xt76dj58db7p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt76dj58db7p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19190327  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 27, 1919 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 27, 1919 1919 2012 true xt76dj58db7p section xt76dj58db7p THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON. KY MARCH 27, 1919

VOL IX
GREAT MEMORIAL
Oil CAMPUS

TO

"CAMPUSTRY" TO
IMPROVE ITS
CLASS ROOM

BUILDING TO BE ERECTED

HOUSE ALL STUDENT ACTIVITIES

University Will Have All Needs Filled and Memory of
Sons Perpetuated by Structure to be Built From
Popular Conscription and Used By
Students Alone
AUDITORIUM GATHERING PLACE FOR ALL STATE
Kentucky will have a great memorial
building on the campus to the men of

the

student-bod- y

and alumni, who fell

in the war, if the recommendations

of

the executive committee to the Board
of Trustees are approved.
An unofficial committee composed of

Secretary Owens, Professors Freeman
and Bryant and Mr. A. O. Whipple,
superintendent

of

buildings

grounds, reported favorably to the

and
Exe-

cutive Committee of Trustees at their
meeting 'Wednesday, and the committee is in favor of the erection of such
a building. Its site has not been chosen, and no plans have been drawn. It
is only known that it will house most
of the students activities of the campus.
The suggestions of the committee
provide for an auditorium, with an
stage and all accessories for
producing the dramatic; attempts of
the students. There will be rooms for
the Y. W. and Y. M. C. A., including offices and rest rooms and reading
rooms; rooms for the various literary
society; olub rooms for students and
probably a faculty club room; a barber shop, pressing room, students'
store, billiard rooms, bowling allies,
all the needs of the students as they,
have been observed for some time will
be provided in the new building.
In the event of the erection of this
building, it will not conflict with the
present plans of the Little Theatre to
be placed in the second floor of the
old dormitory building. This is a laboratory for the English and dramatic
departments of the University.
The greatest needs of the University
will bo met by the erection of this
building. There will be a place for the
social commingling of students, the
permanent homes of societies, clubs
and organizations that are now practically homeless; the University will
bo bettor advertised than it has over
been, by reason of its ability to provide a place for the attractions that
come to Lexington. Speakers of national roputo can bo brought to Lexington under the namo of the University; statowldo conventions and conferences can bo hold at tho Univorsity;
tho possibilltl.es of the building aro unlimited. It will advance Kentucky to
tho front rank in which it belongs
and servo to keep over alive the memory of those of our brothers and associates who have paid the full measure
of love for their native land.

BASKETBALL

"K'S"

TO FIVE WILDCATS

Tabbies Come in on Letters
Too; Much Credit Due
Every Member of Both
Teams.
At a meeting of the Athletic Committee, Tuesday, March 25. it was decided that the following men should
receive letters for work done on the
basketball floor this year.
H. C. Thomas, J. A. Dishman, J. C.
Everett, L. A. Burnham, Edward Parker, manager.
Dishman, captain of the Wildcats, is
men Kenone of the best
tucky has ever produced. He is big,
rough, and a good goal shooter, so he
had to be good. When the game started and Dishman got the ball, Kentucky
had a good start for a victory.
Henry Thomas played forward, and
did it well. His goal throwing was exceptional, and he could always be depended upon.
Lawrence Burnham, the fastest little man on the team, played with more
style than any of his fellow letter
bearers. He was quick, accurate, and
snappy, and when it came to dodge
work, he was present.
Everett put the ball over in a style,
natural to actors only. Long shots
were as easy for him as home shots,
and when the score needed, a boosting,
Everett did it.
Ed Parker, manager, always added to
the excitement. Whenever Ed got in,
fhero was either a scrap or the 'score
went up for Kentucky. Parker was
little, but his speed offset this

d

on Page Six.)

KERNEL HAS OFFICE
By the addition of a new room to
tho Department of Journalism and tho
courtesy of Professor Enoch Grohan,
head of that department, members of
tho eKrnel and Kentuckian staffs now
havo an offlco equipped with desks,
typewriters, copy paper and other paraphernalia necossary to tho preparation of nows and editorial matter.
Since roprosontatlves of tho two publications aro most always present, office hours aro class hours. Tho room
is situated on tho first floor of tho
Main Building, across from tho University Cafeteria.

The planting of 600 vines and bushes
on the campus of the University will
be begun as soon as the shrubbery arrives. It is expected this week or the
first of next.
This is a part of the general plan
to beautify the campus and the home
of the president. Workmen are now
engaged in planting and gardening on
Maxwell Place, the home of President
McVey.
The vines to be planted will
be trained on the walls of the buildings
of the University, and the shrubs will
be arranged around the foundations.
It is probable that the roads of the
campus will be worked as soon as the
settlement with the government is consummated. There is a representative
of the War Department in the business
office now and his recommendations
will be made in a few days. There are
other inspections of accounts to be
made and it is not known when the
settlement for the damage done to the
roads will be made.
Some of the memorial trees given to
the city for planting in the parks have
been offered to the University by Commissioner Dunlap, and will be used in
the Scovell Park tract if a satisfactory settlement of the present conference is made.

T

No. 16

"THE STUDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES
FOR

THE STUDENTS

University Y. M. and Y. W. to Start Campaign for
tucky Part in World Fellowship Fund for
Students of Armenia and India

The first rehearsal of the new Stroll-

er play, "Under Cover," which will be
produced about May 1, was held in the
Stroller rooms at the University on
Monday afternoon, March 23. A large
percentage of the members were present for tryouts, but due to the failure
of the scripts to arrive, actual work
was postponed until the last of the
week.
The play, which is a detectivo story,
was selected by tho committee, composed of Eliza Spurrier, Christine Hopkins, Gus Gay and Grover Creech, this
year's stage manager. It is tho largest
and best the Strollers have ever attempted to produce.
Competition for parts In tho cast
promise to bo keen according to Information from Stage Manager Creech,
who is In chargo of tho picking of tho
cast. Ho urges that every Strollor
report for
and demonstrate his
or her ability. Tho play calls for
thlrtoen peoplo, eight men and live
women.
Emory Frazlor and Gus Gay, shining
lights in former Strollor productions,
aro out for tho leads and they will be
hard to beat. Miss Spurrier will possibly try for the leading female role.
(Continued from Pago Two,)
try-out- s

Ken-

QUOTA WILL BE ASSIGNED TO U. OF KENTUCKY
"LITTLE THEATER"
OLD

IN

DORMITORY-PLA- N

English Department Will
Promote Plays, Pageants
and Lectures in Prospective Room.
Before long the carpenters, brick
masons and painters will be busy on
the interior of the Old Dormitory building, converting It into a modern "little
theatre." University plays and lectures
will be given here. Stroller plays are
to be rehearsed on its stage, and it is
to be used for all the theatrical productions of the University, with the
probable exception of annual Strollers'
plays.
The entire second floor of the Old
Dormitorp will be taken over by the
Department of English, the middle section will be made into a miniature
theatre with an auditorium equipped
with modern opera chairs to seat about
136 persons. The stage will be about
fourteen feet deep and twenty-sevefeet wide, with scenery, curtains and
all the paraphernalia necessary for a
modern stage. One of the two rooms
adjoining the stage is to be used as a
property room and the other is to be
used as an office. It Is very probable
that another of the rooms will be used
as the Stroller's club room, so that
the Strollers may conveniently use the
Little Theatre as their laboratory. The
Art and Design Department will havo
rooms on the third floor, and will assist In making the scenery for the
stage. Tho present plans call for
equipment which will enable the theatrical organization to accumulate properties, and have a permanent wardrobe, of which the average college theorganization
cannot boast.
atrical
Kentucky will be ono of only six or
n

Competition Will Be Keen
With Old Strollers Back at
Tryouts, Many Members
Are Ambitious

OF THE WORLD"

(Continued on Page Fivo.)

HAFFLER IS BACK
Lieut. Wayno Hafflor, former cheer
leader, and student in tho Department
of Civil Engineering, visited tho University Mondny en route to his homo
in La Grango from New York, whore
ho landed tliroo weeks ago. Lieut.
Huffier onllsted an secured his commission in ono of tho first training
camps at Fort Benjamin Harrison. He
was a mo m bur of tho Rainbow Division and saw active service in Franco.
Liout. Hafflor expects to return to
school next year.

Once again the University of Kentucky has the opportunity to stand by
the other universities of our country in
movement for a great
a nation-wid- e
cause; to help raise in a whirlwind
campaign, the "World Fellowship
Fund," for the purpose of bringing to
the dim corners of the earth the fruits
of a genuine democracy, and to teach
the principles of christian education
and christian citizenship.
The slogan of the campaign Is "The
Students of the United States for the
Students of the World."
Miss Louise Will, the new
of the Y. W. C. A., Mr. Jesse
Tappe representing the Y. M. C. A.,
and Dr. Boyd from the faculty have
charge of the campaign. What is
called a "week of education," is the
first part of the program and this bee
gan Tuesday, March 24, when
men" appeared at all organizations, that met on the campus, giving
the purposes of this movement, and
reasons for our participation.
"four-minut-

Four Minute Men and Women.
The four minute speakers are Misses
Mildred Graham, Louise Will, Adele
Slade, Margaret Smith, Mildred Collins, Louanna Duckwall, from Y. M.
C. A.; Messrs. R. L. Duncan, J. P.
Barnes, V. H. Barlow, George Gregory,
John Davis, M. C. Redwine, from Y.
M. C. A. and Dr. Boyd, Prof. Freeman,
Prof. Karraker, and Judge Chalkley
representing the faculty.
The Y. M. C. A. funds aro to be sent
for relief work in Armenia and the
funds of the Y. W. C. A. will be sent
either to India or South America. Its
purpose will be to capitalize for tho
promotion of christian world fellowship, the capacity recently discovered
In ourselves for generous and even
sacrificial giving, to establish in all
tho earth foundation principles of
Christianity on which may be built a
new world order.
Sunday night at tho regular meeting
of tho Y. W. C. A. at Patterson Hall,
a picturesque pageant, "Tho Call of
tho New World." will bo given by 23
Univorsity girls. Tho fivo principal
speakers are: Elizabeth McGowan,
Frances Marsh, Margaret Woll, Mlna
White, Suo Boardman, representing
"The Spirit of tho Association." "Tho
Volco of tho Eight Weeks Club," "Tho
Volco of tho United War Work," "Tho
Voice of tho Vocational Conference,"
"Tho Volco of World Fellowship," respectively.
Sunday morning tho service held by
Dr. Bush will bo dovoted to promoting
interest in the campaign.
Origin of Movement.
This lileu originated at tho Student

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

fAGE2

STRAND

The best in Moving Pictures
PARAMOUNT, ARTCRAFT,
GOLDWYN AND SELECT PICTURES
Remember, We Lead ; Others Follow
Volunteer Conference, held at

North-fold-

OPEN

ADMISSION

ALL-AMERICA- N

10 A. M. to 11 P. M.

10c.

and 20c, War Tax Included

EARLY SPRING

,

Included In the program wan the
Undertaking "To Secure at least
million dollars during the acadfor the foreign misemic year 1918-1sionary program of the church and se
cure such funds as may be necessary
to meet the need arising from the war
situation in 1918." All universities of
any repute have been asked to take
part.
This campaign invites the immediate
of each student,
definite
and it projects the idealism and best
traditions of our college life Into remote corners of the world.
It is the duty of every student and
every member of the faculty to do his
part.

I

Concerts Daily, Afternoon and Evening
S. F. GRIFFITHS
ORCHESTRA
The best Orchestra in the South, Hear it.

Save Twenty of these Tags and fret One Suit

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RHODES ENTRANCE

one-ha-

9

No More Examinations For
Entrance to American
Scholarships to English
University.

President M. B. Adams, of Georgetown College, chairman of the Kentucky Committee of Selection for
Rhodes Scholars, has received from
the Rhodes Trust of London, England,
the following important announcement:
"During the years 1917 and 1918, the
organizing secretary of the trust, Dr.
O. R. Parkin, C. M. G., visited most of
MISS BURNER ON WAR the states of the American Union and
AT PHILOSOPHIAN the provinces of Canada, and made an
exhaustive study in consultation with
The program of the Philosophian Lit- university and college authorities, of
erary Society at its last meeting was the operation in those countries of the
an address by Miss Oolooah Burner, system pursued in the selection of
secretary of the Y. W. C. A. recently scholars since the foundation of the
returned from six months service in trust. As a result of this investiga
France.
tion, certain changes in the methods
Miss Burner's work was among the of selection have been under consld
nurses and patients in a base hospital. eration.
She discussed the great impressions
"Among other changes, it has been
which he received in this service. The decided that candidates In the United
supreme courage of nurses and sold- States, who are otherwise eligible,
iers in the face of disappointment and shall no longer be required to pass a
danger and their cheerfulness in the qualifying examination, but shall be
monotony of their tiring service were selected, with due reference to the
their greatest attributes. She told of suggestions of Mr. Rhodes, on the
writing letters for wounded men who basis of their university or college
had no hope of ever returning to their standing, subject to any further test
homes, but who sent the most cheer which the committees of selection may
ful and optimistic letters to their fam in their discretion impose."
ilies. She also told of the inevitable
Information as to procedure and
who had broken his arm date of election will be issued as soon
cranking an ambulance and who wrote as possible. Professor Frank Aydel
home of his terrible "wound." There otte, of the Massachusetts Institute
was in general, however, no verbosity of Technology has become American
in the majority of cases. Another im Secretary to the Rhodes Trustees and
pressive action on the part of the suf will keep the State Chairman of the
ferers and nurses was the absolute Committees of Selection supplied with
loss of self in the thought of the great information.
conflict and Ideal for which they had
enlisted.

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and
Furnishings
that are full
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Wants

four-flush-

INTER-SOCIET- Y

Sec the New Things
while the time is Good.

DEBATES BEGIN
FRIDAY NIGHT
The Union and Patterson Literary
Societies will hold the first of a series
debates Fdday night,
of
March 28, at 7:30 p. m. The question
to be debated is: "Resolved, That the
Constitution of the League of Nations
Should be Adopted by the United
States Senate." The Union will be
represented by H. M. Blakey, and S.
W. Smith, representing the affirma
tive; the Patterson by Harod McGregor
and Vola Clarence Swarengen. The
debate will be held before the two
clubs in Joint session, and instead of
judges, the audience will decide the
winner by vote. This debate will in
no way take the place of the annual
debate between the two clubs, but instead 1b the first of a series of debates
intended to stimulate interest in the
literary societies.

W. B. MARTIN'S

College Men receive
special attention here.

CopjrlfhtWt

PRESCRIPTIONS
Everything a

Drug

complete

Store

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John's Drug store
The Post Office Pharmacy
MAIN & WALNUT

PHOENIX
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PHONES

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DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
CITY RATES 50 CENTS

inter-societ- y

Members of the John Hays Ham
moiid Engineering Society will be addressed on Saturday morning at the
fourth hour by Dr. Cornell, of the De
partment of Zoology.
The American Institute of Electrical
Engineers meets this week. J. E.
and R. S. Arnold will talk on
Aeronautics, and C. F. de Mey on Engineering Research.
PRE-MED-

ON EVOLUTION

At the regular meeting of the
Society Monday night, Dr.
Shull lectured on "Evolution." The
meeting was well attended.

STROLERS BEGIN
(Continued From Page One.)
ability and will
be remembered for the excellent way
in which they handled the leads in the
"Lion and the Mouse," and "Mice and
All have exceptional

Men."

McGURK'S

Phoenix Hotel Lobby

Graves, Cox & Co.

R B. Robards

INCORPORATED.

COLLEGE BOYS' TAILOR

"College Fellow's

Shop."

LUNCHES

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Phone 154

THE POPULAR
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SUITS

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Lex., Ky.
1.

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A.

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Progressive Shoe Hospital
My work and prices always
keep me busy
140 South Limestone
Shoes repaired while you

wait

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
VMM,

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PAGES

MECHS. TAKE THEIR

Co.

Graddy-Rya- n

FOUR YEAR MAN "LOOKS

prcnsnMATQ

LI

BOTH WAYS FROM NOW"

INCORPORATED.

Cities of Ohio Included in The friends of Ensign Walter A.
Reminiscent Senior "Takes
140 West Main St.
Telephone 903
Itineraries of Young; Engi- Reld, of tho naval reserve, and Bon
of Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Reld, of East
Pen in Hand" And Says
neers, With Many FacHigh street, will bo interested to learn
"Wear for Young Men and Men Who Stay Young"
He Hates to Quit.
tories Open.
that ho was recently married to Miss
m
!

Seniors and Juniors of the Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering will leave on their annual
inspection trips next week.
Tho Senior Engineers will leave Sunday night. The party will arrive in
Chicago Monday morning, where its
members stop at the Palmer House.
The following places will bo visited
and inspected: Blackstono Hotel Power Plant; Armour and Co.; American
Bridge Co.; Illinois Steel Co.; Western
Electric Co.; Chicago Telephone Co.;
Crane Co.; Sears, Roebuck and Co.;
Division Station Gas Works; the Municipal Pier; the Pump Station and
Water Intakes of the Chicago Water
Supply System.

THE PHOENIX HOTEL
LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY

A Metropolitan' Hotel
Respectfully selicxts the patronage ofJUnivcrsity People

JOHN SKAIN, Manager

Saturday evening a dinner will be
given by the Chicago Alumni Club at
the Great Northern Hotel. The party
expects to arrive in Lexington on the
return trip Sunday night. Dean F.
Paul Anderson, Professors W. A. Free
man, W. A. Newman and Instructor
John Dicker, will be representatives
of the Engineering faculty on the trip.
The Juniors expect to arrive in Cincinnati April 1st. It Is planned to
visit the California Pumping Station
which supplies the city with water;
the American Tool Works Co.; the
Cincinnati Milling Machine Co.; Beck-forTool Co.; and Cincinnati Planer
Co. The bridges across the Ohio river
at this point will also be inspected.
On Thursday the party will go to
Hamilton, Ohio, and visit the Niles
Tools Works; Long and Alsteter Co.;
Hoover, Orens and Rentzler Co.; and
the Becket Paper Mills.
The following day Dayton will be
visited. In Dayton, the Omer Fare
Register Co.; the Piatt Co.; and the
Dayton Engineering Laboratories will
be visited. The return trip to Cincinnati will be made Friday night.
On Saturday the Juniors will go to
the Andrews Steel Mills, Newport Roll
er Mills, the Trump Electric Co., and
Cincinnati
after which
they will return to Lexington at 10:30
d

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The best shops carry them at $6
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Carl Denker,

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Phone 3743

University
Representative

Madeline Hunter, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. John Hunter, of Philadelphia.
Tho romance began when Ensign
Reld was invited to dine with the
Hunters In their home on Benlst avenue and in this way tho young people
met. The bridegroom was trained In
the State Normal School at Richmond
and tho University of Kentucky, and
at tho time of his enlistment, was
principal of the high school at Morgan-field- ,
Ky.
Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Waters were visitors at the University of Kentucky
Monday. Mr. Waters was a graduate
of the College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering of the class of 1917.
He has Just been released from the
army, holding a Second Lieutenant's
commission. He will go to Camden, N.
J., as assistant to the Chief Engineer
of the Public Service Railroad Company.

Professor C. B. Cornell will lecture
to the Sophomore Engineers Saturday
on "Psychology and Engineering." He
will speak to the Central Kentucky
Woman's Club at 3 p. m. Saturday on
"Applied Psychology."
John E. Dotterer, former professor
of mathematics at the University, was
married to Miss Emma McCoy in
Iowa, Wednesday, March 19. Students will remember Professor Dotterer as a teacher of algebra and geometry.
Al-bi-

FREE VERSE A LA
FRESHMAN "TO

AURYNNE"

My own dearest Aurynne,
Your eyes are blue,
Your cheeks are pink,
And tho your brain
Refuses to think,
Some thing I always can forgive,
Forget and love, love and live.
Editor's Note No member of the
Kernel staff is responsible for this.
p. m.
It was found in the journsilism room
The following Seniors will make the
intact.
trip: Anderson, Jr., F. Paul, Arnold, R.
S., Bauer, L. H., Batsel, C. N., Baugh,
W. S., Diamond, R. K.. Bell, T. M., NEW "K" JOB FOR
David, W. R de Mey, C. F., Dudley, UNIVERSIY DEBATERS
D. R., Edmonds, E. A., Eyl, J. M.,
Frankel, G., Hall, A. D Hanson, R.
Each student who represents the
N Johnson, C. F., Kolm, A., Leman,, Unlvorslty in any oratorical contest or
J. J., Lillard, E. A., McClelland, J. E., debate is to recelvo a forensic award
Maddox, H. E., Proctor, H. G., Shouse, of standard design. As athletic men
J. F., Smith. Mose, Templlu. C. L., are awarded "K" sweaters as a reward
Thinner, C. A.. Wallingford, J. S.. Mil- for their efforts, this custom of having
tho University oratorical representaton. Jr.. H. M.
Instructors, F. Paul Anderson, Prof. tives recognized will be followed.
Professor Mabie, of the Department
Freeman, Prof. D. V. Terrell, J. B.
f English, who is Instituting this pracDIckor, G. L. Jackson.
Tho following Juniors will mako tho tice says the forensic emblem is in
tho hands of a designer and will bo a
trip: Boone, II. P., Clioato, D. C,
C. M., Woods, J. IX, Thompson, charm, probably oblong in shape, with
II. C., Wallace, W. M., Bronmgom, an ombossed "K" and the proper InJerry, Nlsrack, J. M., Elsoy, Everett scription.
E., Coleman, J. W Morgan, J. C, Morgan, L. W., Morris. J. C, Slogol, J. B.,

Forman. M., Knight, N. W.. Guthrie, J.
T., Gorman, Tom L., Land, J. M., MarA follow don't need a dog license shall, W. F., Stophens, A. C.
J. H. Bailey, N. T. Puckott. Gordon,
unless ho hus a dog. Uut u "bird" with

a marriage Ucenso, might as well havo Smith Park, U. V. Jarred and John
a .hunting license for neither over Marking made the trip last year and
gets him whut ho wants.
will not accompany tho others.

Looking both wnys from now, the
r
students of tho University

four-yea-

can see many Improvements about the
campus already accomplished and
many more planned.
To appreciate

the good things that

are coming It is necessary

for us to
reflect upon what has been. It will
be unnecessary to say much about tho
old dormitories In order to arouse tho
appropriate thoughts. The mention of
the holes in the base boards of the
rooms Is enuf. The basement of tho
Main Building will bear much pralso
when we look at It now and plcturo It
four years ago. Then the water had
access to the class room. Then the
walls threatened to fall on the heads
of the student. Then the floor set
traps for unwary feet. Now the water
goes Into the ground or stays In the
steam pipes from which it used to
drip. Now the plastering is so iiTmly
fixed that a "rock would fly from its
firm base" as soon as tho plaster.
Conducive to study this Is. Now the
floor invites dancing feet with not a
hole to trip.
In the "golden olden days" one
could get a drink of water by sneaking Into the basement of the gymnas
ium and standing on one's head at a
faucet, and standing up till the water
ran beneath the collar out of sight.
Now it will soon be possible to drink
like a modern human being at a fountain, when they begin their spring run.
Years ago we could wash our hands
on the campus by breaking or "ledg-ing- "
into some innocent's room at the
dorm and using his small pitcher of
water. Now we have a lavoratory,
where soap is seen at intervals. We
s
used to eat anywhere; ndw trim
In aprons use moral force to make
us eat good stuff pardon menus, at
the cafeteria.
We used to get our hands caught in
the blackboards (?) and get scolded
for delaying the class. Now we pursue the even smooth tenor of our ways
writing our exercises for the profs.
We used to writhe because we didn't
have enuf books in the library. Now,
altho we haven't too many, wo at least
have more.
We used to have a heck of a time!
But now we are getting along line
and the future stares us in the faco
brilliant with promise. We hate to
leave, some of us. The romance and
tho romances of tho campus are about
to be broken.. Our visits In tho years
to come wil lbo pleasing surprises.
We see a bigger and better University.
R. O. T. C.

Units

In

Kentucky.

(Georgetoninn).

According to tho latest figures there
will be sevon It. O. T. C. units in tho
colleges of Kentucky next fall. At the
Unlvorslty of Kentucky tho It. 0. T.
C. work will bo resumed at tho beginFavored Protection.
(Exchango.)
ning of tho second semestor.
Tho
Clarence: "So you take Economics?" other colleges that will havo units
aro, Georgetown College. Georgetown;
Chalru: "Nothing olso!"
Clarence: "Are you In favor of Pro Borea College, Berea; Bethel College,
toctlon?"
Hussellvllle; Kentucky Military InClaire: "Oh, Clarence, this is so sud stitute, Lyndon, and Western Kentucky Normal School, Bowling Green.
den."

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 4

University.
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL is the official newspaper of the
subscribers all the college sews
It is issued with a view of furnishing to its
concerning the
of Kentucky, together with a digest of items of interest
Universities of other States and Canada.

EDITORIAL 8TAFP

Frances
McClure.

F

Editor
Assistant Editor
Associate Editor
Squlrrel Food
Feature Edltor
Military Editor
Ed,tor
SDortin
Editor
Home Economics
Patterson Hall
Philosophlan
Law
Engineering

M.n.ilna

Marsh, Margaret

REPORTERS.
Smith, Roberta

Why cut old campus Into strips,
When 'twas once so clean and neat?

BEAUTIFY THE CAMPUS.

"Co-Ed- "

club

nor

now-grace-

UMCRIPTION, ONE DOLLAR A YEAR. FIVE CENTt A COPY
mail matter.
Entered at Lexington Postofflce as second-clas- s

EDITOR-IN-CHIE-

My gal is not

Congratulations, Dr. Patterson, The Kernel, on behalf
of the entire student body, extends hearty congratulations
to you on your eighty-sixt- h
birthday. We wish you many
happy returns of Wednesday, March 26.
birthday. Perhaps you spent She don't pull this baby talk,
It was your eighty-sixt- h
in your comfortable chair, recalling birthdays But heavens above,
it sitting
of years gone by when, younger and more active, you were Just see her work in the parlor,
Oh, boy, how she can love.
laying up the laurels with which your advanced age is
Perhaps, like the young-ol- d
man that you are,
emethlnf Less.
you were looking into the future, seeing birthdays that
are to come.
The sign In the Versailles cemetery.
Each birthday with its coming makes us realize all the "Put all Trash In Boxes," certainly
more what you have done for education in Kentuckv. for makes us wonder how it Is that that
former, present and future students in the University of Woodford county Marine, who grace
Kentucky. During the remainder of your life you' will be our company so beautifully, has esvenerated by Kentucky students; you will be regarded as caped this long.
the Grand Old Man of the University of Kentucky. When
you have passed to your reward, their love and admiration
A Cry For Freedom.
will be none the less and the reverence and esteem with Why walk on the grass folks,
which they hold your memory will be manifold.
When walks are made for feet?

Published every Thursday thraout the College year by the student body
of the University of Kentucky, for the benefit of the students,
alumni and faculty of the institution.

THORNTON CONNELL
Charles Planck
Miss Eliza Spurrier
Miss Eliza Plggott
Lee McClain
Frederick Jackson
Robt.J. Ralble
Donald Dinning
Miss Mildred Graham
Miss Austin Lilly
Miss Virginia Helm Mllrter
Miss Louise Will
Cecil Heavrln
N. D. Witt
Adele Slade

smart nor cute;
pretty
She can't dance or skate,
She ain't clever, 'gay or witty,
Her lines may be out of date.

GOD SPEED.

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Among good things in store for the University of Please leave it like it uster be;
Kentucky is beautification of the campus. The Kernel is Don't change its looks o please.
absolutely certain, that given time, our campus will attain Don't move a shrub, a twig, a bush.
beauty. Comprehensive and complete plans have been And care for all the trees.
drawn up concerning changes that are to be made on the
r,
campus. We do not think it amiss, however, to publish a Please don't forget us
few student views on the subject.
Who claim our "campus" class;
To begin with there is that unsightly swamp. The So why not live and let live,
Kernel, on behalf of the students, appeals for the imme- And don't forget the grass.
diate obliteration of that repulsive hole in the northeast
corner of the campus. It is nothing less than pnlWtfno- Judge You wish a divorce, madame
place for filthy water