNE 3,. a
?“`U·D u nm    smu LOGAN  amnzn  DMR  v HARLFL,.
· RLISLE TRIGG {ODD SNP ALLEN CTQELR. WNULEV f•/
KL/ ....5s qtmq .' ·'_" ' ‘ · · ·— “°"52a.. EY"'  M —· wm. . BELL/'
1 · 5 I . 5
    3.5 s
Fig. 14.—May.— Monthly precipitation totals less ·  Q3.
than amounts shown §Q_ years in 100 (equalled 3.5 _ __.  ` »···¤?¤·· · _ . ‘ f
or exceeded @ years in 100). Inches.    Mm,. /-;EE·~JGRmh.
(0.5-inch interval analysis) `°   __mm W .
Braun.    l   sovol .
,Q;ERSoN   BOURBBN   J•
          g L4wn:racE\,
4 O0 • ¢. . +:4tX/2 · IAEALE   g     MARY"; .
I/`·  §”‘“°" M5. qq     H .,,0     `*·~,
www  `   944*0  4   PIKE 7
{ .\_ Q   _ ,   LEYCHE Y.
gibklno IACIII  C>8 . [Za  $ *’°""°°“ i Q · 7.0
/\. °:!El€*S;)N _ S '4tq`p°`“c,,..n¤¤¤      u ¤" .\
  " `   ‘ al E"
8 O Y ' I PIKE /
°"'Y»:~¤(., [ ' •
. _,, W Q eq } . O
>8°O · I     l • S  »¤¤~=¤ '
— x_ S  · / _ { _f .
(  IACIK '      BARREN   I    ARLAU
· IS`!   LOGIN  NBERV •/ V
8.0 Q I-; '¤¤ s»¤¤sc¤ Arru MOWCE L*"° UNION Lwunrtev BE ‘ .?
I X: I .;. . . .`,,. __i_ t_  Q4 .. EQ nv- _ _L
“""‘“"— °""" °"  ·—’ >8.0 7.0
8.0
8.0 7.0

 ll
ll .55. X
Fig. 16.·.lL*L· MonghlY Preciliiggtion tofsfilg less 20%  2 .0
8 B ` ,
ZlaE.Z`§.ZU$1°EiE§h$Z'3g%.’F€5$.m1...h.(..“*“a mK_I_ ;.   r ~*L~  ls  .—.\_..- g_
(O.5—inch interval analysis) .   • M5 8m~..»· \ 2 .0
· 21........ {Q    wp
sk   1w.EN  
p   _   1E,¤  \ ·( °  Q,   2.0
;·  ¤   ..11·1 » 7— @ M h.@b. ~·* -.
. .... NBER  . · LE *¤*¤ Y
  '* l`¥$§§®w’°s  
 ~  1F*  ‘¢ $%¢· —
       M wr ¤.RREN   &  
  ·  mln . SITE?  LLL. "'°"P‘L.  iw  *:4 ·· =  .  mil  LL/· 2-/E)
* -¤".¤M.—  "PS wma.} ] _O 2.0 .
*-0 1.0 LO L5 2`O 2.0
  ·}_ 4.0 4.0
Fig. 17.-_]_ug<;— Monthly precipitation totals 3_5   ~[ %`__
less than amounts shown Qyears in 100 _;_,  § unc. · /._  . · 3_5
(equalled or exceeded QQ years in 100). 6,__P¤·?¤¤~  §  mm LEE' smh-
Inches. (0.5-inch interval analysis) bmw   Bm`< 3. 5 .
3-0 ..8   "°°"     ’~ 8.5
 . 8. _ W ·   •@/@  
43 \ NGERSON · CQ}   . Q .
7~—    . g@~  4-<>
..5 .  - Q   < ~ ®@@ ,. . 1 ·
>3.5 . ‘   Q A    M m- /
‘ \-   » {   { -( 4 5
 ;t;;~ =¤—~¢—·»   .  ¤~¤"r~ v—.¢*·— JQ ~A;=»· ’ ‘
. . ."`°""" `   -5-  °.D . llfil-  ~¤~:·¤;..Lm   ·¤· .. »a¤mlmfv ¤. ' · 4•5
3*5 xl/L};-$l‘B‘.i WAVES CELL" .) ° 3 5
3.5 · 3.5 4.0 ‘
    7.0 6.0
Fig. l8.'__I£U_€;"' Monthly precipitation totals less    6:. i ·
than amounts sh0wnQj?_ years in 100 (equalled ' \‘;m Qs g •"‘°"" ' r~.\~_/· ' 4 6.0
or exceeded 1Q_years in 100). Inches. 6%  4*  **°5° l .;..5 wm ,
(1 .0—inch interval analysis) ZMm ~»»$¤_..  6 O
, 7 O sk.   .....  
<7.  4   0 **8     "
7.0       A L1       "**
i   ./7 O
8-0 4;...     ? ¢ [D  .. . 8 O
.   Q       Q (W" >m ·
G '  l . "T:°Z`.°"$"  ~·»~··¤¤  2*:*     Aw {ker lf
>8·Q/_   ms  _ .... - .... . . .
8 0  @07.0 8.0 8·0 7.0 7·° 8.0

 12
  3,
Fig. 19.-jylgg Monthly precipitation totals less _   E _ 1 °5
1 in ll C1 .  5   . .
  4i°€¥4‘?*““  
· BLMM ,5    BOVD\ 2.5
ak   $E~$¤~    ¢$»   AWRE ’.
.,l<\. _ · QQ · ,,..3:   %»  ..1.u.J I
    llatol   ·—tt·       @1,F% >4:4
J      2    _/
4 ~ V  Yii" “" QQ  ¢w”$ ·¤·’•§ 1t»t~  . 1 “
64 L·~» ..i c.1. "     ., 2.5 p
_ _.\_: ·‘ .... - · ·»-· -—.“°**5 < .¤ 3-9 Yin ’ 1 $»@  “‘ O
’ umass ¤·=¤*"‘“`°°` -5 _ ' ` . Q ‘ \_
  ·*»· {LMW     Y   P
3.0 I   (      _ ?·5.0
. .\. X  ....1.....  {   mc.; 
<3·<>4 _ __L_l_ -~ g   EARREN gan 1- @ RLAN 9
_........ A mc ¤¤¤··~ @ ‘   /·"
3.0 *· ¤··· ~ _     M. mm    W  L _ _/ 5.0 1
  ****5* wmv.} ._. ' ` V. ·—· -—- _.  L H H   O 4‘5
3.5
6. 3 X7 O
Fig. 21.—_]g_ly;— Monthly precipitation totals less W   ’
than amounts shown Qyears in 100 (equalled _`  g ( ‘ , _
or exceedcdgyears in 100). Inches. xm =·*‘ { mam .   K
(1.0-inch interval analysis) (6.6;%    ”°5°N LW5 ¤m~¤¤`
  ‘ "“`° `5°*" w  ml
7.0 6.0 p-  WVAM . 8.0
7-<> .4 fi =··4~ 4 M.  #@9  ....... 1.
. .\, V A 1 Q ·
4  * 11=t11       »—144  $ *5i%% ‘i‘i “ ~
  °"¢  "?
      ‘/
7.0 .  um .....5.... wm Bm;. W KARL):-{_
   @w ¤“ mw¤·· 441t~1r 4    
  0 M   ·¤¤» 1 ~ —»4¤~ · 4—4~ ‘===4* ‘b/ ·»·’
. .‘\.; ° _' '_ ''`‘ `··· ·— “°"5  mm me  
l·O ¤~.....,.  Q V   @   ./`
· •\· \  MUALENBER      , \-E"CH[Y(•
QLLAR  M:CIACK[ · _'  CHRISTIAN  ARREN  DAW   2-'·
<-I .0  I   TRIGG YODD LOGAN SIMPSO ALLEN   WHITLEV • {ll ll .5
  . . - - ._. M¤N§<_5__ .£'f’"  ru .. qcp_»g__ , ¤€LLJ`
   cvuvgs ¤;5._£.!_;
l .5
l .0
QE %`
Fig. 23.-August.- Monthly precipitation totals less    `E _
than amounts shown Q years in 100 (equalled _j_t    ....:[~ · /__ _ ·
or exceeded§Qyears in 100). Inches. @3;* ; O }5RANY  MASON LEE-J   3.0
(0.5-inch interval analysis) 3 O ·  wm '6m$OH @ cnzanup
. ...‘   #4 3.0 y
· . Ask.- 5  ,~,N¤L¤$°   ' “ RENCI  3 I O
. ·’l1.0 LO ` '
Fig. 26.—September.— Monthly precipitation mtg]; legs     2•5
than amonmts shown §Q_ years in 100 (equalled or ;_,  é · · /._   · A
exceeded@yea1s in 100). Inches. 6.{F’*;"°*     \"/  
(0.5-inch interval analysis) ·     m¤~0»·   p
2.55     ....   4
' ‘ I § L.1wnzncz\_
_ _ x. · 4@q.‘@  Q ..... Q
.4%- . I vu? umu: ¥ 9A'   ·  Mmm; .
js. »1md:¤zo11 mss + mc g  6_ ..m1;¤N & & .\`
~-# @ QD •* "   ·’
·  I  W' W A "
( \· Ag  @ 'Q   `‘`°"E Y"
TILLARU u IIC     0  ADAIR  {   ML.
  .....       .. ...0. . ....   ¤11=1···L_ NYON   ,_5_ f-
  ¤···~s= ww;.} -27 · h - lv ·—' `_` _`  W H W " ` `LU 2.5
2.5
If. X
Fig .' 27.-September. — Monthly PreciPitation totals less >°°~e  
than amotmts shown Q years in 100 (equalled or ‘ g ‘__.
exc5:cdcc;_@yez1ri in 1100). Inches.   Qu  -  
(1. -inc interva ana sis) °* (° "”  · W-
Y _ l  Nsnmscw  K K
5 · O aroma ` '     sovu
.;T,Q,w~    souuscn {_
If Q E `     c¤\.
1. .1, · *   Q E. @@ ~
'  ·gd[¤SON .\j ·1¤%`*• IIEADQ l `   ` I •  MARVIN I
./` OAVIESS MU·°“·‘O6[ cq ,9     V N.
..0 ..0 S a  A..m % @>—•   ;
l:irY’E**¢t~     q  · /.
 I. I  c¤¤1sm¤ ' snug;.  ‘D"'°  _ L _
_    I .... _ |  fl s/0
  ° O ` YODD $»n¤5g~  mngq   WNIYLEV f.
· ' "*—·— · · ·-· ·— "°“?  . ii'?  rr —- ·2¤=* . BELL `
6.0   ~··~$¤  ¤,1,g.,_) A—` J
6.0 6.0 5_O
6.0

 15
_/~. .X
Fig . 28 .-October.- Monthly precipitation totals less SOO"'  
than amounts shown Qyears in 100 (equalled or _`  5* _ _
exceeded Q years in 100). Inches.   XQROL .»~  5 ‘“‘°“" Mlm /*·\__J-  
(0.5-inch interval analysis) · **4, ° @ =¤**$ cnczuuv
Braun      ¤cv¤\
*{;;:•·2  * ‘···~.---- -··· ~»· ·- ··¤~@¤*;¤°=   LEE"/WWE-
in 100). Inches. (O.5—inch   ! _   / ·
interval analysis) 3 O l°~¤···~ `    ¤°'°l
3·° ` ‘ ‘§@$ ~~  @1 Q ’
<3 O   ’ J     §    AwRENCE\_< 2 ’5
{ • . _ ~Jg,_ °   W W <. ® $  
, N mann   Qt Gt   ` `   ·
3 _0 _;   ,....   Q   p \__,
    Mme @“~ M  
(· '\·   Q     L¤*°"Es‘( 2 • 5
P **L·*° . ....,       W ¤A~~E~  @ ¢ ....2,.
l c am U ° 5 mma '¤¤¤ srwson Atrgu Cltiinw "**"'YL€* {
3.5_ _ ‘··\.-·-- ···· ~·-· -—. "ONPL. EY"'  *:1 ~· mu. . BELL/'
\l./..0tm ¤¤·v$¤ seas  _} 3,0
< 2 .5 1
3 5
3..5 ·
900*E 73. 5gO
Fig. 33.—November.— Monthly precipitation totals   g °¤__,
less than amotmts shown QQ years in 100 _ tj,  {3; ····¤7·=•· · /—_\J- '
(cqualled or exceeded LQ years in 6sbFr""°`  5 “°$°" was- Gm,)  '
100). inches. (1.0—inch _   _A__   -
interval analysis) 6-0 °“°"‘** 6 I   “°'°l
_ BDURBON (
6·O sx ,3 " "‘°"   % M .t..~   5·O
as 0 . . ~· - <@@ Q @ .
6_() · _ gx. _ .\A   `( g Q  
· [~‘E1S¤" V `“   Q Q C ¢· ‘-
GAVESS NK  491% a s`-'
W  Q   ¤*~    »
7°O   — " · N W   W" '/
. . 5 .   ,_g1c» I  (  .  G umu  5    `   HA}.,/·
  in- YOUID - snpfixl A;_|_fL   · l·‘~° SPN  vv b`  [ qv §lH1TI_sV HELL/' .
  ¤··~s· _~m·;_) L
7.0 7_O 6.0
7.0

 17
vg`. .v
Fig. 34.—December.- Monthly precipitation totals ) 0** %
less than amounts shown Q years in 100 (equalled _ `  5* _£N I _
or exceeded QQ years in 100). Inches. .| 5 6 xxgm »»»  5 ‘”‘°‘ /"~\__/·  
(O.5—inch interval analysis) ° ·%€ Q "  mm LMS an NUP i
BL Q . mmmsow M    Bow`
RQ. ...~   ' Al   (I
I .5 NSR ’ JE  §   LAwRENCE\,
/`· .Q6&$;)N      ° [MEADE   ·\‘;| .5
i umass ¤¤¥°*`“mDG c"’$,,_1 l   l
.   / W R .
JSZM. Q   .1222.   ./
I . - gg J   LE\’CHE·r
G`““‘ =»··=·¤··~ ¤·=¤¤¤~  “°""‘ . L  .
l .5 _ ··L·$=¤ Q TRIGG L°°°" C,,,m_ ’ Y ` .0 /./i 2 O
A/_.\_i;m°” MES mUW—}·—·........ . - ·~.-- .- ~¤~5z.... LET"'  vv ·· as  , . BEL:/` ’
2.5
Fig. 35.-December.- Monthly precipitation Q '5    °??é_
t t lsl th ts ho Q ears in · ` f .,..¤i¤· · _ . ·
1<00i (eq(lii;1le;n0;u;1;cJ;1ed;d§v;)_nyea1?s in 2 _5 °=,  · · •/Ai S MASON     '
{ GREKNUP
100). Inches. (0.5-inch interval      
=~¤¤1YSiS> 3-0 " k°"·~ `-. A Q  ”°'° ·
‘ ` .   .. 2
3 . O ·`Sk |•QFERSON   ‘ AWRENC!\_
. . · ' · E f _
< gi   .     .i&%&—@“"“ @  -..3-0
nnwass . ¤¤¤°"” @9 -( ,
  ’ { ,..» ` W  a M `*’
3.0   W   •/./
» ~r» .¢·@@@s§•r °  it
QLLMD M ,4   CWIISYIAN   7   ( f i \ _ HARLAN • 3 5
3°5 ·     TRIGG wan LOGAN NP   main  `   mTLEv  lk. .-/ •
  WAVES cp.%¤!_j—`_-‘-_. · i .  0%.   U aux.  ·   4nO _
4.0 4.0
Fig. 36.-December.- Monthly precipitation totals   § Q;.
less than amounts shown Q years in 100 (equalled (   5   · ,._\`/.   5 O
d dg ‘ 100). I h s. {‘%Q°  ‘ 5 » @  w..` New- •
Z .2’i‘§§Eh€......i.‘T`§Z.1§.... “° E .   »»~~ s q  v_ ·
5cO ,J[ n   BOVNBON   l.
~.\, _ "§k_  ..m..a\. ’ 5.0
/·   .\; ·..<».·'_U_...»¤        N
      _ ~ ·       ` 5.0
 CMYYEMDCN ' * v   'A ,
.   A f A L[1;><[R °
{ \_ )    @ ·· — .   f
“L‘·*"° · U annum "°"'° `
.  nm Q cwvswn v E   ` ` “ ••n¤L:1:-I 5 .0
U '-'SLE A ·m.;,q, mm  wscm ALLEN  .,2,. O  {  I}! 6 O
wg] -mlqs qL£·!-}·-;____ . -`,..· ._