xt76dj58fp9w https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt76dj58fp9w/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky 1958 athletic publications  English University of Kentucky This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. University of Kentucky Football Media Guides University of Kentucky Football Facts For Press, Radio, and TV, 1958 image University of Kentucky Football Facts For Press, Radio, and TV, 1958 1958 2015 true xt76dj58fp9w section xt76dj58fp9w   A..—           ``‘\    L  = "  
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FOR wR?ZJ.> — m~x;Z>EO m YV 39:8

 1958 KENTUCKY FOOTBALL SCHEDULE A, L
Date Opponent Site Starting Time V-1
. I'
Sept. 15 Hawaii—1.ouisvil1e (State Fairgrottnds) .. ....,. ..8:30 p.m. (LDT  
Sept. 20 "’Ge0rgia Tech—Lexingt0n .............,....,.........,,.. 8:00 p.m. CDT  
Sept. 27 *NIississippi—Memphis   ....,....t....t....,,.,.t..,.   8:00 ]>.m. CST
()ct. 4 Open
Oct. ll *Auburn—Lexingt0n .................. . ..................... .. 8:00 p.m. CDT ;
Oct. 18 *Louisiaua State—Bat0u Rouge .................. . ...... 8:00 p.m. CST ` (
Oct. 25 *Georgia—Athens ......................................., ,. ...... 2:00 p.m. }£S'1` (
Nov. 1 ’*°Mississippi State (H(1)—Lexingt0n .................. 2:00 p.m. CDT °
Nov. 8 ‘?°Vanderbilt—Lexington .......................,....... . ..... 2:00 p.m. CDT i
Nov. 15 Xavier—Lexingt0n . ............................................. 2:00 p.m. CDT (
Nov. 22 *Tennessee—]{n0xvil1e ............................a............. 2:00 p.m.   ~  
‘* Southeastern Conference Game, (HC) Homecoming Game. 1
1957 SEASON RESULTS I
All Gomes: Won 3, Lost 7 — .300 A
SEC Only: Won 1, Lost 7 —— .125
Crowd
I)ate Opponent Site UK Opp. Estimate
Sept. 21 *Ge0rgia Tech ........................ (A) 0 13 40,000 ‘
Sept. 28 *)Iississippi . ..... . .......................   0 15 34,000  
Oct. 5 *F10rit1a ....................................   7 14 33,000 I
Oct. 12 *Auburn ....,............................... (A) 0 6 31,000  
Oct. 19 *LSU .........................1.......1........   0 21 50,000 ` ,
Oct. 26 ‘*Ge0rgia 1.................................   14 33 25,000 )
Nov. 2 Memphis State ........1 . ............   53 7 20,000 ,`
Nov. 9 *Vanderbi1t .............................. (A) 7 12 23,429 Q
Nov. 16 Xavier .............. . ..... . ............... (H) 27 0 20,000  
Nov. 23 *Tennessee .............................. (H) 20 6 36,500 `
128 127 312,929 .
‘·* Southeastern Conference Game (Home`Attendance: 168,500) ,  

 I (Reprinted from The Birmingham (Ala.) News, May ll, l958)
  Wildcats Have Toughest SEC Schedule-
~·- Collier Needs Solace, and ll Lou Michaels
By ALF VAN HOUSE 11th place, at 59.3, and Vander-
News Sports Writer bilt 12th at 52.0.
Say this for the football team The N€W$ formula l$ simply
; Blanton Collier will send out of thlsi
._ bluegrass Lexington, Ky., next Each opponent is listed at the
1 i Fal]: exact number of points it totaled
1t’11 not be dispatched looking i¤ the N¤WS’ Spring poll- The
i - for e]ii](]ien_ igs challenging points are added down the sched-
giants, just as Ad0]n]i Ruppls bas- ule, then divided by the total
i ketball teams do, and nearby SEC gam€$· ltls €a$Y to do, and
Calumet Farm’s big horses. lair-
The University of Kentucky Thus Kentucky’s schedule, list-
a \Vildcats win the title as playing ing Georgia Tech (87), Ole Miss
. the Southeastern Conferencels (103%), Auburn (114%), LSU
I ‘ roughest family schedule, win it (48), Georgia (50), Mississippi
fairly easily—unwantted though it State (93), Vanderbilt (34) and
1 may be. Tennessee (88), adds to 618
The VVildcats take on eight points. Divided by eight, that’s
league clubs before November 77.3.
finds, including the five highest The complete rundown on each
I lated 0utlllS· team’s schedule toughness is:
\Vith 11 Lou Michaels, Paul Y
Brown’s ex-aid might not worry. I- kentucky- 77-3
But nearly a dozen short of that 2* TSmI€S_S€€g 73-9 _
All—World type, Collier needs 3- MISSISSIPPI Stale- (2-9
sympathy and quiet music. 4- AIIbIIIII> 617
Under a new (and mathemati- 5- AIaPaI“a> 66-6
l cally sounder) system of deter- 6· Ceorgm- 65-3
I mining schedule toughness, Ken- 7- TuIa“€> 62-6
~ tucl 60-0
` J list for the last two years, ranks I0- FIOI`Id?I~ 596
  next in line at 73_9_ _ 11. C€0I`gl&l Tech, 59.3
i Mississippi State tackles the I2- V*IIld€I`bIIt> 52-0
  No. 3 difficult intraconference Kentucky was ranked in sev-
  run (72.9), and the list runs from enth place in Zipp Newman’s
  there through Georgia Tech in poll.

 TO THE PRESS AND RADIO
Here is your copy of the 1958 facts booklet on the Kentucky VVild-
cats which we sincerely hope will aid you in covering and answering
questions on U. of K. football this season. Material in this brochure is
up to date as publication was delayed until after the first few days of
pre-season practice to allow for normal changes. If you desire addi- J
` tional information or have any questions not answered herein, please  
i feel free to contact the Sports Publicity Office. p
Information y
WORKING TICKETS—Address requests to Sports Publicity Office as
far in advance as possible. After Tuesday preceding the game, tickets `
will not be mailed. Pick up at the Information Window in Memorial
Coliseum, directly across the street from the stadium.
COMPS—No individual game allotment.
WESTERN UNION·—Advise if you intend to file from press box so
that you may be assigned a seat adjacent to your Western Union opera—
tor. It is also advisable to notify the Commercial Manager of Western
Union in Lexington. x
RADIO—Apply directly to Radio Director, University of Kentucky,
McVey Hall, Lexington, supplying information regarding proposed
B sponsors and any network arrangement. Booth assignment will be made
` and working tickets issued by Sports Publicity Office upon receipt of l
approved permit from Radio Director. Spotters are available if re-
quested well in advance. Stations should order lines installed by con-
tacting Commercial Department, General Telephone Co., 151 \Valnut
St., Lexington.
TELEVISION—Rules of the NCAA and Southeastern Conference pro-
hibit "live" telecasting of U. of K.’s football games except in such event  
as the University is a participant in the NCAA—c0ntr0lled "Game of the ,
Week" series. Only the official cameramen of the two teams are allowed i
to make motion pictures of the game for delayed showing on TV. News-
clips on game highlights will be furnished to TV stations by the Sports I
Publicity Office upon advance request and on an actual cost basis. .

 O O
University of Kentucky
E, I 9 5 8
I
O
PUBLISHED BY: University of Kentucky
Athletics Association
O
n PREPARED AND EDITED BY:
KEN KUHN
Director of Sports Publicity
  •
COMPOSITION AND PRINTING BY: The Kernel Press,
University of Kentucky
I •
I
  SPORTS PUBLICITY OFFICE
TELEPHONE: 2-2200, Ext. 2241
I Memorial Coliseum
Lexington, Kentucky
MRS. PHYLLIS PURVIS SCOTTIE HELT
Secretary Student Assistant

 1
STOLL FIELD ——- McLEAN STADIUM
Much confusion among the general public and the Sl)OI`[S-W1'f[lI1g
fraternity apparently exists over a seeming duplication of titles in re-
ferring to the University of Kentucky's football setup along ",-\venue
of Champions."
Officially, by action of the University Board of Trustees, the general
area encompassing the playing Held is known as "Stoll Field." Like— y
wise, by authority of the same body, the stadium proper is known as , l
l "McLean Stadium "
Kentucky’s first football field, occupying the general site of what ‘
is now the practice field west of the stadium, was first given a name
when it was dedicated on October 14, 1916, as Stoll Field in honor of 11
the late judge Richard C. Stoll, prominent alumnus, trustee and bene- "
factor of the University of Kentucky, Soon after the first sections of ‘
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[ i

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l
 ‘ BLANTON COLLIER
E Head Football Couch
V (Four Years — Won 22, Lost 'I7, Tied `ll
-· A quiet-mannered native Kentuckian who is widely regarded at
all levels of the game as one of football's most brilliant tacticians and
· finest gentlemen. Blanton Long Collier is a man of unique background
V and the personilication of a patient. thorough teacher.
\iVith only four years in the collegiate coaching ranks behind him,
the popular \iVildcat mentor might be considered a novice to the un-
; informed. But to his fellow mentors throughout the country, who know
· the facts of his background and football philosophy. he is held in the
highest respect and already has been accorded "Coach of the Year"
honor in the tough Southeastern Conference.
A great many, both in the profession and out, feel that Kentucky
is fortunate to have the services of one of the keenest minds in the grid
sport who needs only a few more "tools of the trade" {outstanding play-
ers) to boost the \iVildcats to the top. Although his first four Kentucky
clevens have not reached the Southeastern Conference throne room or
taken part in post-season bowl activity, both University officials and the
"Man ln '1`he Street" are solidly behind Collier and the program he
directs with hard-working efficiency.
\i\’hen Collier gave up the security of his position as backfield coach
and chief aide to fabulous Paul Brown of the perennial world pro cham-
pion Cleveland Browns to take over the reins at his home»state univer-
sity in 1954, he fulfilled a life-long ambition and climaxed a unique rise
in the coaching game. l-le became a college coach for the hrst time after
nearly a quarter»century in the profession of tutoring football.
_ Born in Millersburg, Ky., and brought up in Paris, Ky., only 17
l Miles from the University campus, Collier began his athletic career at
 ° Paris High School by playing both football and basketball. Later at
Georgetown College, he lettered in both sports. Although not an out-
standing gridder because of his lack of size (he weighed only 125 pounds
` then). he nevertheless was regarded as a close student of the game and,
upon graduation in 1927, was named coach of all sports at Paris 1-ligh.
1-Ie held this position until he entered the Navy in 1943. During
16 years in the schoolboy coaching ranks, his teams won or shared two
13

 Central Kentucky Conference football titles and six basketball chain- .
pionships. His last high school grid team (1943) ranked as unofficial  ’
state champions. Also during this period he took postgraduate work .
at the University of Kentucky and received a master’s degree in educa- Q
tional administration in 1942.
It was while he was stationed at the Great Lakes Naval Training  `
Station during his Navy tour that Collier and Paul Brown discovered -
each other. Brown, a lieutenant and head coach of the Great Lakes v_
_ football team, became impressed with Yoeman Collier’s football knowl- *
l edge and added him to the staff as an assistant coach. The following w
year (1946) when the Cleveland Browns were organized with Brown
as head coach, Collier made the unique jump from high school ranks `
(via service ball) to the pros by going along as backfield coach. ·
During eight seasons with the perennial world champion Browns,
Collier made a reputation that stamped him as a great teacher of foot-  ‘
ball—determined but quietly patient. His special function as number Wl
one aide to Brown was pass defense and the club consistently ranked ·(
tops in the league in this department.  '
Enters College Ranks In 1954 As UK Coach (
When the Kentucky job became available in l954·with the transfer  
of Paul Bryant to Texas A Sc M, Collier was lured into collegiate ranks
for the first time in nearly a quarter-century of coaching experience. l
Given a three-year contract, Collier launched an immediate attack .
based on his version of the Split T offense and spiced with a generous
l helping of gridiron fundamentals and stress on perfection in play
execution,
The results came almost immediately as the \=Vildcats, after an
. erratic start that saw a 2-3 split in the first five encounters, forged a vic-
tory string of Eve straight from mid-season and capped it with a win
over arch-rival Tennessee in the rain at Knoxville. The Kentuckians
were in bowl contention all the way as they wound up with a 7~3 record ·.
for the 1954 campaign. I
Coach Collier was rewarded by grateful school officials with a new
five—year contract and fellow mentors of the Southeastern Conference
voted him "SEC Coach of the Year." In gaining this honor in his "fresh- f
man" season at UK, an achievement made all the more noteworthy con- `
sidering that it was the first time the title had been bestowed on a coach
in his initial year of college tutoring, Collier climaxed a unique rise in
the game.
14

 5
`_ The 1955 campaign was virtually a repetition of the previous year.
 » In carving out a 6-3-1 mark, Collier could point with pride to the fact
_ that his men registered a win over Ole Miss, the only setback suffered
g, by the eventual SEC and Cotton Bowl champs. and a second straight
triumph over Powerful Tennessee that eliminated the Vols from bowl
 — contention and again boosted the \z\’ildcats’ stock for a post-season date.
 I Two years ago, Kentucky slipped to sixth place on a record of six
i wins and four defeats and in 1957 hit rock bottom in the conference
 l standings as the result of only three victories in 10 starts against some
Y, of the South’s toughest grid powers. But there was some solace to be
l gained in the knowledge that impartial observers classed the ’56 record
 — as remarkable in view of personnel problems and praised the 1957 out-
; fit, which wound up in a blaze of glory by upsetting Tennessee for the
third time in four years, as "probably the nation’s best non-winning
~ team." Another point of pride in the luckless ’57 record was the YVi1d-
cats’ near upset of eventual national champion Auburn, who needed a
jl key penalty and questionable help at the goal line to eke out a 6-0 win
F on their home ground.
4 Coincidental with his success on the football Held, Collier has
l gained increasingly wide popularity and respect throughout the state
1 and nation. Relations with Kentucky high school coaches are at an all-
l time high and the \Vildcat mentor is constantly in demand as an au-
thoritative lecturer at coaching clinics all over the country. In the sum-
1 mer of 1957, he went overseas for the Army and Air Force to conduct
y clinics for armed services personnel in japan and Hawaii. He also has
served as one of the East coaches in the annual Shrine East-\Vest game
at San Francisco for the past two years and, i11 1955, was a coach in the
Christian Bowl game.
Collier married Miss Mary Forman Varden of Paris in 1931 and
they have three daughters—Carolyn, Kay and jane.
5 ALUMNUS COACH
Although Head Coach Blanton Collier did not receive his initial
college degr