xt769p2w6g5g https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt769p2w6g5g/data/mets.xml Kentucky Kentucky Press Association Kentucky Press Service University of Kentucky. School of Journalism 1992 Call Number: PN4700.K37 Issues not published 1935 Aug - 1937 Oct, 1937 Jul - 1937 Aug, 1939 Oct - Dec, 1940 Jan - Mar, 1951 Aug - 1956 Sep. Includes Supplementary Material:  2005/2006, Kentucky High School Journalism Association contest 2004-2005, Advertising excellence in Kentucky newspapers 2003-2005, Excellence in Kentucky newspapers newsletters  English Lexington, KY.: School of Journalism, University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Press Press -- Kentucky -- Periodicals The Kentucky Press, January 1992 Vol.63 No.1 text The Kentucky Press, January 1992 Vol.63 No.1 1992 2019 true xt769p2w6g5g section xt769p2w6g5g V e e y PERlODlCALS I NEWSPAPER l trims .
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OffiCial Publication of the Kentucky Press Serv1ce — Vol. 63, No. 1 - January 1992 : ,
f ___—.—————_——-—'_———-—————————"""'_—
’ , ' O 0 o o .
. , - ~ , LIK starts, Frankfort 15 Winter convention Site .~
1 'Ii . 3H“ l l OfPame' ' ; Newsman—turned—newsmaker Bartscher of the Norfolk (Neb.) News At 3 p.m., Friday, members of the 7
. , , / . ' ' " Terry Andersonis, tentatively at press speak on the intriguing topic, ”The Associates Division will have a busi-
, ,1 , , ’ ' " .' ' . time, the keynote speaker for KPA'S MeekMayInheritthe EarthbutThe ’11 ness meeting and election of 1992 of— i
'V '1‘ For advertising Winter Convention and Trade Show, Never Survive in This Market”; a>hd ficers. At the same time, the News ‘
, I “ If: '1‘ y Ed Deitz, UK News . . . I . set for Jan. 23-25 at Capital Plaza circulation personnel can toss their Editorial Division is tentatively [,
‘, :1, The University of Kentucky Holiday Inn in Frankfort. concerns to Jim Syers, Kentucky dis— scheduled to hear from the new f
J A school ofJournalism is establishing Anderson, long-time Associated trictpostmaster,and other postaloffi— governor’s press secretary, Frank .
a Kentucky Advertising Hall of Pressnewsmanwhowasreleasedfrom cials. Ashley; Bartscher will talk to adver-
Fameand wants nominationsforits captivity in the Middle East in De- tising people about ”Overcoming ,4
first-em group of'inducteeé- . cemberr has been aSkEd to Speak at Obiecfions and Selling Special Sec- '
" The Hall of Fame" will" honor 9=05 a.m., fOHOWing the Offidal “’91- I959 lions": and the Circulation Division
persQVns WHO have made significant come to the convention, on Friday, will host a roundtable discussion on
contributions to the ”pretence and. Jan. 24. Liberal /conservative, page 2 building circulation.
statureof advertising? and nomi-l, Another headliner,Gov. Brereton Bossy Aussie retires, page 3 News-editorial persons will getin
nees —-— living or dead —¥—~ shou1d be 3 Jones, has been confirmed as the lun- Names, page 4 a couple of extra afternoon programs.
”native Kentuckians.ortindivi‘du‘als cheon Speaker on Friday- Who is KPA? page 6 At 3:30 p.m., Dr. Jim Highland of .
who ,have' spent a substantial A150 on tap for Friday morning Voices, The '29ers, page 13 Western Kentucky University will ,
amount of time practicing their are general sessions on readers and on Ideas, page M discuss the computerization of court '
, profession in Kentucky. ' environmental issues. At 10, Susan Open Records, page 18 records, followed at 4:30 pm. by a
The $11991 Offers segment?" ' Miner and Rani? coma“ Of scrip“ see C°”"e""°"' boc“ “‘99
giléfnsfiififboifi ibufhfifis'm'afia '35:" Howard Inc. will speak on ”What .
vertising. The "UK jougnafis‘fir, Readers Really WaVIrViIt‘: NewHLssspnls -w ,1
Alumni Association'eStabliShed a for Newspapers.” EY Wl e 0 ' -
Kentucky Journalism H311 ofFame' lowed by a panel discussion, led by ‘ The conventlon at a glance _
in 1980. , . Mary Schurz, KPA Newsprint Recy— (Capital Plaza Holiday lnn, unless otherwise noted)
Nominations . should be: re-' cling Task Force chairman, on Thursday, Jan, 23
ceived atthe school by mid-January. “Newspapers and the Environment.” —11 a.m., Central office ribbon cutting, 101 Consumer Lane
Inductees will behonored at a spa—1 Friday afternoon willbefilled with —noon, KPA/KPS board of directors luncheon; Convention registration begins '
cial recognition pro'grajnjn'vApri]. ‘V concurrent meetings of KPA divisions. ~1 p.m., KPA/KPS board of directors meeting
' j»,Fiiither informatibn can‘b'e'Oblf‘v At 1:30 p.m., news-editorial folks -—3 p.m., LRC Media Day, Capitol building
_ ‘tainedf‘iby ,writing’rgthe‘school of, will participate in a discussion about —6 p.m., Legislative reception
Journalism, Q3UK,_;IQ¢)§;1}gfon ,KY L51 revisions to the state’s Open Meetings Friday, Jan. 24
40506¥0042,-or5bycalling606/257— and Open Records laws; advertising —9 a.m., Welcome _
2786‘. - f . 153'} ~ .g representatives will hear Larry ~9205 a.m., Terry Anderson, AP bureau chiei/former hostage (tentative)
‘ ’ V " " ' ' “ ' —10 a.m., Whaireaders really want. . .,Susan Miller& Randy Cochran V“
—11 a.m., Newspapers & the environment, panel '
——11 a.m., KPA/USPS Postal Advisory Committee
’ —noon, Luncheon, Gov. Brereton Jones I
—1:30-3 pm. (concurrent sessions) ’1
News-Editorial: OM/OR panel
-Advertising: The meek may inherit the earth . . ., Larry Bartscher ‘
Circulation: Newspapers & the post office, Jim Syers .
- —3 pm. (concurrent)
- -Associates: Business meeting i
News-Editorial: Governor's press secretary Frank Ashley (tentative) ,;
Cut the ribbon -Advertising: Overcoming objections, Selling sections, Bartscher '
come early to the 1992 Winter convention. and Share in ribbon cutting —3%5c::fl‘l‘l‘ev§:jlgdrillolliglfjIggfipfilgr‘lzl'ing court records, Jim Highland ,'
ceremonies for KPA s new central office building in Frankfort. Though the _4_30 _ . . , . .
. . . . . p.m., News Editorial, Western Kentucky 5 photography proiecl .
building was occupied by the staff last fall, Thursday, Jan. 23, Will mark the —6 p m _ Awards reception .
official opening of the building. The ritual is at 11 a.m., followed by open __7,0'5 "m Awards ban uet }
house. The office building is at 101 Consumer Lane, about one-fourth mile ' p. " q '
from the Frankfort-Lawrenceburg exit on 1-64 From the interstate go south Saturday, Jan. 25 ‘
. . ‘ . . ’ —8:30 a.m., Early bird drawings; business session j
_ . on USIZ7,being careful to av01d the road construction equipment. Turn onto _9,30 a m Weekl ne . E U & CV&T :I
Burlin t n tth K ntu k M uf tured H usin buildin .On ourri ht ‘ ' " y WSW/09’ We“ K 3’
. g 0 a e e C y an {ac . 0. g . g y . g —10:30 am. KERA—18 months later Dr. Thomas Boysen & Bob Sexton
ill be a new office ark and KPA 15 n ht behind the Burlin ton office ark ' . ’ ;-
W p ’ g g p —-1 1 :45 a.m., Changing of the Guard luncheon ._‘
Sign. Come see us.
._ V ..,A.___L_.ek_.v.._i___~_~m... C "A,“ ___‘4_____~ _7’___.,.__A__~___,,___..~.__W-CM. - . ,,__,_¥. ,C_ ~~~-~-#~~- . _s...__.-,. ' 0‘ __,. fr" " 5

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l
" Page 2, The Kentucky Press, January 1992 i
bl o d o o . o o I V ' . :» ". »‘ ’j ‘[
Pu u: mgnosw. Multiple personalities ~T;h.e,=»Kentucky
Dependlng on viewpoint, media are liberalz conservative "Press . . ‘ S
ByRandyPatrlck . . i I .‘ “ ' 1 i 7 1991 Officers .
Richmond Register ‘ . . _ _ 3;»- 5."; . . 1.. ,V President ‘
Are the news media too liberal or s " -; . if; " ” 1.3? m Celia McDonald, 5'
. too conservative? _ . 3 use if 7} w : Harlan Daily Enterprise
”The answer is ’yes’ and 'yes,’” 3 if: ’7; z A President-Elect :
Herald-Leader- .. Dan ””9 Advocate Messenge’ '
Kelly and Sue Wylie, assistant \s‘ Past President ‘
news director forWLEX—TV, discussed . . it??? i j‘ifiz, if David Havvpe, The Courier—Journal ’
'uequesuouuuungaNov.21forum ~ .. .5 » 1 Xm'i'is'démi Ti, 0 - i
The forum was Sponshred by the “ ' “ m , g . ”‘ Dorothy Abernathy, Ole/ham Era ‘T
campus chapter of the Soc1ety of Pro- “ ‘ “no u\- 2:» Board of Directors 7
fessional Journalists. i -‘ .‘ 713”" District 1 _
Kelly said the press is much too . . l _ l: \ .. ‘ . 3 William Mitchell, Fulton Leader
liberal for some people and much too 0* , ‘_ ' DiSt'iCt 2 ‘
conservative for others, ”which is re- “A , "33 " i " Jed Dillingham i ;
ally the way it ought to be if newspa- r‘ S; I, . :6 . >~ Dawson Springs Progress ‘ .
, , _ sh‘d :3 eresa Revlett, McLean County News ,
their proper role in a democratic so- § .~ @335! -" '_ '1: “M . i District 4 ‘
ciety-" .. ‘ ti sf," s 5 {figs ,, 5 g. * g ;‘_ . MM: g Charlie Portmann, Franklin Favorite I
, The editor said he has had to give e i - “t; V_ . "f . ‘ 933:“ V ' ' E 'i Districts .
i the question much thought in recent “if; fl I i. i 3“ i .' ' . Coleman Love
weeks because of two things that have if .3 ' A; “W .- . ié ' Elizabethtown News Enterprise
One was a boycott led by a fun_ ' w‘wwe} . ., . -, - l . Dorothy Abernathy, Oldham Era
damentalist minister who felt that Yes 117111110 DIStHCt-I - -
conservatives were being treated un— Tim Kelly, editor of the Lexington Herald-Leader, and Sue Wylie, assistant ggtillc‘tlvgguck Gal/aim County News 5
falrly on the paper’ 5 editorial page. news director at WLEX—TV,dlscussedwhether the media are too liberal or too Ken Metz, Bath County News Outlook . i
The other was the deClSlon not to conservatlve dunng a recent forum in Richmond. District 10-11 ,
publish a series of Doonesbury comic time. . rrlfeverybodyis bein USA Tod a John Del Santo , ‘
:ltidijsgg’fsgildxirsgfaflg1:32:11}: Free air time is expensive, how- or if everybody’s beinggthe 5-secon}d 3's 316:2: 128”}, Independent ~ ' V
_ ' and used illegal drugs y g ever, and the rule often stifles public sound bite, we’re going to put our- Louise Hatmaker ' it. ..
In the first situation, he said, con- debate onlmportantlssues,Wylle said. selves out of busmess eventually,” she Jackson Times/Beattyville Enterprise 1
servatives wanted things kept out of -We 51mply don t carry local acl- remarked. - - - District 13 l
the paper, such as Joel Pett’s cartoons fortlSIIlg anymore, because we can t _ .Wylle sald It was becoming more Glenn Gray, Manchester Enterprise
thatusedacoathan erasas b If a ord,really,to givefreecommerclals dlfflcult for televlsmn to glve some District .14 . , -
. b , . g ym 0 or to the Side that can’t pay,” she said. stones the attention they deserve. Stuart SImPSOD. PU/aSkI Week ' :
lilbtelrgsifitefenu aggt‘liisatisdggllsnmher, On the question of how advertis— ”I think we’re getting more shal— District 15A _ '
not kept in p 1 g was ing and marketing affect news cover— low,” she said. ”We are in the grasp of gin green, Lexrngton Her aId-Leader
' age’ the ”Sponges 0f Wylie and Kelly news mnsultants'” Ghsiril‘gnigl: Citizen Voice & Times 2 -
:t'14111131‘11:=:‘IE====:"':‘ '5:E#11::i55:15:22?"$552311" 312211:izizifiziziziiE:=:=:E:1:§:15:21:35235$? '3W:"351355“?"2115331523 _ ’ a
somethmgtoheagomhsnbio- ally feature sponsors in its business control over editors. He said lie has ‘ féfgeLngvseri-fiifiggg? Standard ;
59d35935m3933mfiahmm stories instead of businesses thatdon’t worked for several chain-owned JerleneyRose Clay Cityuir'lifnres
maintainfiiestamqmandwhm advertise. But Kelly said the Herald- ' newspapers and has never had cor- Associates Division ‘ .
you’reiafidfigabeutevertummg Leader has so many advertisers its porate executives tell him what edi- Gary LUhl'i Kentucky RECC ‘ ‘
rearlwuwmfurtahle theyare Both said that it was unusual In 1989, a poll done by theHerazd- 0°“9 Tail“ .M‘- $‘?”.’"9A"V°°a’9 f 1
-:-tu524.144.:.33:-:<:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:~:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-34-3-3z44-7.:-:~:-:-:.:»:-:-:-:-:I:Z:I:I:2:Z:Z:3:i:5:15513::$1355:3:5:1t1:3:5:111:31535 advertising to try to kee news from readErs thought the news a er’S - I A
”In each case,” said Kelly, ”what being published or aired? opinions were usually modegatle, 25 éitlizfioaagfimifimgfifl !
gas Been interesting to me is that there .'______ percent thought they were liberal, and Jo-Ann Albers .1 -
as eenacountergroup telling us not . 19 ercent thou ht the were conser- Western KentUCk Universit ‘- i
to give in to the people complaining.” T (in everybody’s being U.SA vatgve. g y Y _ y l r
Wylie said the Federal Commu- ° 33" 0’ 1f everybOdYS bemg But Kelly said he thought that KP‘VKPS °°'“'"' °“'°° . . : 1
nications Commission demands t1“? 5-second sound blte, we’re more liberals than conservatives pur- ggriiiieTi-lylivoarrndpsgssifiggguhtigf:ctor
”equal time" on television for oppos- £01135 to put ourflelves out Of sue careers in journalism. G'Ofia DaViS- Advertising Direct: i
mg views. But sometimes the results usmess eventua y. ,, . _ Reba Lewis. Administrative Assistant T a
are ridiculous, she added. For example, -Dr. Libby Fr aaSr EKU thingic? 1;: :‘j’cfdgnliilivsii’i’ 1:221:31? :— giigycfmhnmfcrir’ 2:32;an Assjsmt .
_ when the Vegetarian Association of w body goes into journalism to maintain Pam Shingler. 'News Bugau Director & i a
America petitioned for equal time to Kelly defended growing empha- the status quo, and when you’re talk- Edit“ The Ken’UCky Press ‘ t
. counter grocery ads for red meat, the Sis on shorter stories in newspapers. ing about overturning the status qu0, gayeChapman, .News Bureau ASSiSta’“ . C
' meat ads were pUHEd. He said marketing research shows that you’re making people uncomfortable.” ngéfillgmsgxflgaaélfilnMfafihcwd“
During the debate'over Sunday the average readers will not read a '2‘?.‘::1~PE'::-:E;:EE:.52:11:32 .3. . , 3,; 5531.5:,_;:,..,.;:;;;;,,_ Mail/News Release Servicgi Naaynecy Paepyrgin ‘

, liquor sales a few years ago, those who story that is continued on another page. wevemoved “‘9 1“an PISS (1551‘1-0023-0324)is Published ‘ r
were against allowing restaurants in But Dr. Libby Fraas, an EKU Cross (“mp Asolduddres mflflfifiggfifnfiffimm- ,
Lexington to sell liquor by the drink journalism professor, said it could be chan once. sumprmmaissipayear Postmass- »

/ on Sunclays had virtually no money, detrimental to deny detailed infor- mmnmeOEOmerne :32 53:52:19 gadm “exa‘mkyhe‘s' . j
8° the station had to give them free mation to those who want it. (sardoniioucnmmonmnumwso (502) 223.982? e’ “" “my “6°” '
- 9—2

 l 3
3 January 1992, The Kentucky Press, Page 3 3
r . 5,
3 9"1'0111 dfOT‘TflET Student; Wit/6 [07% through the stories they tell and the fun 3 ’
1 . things they do is really important to me.”
' ; Ausenbaugh’s repertoire of stories has fir
' A 1e e n d retlre S been one of his most effective teaching
, tools and an outstanding personal char— 3
; ' acteristic. 3
; 0 ”He speaks in parables,” Hawpe says. 3
‘3 6,; C 0 e a u e S S are m e m orl e S ”All of his stories have a meaning. You {I
; have to listen to his stories or you miss 3
. two-thirds of the value of having the re— ,3
' Ww lationship with him.” 3
; Ausenbau h’s own ' ' 33
; :diflegieaeizgg)” Republican for; who he is, what he knows and what ”Now that may not be the best way to smallsouthegn Kentuclsctygrgvf: 5333;353:313: 3
-; I he’s done, Highland says. ; recruit facultymembers, butit worked out Springs, where he was born in a hotel 9, -
The classroom has few empty seats. Books, ’I‘ he one thing he dld- for this program real [well for the students, I can tell you owned by his grandparents. ”When I was :3
. , was he gave it respectability on a national that. youn there were 13 hot 1 ' D ‘2?
3 papers, and personal 3783033813335 are spread scale ” Highland says ”Hehad theinherent What lans has Ausenbau h made for ' g e ,5, m awson a?
i 32 across deSks 3" preparation for class. nature ability to understand language his retireEnent7 g firing: admin: 0130333333000, heexplains. 3
. 5 513333383135 f 0m}: 331333158233 60333382514330" better than anyone else and to impart that ”I’ve got a big damn fish pond. It’sabout wattle:- inashealllcdvfl) 321:), ’ smelling/tasting
t w ieawazting 3 . eac .5 “my .They knowledge, not just on this campus but 35 feet across and five feet deep,” ”Th .. ' . T:
3 wonder what he wlll have m storef or them nationally Ausenbaugh says ”I don’t plan to do . e notion got out that 33 was thera- :3:
today, ' ' peutic. Northern folks would come down 3
= One minute to class time, he enters. A there and drink the waters. There were 26 ;
‘. wave of quiet rolls forward. trains running into Dawson Springs,” he ;
”Now that you ladies and gentlemen are 5» recalls. ”I remember, as a child, seeing all
. , comfortable. Gehen sie aus and yachts, . ‘ kinds of strangers in town. The Pittsburgh 4
geradeaus, um die ecke und rechts.” ; 3 3., _ ; . j. Pirates and Chicago Cubs held spring {‘
3 Many puzzled looks. it?“ " 3 , , ' a 3% training in Dawson Springs.”
”I just said go out the door turn to your 1 : -; \ M3 ‘ A5 a boy, Ausenbaugh and his friends
~ right, 80 straight, then around the corner to M 3" would bet on who could drink the most 3
the classroom on the right.” ‘1 _ 3: 3.72: fi water at Haniby’s Well. ”You’d better be
James Driscol Ausenbaugh, former gas ,4 {as 1;}; , ; , fairly close toamen’s facility, or women’s 1.
' weekly newspaper editor and city/state __ § as 1% £4 ' ;; / facility or no facility. When you drank that i
editor for the Courier-journal, the ”great ~’ '3 ’ 3 water, your time was growing short.” ‘
2 ' round man” of Western Kentucky Uni- ' ~ " a . , , 1_ His parents, Archie Chester and Carna
versity journalism, hasbegun another day ; 3 3,; g: 3 , ‘ Mae Franklin Ausenbaugh, were teachers. 3
_: of class. _ . ”3&3? :3 ' : ”From the time I was little, I was a ’,
Since 1976, Ausenbaugh has taught the . . ”35.12;; 235 ; ; ' " reader,” Ausenbaugh says. ”I always read. 3
' crafts of editing and writing to 1,100 , , 2 . 3;. , I used to read a magazine, usually The , r
, Western journalism students. He teaches , ; ,; ~33..s ’ Saturday Evening Post, and listen to the -
3 with his own special style that may find , N ‘ .ngh w: radio at the same time. Dad would chal- /’
‘ ' f the students reading a selection written by . “5;, 3;, :"ii ' ; ‘3 ; lenge me ’You can’t keep up with both.’
3"" ....~ ”a surgeon in praise of his scalpel, critiqu- L 3hfir‘: '; 2_ “ . L a, ”I said, ’Yes I can, tESt me.’, He would . 3
’ '5 ing newspapers or editing the college 3;; 3 33M.“ §s§§§ . “ . ' ’ ,3 ask me some questions about the radio or _
‘ president’s inter-departmental memos. . i Rig; - 5 W-§.:%§.§; .: 2,, g 1. ‘2 :33 whatever, but I learned to tune my ears . , . J
3 ”Edit gently, as if it were your own,” he ; £3 _ . ‘ 3w§is f’ ' 33 and eyes in two different directions. I '.
. tells his students. Then he applies his red 3.. :1 » . seesaw”? or $553 ‘ always read; always cared about reading." ‘ - ,
pen to their efforts and often returns as- _ * 5 . ‘3‘ 5 » ’3 ';»_;.;;,>5; :.;? «3;. He recalls a fourth grade teacher who :
signmentsheetsthat resembleHandiwipes \_ k ; ' » % ' M :2; 3%. wasa ”terrible disciplinarian.”
; used at a stabbing. i: » , -. i' 7 ; f ‘ g2 "She was a nice person, but she didn’t _
; By the end of one of his semesters, the ; 3 ; ‘ ' 5 E "‘ -3“ ;‘ .1 know how to keep control. I was uncon-
3 students may feel much like their papers, . Z; ”s : 3 ‘ ‘\\\ ; , . y , i " trollable. She was constantly spanking '
buttheyareabletoenternewsroomsacross . ; K33 \\\ ; \_- «.;V’«‘; ’ if I ' . me. Iused to have it counted at 40 some :
the country armed with strong language ; . §. _ .3, § ‘1‘: \ a. ' :.; . k ’ :.;... >1 ; odd spankings she gave me that year. 2
.2 skills, a better idea of what makes a good if- L 2* ’2 $3 2 ; \X 1 . . ‘ ”She finally put me in the hall and ' ;
; news story and an array of Ausenbaugh 3.3.3.... 7?“ ,. f " ‘\ ’ a: i wouldn’t let me sit withtheother children. ;,
‘ axioms —”Clutter is the disease Of ; w. and v‘ “$333333” \ I; M _ 33, A“ day EVEI'y day, I was out in that hall. \
‘ American writers.” ”Ifyou like or dislike _ f mm f”, 3 2 3 Our little library was along walls 0f the ‘
‘3 a piece of writing, know why.” ”Love the ;. wwhm...“s§§s ”33 f»? j corridor. We didn’t have a library, jUSt ,
1 language.” ”Think, comma, damnit.” _ e‘hisfié; . shelves out in the hall. .1
: As the new year begins, however, , _ _; ; C32; ”That year I read every book in the .
‘2 Ausenbaugh is retiring. : ' " ' ' ‘ ‘ ‘ » 2 2 - ., - library,even read allthegirls’books,Nancy ;
. ; ; » . ; Drew and all those. The teacher knew, but I
3 . ”I don’t think there is any doubt that his * she didn’t care as long as I wasn’t in her ,
; biggest contribution to .Kentucky )ournal- ; . hair,” he says. '
5 15m has been 1“ producing a generation 0f ‘ Reading has been much harder for
2' reporters who bear hls mark, Courier- WKU Photo Ausenbaugh in the last year. He has had 3
i Iou/rnal editor Dav1d Hawpe says. . ”He cares about the student, 1 mean he much fishing. To hell with that. I’ve done eye surgery twice for detached retinas. _
When I first met him, he was teaching really cares about them. He wants then to enough of that. I’m going to write... ”The real frustration is that I have very ; f
;, the people who worked for him. As an learn,he worksthemhard andtheyrespect ”I’ve got some writing I’m really des- little sight in my right eye now. It is 1
, editor and a teacher, he produced a whole him for it. . . Well, the good ones re5pect perate to do. I want to write a whole lot of difficult to read though I still do it all the ._
: generation of Journalists who understood him for it." little stories out of my newspaper life, time I get nine community papers a week '
2; what the story was, loved the language Ausenbaugh was selected to teach at about newspeople and political people... at my house,” he says. 3
. and were unafraid to reach a little higher, Western, according to Highland, by David Some funny, some sad... ”I get the papers I used to own in part, .A 2
try a little harder, to really strive for ex- Whitaker, a former Couner-[ournal copy . ’I feel a real sense of urgency about the the Edmonton paper, the Cumberland Z
cellence, Hawpe says. editor and c0py desk chief, little stories. Whether] put them in abook County News, and the one from Celina, ,
5;. . One of his Western colleagues, James ”Dave came here to head up the pro- or publish them or whateveris not terribly Tenn.” 1
an ; Highland, knew Ausenbaugh first by gram, and when we .hegan looking for important, but I want to get them down He also gets papers from Dawson '
2d ; reputation. later the two 101ned forces to someone to be an; editing teacher, Dave because many of these stories nobody else Springs where his first cousin .. once re- ':
1k. doconsultationworkat newspapersacross kneWJim might be interested. We actually knows but me. . moved __ is the editor. He also takes his ; 1
n8 , the state. _ went out and recruited Jim. We wrote the ”T hey’ re stories I collected in a long, local Scottsville paper and the Courier. , j ,
as— ' ; ”He .RROWS everybody m KentUCI .4 33$ graduate replaces SHAWN attorney Who has serVEd as counSEI ..;.zzszzéaEéizieir==‘25552552=_32325252225222523252Esizisisisisésfisizizisi2322555:5252523232525232525252£32€3553235255253;£3533;252332;;éziiéziziséagage,
, t 3 ‘ g , RUMSEY who accepted a reporting to KPA on open meetings/open Inmemflm
" (:2:le (E; g - job at The Cleaner in Henderson. records and Other issues, 15 the --:-:-2;2;2:22;;:;3;5;z;z;:_-:;z;z;z;z;2;:;:;:;:;:;15:2:1:;2:23;;:;:3:3:;:;:;:55:5:;:55;:;:;:;:;:;:;:5;:;:3:;:;:;::2r:3:;:;:::::;:;:;:;:;:;:;:;:»:»:>‘ i
‘g ”5” ' i . 1* KIT MILLAY d't f Th state's new Secretary of the Cabinet Ralph Edward Iohnson ,i
.‘1’ its... V . ' e 1 or o e for Natural Resources and Env1ron- A 1988inductee into the Kentucky 1
« _ I; . y . Oldham Era, LaGrange, Is the new mental Protection. . 1
- -:- .. . . . . . Journalism Hall of Fame, Ralph Ed- 1
£ fl .. Vice president of the Lou1sv111e MARTI BO ATRIGHT, compo- ward Johnson 81 died Dec 26 in a 1
g ' KHZ I chapter Of the Society Of Profes- sifion department chief at The . ’ . I I l
i y ,. g » . . .- . . . Lexmgton nursmg home. 7 7:
'1 " ' ' ' . 51011al Journalists. . Pineville Sun, recelved abroken hip , - »-~—--—-— .
g - -. .. . Am on authors si nin their d h 1 . 1 , , . _ , - He was a 1939 graduate of the j . _ 7
‘ .3 , g g g, an 0t er mu tip e in]ur1es man University of Kentucky, where hewas ‘3 '
: . r - A ~ bOOkS at the TECent Kentucky BOOk automoblle accxdent In early _ .
. ' . .. . - . sports editor for The Kentucky Kernel. t
,- . . , Fair, cosponsored by The State November. . 1
~' - '~ ‘ ' . A former reporter for The State Iour- 1
' Journal in Frankfort, were colum- / _ ;
Gary E. Whitenack has been pro- nist JOHN ED PEARCE, BOB Composition manager EARL nalinFrankfort, he wasaphotographer 1
moted to controller of The Courier- HILL of the C o urier—Iourn al, cartoon- RANDOLPH recently completed for Assoc1ated Press from_1943r to 1955 1
Ioumal and Louisv111e Times Co., ist JOEL PETT of the Lexington his 4lst year of employment with and an AP reporteruntil his retirement .2
effective March 14. Now assmtant Heral d-Lead er and cartoonist The Casey County News in Liberty. in 1969. hi . b UK ;
controller, Whitenack )omed the LINDA BOILE AU of The State Sen tinel-News advertising . He accepted a teac ng 10' at 1
. company in 1976 as a financial and Ioarnal. “ manager DEBBIE B ALL ARD has in 1974 and retired from-there in 1980.
budget analyst. He receized a is DAVID V- HAWPE, editor 0f been elected to a three-year term on 35%;?:gggéotgsspfizggggfgr'hZ?
degree from weStem entuc y the Courier-Journal and past KPA the Shelby County Chamber of . p . g . p ;
‘ , Universny and MBA from . .11 b h k . topurnahsmcourses and deSIgned the 3
' 1 preSIdent, W et e eynote Commerce board 0f directors. h 01's hoto labs accordin to news l
2313:3115“; Colllpge. :19 repi aces speaker at the winter meeting of the :pgrts p ’ g '1
es er ' 02a r., w 0 Is re rlng. Tennessee Press Association, Jan. 24 gigE5E53335535255521;22135332;E533512153335325235333155Iigiiiif52353;:i:‘=@3312EiE§E§§§55‘iiE§S§S§E§i§E§EEE§S§E§Ef5“223%:§E§3§E§E§E§E§E§E§E§E§E§E§E§E ' ,
. . inNashvme. SiateNNAlmdw CarlB- Rmnboldt5r~
A former broadcast loumallst/ New to the mailroom staff at Charteresgrremyaerweam Retired photographer Carl B.
been employed bY_ the Appalachian Elizabethtown is former truck Wméfivegenmmgmmhamt isville after a series of strokes. l
NEWS-Ems 1“ P1kev111e “ass“ driver WILLIAM JEROME cemflees Heworked withthephotography
“fer-TheWestem Kentmky PEERCE. aewreeeaeermwsrere staff ofThe Courier—Journal and Lou—
“were? g‘adwtep’evmly . CemfleeAFreméntCfik isville Times from 1943 until his
worked 1“ the “SW5 departments 0f LAUR_A KOPER has been hired Mgnmlagfffigifgflnflgflygufer‘ tirement in 1979, much of that time as
WPKE/WDHR 1n P1kev111e and as a part-time sales representative priseNamedtetheMamhersfnp a color food photographer for the
WSFC/WSEK in Somerset, where by Landmark Community Newspa- Ctteewereatfresiéentretect Sunday Magazine. He continued to
L . Associated Press broadcast news and combo ads in the Louisvflle gnrnanvttteandhdaxfieamsf He was also a former pressman
. - competition. She replaces DON market. LandmrkCemnflminewsPaPfim for the Corydon (1nd.) Democrat. 3
15°31:- Wh°F§egnfif°tfke§m At the Central Kentucky News— reeeureramayehmmyem Don Alan Litwin
' ‘y g‘ - GREENE is the new part-time meanness porter for The Enquirer (Cincinnati '
A new sales representative at . . Heafliwifialseeonhnuetocharr . 1
The Harlan Dail Enterprise is receptionist. , and Covmgton) for the laSt 12 years, 1
y . fimfiestffieefiamtteefindia died Nov. 13 from complications from ‘
REBECCA K. CREECH, a - DAVE BERRY I edltor of The 3333::52:32::5:1:i:1:f:f§l‘ffif:1:3:1:3:33§§2afi11:55:323:3:313'3:3:1ziiiifégfiiflfiifitiaggggéfi:3:113:2251122213355 ' . i
Cumbetland mhve Who mOSt Messenger ‘1 nq utrer 1n OwenSbOI'O, 5515+:'1‘1'igigggfziziizig"' igfii?‘:f""':"j"‘ ‘zit:‘-‘A:::~§-'-:-‘-:;EEEE: "3""'EEif?"'2"'1""75':'1'"55533?:"':':“‘:3§§§§§:" _ I - . i
- . . . Wilwmwmmuewmmenmg book reviews and was a stringer in the a
_ Kroger’ _s in Cincinnati. Gannett contest. iii22Eiii:s2§Eé5E3iSizisiaisisisiaizisiaisi233353225325552325aEé5sEsis53E2Es5sisiusisisfgsésiféafiiszaisEéEiEaBattlsiaaizfxsizisflisEz‘izisis‘eé255EaEziszsizizisisisiaisisti Sports ePal' e - i

 i January 1992, The Kentucky Press, Page 5 i
i fix 5
I
The Recorder Newspapers —- injured in the fire which was doused . Seven African leaders, including in Education program, which now i
Boone, Kenton and Campbell by the automatic fire extinguishing five journalists, stopped at The News- includes 70 teachers in 15 local 3
i . counties — sponsored a writing system on the presses. Enterprise in Elizabethtown recently schools who use the newspaper once
contest on “your most memorable The Gleaner in Henderson is during a tour of the United States, a month as a classroom lesson. The
i Northern Kentucky Christmas." taking a few months off from its coordinated by the Institute of paper distributes more than 4,000
i Winning stories were printed in the recycling program, which has International Education in Washing- copies of the monthly edition .
i Christmas editions of the three collected about 150 tons of used ton, DC. containing the NIE page. Pulaski i
i papers. Top prize was $100, fol- newsprint for recycling into building Members of the Casey County County merchants help to sponsor i
1 lowed by $50 for second place, $25 insulation and newsprint since Middle School Journalism Club the program. E
l for third, $15 for fourth and $10 for April. Cold weather was cited for visited the Casey County News The Middlasboro Daily News ;
5 fifth. ., the hiatus. recenty to learn how to put together increased its home delivery rate by 5
i; The Curlisle County Nms moved The Daily Independent in a monthly newspaper page to be $1 per month on Dec. 1.