xt76dj58gq18 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt76dj58gq18/data/mets.xml Kentucky Kentucky Press Association Kentucky Press Service University of Kentucky. School of Journalism 1929 Call Number: PN4700.K37 Issues not published 1935 Aug - 1937 Oct, 1937 Jul - 1937 Aug, 1939 Oct - Dec, 1940 Jan - Mar, 1951 Aug - 1956 Sep. Includes Supplementary Material:  2005/2006, Kentucky High School Journalism Association contest 2004-2005, Advertising excellence in Kentucky newspapers 2003-2005, Excellence in Kentucky newspapers newsletters  English Lexington, KY.: School of Journalism, University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Press Press -- Kentucky -- Periodicals The Kentucky Press, September 1929 Vol.1 No.8 text The Kentucky Press, September 1929 Vol.1 No.8 1929 2019 true xt76dj58gq18 section xt76dj58gq18 PAGE(S)  
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 i September, 1929 THE KENTUCKY PRESS Page Three , I
, HIRAM DUDLEY FIFTY Ill-'-'-'I'I'I'I'I-I'n'uI'”I'M-'1'WI'JH-Fn‘fu‘u'uwmflfu'fi'n'fi'ffim '. I
; YEARS IN INDUSTRY -' , I
I Hiram Dudley, editor and publisher . I
I of the Flemingsburg (Ky.) Times— .
I Democrat, and now in his fifty—first .: . . o I'
I year of continuous service in the indus- :. P M h I- I ;‘
I eey, wee been eeeeemeee n nee. e .- I ype, rmtlng ac Inery :: I I
I son of Charles Zadock and Sophia 5 2 I I
I Northcott Dudley of Fleming county, .- _ ' I
!. Ky. When 21 years old Hiram went ' 5 5 I '
f to western Mlssourlg an? on April 16’ i Complete outfits for large and small -" I
i 1873, began the publication of a week- :- , 5 I ',
1y, the Times, at Aullville. The pub- .: lants 5 II I
I lication continued for a year when he :- p '- ,
I, merged it with a paper at Lexington, :: .: :
' the Caucasian. Hiram Dudley worked . :5
on the Caucasian until September, 15 Boston Stitchers Kelly Presses 5 g;
1874, when he and an old printer, Her- '- 5 I» I
man Westbrook, began the publication II: . i. I I I
of the Cass County Times at Pleasant .- III
’ Hill, Mo. This was during the grass- a LEE B“ DAVISON i e 3;, I
' hopper visitation of 1874-75, and when . _ - II '
the grasshoppers ate up everything :: Travellng Representatlve a: I I
green in sight he sold out his interest ' ' II' I I I
in the Times and returned to his old 526 Unlon Street NaShVIHe’ Tenn' g I I
home in Kentucky. I. 'I: I I I
, He worked as a compositor on the :i' I I
Flemingsburg Democrat until 1877. FMWEAWN-‘f-WM}.V—%HH'JMHW.'n'ui'u'I-‘u‘n'iz' , I
I when he started a job office in Flem- 7 ¥ V II
' ingsburg, and in February, 1879, began ’ ’“’ ' ' i _ " W‘ " _._-._ ' W " " I ‘
the publication of the Flemingsburg
Times. Some two year's later he I
bought out the Democrat and consoli- II 1,
dated the two papers under the name I I
by which the paper is now known, the The I II
77 7 Times-Democrat. 7,, ~‘7;7“m#h\ ,_.,,,._,D , , ,, I, 7 , , , 77 fl , ‘
Though age creeps on, Mr. Dudley is EXTENSION DIVISION I ‘v I
3 still fond of hunting and fishing, likes I I
to see a good game of baseball or ' . ' i
basketball, and enjoys life in general. , UNIVCI Slty Of KentUCRy ‘ I
, —Linotype News.- - , I
If its news of the Kentucky news- —_ I I I V
paper fraternity, the Press wants it. I 3 . I
Send it In. ' '
-——.__——‘ Offers a large variety of subjects for home I I
' . . . . I
SALLYS SALL'ES study which carry umvers1ty credit. I I
. , I I
w . Among those offered are two courses In Jour- , I , I
73);} . . y ' 0 . I
Q nalism, Reporting (one year credit) and SpeCIal I .3 I
/ _ 'I
E .9 ‘ Feature Writing (one-half year credit). . - I
. V , I
’ ‘fih ' ' I
I: :‘n—A‘I , ——
”was . . I I I
' .55”, @0ka Why not increase the efi’1c1ency of your staff, I 3 ,
ins“ , . . I . 1 '
u _§"$J(A ' or correspondents, by enrolling them in these I I .
‘ 0% I“ I4 ‘ I ,
¥$ 3 courses! I II
I I , P 4 It I ,I
' / L A __ I II
‘ 00% / For Information Address _ I I I
, , ' . , DR. WELLINGTON PATRICK, DIRECTOR ' , ’-
'- " ' Lexington, Kentucky I 7 i
I _ I
f ' _ I , , . ,
i» ' The populatIon of any country Is more III ,
I dense from the neck up. A,,_,___ ___ A __ _, .. * W W__,,. _ E .
. I ' * ' WW“ — I I
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I III Page Four THE KENTUCKY PRESS September, 1929 ‘
, , iIagIsgj‘s I
. I {“1 (Continued from First Page) from 14 inches up to 22 inches, with should be: I
' I III"; means that they have access to a near— the popular length being 193/4 01‘ 20 Circulation. Rate COL Inch I
I": III 331‘: by casting box. Only sixteen papers inches. Less than 500 250
I” III I . have adopted the l2-em width column, Circulation Statistics 500-1000 . . . . .. 30c
I_ ,III 1‘ I one uses an 11 em column, two use the In the following table circulation 1000—1500 35c
. I . l‘I ,.: odd size of 131,~’_--em column, while 151 and advertising rates are given 510- 1500~2000 40c
, £3 III I: kept the old 13 em column in their cording to the headings at the top of 2000-3000 45c
‘ E I IHI papers, In the number of columns to each column. The names of the papers 3000-4000 500 I
III III ' the page we find the six-column page are not given but each line of figures In checking over the following fig- I
‘ ,’ II“ jzfi ' is the most popular with 94 editors, stands for a particular paper. These ures we find that many of our Ken- I'
3"! IIIII‘I the seven-column page with 52 edi— are run in alphabetical order. The tucky papers are not getting anywhere I 1
I, III tors, and eight-columns find 14 ad- editor has been an advocate for many near the minimum rate per column I 1
I III II herents. Five papers are listed as years of a proper and adequate col— inch that they should. We cannot S 1
II II II printing only five columns to the page, umn—inch rate for advertising. Ac- urge any too strongly that every editor I 2
- I t“ I one with four columns, one with three cording to the survey of the National Whose advertising rates are “below I 1
. I III columns, and one with the colonial— Editorial Association, the minimum cost” should raise them to a living I 2
, II‘ EEIIIII day custom of using nine columns, the advertising rate per inch that the wage. Too many depend on the job I 1
II I"1 ;: so-called blanket sheet. In the col— country newspaper should charge in shop to carry the newepaper load. You I 2
I 'I, III“ 3'; umn length we find papers running order to cover cost plus a small profit will be convinced by these figures. I 1
-.I 11,1, ~11 1
3‘! IEIIII ‘31 - 1 3
II II‘ II Rates 500 30 5 .. .. 1730 444 950 35 10 5 35 I
I IIIIII I . 4000 300 3000 30 5 a 35 900 400 500 30 10 5 30 j 2
III "IIIIIIII I 5 a) . 1569 569 1000 25 10 10 25 2791 688 1871 40 5 10 40 L
, III IIIII‘I I g- -.. .5 5 1525 200 300 35 10 10 .. 3000 40 10 .. ..
1 II?» Circulation H a ‘4 g 1300 720 720 30 5 1o 30 300 200 000 20 1o 5 40 r 1
II) 31.13%: j g d is a 1130 327 640 25 10 10 50 1200 15 10 .. ,_ .
; III :i‘IIII I h E f '5 525 20 5 .. .. 1800 600 900 30 10 10 30 1
III II'IIIIIIIIII I _ ._. C1 .1 g 8 g ,2 '2175 500 1575 35 10 10 50 1050 350 700 25 5 10 35 '
II ‘,'I g a g .2 K. 8 g 1700 30 5 10 50 1500 500 800 25 10 10 5o «
III-II III II g E04 D: g [,1 p: 94 2925 40 10 .. .. 1400 840 550 25 5 10 40
I IIIII 2460 520 1040 30 10 10 30 4259 1225 2500 40 5 10 50 900 300 600 30 10 7 50
I: III) I 750 20 5 .. .. 1965 393 1572 30 5 10 30 2321 1200 1321 40 5 10 50 5]
Eli, {in515 “, I. 1000 300 600 20 5 10 20 135° 70° 115° 40' 1° 1° 40 4312 120° 310° 42 10 10 56 . 0
II I i 2600 5-00 1300 35 5 5 50 140° 45° 800’ 2° 1° 7 3° 210° 1°00 35° 4° 1° 10 50 I!
‘ i I 1.3.1191. ‘ 2500 500 1600 30 10 10 40 500 20 ~ -- -- 150° 1000 500 30 5 15 45 . 1 "p
. I II I 1500 500 1000 20 5 5 20 3250 30 .. .. ._ 1350 300 900 25 5 10 25 _ n
: III: “I :II 1250 450 800 35 10 18 50 1025 400 625 30 10 20 30 , 3280 810 1470 40 10 10 50 ' f'
E t it III‘II II 1353 435 1418 35 10 15 42 2°00 100° 100° 45 5 1° 45 125° 30° 95° 25 1° 6 35 p
i, I III: I 1500 500 500 30 30 10 50 450° 200° 200° 5° -- 2° 5° 15°“ 60° 90° 3° 10 1° 30 i s}
III Iiiié’fl‘ I 315 200 600 20 10 5 30 3658 300 2353 40 .. 10 50 4600 40 10 .. .. t f‘
a : ii I 1375 1533 25 10 10 30 160° 18 4 " " 2850 900 1925 40 " 1° 50 I 11
I II II I 2300 250 1700 35 10 5 50 1900 800 900 30 10 12 35 2500 850 1550 40 10 10 50 2:
v. III; I 2000 3000 1700 40 .. 121/2 50 225° 55° 170° 40, 5 1° 5° 445° 200° 200° 6° 10 1° 75 ~
I - III III 535 161 300 25 5 20 30 2000 . . . . 2000 35 . . 4 35 1400 600 800 30 10 10 50
7 2 I IIIII '1‘: 2900 200 600 40 10 10 50 2500 30 .. 10 40 2000 500 1500 35 10 10 50 . E‘
: IIIIIIII ‘1 500 100 400 15 5 7 15 790 300 490 40 10 7 40 1600 250 1350 40 8 15 50 (
i I III 1517 130 1150 25 10 10 25 3393 2045 1353 40 10 10 40 3150 1450 1700 30 .. 5 30 I e?
: III 1000 2.70 630 30 5 5 50 2300 1100 900 271/2 71/2 10 27% 3360 1171 1350 30 10 10 50 " g
, III} I 1750 700 375 25 10 10 50 140° 75° 65° 3° 1° 1° 5° 120° 25 1° -' -- I S]
I I I 2314 300 1360 35 .. 10 35 2100 600 1500 35 10 7 45 700 500 200 35 .. 7 50 f a
I I I I 1230 400 650 25 . . 10 25 2285 338 1847 40 10 10 50 600 200 400 15 5 5 20 , I C]
-I III I 2000 500 1100 30 10 10 40 656. 250 400 20 1o 5 20 3600 1600 2000 35 5 7 50 l n
~ I 113:1 I 2200 500 300 40 5 .. 40 2624 505 1324 45 10 10 60 2750 1250 1550 40 10 10 50 ‘ - fl
I :. I‘LEI‘IIII 1730 400 1275 30 5 5 50 120° 24° 96° 25 1° 5 35 310° 125° 135° 40' 5 1° 50 3 t
5. “ ‘1 1800 500 1300 35- 5 10 50 1200 400 300 30 10 10 50 2000 500 1500 40 ., 10 40 l (
I I IIIII I I 3600 2000 1100 40 5 6 50 2000 500 1400 30 10 10 40 1863 700 1163 25 10 4 35 l» t‘.
1 , ijIII I I 1230 330 900 25 5 5 25 2198 456 1482 35 10 10 35 1000 300 700 25 10 10 25 a.
“\ IIIIII , 2000 1000 1000 40 10 10 50 3200 1000 1000 25 10 5 25 2485 1130 1355 40 10 121/2 60 ' t]
I , II I 1600_ 400 1200 30 10 .. .. 1450 800 500 20 5 10 20 3569 2569 1000 45 10 121A; 60
III 3000 1500 1250 40 .. 10 50 1000 25 10 .. .. 1400 300 900 30 5 3 50 u
I , . :II I ,; 2429 595 1500 30 10 10 50 3250 1250 2000 25‘ 5 10 30 300 430 320 30 10 10 30 2
II. II I" :‘III 1 2400 475 1625 30 10 10 30 1700 427 787 25 10 5 25 850 425 425 20 5 0 25 “f
I» . I f I 2400 _ . _ . . . . _ 30 10 . . . . 3100 800 1300 35 8 10 40 2764 1119 1217 35 10 10 50 3:
I ' ,I III‘ I 1250 700 550 30 10 10 35 1650 415 1200 45 5 10 50 2150 1000 950 35 10 15 50 j C(
. I . IIIII II 1150 500 650 30 10 10 35 850 209 441 25 5 4 25 2100 350 1450 30 10 121/2 35 ; -
I . I “I I 1150 500 650 30 10 10 50 2417 785 1632 28 7 10 28 3000 900 1240 40 5 10 30 ~ I;
I . II III I I 1500 000 500 30 5 ,, 5 35 , 4000 400 3600 25 .. 5 25 500 30 5 10 50 1,
‘- II I I 2300 900 1900 40 10 15 40 2000 362 1292 30 10 10 35 . 1700 . . . . . . . . 30 10 . . . . 11'
I III i 3650 1600 2000 40 15 10 50 1192 25 .. .. .. 625 225 400 39 5 10 40 I e1
If III I 2500 1500 1000 35 10 10 50 2750 1000 1750 35 ., 5 35 30° 25 .10 12. 25 7 I si
:1; £2: I I I 2035 950 1000 35 5 — 10 50 300 500 200 17 .5 5 20 Please Turn to Page Five)
1 ' i - ’0
It» - x? 5.
>11 ' ‘ ' “ l

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I I II
. 21
I I
September, 1929 THE KENTUCKY PRESS Page Five II I
. I .I
News are twelve and a half picas wide, ening up effect contributed to the page I 1
d o eight columns to the page. But the as a whole by the use of extra shoul- ‘ , II
:5 'I: .E 5 magazine page (page five) appears in ders of white space for the column ; I
Circulation H a >4 III six columns—sometimes in four, with rules. III
33 . 35‘ BI a double column panel in the center. Papers that now use four single col- 1 .
‘2‘ E 9‘ .. And extra shoulders of white space umns to present their editorials or I 1
.— 3 o S g} help considerably to brighten up the feature matter, or that use two double I ‘ I
’5 , g E '53 OI S 5 page. columns of eight point or smaller for II ‘
g E3 13:”: '5 g § E Eight times twelve and a half picas that purpose, should find it desirable III ‘
equals 100 picas. Allowing for seven to convert those columns into three III
1200 400 800 25 5 10 30 six point column rules, the total print— columns, with extra shoulders of white 1' I ‘
1985 375 1340 30 5 10 35 illg width is 1031/; picas. Six into space for the column rules. Of course TH
1310 33 .. 10 33 1031/; picas goes sixteen times, with when only part of a page is presented 1
2875 250 2675 30 5 5 30 seven and a half picas over for the in this way, there should be no extra I I
1100 85 900 30 10 .. 30 column rules and extra shoulders of shoulder of white space to the right of I I I
2680 700 1980 35 10 10 50 white space. the third column rule. Those three I‘ I
1500 35 10 .. .. These columns sixteen picas wide are wider column should be self contained II I
2500 385 2000 40 5 10 40 more attractive, and easier to read, and not intrude on the single column I I
1200 400 600 25 5 10 35 than would be the case were the same lines adjoining. . I ‘;
3000 35 5 10 30 face and point size to be used in col— ________ II I
600 350 105 25 10 10 50 umns twenty -five and a half picas m Tell the Forum, and your brother ‘l 1
2350 1000 1350 40 5 10 40 Width or Wlder,‘ , . editors, your newspaper problems. I- II
The suggestion ls offered that edl- Ii III
——-——-—— tors desirous of brightening up their “—“—— II I I1
editorial or feature pages, study the Otis C. Thomas, published of the ‘1‘ j‘
IMPROVING THE MAKE-UP OF I make-up or page five of The News. Liberty News, now operating in a new I I I
EDITORIAL FEATURE PAGES Observe the attractiveness of the page modern brick building, recently added lI II
. , h L' t as a whole. Notice the widths of its a Linotype. Mr. Thomas has been . I : II
(By John E‘ Allen, m t 8 m0 y p e columns—how easy the lines are to publishing the News, established in iIi II
NEWS)' read. And don’t overlook the bright- 1904 by his father, about ten years. II 1
Many nBWSpaperS_particumfly the .m I I 1
small town papers—make the mistake II I I I
of setting editorials (and other feature a _ I II III I I
matter on their editorial pages) in . I I . II
lines that are too wide for use in com— I I .- [/ I 2‘ '. - g I . 1 I
arat'wel ~WM€~MI¢7 ”,1 l“-‘-:;. . g r’ 4” g... I / I I , . I 1' I I II I . ‘
fileasuresycall the use of larger faces. I Q] gI’V/I? Egg? -/” W I I Cl % I, I 1 II I I
While six, seven and eight point I ’ fl¢1/I%E¢:i \§ , II . I/ f ; ‘I I: I I1
faces are approximate for use in news— I /I ’I/E" Egg/Q :17: :2. gill I i / y . I III I I
paper columns for twelve to thirteen I ’/ fly/ //A/;j¢ ; 27;; ”I - I I II I I
picts wide, those same faces are too I // éI/ ’1' fl /?'I¢e f- Egg ' f I/ I III I I
small for use in columns from twenty- I / .. gIV‘V/l‘ g2 ” ' II '7/ gag? g I IV I I
four and a half to twenty—six and a I / k / // Wig/l é I -II I. v I
half picas wide. Comparatively wide I '/ /’ fl/ ':?2.-/' /11g;5/,¢_.4 / 1 I I 1
lines set in comparatively small faces I 4/% //I"é’q-:’I gem ¢I I I
are unattractive and difficult to read. 1 " //,,m2/% : ,7‘ 3,»,7’ gm _____I /1 I I l‘
’ Although it would be foolish to at- I 2' ~ 5,711 [642.251 \‘figil¢z I I II
tempt to lay down an arbitrary rule I _' ’ R ’I/ ‘ .m— ‘ /I I II‘ ‘
for the width of type lines, repeated I / K //I 7', ¢V 1 ‘I III
experiments suggest that a fairly safe I ,4. fl? I . . II
guide to follow is this: That a column 1 g / ¢I5 1 : I
should not be much wider than an I \% é , I/I 1 I I . II
alphabet and a half of the lower case 1 \k 2': Ii/i / g¢ I I II I I
characters of the font to be used—not I . 3 ’ , «a: Igé E I . 5 II I
more, at least than two alphabets. or i . \42 (I 2/ ”I" , I I II‘
fifty-two characters of lower case. I 114$ §\ \ ’ f_ \\ , II; ' . I I II .
’ Many editors who now set their edi- I , ‘é I , Ml??? ’ J§I % I I I
torials (and certain feature matter) in I I! g: §-.' 7/41,”; 00 . Li 1 II I
twenty-four and a half or twenty-six I .7, g; " :41 fi / ' I I " I I; ‘
and a half pica widths would do better I 7—" : § ‘2, «I / / 1 I I I I
to increase the type size, or to decrease I ~— / / / \ I I ; I
the width of the columns. / — , I / ”1.15 ‘\ I I .
. . . . /4 ‘/ %/_/ ,// _ .v ’ I , f
Those who do not Wlsh to lnclease ( A é ‘ .41 , w I I
the type size, but do want their edi- J 17" //_ ' \ ‘3‘ ' “J . , II I
torial columns to be at least a little I ‘\ 3’s l \_ f) . I
wider than the regular news columns, ' . .. .1, " I I i
can secure the desired result by con- I r ' ///' ' ‘%\% I
verting three regular columns into two I ' I I“.
columns from seventeen to nineteen I I , 3%? %%%@) I II
picas in width. An even more attrac- 3% a 6- ‘ ’ ‘
tive arrangement results from convert- I k I I
ing four regular columns into three col- II ' M/Mfilit M0 dwefgéJEg’Mafl‘ I '
umns of three sixteen picas wide, with " 9.0 " J I ‘ 1 ‘I
extra shoulders of white space on both I: {bf 4.94/8 gz,‘ a6 ///J¥(€fid’ Of 5 I I
Sides of the column rules involved. v i W I' I
The regular columns of the Linotype A g... . . . _ 1....-.” . _ .. . . _ ,1, . _ I I I II
. I ‘ ‘ 1" iI,
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- jjjg‘l Page Six THE KENTUCKY PRESS September, 1929 '
: ‘ 'l;.g;:;:;jij§i '
:1 - lilti‘wwl"
E ljjjjj‘j (Continued from First Page) allowed its record to fall behind the that kind of coverage and now often
, ' jj jjw l1 requirements of the Bureau and it was hesitate to use it. j
; I» ‘jjjjj‘ ing manager of the Western Electric necessary to place that publication “One great advantage of the Audit j
. jjjjjjjjjjj-j Company, who is president of the under suspension. Instead of dropping Bureau of Circulations would be abso- ,
: . jlj :jjj Audit Bureau of Circulations, the out, the paper paid its dues right along lutely uniform methods of auditing and j
, jjj’j?;;i3 Skowhegan paper said: “Perhaps the until it would be restored to member- reporting. %
, jjjjji greatest benefit derived from our mem- ‘ship. It is hardly likely that they “This Board desires to compliment g
' 5 jjj‘H bership in the Audit Bureau Of Ch'- would have done this had they not felt the State Press Associations of New r
-j, jj555“j culations is that we have been able to A. B. C. membership was worth what York and Nebraska for initiating au- j .
. ,_;; ,jjjjjgj, sir mamtam a rate for advertlslng cqm- it cost. dited circulations in their states and ‘
~ 3? jjjjjjj‘jjg mensurate With our 4500 Circulatlon. The field manager of the Nebraska sincerely hopes that such auditing will .
f j -jjj;j‘j“,3ljjjj Numbering among the larger weeklies Press Association in a recent article finally be entrusted to the Audit Bu- ~
Mj igjjjjg jjjj “1 iS perhaps natural to expect that said: “Advertisers have the same reau of Circulations."
‘1 ’j'ji,‘ we would receive practically 311 na— right to know what they are buying Many publishers think they cannot
, “jj , jjjlj jgj’ tional accounts using Maine pepers in as any other customer. Although ser— afford the expense. For papers with a ~
. j g jjjjjg‘jji, 0111‘ class even though we mamtalned vice is an indefinite quantity, Nebraska distribution of 5,000 or less per issue
jjj j ,‘jj, no audit seerce. We are satisfied, publishers are attempting to define it the cost is only $1.00 per week. This ,
'jgf jjjj‘ however, that our A. B. C. statements in terms of what the market demands is the annual dues, and there is no
jj ijjjjj j‘j‘; have resulted in some additional busi— and are endeavoring to furnish every further cost. It includes all auditing
3113, jiljjjjjl j 11883. An instance of this occurred re- possible aid in determining the value expense, except perhaps in the case
jj‘jjjjj,j cently. After working on an. account of their service. Realizing that others of the initial audit, which may not be '
g' ‘jjgj ,jjjjjjji‘jjjj for some tWO months and havmg been had worked on similar problems, their quite covered by the first year‘s dues. ‘
; j! jjjgjj‘jfjé actually turned down, we drove home first step was to secure a copy of the This surely is not much of a burden
1' jjijjj‘jijfjj a final argument of A. B. C. member- requirements of the Audit Bureau of to any publisher, and is insignificant
j :j‘ jjjjjj .jjjj ship. Circulation and model their general as a business promotion expense. It is
j: .jjf jjl jjj "fA two-year contract was received plans as closely as possible upon these probably no more than will be found
j j xjjj‘ jj‘j; last week, our patron replying in part; requirements.“ In a letter to the Bu- necessary to handle the publishers, , -
j j- [W jj ‘We appreciate the fact that the In— reau a few months ago this same field statements and make audits under the
"jar? jljjjj‘j‘ dependent-Reporter is a member of manager said: “It seems to be falling auspices of the State Press Associa- .
jjj jjjjjj'jj‘ the A. B. c_, which is unusual for a to me to sort of promote the idea of tions. It would be a nuisance to have '
j ‘j : j‘jjjjl“j weekly paper. We wish more of them country newspaper audits generally in j a number of standards. As the Worth
j ‘ iijjjjjjjjijjjj‘jj would fouow suit.’ Prior to our affiha- other states as well as Nebraska. While County Tribune man said, why waste .
j jgjjjjjjjjjjj1j‘jj tion with you some five years ago we the work will necessarily be done in money trying to build up an organi-
j jg. ‘H‘jj ‘jj engaged no outside auditor. As to the state units at the start, I forsee the zation for circulation verification when
j'j ‘jj expense under the present arrange- time when this too will be a national one is already built and available to
j j ijj‘j ment, it. is difficult to imagine how the activity taken care of by a national all at a very reasonable cost?
’ j if; j: g‘ work could be done so thoroughly at organization. I do not see how it can The question asked by the small
j j} jjjjj much less the rate which you are now be satisfactorily handled in any other town weekly publisher, “What could I
i jj jgjj {jj charging, While independent or small way. If left to the various State Press get out of a membership in the Audit
j jjjj jjjj j‘ji group audits may serve the purpose Associations it will mean that each Bureau of Circulations,” is a very prac-
j ‘ jjjj‘vd very well, it is our opinion that a week- state association will have a chance to tical one and perfectly legitimate. It .
j jjj jjjjlj ly newspaper able to claim member— inject its own peculiar ideas, which is usually asked, however, with a
j j jjjjjgfii jjj ship in the Audit Bureau of Circula- may not be in harmony with the rather narrow outlook, or let us say.
j j :Hjj‘jj g tions or a similar organization of na— necessary spirit of newspaper auditing. a~ shortsighted view of what will be
‘ jl jj‘j jj tional prominence at once demands the I wish it were possible for the Audit the benefit to them. If by benefit
j ,j‘ ,jjj j: attention and enjoys greater prestige Bureau of Circulations to take this they mean what advertising contract
jjj‘jijm with advertisers and with advertising matter off of our hands and create a will immediately fall into their laps ‘
‘ j; jjjj‘jjj agencies.” division for the purpose of taking upon entering the Audit Bureau, no
, j :5} 'jjijjj‘ The publisher of the Worth County care of weekly newspaper audits. I one can guarantee them any specific
j j “‘jljl .jjj Tribune said in reply to the same in- think lt would be 'far better if there lmmedlate benefit.
j j“ jjjjjjj‘j ‘jj quiry': u A. B. C. membership is the were only one offiClal audltlng organi—g There is no doubt that many adver-
' ' j ‘jt j ,jj only audit answer of the country zation." tisers are passing up the small town
. j jjjjj 1 jj: weekly, and until they reach it they The Executive Board of the Ameri— field entirely because they feel too un—
jj-jjgéjjg 3g take only half measures. _ . . Who can Association of Advertising Agen- certain about it. That many of them _g
j g ;,,j besides A. B. C. has an established cies recently adoptedaresolution which are looking towards it with consid—
\ j: jjil reputation with the general advertiser? read: erable interest is evidenced by the re-
: iijjj Why waste money trying to build “In view of the fact that advertis— cent developments among the Press
j juj‘j‘ such a reputation when one is already ing agencies and advertisers are con- Associations themselves and in the. {55“
j jjj‘ j‘jjjjjj , built and available to all at a very siderably hampered in their use of the- somatlon 0f Amerlffian Advertlsme
§ f,‘ jjjjj‘j.»., j reasonable cost?” Mr. Simon then country newspapers by the lack of re- Agents. The questlon ShOUId net
i fl jjjjj} j goes on to relate how he sold out last liable circulation and other data, this therefore be “What immediate specific
j jjj ljij December to a company headed by a Board desires to go on record in rec- contract that some other paper is get— ,
5 “jjrjlj {1? man who had been with them eight ommending to country publishers and ting will my individual paper Secure
_9 W 2 . years and he points out that everybody the State Associations that they adopt 1f 1 Jom the Andlt .Bureau Of Clrcu-
g, jjjjjjj j‘x, in the company knew exactly what some reliable method of having circu— latlons.” 'The question should be the
j ; iljij they were buying in the way of cir— lations periodically checked, and es- PIS QheStIOh Of “What larger prosper-
| 33, jjjjjl culation. Mr. Simons said that last pecially recommend that the Audit Bu- lty W111 come. to the small town field
' jg} jjjjj jg: year he carried nearly 35,000 inches reau of Circulations be employed in as a whole In Whieh my paper W111
j, jjjjij; jf; of advertising at an average rate of view of its experience, efficiency and share if we organize our field on a
’ - j {i jijjjjlu 2'7 cents. He says he led his competi- its general acceptance by publishers, verified circulation basis?”
‘ jj jjijjjj tor in every way and some time ago advertisers and advertising agencies. _An°the1‘ Deiht 0t misunderstanding
: jj jjjw ;,3 even raised his subscription price 50 “This Board believes that if the has been that'hOthlhg hilt paid-1n—ad- f
' jjjjj‘ jjj cents above his competitor. country papers could be put upon a vance Circulation 15 recognized in the ,
_ l j“ M jg The Wildwood paper evidently did sound basis of known circulation val- Bureau‘s reports. This is a mistake. .
:31; ‘jjj not give Mr. Thomson a reply, but ues, they would be much more widely Every copy distributed to a reader is
2‘ j :1; _‘ 5jj ,, after .havmg an audit that newspapers used by national advertisers who need (Please Turn to Page Seven) ;
é 'f iijjij j? ‘
jéjjjjj ‘33 \
jo'j‘éfj . I
, .-,'~“ ‘ . ' « r’ .

 E E ‘
E .
September, 1929 THE KENTUCKY PRESS Page Seven ‘ 1 EE
faithfully reported. It is true that the way would be a mail list for periodi- (Continued from First Page) E
distribution is segregated and analyzed cal dates during the twelve months— (Pumpkins). ‘ E
in such ways that its character may say a list every eight weeks. It is also “What do these strong forebodings j E
be known to the advertiser, and no necessary for the publisher to keep a mean.” (Ghostly weird shapes). E E
publisher should be unwilling to dis- record of how many papers were print— “No leap in the dark when buying 1 E
close the exact facts about the thing ed each issue and a record of the here.” (Frog). ‘E 'E
be is offering to an advertiser in re- amount of paper that was used. A per- “Witch shall it be. Take your choice.” 1E : ‘ E
turn for the latter’s money. If a pub— manent record book must be maintain- (Witch). EE E
lisher distributes regularly 3000 copies, ed. The Bureau has prepared such a Autumn—Foliage and flowers rich in ‘ E
1500 copies of which are paid for in book for the use of daily newspapers, reds, orange and brown, together with E
. advance, 1000 in three months and 500 but as yet has no special book for the fruits of the harvest. The grape 1E EE1
some time after six months have weeklies. Such a book will undoubted— is particularly designated as a fall sym- 1E E--‘ EE
passed, he should be willing to tell the 1y be prepared when the number of bol. (See September). E E
advertiser all those facts. That is weekly members warrant it. In the Columbus Day—Pictures of Columbus 1E
what the A. B. C. member does in the meantime the regular newspapers cir- and his caravels, Ferdinand and Isa- E
Bureau reports. culation record book can be used. belle of Spain, his landing in America. E .
The Audit Bureau of Circulations is etc. -; E1
not a hardboiled circulation watchdog (Compiled byE and printed here . EE
which has undertaken. to go about the Lehigh Harrison, publisher of the Fh1:0ugh‘lthe courtesy of The Advertis- E E
purpose Pf catching dishonest publlsh- Henderson Gleaner and Henderson mg W01 d’ Columbus, Ohlo') E
ers. It 15 a creature 0f the publishers Journal, today announced the purchase . . EE
themselves. It 15 a cooperatlve organ- of a site on North Elm street for a new The Forum wants your letters on E 1 E
ization owned and operated Jorntly‘by home for the two papers. He plans to current ploblems. Send them In. E E. E
DUbHSherSv advertlselfi and advertlslng leave in a, few days to visit newgpaper ————-——— E: E
agencies through. thh the buyer and plants in other cities for ideas before W. F. Fultz, publisher of the Olive E-
591191' 0f advertising space can deal completing plans. The site, bought Hill Herald, which he established ‘E EE E
frankly Wlth one another. on the has” from Mr, and Mrs. George Minnis, has 15 years ago, purchased a Model 8 re- E1 1 EE
M a thoroegh understandlng Of all the been occupied for 50 years by a build- cently. The Herald is housed in its E E EE
facts. Thls makes ft a great conve- ing now used as a boarding house. own building. 1 3 EE
nience for both parties, and the A. B. E . 1
C- has proved itself in the fifteen years E . ‘ EE
of its existence to be a remarkable pro- E .E E .
moter of business for its publisher 2 NATIONALLY ADVERTISED g EEE Ei
members by establishing confidence in g PAPER g E EE
the whole business of advertising. The E 5 E E E . E
small WWII. fiffld may Dartake Of that 2 Mr. Editor: Your customer, a paper user, reads 3 11’ 1 1,1
PI‘OSpel‘ltY 1f “3 Wln- , . E about certain nationally advertised brands of paper in 5 EE ‘1 3
The emit—erflflmflllsi‘f’rjiglfle 5 “neyervmagazine , DO. you takeadvantagaof. this adver- 5 NE E E
advertisers information should be done : . . ' ' ’ . , _ ‘ 1 1 7 1 z "‘1 E‘ 1
. . : t1s1ng? Do you supply your customers With this paper : E1 1 E
direct along the lines of what the ad- . . . .E E
vertiser wants. So far as a daily i on thelr orders? It costs you no more than the other E.E1 E ‘1
newspaper is concerned this is exem- g trade marks. Why not stock the advertised bonds and 'E E1E = t
. . Dlified by the standard form of report 3 secure them from— '5 E E
used by the Bureau on that class of 3 >5 "EIE
publications. The three weekly news- 3 . L' C' TURNER 3 'E E1 1 E
papers which are members of the Bu- 2 Lexington Representative E E E E
. reau have been using the same form, E WHITAKER pApER COMPANY E E E 1
. and it has evidently proved satisfac- E E E E
1, - tory. On this form the circulation is E C' A- WALSH FRANK FUND E E;‘ T E EE
. divided into three territorial divisions E Western Kentucky Eastern Kentucky 5 E: EE
1 ‘0”3’1 “human 01‘ trading tel‘rit0ry1 E‘ f E
and all other. City is generally the E 1‘1 EE
1 corporate limits 0f the City Of DUb- Em E‘ E E
_ iication. Suburban or trading terri- E . -EE
. tory is the territory surrounding the i ‘1 E 1
_ city from which the city draws its Get Your EE 1E1
. trade. This is described in Paragraph IMPERIAL E E1 E
, 10 of the.Audit Reports. “All other" Metal Direct From ‘E 1
i 15; 2‘“ terrltm‘y beyond that Classed as Cincinnati, Louisville, or Nashville Warehouses E ‘l
. city and suburban. The Bureau’s re- . 1 . 1‘
I quirements are that the publisher shall The Imperial Type Metal Company manufactures nothing but type E E
; have a record of his distribution for fiftifio Hilfifiogieggalggtlzfi this giggltéed in quality and uniformity, 1' E EE
, - . . .- e e a m s. E .‘ ‘
E figsrsifizzltieonssegwigizbedl bifaileejifsatuggf This paper that you are reading, the Louisville Courier-Journal, the : E
. scribed. P , h . Lexington Herald and the Lexmgton Leader, as well as a majority of . E E
1 . , laragrap 3 prov1des for other papers in the state, are consxstent users of Imperial Metals and 1
, three div1s10ns of the paid. Paragraph the Plus Plan. - E E
E 1% pir‘lozides for various classifications The next time you need metal, get Imperial and compare the results. 1
, o w a does not measure u to the E EE
1 Bureau‘s definition of paid. Tlhe keep- CINCINNATI NASHVILLE ll LEGS-ISVILLE E E
E ing of this information for each week M02233; Egan'stco' Trgfiger; 53:2;600. a; £181,312:- , E: [E
1 “"11 not entail any considerable work Main 1150 E 101 B’dway Tel. 6-8572 City 7951 E 11 ‘
or expense to the publisher. . E ‘ 5 E
I Proof of the correctness of the fig- Imperl