xt76hd7nph4h https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt76hd7nph4h/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky University of Kentucky 19980820 minutes English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Minutes of the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees Minutes of the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees, 1998-08-oct20. text Minutes of the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees, 1998-08-oct20. 1998 2011 true xt76hd7nph4h section xt76hd7nph4h 





                                        AGENDA

                             Meeting of the Board of Trustees
                                  University of Kentucky
                                         1:00 P.M.
                                      October 20, 1998
Invocation

Roll Call

Approval of Minutes

President's Report and Action Items

PR 1    President's Report to the Trustees
        A.  Center for Applied Energy Research Report

PR 2    Personnel Actions

PR 3    Central Administration (No items to report)

PR 4    Community College System (No items to report)

PR 5    Lexington Campus (No items to report)

PR 6    Medical Center
        A.  Creation of a School of Public Health
        B. Naming of University Laboratories - Medical Center

Finance Committee

1.    Acceptance of Interim Financial Report for the University of Kentucky for the Three
            Months Ended September 30, 1998
 2.     Acceptance of the Financial Statements of the University of Kentucky and Affiliated
             Corporations and Other Related Organizations for the Year Ended June 30, 1998
 3.    Report of Leases
 4.    Approval of Lease
 5.    Patent and Copyright Assignments Report
 6.     GTE South, Inc. Pledge
 7.    Helen Thacker Hill Gift of $105,397
 8.    Oliver H., Jr. and Anne H. Raymond Gift and Pledge of $2 Million
 9.    Ashland Inc. Pledge of $1 Million




 








       Minutes of the Meeting of the Board of Trustees of the University of Kentucky,
Tuesday, October 20, 1998.

       The Board of Trustees of the University of Kentucky met at 1:00 p.m. (Lexington
time) on Tuesday, October 20, 1998 in the Board Room on the 18th floor of Patterson
Office Tower.

       A.    Meeting Opened

       Governor Edward T. Breathitt, Chairperson, called the meeting to order at 1:12
p.m., and the invocation was pronounced by Mr. Martin Welenken.

      B.    Roll Call

      The following members of the Board of Trustees answered the call of the roll:
Mr. Ted Bates, Governor Edward T. Breathitt (Chairperson), Mr. Nathan Brown, Mr.
Paul W. Chellgren, Mr. Merwin Grayson, Mr. John "Jack" Guthrie, Mr. James F.
Hardymon, Professor Loys L. Mather, Dr. Robert P. Meriwether, Mr. Billy Joe Miles,
Dr. Elissa Plattner, Mr. Steven S. Reed, Professor Daniel R. Reedy, Mr. C. Frank Shoop,
Mrs. Marian Sims, Dr. W. Grady Stumbo, Mr. Martin Welenken, Mr. Billy B.
Wilcoxson, and Mr. Russell Williams. Absent from the meeting was Ms. JoEtta Y.
Wickliffe. The University administration was represented by President Charles T.
Wethington, Jr.; Chancellors James W. Holsinger, and Elisabeth Zinser; Vice Presidents
Fitzgerald Bramwell, Joseph T. Burch, Ben W. Carr, Edward A. Carter, George DeBin
and Eugene Williams; Dr. Juanita Fleming, Special Assistant for Academic Affairs; and
Mr. Richard E. Plymale, General Counsel.

      Members of the various news media were also in attendance. A quorum being
present, the Chairperson declared the meeting officially open for the conduct of business
at 1:15p.m.

      C.    Approval of Minutes

      Governor Breathitt said that the Minutes of the Board meeting on September 15,
1998 had been distributed and asked for any additions or corrections. Mr. Guthrie moved
that the Minutes be approved as distributed. Mr. Shoop seconded the motion, and it
carried.

      D.    President's Report to the Board of Trustees (PR 1)

      President Wethington called attention to the following items in PR 1:

      1. The University received $47,666,298 in private donations during the last
         academic year. This represents a 15 percent increase over the prior year, and
         the most private funding ever received.




 





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       2. The Center for Applied Energy Research will receive $10 million from the
          Department of Energy.

       3. The College of Education was approved for a $2 million Kentucky Council on
          Postsecondary Education grant to develop a Center for Literacy development.

       4. An experimental technique called microwave ablation was used by UK
          electrophysiologist Andrea Natale last month to repair a patient's atrial flutter,
          the first time the technique has been used outside of California.

       5. Students in the College of Education placed items into a time capsule on
          October 7th to mark the college's 75th anniversary.

       6. Visitors coming electronically to UK are now welcomed with a more modern,
          user-friendly greeting at the University's web site. The new site, designed by
          Orb-bit Design Group and maintained by UK Public Relations will provide
          up-to-date information to the public about the University.

       7. University researchers continue to look at KERA. An eight-year study by UK
          researchers shows that children who were enrolled in a special preschool
          program in Kentucky public schools are consistently performing as well in
          their classes as the general population of children who were not enrolled in the
          program.

       8. Former New York mobster Michael Franzese presented a seminar about
          gambling on college campuses this month at the UK Singletary Center for the
          Arts. The seminar was sponsored by the UK Athletic Association in order to
          help students and the general public understand the dangers of sports betting.

       President Wethington asked the Board to read the other items in the report at their
leisure.

       E.    Personnel Actions (PR 2)

       President Wethington recommended that approval be given to the appointments,
actions and/or other staff changes which require Board action; and that the report relative
to appointments and/or changes already approved by the administration be accepted.
Mrs. Sims moved approval. The motion, seconded by Mr. Shoop, carried. (See PR 2 at
the end of the Minutes.)

       F.    Creation of a School of Public Health (PR 6A)

       President Wethington called on Chancellor Holsinger to comment about the
creation of a School of Public Health.




 





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       Chancellor Holsinger said it was a great pleasure for him to recommend that the
Board approve the establishment of a School of Public Health. The University is moving
to the year 2020 to be a Top 20 public research university. He said, in his opinion, one of
the key points in moving in that direction is the creation of a School of Public Health.
Public health is an area that has been overlooked for years in American health care, and
as a result of that several new schools of public health have been created across the
country. There is no school of public health in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, nor in
several of the surrounding states. The closest ones are Ohio State and the University of
North Carolina.

       He said that the creation of a School of Public Health is a part of the Five-year
Strategic Plan. A School of Public Health will allow the University to focus more heavily
on issues of the growth of managed care and new information technology in health care.
It will also help renew the University's longstanding emphasis in the academic health
center in the areas of health promotion and disease prevention. This will allow
individuals that work throughout the Commonwealth of Kentucky to have an enhanced
opportunity to obtain the kinds of training that is required in order for them to be able to
effectively be involved in the knowledge and skills that will allow them to assist the
citizens of the Commonwealth in these areas of population based medicine. The creation
of a School of Public Health within the Chandler Medical Center will result in the
University being only the 1 oth academic health center of 125 in the United States to have
all six of the health professions schools: medicine, dentistry, nursing, allied health,
pharmacy and public health.

       President Wethington recommended that the Board approve the establishment of
the School of Public Health within the College of Medicine. He noted that the
recommendation has been through the necessary bodies on the Lexington Campus, the
Medical Center and the University Senate. It comes to the Board with the
recommendation of the faculty in the appropriate bodies that are involved in the
establishment of such a school. He explained that it will be a school within the College
of Medicine, not the establishment of a separate college. Following a discussion about
the budget, structure and programs, Mr. Chellgren moved approval of PR 6A. Mrs. Sims
seconded the motion, and it passed. (See PR 6A at the end of the Minutes.)

       G.    Naming of University Laboratories - Medical Center (PR 6B)

       President Wethington recommended that the Board approve the naming of
Laboratory 125 in the Sanders Brown Center on Aging the R. C. Durr Neuropathology
Research Laboratory, and that Laboratory 223 be named the Paul D. Blazer, Jr. Stroke
Research Laboratory. He noted that a significant contribution has been made by Mr. R.
C. Durr to the Center on Aging, and the Blazer family has contributed $250,000 toward
the study of strokes at the University of Kentucky. The Committee on Naming University
Buildings has made its recommendation to the Chancellor of the Medical Center that




 





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these laboratories be named accordingly. On motion made by Mrs. Sims, seconded by
Mr. Wilcoxson and carried, PR 6B was approved.

       Dr. Plattner thanked President Wethington and Chancellor Holsinger for their
effort in accelerating and moving forward the new addition to research at the university.

       President Wethington expressed appreciation to Dr. Plattner and Mr. Grayson for
their efforts in helping with the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging.

       H.    Center for Applied Energy Research Report

       President Wethington said that he had asked Dr. Frank Derbyshire, Director of the
University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and professor of Chemical
Engineering, to make a presentation. Dr. Derbyshire comes highly credentialed and
highly experienced. The Center for Applied Energy Research, in his opinion, is carrying
out the mission that was envisioned for the Center when it was established and made part
of the University. He noted that the energy lab had been with the University of Kentucky
and the University of Louisville and was returned to the University of Kentucky. He
asked Vice President Bramwell to introduce Dr. Derbyshire.

       Dr. Bramwell said that Dr. Derbyshire had been the Director of the University of
Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and a professor of Chemical Engineering
since September 1989. His previous professional experience includes: Research
Director, Sutcliffe Speakman Carbons Ltd.; Associate Professor of Fuel Science at
Pennsylvania State University; Group leader at Mobil R & D Corporation's Central
Research Division, and other research positions in the private sector. He holds a B.Sc.
Honors degree in Chemical Engineering from Manchester University, England; a M. Eng.
degree in Chemical Engineering from MacMaster University, Ontario; and a Ph.D. in
Chemical Engineering from Imperial College, England. He is a member of several
professional organizations, holds 14 patents and has had 140 papers presented and
published in conference proceedings and journals. Dr. Bramwell said it was a pleasure to
introduce Dr. Derbyshire.

       Dr. Derbyshire thanked President Wethington and the Board for giving him an
opportunity to talk about the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research
(CAER). He provided a brief overview of the history and activities of the Center
followed by a description of recent funding successes. He said that CAER is a
nonacademic unit whose primary focus is research on the use of Kentucky's energy
resources and associated environmental impact. Since 1988, CAER has been an integral
unit of the University of Kentucky and has prospered in the university setting. The
Center has attracted extramural funding to a cumulative value of almost $30 million since
1990, has extensively supported both students and faculty, has fostered program
diversification, and has been active in both instruction and service. Recent significant
funding awards include three contracts from the Department of Energy totaling $8.4
million. These contracts will support research that is concerned with the production of




 





- 5 -



fuels and chemicals from coal gases, strategies for the utilization and disposal of coal
combustion byproducts, and the recovery and use of fine coal waste. The Center is also a
major participant in a large grant award from the National Science Foundation to
establish an Advanced Carbon Materials Center. This research will strengthen the
Center's involvement in materials synthesis and consolidate existing collaborations with
three tier-one departments in the Research Challenge Trust Fund -- chemical & materials
engineering, chemistry, and physics. Following his presentation, he entertained questions
from the Board.

       Dr. Reedy commented on the interface the centers have with the instructional role
as an institution and its academic programming. He pointed out that Dr. Derbyshire and
CAER have been exemplary in the way they have provided that interface. One of the
highest forms of instruction at the institution occurs in those laboratories with direct
interaction with researchers and faculty members. A number of graduate students and
faculty members are involved in those activities, and CAER has done a splendid job of
providing that interface in a number of sectors.

       President Wethington called attention to Dr. Derbyshire's reference to the energy
lab ties with the "targets of opportunity", the programs in the Report of the Task Force on
Research and Graduate Education Priorities identified to have achieved some national or
international level of recognition. Dr. Derbyshire is also making a great effort to tie the
efforts of CAER into the departments on campus, particularly engineering, chemistry,
physics and others as well.

       President Wethington said that the byproduct that Professor Reedy mentioned of
providing a place for faculty and students (graduate and undergraduate) to get experience
during their time at the University is another wonderful addition that the energy lab
makes to the entire University. He said he was very pleased with the progress of the
energy lab and praised Dr. Derbyshire for his fine leadership. Dr. Derbyshire received a
round of applause.

       I.    Announcement by Marian Sims

       Mrs. Sims announced that 1998 marks the 60th anniversary of the University of
Kentucky Student Center, and it has served the campus well. The student organizations
are housed there, and it is a hub of activity for the entire campus. She encouraged the
Board to participate in the 60th anniversary events scheduled for November 6th, 7th, and
8th..

       J.    Acceptance of Interim Financial Report for the University of Kentucky for
the Three Months Ended September 30. 1998 (FCR 1)

       Mr. Hardymon, Chairperson of the Finance Committee, reported that the Finance
Committee met and considered nine items to submit to the Board. FCR 1 is an Interim
Financial Report that is considered at every meeting. This report is for the three months




 





6-



that ended September 30, 1998. He noted the percentage of total budget of income is
28% which is the same as this time last year, and the expenditure level is slightly less,
24% versus 25%. He stated that the balance sheet is strong, and there is positive cash
flow. The Committee reviewed the items that had differences from last year and found
that they were the result of a timing issue of payments from the state and other sources.
He moved approval of FCR 1. Mr. Miles seconded the motion, and it carried. (See FCR
1 at the end of the Minutes.)

       K.    Acceptance of the Financial Statements of the University of Kentucky and
Affiliated Corporations and Other Related Organizations for the Year Ended June 30,
1998 (FCR 2)

       Mr. Hardymon said FCR 2 recommends the acceptance of the financial statements
of the University of Kentucky and the nine affiliated corporations and other related
organizations for the year that ended June 30, 1998. The Finance Committee has the
oversight responsibility involving working with the university's outside auditors and the
internal financial group. The statements are well done and easy to read. They should be
interesting documents to use for talking about the University.

      He reported that the Finance Committee received a full report and copies of the
management letters involving compliance, internal control, and House Bill 622. The
letters stated very strongly that the University has a good financial position, and there are
no deficiencies to report. The Finance Committee will receive another letter on internal
control which is a part of the process. He noted that the Board would receive a letter and
questionnaire regarding Y2000 compliance. He said that he believes the university is far
along toward this compliance. Mr. Hardymon moved approval of FCR 2. Mr. Shoop
seconded the motion, and it passed. (See FCR 2 at the end of the Minutes.)

      L.    Report of Leases (FCR 3)

      Mr. Hardymon said FCR 3 is the Report of Leases that the Board must accept. He
noted that there were two rather small leases that do not exceed $30,000 annually. He
reviewed the square footage and costs and moved approval of FCR 3. His motion,
seconded by Professor Mather, passed. (See FCR 3 at the end of the Minutes.)


      M.    Approval of Lease (FCR 4)

      Mr. Hardymon said FCR 4 is for approval of a lease with an annual value over
$30,000. This is an addendum to a lease involving office space for Kentucky Injury
Prevention/Behavioral Science located on Waller Avenue in Lexington. He noted that the
rate for the expansion is $11.50 per square foot which is the same rate as the original
lease. He moved approval of FCR 4. Mr. Miles seconded his motion, and it passed. (See
FCR 4 at the end of the Minutes.)




 





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       N.    Patent and Copyright Assignments Report (FCR 5)

       Mr. Hardymon said FCR 5 is the Patent and Copyright Assignments Report for
the quarter June 1 through September 30, 1998. He said that the important thing for the
Board to remember is that it is approving a process. These patents are developed by
highly talented individuals. He briefly reviewed the assignments and moved approval of
FCR 5. Mr. Bates seconded the motion, and it carried. (See FCR 5 at the end of the
Minutes.)

       0.    GTE South, Inc. Pledge (FCR 6)

       Mr. Hardymon said FCR 6 recommends that the Board accept a pledge of
$1,500,000 from GTE South, Inc. of Irving, Texas. $600,000 goes to the
communications and network systems building, and $900,000 is for an endowed chair in
computer science in the College of Engineering Department of Computer Science. The
pledge will be paid in five annual installments of $300,000 beginning in January 1999.
On motion made by Mr. Hardymon, seconded by Mr. Brown and carried, FCR 6 was
approved. (See FCR 6 at the end of the Minutes.)

      P.    Helen Thacker Hill Gift of $105,397 (FCR 7)

      Mr. Hardymon moved that the Board accept a gift of municipal bonds valued at
$105,397.69 from Helen Thacker. Ms. Hill received her bachelor's and master's degrees
from the University of Kentucky College of Education. This scholarship fund will benefit
students with certified disabilities who are committed to a career in the rehabilitation of
developmentally disabled adults in rural areas. The University will sell the bonds and use
those funds as designated. He moved approval of FCR 7. Mr. Welenken seconded his
motion, and it passed. (See FCR 7 at the end of the Minutes.)

      Q.    Oliver H., Jr. and Anne H. Raymond Gift and Pledge of $2 Million (FCR


      Mr. Hardymon moved that the Board accept a gift of $1 million and pledge of $1
million from Oliver H., Jr. and Anne H. Raymond of Louisville, Kentucky, to establish
and endow four Raymond-Blythe Professorships and ten Raymond-Terrell Fellowships in
the College of Engineering's Department of Civil Engineering. He reported that Mr. and
Mrs. Raymond have been loyal and generous benefactors of the College of Engineering.
Mr. Raymond is a 1954 graduate with a bachelor's degree in civil engineering, and Mrs.
Raymond received her degree in commerce from UK in 1954. He has been involved with
the University and College for many years and is a member of the Hall of Distinction and
recipient of the Department of Civil Engineering's Lifetime Achievement Award. This
gift is for $ 1million immediately and the pledge will be paid in four annual installments
of $250,000 beginning in 1999. He moved approval of FCR 8. Professor Reedy
seconded his motion, and it passed. (See FCR 8 at the end of the Minutes.)




 





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       R.    Ashland Inc. Pledge of $1 Million (FCR 9)

       Mr. Hardymon moved that the Board accept a pledge of $1 million from Ashland
Inc. to establish and endow the Ashland Chair of Chemical Engineering in the College of
Engineering's Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering. This gift will be paid
in annual installments over a five-year period beginning in 1998. He stated that Ashland
Inc. has been a corporate leader in support of education in Kentucky for many decades,
and it is only fitting that this gift will be the first corporate gift submitted by the
University for matching state money through the Research Challenge Trust Fund. He
moved approval of FCR 9. His motion, seconded by Mr. Chellgren, carried. (See FCR 9
at the end of the Minutes.)

       Governor Breathitt thanked Mr. Hardymon for his very fine report for the Finance
Committee. He said that the financial statements of the University are obviously in
excellent shape, and he expressed appreciation to the administration and staff for their
fine work. The outstanding patents that have been reported reflect great credit on the
research and scholarly activities of the University, and the gifts which the University
continues to receive are indicative of the confidence the alumni and friends have in the
administration and faculty of the University.

       S.    Other Comments

       Mr. Wilcoxson commented that, in his opinion, the Board of Trustees has the
finest representation of people of any Board that he has served on at the University of
Kentucky, and the University is fortunate to have the best president that anyone could
ever want to lead a university.

       Dr. Stumbo requested the faculty representatives to the Board communicate with
their colleagues on the University Senate about the successes that have been achieved
under the leadership of Dr. Wethington in supplying higher level degree courses out in
the state at community colleges. He pointed to the successes in the Radiography Program
at Hazard Community College where students for the fourth year in a row had a 100%
pass rate. Dr. Stumbo also noted that Strategic Indicators 9, 18 and 19 relate directly to
undergraduate instruction and retention and the University's commitment to improving
undergraduate education. He stated that even though we are seeking to improve the
University as a research institution, we must also keep focused on the quality of
undergraduate instruction--from having more full-time faculty involvement, to insuring
that teaching assistants are well trained and monitored. He also urged that faculty leaders
give special attention to fulfilling parental expectations that it should not take six years to
obtain a 4 year degree.

       Governor Breathitt thanked Dr. Stumto for his remarks and urged that the
President report to the Board in the future regarding the issues raised by Dr. Stumbo.




 





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       President Wethington commented that the University this year began a major
initiative focused on undergraduate instruction. Chancellor Zinser and Dr. Louis Swift,
Dean for Undergraduate Studies, are heading this effort. He said that he would report to
the Board in a few months about the specifics of what the faculty and administration are
doing in support of undergraduate instruction.

       Mr. Shoop thanked Paul Chellgren and Ashland Inc. for not only what they have
done for the University but for taking the lead role in promoting higher education across
the state. He expressed his personal thanks to Mr. Chellgren.

       Governor Breathitt reported that KET celebrated their 30th anniversary this year,
and KET's statewide network is the direct result of the generosity of the Blazer
Foundation. That Foundation paid for all the transmittal sites, and Ashland Inc.'s real
estate went out and acquired each one of those sites. Ashland Inc. sent their trained staff
of top real estate people out and put light in the dark corners of the state. He also thanked
Ashland Inc. for their contributions.

       T.    Meeting Adjourned

       There being no further business to come before the Board, the Chairperson
adjourned the meeting at 2:30 p.m.

                                                 Respectfully submitted,



                                                 Merwin Grayson, Jr.
                                                 Secretary
                                                 Board of Trustees

(PR 2, 6A and 6B; FCR 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 which follow are official parts of the
Minutes of the meeting.)




 














Office of the President
October 20, 1998


1.    University Sets Private Fundraisina Record

      The University received $47,666,298 in private donations last academic
year, a 15 percent increase over the prior year and the most private funding ever
received. The number of donors totaled 43,797, including 24,967 alumni. Alumni
gave $13.7 million, a 16 percent increase over the prior year. The largest gift was
a $7 million bequest from the estate of Jes and Clementine Schlaikjer for equine
research.

2.    CAER Receives $10 Million from Department of Energy

      Four Center for Applied Energy Research projects received more than $10
million in grants from the U.S. Department of Energy. The grants include $5.4
million for Bert Davis' coal liquefaction research, $2.2 million for Thomas Robl
and Jack Groppo to develop technology for recovering high-quality fuel and
absorbent carbons from ash ponds and landfills, $1.9 million for Kentucky
DoE/EPSCoR management and $800,000 for Bhupendra Parekh's work on carbon
recovery from fine coal.

3.    New Athletic Academic Center Dedicated

      The new Center for Academic and Tutorial Services (CATS) in Memorial
Coliseum now gives UK athletes the best academic support available at every
level in their education. The new center features 25 tutor rooms, 35 computers, a
study area that can serve up to 90 people and classrooms that can be used for
required NCAA seminars and other classes. The Career and Lifeskills Resource
Center also is located at the center to help athletes find careers. The new center
was made possible due to a $1 million donation from the Ohio Casualty Group.




 






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4.    College of Education to Develop Literacy Center

      A two-year $2 million Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education
grant to the College of Education will be used to develop a center for literacy
development. The center will involve all eight state universities and will offer
training to educators in reliable, research-based reading models that promote
literacy.

5.    New Technique for Heart Problem Performed at UK Hospital

      An experimental technique called microwave ablation was used by UK
electrophysiologist Andrea Natale last month to repair a patient's atrial flutter,
the first time the technique has been used outside of California. UK is one of five
medical centers studying the technique, which could be an important alternative
for patients whose atrial flutter defies traditional therapies. The technique
involves making tiny bums inside the upper chamber of the patient's heart.

6.    Students Mark College of Education's 75th Year

      Students at the College of Education placed items into a time capsule
October 7 to mark the college's 75th anniversary. The capsule was buried on the
grounds of the Taylor Education Building and will be reopened in 2023 when the
college celebrates its centennial. Since 1923, the college has graduated about
18,300 students and currently serves 1,401 undergraduate and 789 graduate
students.

7.    UK Hospital Expands Helicopter Service

      The UK Hospital added a second helicopter to its fleet this month. The
Sikorsky S-76 is based in Jackson between 11 a.m. and 11 p.m. seven days a
week, allowing the hospital to better serve Southeastern Kentucky. Two pilots
and the medical flight crew - which consists of a nurse and paramedic - depart
each morning from UK and return that night. UK's helicopter service receives
about 2,200 requests for transport a year and accommodates about 1,100 of those
requests. The second helicopter will allow UK to respond more effectively to
increased numbers of requests.




 






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8.    University Unveils New Web Page

       Visitors coming electronically to UK are now welcomed with a more
modem, user-friendly greeting at the University's web site. The new site,
designed by Orb-bit Design Group and maintained by UK Public Relations,
debuted October 1 at w-w.uky.edu. The site features navigation specifically
targeted to-the-viewer, constantly changing-photos-and updated information.
From the home site, users enter other pages based on who they are: faculty, staff,
student. prospective student or visitor.

9.    University Researchers Give KERA Preschool Good Grades

      An eight-year study by UK researchers shows that children who were
enrolled in a special preschool program in Kentucky public schools are
consistently performing as well in their classes as the general population of
children who were not enrolled in the program. The preschool allows
economically disadvantaged children age 4 and children with disabilities age 3
and 4 to participate. The UK study compares children who participated with
eligible children who did not participate and children who were not eligible. The
eligible children who did not participate didn't perform as well in academics and
were more likely to have developmental and behavioral problems.

10.   Kentucky Businesses Comment On Confidence in Economy

      Business leaders in Kentucky expect to increase sales, profits and capital
spending in the next year, according to findings of the Kentucky Business
Confidence Survey by the UK Center for Business and Economic Research.
However. the survey reveals a slight decline in the optimism reflected in a similar
survey released last fall. While 70.2 percent of Kentucky businesses expect sales
increases next year, 76.2 percent expected sales increases in last year's survey.

11.  Dentistry and Radiography Students Have 100 Percent Pass Rate

      Dental laboratory technology students at Lexington Community College
had a 100 percent pass rate on the Recognized Graduate Exam, the first step to
becoming certified as a dental technician. LCC's average score was 84.02,
compared to the national average of 71.02. Radiography students at Hazard
Community College had a 100 percent pass rate on the American Registry of
Radiologic Technology examination. This is the fourth year in a row that all HCC
students have passed the test.




 






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12.   Six Inducted into Education Alumni Hall of Fame

      Six people recently were inducted into the College of Education Hall of
Fame. They are George Blanda, former UK and National Football League football
player; Lauretta Byars, UK vice chancellor for minority affairs; Constantine
"Deno" Curris, president of Clemson University; Helen Thacker Hill, director of
student support-services -at -Georgia-College and- State University; C.M. Newton,
UK director of athletics; and Chester Travelstead, former provost and dean of the
University of N