xt76q52f806f https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt76q52f806f/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19191010  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 10, 1919 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 10, 1919 1919 2012 true xt76q52f806f section xt76q52f806f The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON, K.Y., OCT. 10, 1919

VOL. X.

CONTRACT

SIGNED

FOR

STROLLERS SET DATE
FOR AMATEUR NIGHT
New

Photographs to Be Made at
Studio on Campus; Work
Will Be Uniform
CONTRIBUTIONS ASKED

Students Urge& to Show
trionic Talent October 31.

His-

According to custom, "Amateur
Night," an anual event in the Stroller
calaiitlcr will bo held on Friday night,
October 31. At tills time all aspirants
for Stroller honors are requested to
come out and show their histrionic
ability. Whether a Freshman or an
upper classman, one must first appear
on "Amateur Night" to become an
active member of the Strollers, and
be eligible to try out for the annual
production given In the Spring at the
Lexington Opera House. If you can
act, sing, dance, or have any talent
pertaining thereto you should avail
yourself of the opportunity of becoming a Stroller. As one of the old boys
says, "All it takes is nerve."
All old Strollers are requested to be
present at an important meeting to be
held Monday afternoon at 3:30 in the
Stroller Room in the basement of the
Main Building.

The 1920 Kentuckian Staff has made
a decided advance on those of former
years by engaging tho White Studio,
New York City, to do its photographic
work. The White firm is one of tha
largest in New York and makes a specialty of taking pictures for college
annuals. A representative of the firm
will be at the University the week of
November 15 to take the students' pictures, the finishing to be done at the
studio in New York. A studio is being
arranged on the campus where pictures will be taken. All students who
contemplate having .their pictures in
the annual are required to patronize
this, the official photographer provided by the staff. The prices will be
no higher than those of the local photographers and the annual staff 1s de- MEMBERSHIP DRIVE NOW
sirous of having all pictures of uniform size and quality.
OH F0RY.W.C.A.MEM8ERS
Contracts have already been sighed
with Benson, of Nashville, for the
100 Per Cent
printing and with Stafford, of In- Will Try
Enrollment Among Girls
dianapolis for the ngraving.

for

of University

Call for Cartoonists.

William Wallace, art editor, requests that all who can draw cartoons
support the anual by submitting specimens of local subjects, of which the
best will appear in the annual. These
specimens should be addressed to
e
Wallace and either placed in the
box C;f the Kentuckian or
brought to the Kentuckian office.
The contest for snapshots which
was started last Spring is still on. A
prize is offered for .the best group of
snapshots, the number of pictures in
the group not being less than twelve.
These snapshots may be of anything
on the campus, athletics, grounds,
professors. The conbuildings,
test is open to all University students. Such pictures should be sent
to Todd Greene, snapshot editor, or
placed in the Kentuckian box.
post-offic-

Solicits Help of All.
While the annual is primarily a publication of the Senior Class for the
purpose of setting forth and stimulating interest in class, fraternity, organization .military, and athletic activities, the staff has no desire to confine its scope to the ranks of Seniors.
Any article, Joke, cartoon, snapshot
submitted by any underclassman will
be duly considered, and If accepted
credit will be given to the person who
submitted it. The Kentuckian would
also be grateful for any suggestions
from faculty members or students
in makwho are asked to
ing the 1920 annual equal to, If not
better, than any published In former
MID.

Patronize Our Advertisers

The Young Women's Christian As
sociatlon started Its membership camMis3
paign on Tuesday morning.
Lucy Dean, chairman of the Membership Committee, is canvassing the
three dormitories to enlarge the enrollment. Miss Mary Van Meter is in
charge of the committee to secure
memberships from town girls. There
will be no Initial dues, but later a gift
will be asked fro meach member to
aid tho Y. W.
A large percentage of girls in the
University have always been members
of the Y. W. C. A. This year the object of the committees and the assoenrollment
ciation is to secure 100
among the young ladies of the University.
The association is a voluntary organization. It is for the students and
Its activities are such as they institute. The ultimate objective of the
association is the development of
Christian Character.
It Is Its privilege to have somewhat to do with improving of untoward conditions either
by
with other organizations or as an element in some of its
own activities, but it is dealing primarily with women themselves.
Each woman should consider it a
privilege to Join such an association,
the purpose of which shall be "to unite
women of the institution in loyalty
to Jesus Christ, to lead them to accept
Him as their personal Saviour, to
build them up in the knowledge of
Christ, especially through Bible study
and Christian Service, that their character and conduct may be consonant
(Continued on Page 2)

ELECTED
TO

HEAD

JUNIOR

No. 3

NOE ENTERTAINS WITH
ORIGINAL SELECTIONS
ALL

GLASS University

Poet Has Appreciative
Audience In Chapel Tuesday.

Engineer Machine Controls
Class and Elects Its Candidates Without Difficulty
BARNES CLASS ORATOR
George Zerfoas, Lexington, College
was elected president
of the Junior Class at the class meeting in Chapel Thursday morning by a
strictly college vote over Anthony
Dishman, the "A. B. Law" candidate.
The other officers elected were:
Mildred Porter, Lexington, College of
Arts and Sciences,
Lillian Cromwell, Cynthiana, College
of Arts and Sciences, secretary; M.
J. McWhorter, Yosemlte, College of
Engineering, treasurer; J. P. Barnes,
Bradstown, class orator; and J. T.
Stevens, Kevil, Junior cheer leader.
Three men for assistant track managers, one of whom will be track manager next year, and an assistant editor
and assistant business manager of the
f
1919 Kentuckian, who will be
and business manager of the
1920 Kentuckian, respectively, were
not elected at this meeting because of
lack of time, but will be chosen at a
class meeting in the near future.
Zerfoss is a member of the Phi
Delta Theta fraternity, and has made
his letter in football, baseball, basketball and tennis. Miss Porter and Miss
Cromwell are both members of the
Kappa Gamma fraternity and are
members of the basketball squad.
Barnes is a member of the Kappa
Alpha and Alpha Delta Sigma fraternities and the Keys and the Mystic
Thirteen, class societies.
Wayne Haffler, school cheer leader,
made a short talk at the beginning of
the meeting urging the class to display "ye ole time" school spirit by
supporting the cheer leaders at the
games this Fall.
of Engineering,

editor-in-chie-

DR. TIGERT SPEAKS ON
"HAVNG A LIFE PLAN"
Hear Discussion of Value of
Working With Definite Purpose.

Boys

Dr. John J. Tigert, who recently re-

turned from abroad, where he has
been engaged In war work, was the
speaker at the Y. M. C. A. meeting
held in the "Y" room of the Alumni
Building, Sunday evening at G:45
o'clock. Jesse Tapp, President of the
Association, led the meeting.
Dr. Tigert spoke upon the subject
of "Having A Life Plan," and emphasized the necessity of having a
well defined purpose in life and of
keeping that purpose constantly uppermost.
At the next meeting of the Y. M.
C. A., which will be held Sunday evening at 6:45, Judge Lyman Chalkley
will speak on "The Wild Cat's Great
Scrimmage With Himself."

Patronize Our Advertisers

"Tho sacred bonds of love and matrimony are tho greatest things in life,"
said Professor J. T. C. Noo in Chapel
Friday. To illustrate this statement
ho read several delightful poems.
After the devotional exercises and
the usual reading of announcements
the hour passed swiftly as Professor
Noe read some of his short poems.
Most of them were humorous and
caused the audience to rock with
laughter.
"There is a vast quantity of verse
being now written," said he. "Some is
good and some bad. Out of this great
volume, of varying rythm and style,
something worth while is bound to
come. Everybody is interested in
poetry and I make this my excuse for
presenting some of my own verse to
you this morning."
Certainly no excuse was necessary
for Professor Noe's vivid pictures of
mountain life, of the old maid, Sallle
Jones, of the western farmer and his
new Ford and, finally, his rhapsody on
the Jazz and camel walk, left little to
be desired in the way of entertainment
by those who attended chapel on Tuesday.

CANDIDATES TO TRY OUT
FDR DEBATE TEAMS

Sixteen Men Will Represent
University in Intercollegiate Contests
Candidates for places on the intercollegiate debate teams which will
represent the University of Kentucky
in the debates with Miami University
and the University of Cincinnati are
requested to report for preliminary
trials at 7:15 on Tuesday evening,
October 14, in the University Chapel.
The preliminary trials are open to
In the prelimiall undergraduates.
naries, each candidate will be requestextempore
ed to make a
speech on the proposition, "Resolved
That Mr. Edwin P. Morrow Should Be
Elected Governor of Kentucky in the
November, 1919, Election." The candidate may choose the side of the
proposition on which he will speak.
From the men taking part In the
preliminary trials, sixteen will be
chosen. These sixteen men will be
organized into an "Advanced Debate"
class. The intercollegiate debate will
be prepared in this class and each of
the Bixteen men who complete the
work will receive two hours credit.
Shortly before the date of the intercollegiate debates, six men will be
chosen from this class to compose the
debate teams. The men who represent tho University on the teams will
be awarded the forensic "K" to be
worn in the form of a "K" on a gold
medal presented by the University.
(Continued From Page Two)

FORMER RECORDS

Arts and Science College
Lead Other Departments
in Number Enrolled
1014 HAVE REGISTERED
According to the Registrar's report
there are 1014 matriculates at the University up to October 1. This number
for the year exceeds any matriculation
of former years.
The largest number of students, as
usual, has entered the Arts and
Science College, which has a total of
372 students.
The number of matriculates in this college by classes is as
follows:
Freshmen boys 81, girls 86, total
1C7.

Sophomore boys 51, girls 46, total 96.
Junior boys 39, girls 27, total 66.
Senior boys 18, girls 24, total 42.
The total number of Arts and
Science boys is 189, of girls 183.
In the college of Engineering there
are 278 matriculates arranged as follows:
95,
Sophomores
108,
Freshmen
Juniors 47, Seniors 28. There are no
women registered in this college.
The College of Agriculture has 215
students, as follows:
Freshmen boys 62, girls 33, total 95.
Sophomore boys 31, girls 20, total 51.
Junior boys 17, girls 18, total 35.
Senior boys 18, girls 16, total 34.
Total number of boys 128, girls 87.
There are 90 matriculates in the
Law College as follows:
Freshmen boys 15, girls 2, total 17.
Sophomore boys 30, girls 1, total 21.
Junior girls 20, girls 1, total 21.
Senior boys 21, girls 0, total 21.
Total number of boys 86, girls 4.
There are, in the entire University,
955 candidates for degrees distributed
among the different classes as follows:
Freshmen boys 266, girls 121, total
387.

Sophomores boys 207, girls

67,

total

274.

Juniors boys 123, girls 46, total 169.
Senior boys 83, girls 42, total 125.
Total number of boys Is 679, of girls
276.

Besides these there are 59 non-cadldates for degrees, of whom 18 are
special students, 16 are
20 are graduate students and 5 are
auditors.
ADVERTISERS AND
SUBSCRIBERS.
The management of the Kernel
is putting forth every effort to see
that each issue of the paper gets
into the hands of every advertiser
and subscriber on the mailing
list.
If you fall to receive any Issue
during the session please notify
the business manager of such fall
ure and the matter will be gives
Immediate attention.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 2

STRAN D

CONCERTS DAILY, AFTERNOON AND EVENING

STRAND ALL AMERICAN
ORCHESTRA

THE
"THE

f EST ORCHESTRA

IN THE SOUTH"

HOME OF

"ONLY THE IEST IN MOVING PICTURES"

OPEN 10 A. M. TO 11 P. M.
Adttlts,J18cJplus 2c war tax
Children, 9c phis lc war tax

MENTALITY TESTS CORRELATE
WITH COLLEGE GRADES.

Work for the Year It Outlined
Weekly Meeting

N

CABINET MEMBERS OF

Drown University has published
some Interesting results of the Psyr
chological tests given the
men in October, 1918. The tests required Ingenuity In the Interpretation
and use of words.
As expected the men tested showed
man scored 34.6 and the highest 91.2
on the basis of one hundred. The
majority received a grade between 65
and 70.
s
of the cases
In at least
there was a close relation between the
marks of the tests and the work of
the students In the first term. For
example, of eighty students reported
for doing satisfactory work during the
first term, 13 received a score of good,
14 received an average score, and 53
received scores of poor, and very poor.
An Interesting side light was thrown
for different degrees. The A. B.'s
the ability of men who were out
ceived an average grade of 73.7, the
Ph. B. men of 68.7, .the Sc. B. men of
66.11, and the Specials of 65.21. This
would seem to indicate that the A. B.
degree still attracts men of the best
intellectual abillyt.

PARAMOUNT, ARTCRAFT, GOLD-WYAND SELECT PICTURES

Y. W. C. A. GIVE PLANS

at

Royal Mills

Important Message of Economy

Elastic
Ribbed

first-yea-

At a meeting of the Y. W. C. A. held
at Patterson Hall Sunday evening at
6:45 o'clock, members of the cabinet
outlined their plans for the coming
year. Miss Margaret Woll, the President, led the meeting. A vocal solo,
"Oh, Jesus, Thou Art Standing," was
rendered by Miss Miriam Klnchloe,
accompanied by Miss Martha Polllt.
Miss Woll made a short talk on the
Y. W. C. A., telling of its history, purpose and the work that it expected
to accomplish this year. She then Introduced the cabinet members who
briefly told of their plans.
Following is a list of the members
of the cabinet:
and Chairman of the
Miss
Classes
World Citizenship
Louise Will.
Secretary and Chairman of the
Miss Martha
Publicity Committee
Polllt.
Treasurer and Chairman of the
Miss Lucy
Membership Committee
Dean.
Chairman of Social Service CommitteeMiss Elizabeth Card.
CANDIDATES TO TRY OUT
FOR DEBATE TEAMS
Chairman of the Social Committee-M- iss
(Continued From Page 1)
Elizabeth Kraft.
The following course Is offered by
Chairman of Program Committee-M- iss
the Department of English:
Adele Slade.
English 12, Advanced Debate.
The Membership Committee will
Intensive work in the preparation conduct a campaign this week and the
and delivery of argumentative speech- new members will be initiated at the
es. Conferences, round table discus- next meeting, to be held next Sunday
sions, and debate practice at hours to night. There will be special music.
be fixed by appointment. Limited to
sixteen students selected by compe- MEMBERSHIP DRIVE ON
FOR Y. W. C. A. MEMBERS
tition open to all undergraduates. The
representatives of the University in
(Continued From Page 1)
the intercollegiate debates will be
chosen from this class. Two hours a with their belief. It shall thus assoweek. First semester.
ciate them with the students of the
Students who wish to enter the pre- world for advancement of the Kingliminary trials are requested to give dom of God. It shall further seek to
their names and addresses to Pro- enlist their devotion to the Christian
fessor E. C. Mabie, Box 586, University church and to the religious work of
Postoffice.
the institution."
two-third-

re-o- n

MUSICIANS,

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Give Your Dollars a Fair Chance
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SEE THE NEW
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cases out of ten, the man
once smokes a W D C Pipe
becomes a life member of the W D C
club. He can't help it, because a
W D C is certainly a man's size smoke.
It's as sweet and mellow as carefully
selected French briar and expert seasoning can make it. Not only material
of the first water, but craftsmanship of
the highest order, and designs that are
most pleasing all combine to make the
WD C Pipe a smoke of peace, contentment and satisfaction. A man's smoke.
Any good dealer will confirm this.

NINE

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Athletic

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Call and see us and look our sock over.

I

Rugby

New

Croppers Laundry

We handle all the clothes a young lady needs
while in College.

'V

Comvicht

$30.85

"Buck" Elliott, class of '19, is doing
Everyone interested in forming a work in the University of Illinois tomandolin and guitar club meet in ward a Masters in Animal Husbandry.
the Band Room in the Gymnasium
Building, Monday at 3:30 p. m.
Patronize Our Advertisers

). D, Pur cell Co.

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 3

Call 80
Now Possible to Take Work
Towards a Degree by
Correspondence
As a distinctive departure in its educational work tho University of Kenoffering correspondence
is
tucky
courses in a wide field of educational
activities. The object of this department is to provide, at tho smallest
possible expense and in tho most practical manner, the highest type of education possible to tho citizens of the
Commonwealth who aro unable to attend educational Institutions.
It is
believed that the University of Kentucky should bo in close relationship
with the homes of tho Stato to the
end that any citizen might feci free
to call upon tho University for any
assistance which the Institution can
render.
The list of courses includes Agriculture, Art and Design, Botany, Economics, Education, English, French,
German, Greek, History, Latin, Mathematics, Mechanical Drawing, Mining
and Road Building.
A complete description
of the
courses appears in the Bulletin of the
Department of University Extension,
and anyone interested may obtain one
from Mr. Patrick who is the director
of this work.
OLD

hearts
That answer Culture's call;
Again your doors are open to the
youth
Of old Kentucky, fresh from home and

rest;

TRANSFER CO.
The Authorized Railroad Transfer Busses and Taxi Trucks
Meet All Trains
PROMPT SERVICE

Call 80

The College Store
For College People

Down Toivn

Text Books

Meeting Place

Pennants
Kodak Books

for

Fountain Pens

University Boys
Open Until 8 P. M. Every Evening

Basement Main
Building University

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233 West Short

We Welcome AH

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University Students

U. OF K.

Old U. of K.
Once more your stately hallowed halls
Fling forth a cheery welcome to young

LEXINGTON OMNIBUS AND BAGGAGE

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To both old and new students we extend a cordial welcome.
To you old men we say we are glad to have you back again
and shall hope to see you in our store in the near future so that
we can give you a good handshake and a personal welcome
back to our city.

Most Complete Assortment of Silk Shirts
We Earnestly Solicit Your Patronage

To you new men who are just entering upon your collegiate
career we extend a warm welcome and extend you a personal
invitation to come and see us at an early date so we may

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Once more we fiUBh with pride
Oh U. of K. we love you best.

MORRIS L. LEVY, Designer

Phoenix Block

(Jut tright Tailoring Company

Our alma mater,
and dear as life:
Sweet as mother-love- ,
Tender recollections bring us hope,
And banish strife;
Greetings, then, despite the clouds
That oft arise to darken sunny days,
We love you just the same,
Old U. of K.
R. F. PETERS, 20.

"We Fit You"

GENE SULLIVAN

145 West Main Street

"Let's Get Acquainted"

MECHANICAL

AND CIVIL ENGINEERS

Ours is the Quality Shop

WILL FIND A COMPLETE STOCK OF

CHANGES IN ANNOUNCEMENT.

DRAWING INSTRUMENTS AND MATERIAL

The editors of the Weekly Bulletin
wish to correct the statement concern
Ing Matriculation Lectures. The lec
tures hereafter will be held in Chapel.
The Kernel would also like to cor
rect the announcement of .the appointment of the Bulletin editors. Miss
Catherine Tucker will be Miss Buck
man's assistant, instead of Miss Margaret Smith.

AT

FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY
OF FOOTBALL.
It is interesting to note that this
year is the fiftieth anniversary of the
origin of American
football. Many changes have taken
place during this time and players of
the old fashioned game would hardly
recognize a modern exhibition. In the
matter of coaching and management
there have been many changes. New
coaches and new systems have appeared in most of the large eastern
colleges.

GEO. LUGIART

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J20 N. UPPER

FOUNTAIN PENS, STATIONERY, LOOSE

The finest and most complete exclusively retail Optical establishment
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A faithful and accurate Optical Service in all its branches.
EYES examined by an Optometrist intimately familiar with the most
intricate problems of refraction.
The grinding of the lenses, the expert fitting and all other details
are accomplished within our establishment.
THE FEATURE ONE DAY SERVICE

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Optometrist

THE COLLEGE BOYS' STORE

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Clothing, Furnishings, Hats, Shoes and Tailoring

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 4

carries on ns follows: "Every time 1
ace tho uniforms handed out to our
boys and pipe tho way they fit tho different topographical features of tho
Aforementioned lads I nm Impressed
with tho need of consolidating tho
Quartermaster and Engineering Departments of the Army. The uniforms
saws and
now are cut with cross-cu- t
entrenching shovels and there Is no
need of two departments to handle
my
this work."

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
Published every Friday throughout the Oollego year by the student body
of the University of Kentucky, for the benefit of the students,
nluinnl nnd faculty of the Institution.

FOOD

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL Is tho official newspaper of the University.
to Its subscribers nil the college news
Kentucky, together with a digest of items of Interest concerning the
of
Universities of other States and Canada.

It

is Issued with a view of furnishing

SUBSCRIPTION, ONE DOLLAR AND FIFTY CENTS A YEAR.
FIVE CENTS THE COPY.
mall matter.
Entered at Lexington Postofflco as second-clas- s
EDITORIAL STAFF (Incomplete).
f
A. GAVIN NORMENT
Managing
.
LOUISE WILL
..Asslstnnt Managing
ROBERT RAII3LE
ADELE SLADE
.Squirrel Food
MARY ELIZABETH JAMES..
.Sport
DONALD DINNING
McCLURE.-FRANCEExchange
MARGARET
S
EdItor-ln-Chle-

Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Feature Editor
Co-e-

--

MARSH

REPORTERS.
MARSHALL, ELIZABETH CARD, MARY ARCHER BELL,
ROBERT MITCHELL, JR., FRANK WILSON.
BUSINESS STAFF.
Business Manager
J. P. BARNES
ELIZABETH

REVIVAL

OF THE SENIOR COURT.

To anyone who is familiar with conditions at the University and on Its
grounds during the period of the S. A. T. C. regime, there must invariably
come the thought of the change between that and the present time. Simultaneously with this thought comes the decision that the grounds of the
University should never be marred in such manner again. The University,
s
condition,
at great cost, has succeeded iln putting the campus 'in
is up to the student body ,to see that it is kept that way.
and it
In this connection may be considered the value of the Senior Court, that
august assembly which is the supreme judicial body of the University. When
any person, either through malice or thoughtlessness, so far forgets himself
as in any way to mar or deface the grounds and buildings, some penalty
should be prescribed that would so forcefully impress itself upon his mind
that he would not offend again.
Tho Kernel specifically Insists that an edict be issued by the Senior
Court prohibiting all short cuts across grass plots, and against the
arid ancient custom of defacing buildings and walks with class numerals,
a custom by the way, that might obtain with better grace in a preparatory
school for younger boys, but out of the question in a University, where grown
young men and women are pursuing ,tlieir studies for degrees. This edict
should be obeyed by the faculty and all members of the student body. In
this and in many other problems of University life the Senior Court can prove
a power for good on the campus. The Senior Court, rightly conducted, will
have an influence on the personnel of the University that would be far more
lasting than any ruling that might be dssued by the faculty, and would be a
step toward effective student
Many problems arise on the campus that are out of the jurisdiction of
the faculty. In these cases there is usually a right and wrong side. A fair
minded Senior Court, operating for the good of the University and the student
body, is the proper tribunal by which such questions should be decided.
Whenever the student body has reached the stage at which its representatives can promulgate fair and sensible laws for its own
a long step has been taken along the path of progress and right thinking
in the University.
first-clas-

I

WE ALL CAN HELP.

The Wildcats have made a good start. They have fulfilled the expecta
tions of their coach, the University and their supporters of our State. From
all sections U. K. alumni are anxiously awaiting the results of the season.
Coach Gill is giving the Cats the best that is in him. The members of
the team are exerting themselves to the most, both mentally and physically,
for the honor of old Kentucky.
Now what can we do?
A word of congratulation, signs of appreciation for his efforts, mean
much to the man who is working on Stoll Field each afternoon.
And again, we all know the main essential of a winning team is condition. A football man is only human. He is not proof against temptation.
And yet, one night's loss of sleep, one ciraget, may impair that man's usefulness to the extent of making a weak spot on the team which the opposing
eleven will be sure to find, thereby losing a game for Kentucky.
A word in time to a friend, a friendly admonition as to what the consequences will be, a reminder of what the University expects of him, may keep
.a player from that which would injure his physical condition and lower the
efficiency of the team.
Let the men see that you are interested in them; that the University is
behind them, win or lose, and is expecting them .to fulfill the hopes placed
in the team and that only by the strictest training can this be done.
This is something we all can, and should do.
The demonstration on the part of the yelling contingent exhibited on Stoll
Field on the occasion of the Georgetown game was unworthy of the student
body; indeed it was so poorly representative of U. of K. spirit as It has been
exhibited in the old days as to have been wellnigh disgraceful, and had the
team disclosed no greater spirit in the contest than was shown by the
students' apparent apathy in supplying the necessary stimulus for battle from
..the stand and sidelines we should have lost the contest and should have
deserved to lose it.

Fresh "Yesslr, mentally In
Once a young Freshmnn called Corn
(That's his nnme as sure ns you're head."
born)
Took his girl to the show;
ON DIT
'Twns the Strand we all know.
A real sport Is young Freshmnn Corn.
Oh, Shoes! They flirt with Newton's
law
But when she returned to Pntt Hall,
Go up and never down,
A Senior, (she's catty, that's all).
And Pat Hall walk Is still best bet
Said, "Freshle, my dear,
With shoemakers In town.
Did you bite of his ear?
Corn's quite late In season this fall."
'S tho truth! The walk that sug
The girls at Maxwell Hall suspect gests a short cut from Patterson Hnll
that the girls at Smith Hall are "put- to the campus is a "delusion and a
ting one over" on them. Residents tnare." Many a dainty slipper has
at Smith Hall believe the girls "have hastened to an untimely and end over
a better time" at Maxwell. The girls Its rocky surface; many a stalwart
at Patt Hall are sure that the newer school shoe has squeaked in fear as
its wearer sped to class; and many an
halls can get away with anything.
outraged overshoe has been cut to
Jazzing
the sole. Eds and
PLAINT OF UNCLE SAM.
wearily Hallward from an Armory
My mills are now steel less
My dreadnoughts are keel less
dance have felt prophetic twinges of
My coal dealers deal less
the morning after, the moment they
My printing shops spell less
touched the walk. Figuratively, "tho
path of true love never runs smooth"
My rioters meal less
My colleges feeless
but when one steps upon the reality j
My trolley lines wheel less
My dry laws repeal less
The Kentucky Kernel says: If the
Whntinell are we coming to?
students displayed the same wonderful
ability in locating classes as they did
N. Y. Evening Sun.
in determining the whereabouts of the
A Patt Hall girl knitted a sweater. race track, suh, the attendance at our
For reasons known only to the fem- noble institution of learning during
inine "mind" she unravelled said the opening week of school would have
sweater and, using the same material, been considerably larger, suh.
knitted another sweater. The question
From London comes the announceis what has he now, the same sweater
ment that soft collars have been
or a new one?
banned in the English universities beWho says chivalry is dead? Tubby cause they "make for general untidiJouett got up and gave his seat to ness of dress." Local college authorithree girls at the Georgetown game ties now consider civilization to have
advanced to the stage where the
last Saturday.
sandpaper collar can be
They say that chafing dish parties safely discarded.
are very popular this season. Each
guest is expected to bring his own
The Old Soldier squints one eye and
chafing dish and alcohol. It is up to
the guests to decide whether or not
they care to waste the alcohol by
cooking with it.
s

The Knight of the Lexington Drug
registered thirst by coughing dryly a
couple o' times, remarked carelessly
on the hot weather and then casually
said: "Don't care If I do, old man."
PROPHET WITHOUT HONOR.
(With Apologies to Walt Mason.)
When I finished up my high school
and I took tho trail to State, all the
knowledge of all ages had been crammed into my pate. I had learned the
vast experience of a thousand eons
past all I lacked wa(t reputation, then
I'd
the world would be outclassed.
corrected all my errors, all my weakness brought to light; I was one
among the wonders, strong-willepolished, erudite. But with all my information and my comprehensive
brains, and my high aesthetic standards, no one seemed to take the pains
to announce that I was fated to be
learned and be high; the unsympathetic
public wouldn't put me In Its eye. 'Twas
a little bit to learn yet, though I knew
It wasn't much; so I thought I'd come
to college and smear on the final
But up here you haven't
touch.
noticed I'm a wizard in disguise; you
are ignorant of my greatness I can
see it in your eyes. You don't ask for
my opinion a3 to how I'd run the
Stat