xt76q52fb48v https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt76q52fb48v/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19610216  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 16, 1961 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 16, 1961 1961 2015 true xt76q52fb48v section xt76q52fb48v Editor Discusses
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Today's Weather:
Partly Cloudy And Cool ;
High 59, Low 11

1

Four

University of Kentucky
Vol. LI I, No, 6.1

LEXINGTON,

FEB.

KY., THURSDAY,

Parking Lol

Eight Pages

k Student Bookstore
Called Poor Idea
By Shop Managers

Being Built
By Stadium

Tlie dirt teing dumped on
tin cast e nd of Stoll Field, between Hose Street ami the
Avenue of Champions, is to
facilitate the construction of
a parking area.
- P. Karris, chief engineer of

Such Slorcs
Usually Fail,
They Maintain

'

I-

the Division of Maintenance and
Operations, Mid (hat the specifications plans should be completed
In a week. He added that the
parking lot will be available for
ue in two or three months If the
weather permits construction.
The parking area will be open
to both faculty and students on
an assigned basis.
As the plans have not yet been
received by the business office, no
estimates are available.

lfi, 1961

Student Congress ought to and clgarettes-n- ot
books," he
think twice before going into
the bookstore business.
whether the addition of a new
The managers of the two ex- bookstore would seriously affect

First Tickets

Jo Hern, right, and Dave Stewart, renter, sell Dr. Frank G. Dickey,
president of the University, two tickets to the American version
of the Oberammergau Passion Play to be presented Feb.
6
in McAllister Auditorium at Transylvania College.

Countess Tolstoy
May Speak Here

OClry JKCCltntlOIl

S,.1.,1..1,,1

his business, but Kennedy said he
believed the existing stores would
be able to survive.
"Certainly they couldn't drive
us out of business," he said. "They
could hurt us some, though; no
question about that."'
The book merchants agreed that
the history of student-owne- d
ZZSOl bookstores is none too proud.
0 uu ut "Most student-owne- d
bookstores

isting campus bookstores both expressed this opinion after learning that Student Congress has
begun a study to determine the
feasibility of operating a student-owne- d
bookstore at UK.
Joseph P. Kennedy, owner of
Kennedy's Book Store, and James

Basil Kathhone's
.

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wi.j

ZJ?Z
DW.
incles
ness,

,

!IeVA

,K,t u,

Actor Basil Rathbone will
of the bookstore busi- Countess Alexandra Tolstov. daudifer of flip It II
n
author and philosopher I,eo Tolstov. mav aonear in Memorial give a tlramatic presentation
of poetry entitled "The Best One SC delegate charged in
Hall this snrinu if nledie tn'.ilm S.Vlfl mn
1,f,
From My Bookshelf" at 8:13
0?daf "ht' conrs? mtln
Prof. Robert Moore of the
are "buying books
50 cent
they each try to get
Foreign Languages Depart- in Memorial Coliseum. for $8 that aren't worth $1.50."
tonight
ment said yesterday that he had pledge from 16 people.
The program is part of the Cen- - Others expressed the belief that
this manner we can determ- "In
been in contact with Countess
UK 1:1

1

Tolstoy for several months trying to arrange for her appearance
here.
The Countess and her agent
have agreed to waive the usual
lecture fee if $500 ran be raised
as a contribution to the Tolstoy
of whith the lecturer
Prrsiarni, rrol. Moore said.
To raife the necessary funds,
Prof. Moore has suggested to stu- in his Russian class that
""

"

"

"

Mardi Gras Oueen

lVlT:

Queen is chosen will be held in
the Student Union voting booth
from 9 a.ni. U 5 p.m. today.
The queen will be selected
from the five finalists by a panel of Judges and crowned at the
Mardi Gras Saturday night by
W.
Dr. Frederick
Whiteside,
most popular professor.
Sponsored by the University
Newman Club, the Mardi Gras
wilt be beld from
p.m. Saturday. The music will be provided by Buford Majors and the
Big Little Band featuring Little
Willie Brown from Nashville,
Tenn.

ine whether we can meet the $500
requirement." he said. "As soon
as we find out that the talk is
financiallv nossible we run nr.
rant,e a date
Professor Moore said that he
i,ad ta)krd
,th lnjv,rSity Vice
rrP,dent Leo Chamberlain
use of Memorial Hall
rerning
hU.
seaU approxilna,f y 1,000
persons.
He was assured by Dr. Cham-den- ts
berlain, the professor said, that
asking for pledges would satisfy
Continued on Page 8

trl

and

Lec-

-a

Steering Committee

The' Little Kentucky Derby
Steering Committee will meet
in Room 206, SUB, at 6:30 p.m.
today.

Six Students To Lead

Freshman Camp In Fall

Pln

Z-J"-

J?8"

lf.
that several

a
Jro"phfd set"Pthe
at

member of the debate team.
Cwens, and the Committee of 240
and Bob Beshear, secretary of the
VMCA and a premedical major
are the sophomores.
The Junior chairmen are Trudy
Webb, member of Kappa Delta,
Committee of 240. Links, treas- urer of the Little Kentucky Derby,
Continued on Page 8

WORLD NEWS
AT A
At A CI ATVrT
tvLilll

student-owne- d

Intramural Debaters
To Be Picked Today
The Student Forum, an intra- mural speaking group, will meet
tonight at 7 o'clock in the Lab
Theatre of the Fine Arts Build- ing to select three speakers to
participate in a debate later this
spring. The meeting will be open
to the public.
Each member will present a
persuasive speech on any subject
for approximately eight minutes.
None of the students has had
more than one year of speech
training.
Mrs. Sue Lucas, speech and de- bate coach at Henry Clay High
School; Mr. E. R. Purdom, assist- ant principal at Henry Clay and
a former member of the Patterson
Literary Society, and Dr. Roger
Chacon, from the UK Depart- -

ment of Philosophy, will act as
judges.
Students placing first, second,
and third will be awarded medals,
They will defend their respective
positions in an audience particl- pation discussion or debate to be
scheduled later this semester.
The student speakers are Bill
Hayes, Alvin Polk, Tom Bunch,
Ammon Golan. Bernard Butts.
Carolyn Ann Smith. Tom
mon, and Irma Strache.
J. W. Patterson, assistant pro-mfeasor of speech, is the sponsor of
the group. He said that applica- tions for membership for the
spring semester are still being ac- cepted. Students Interested may
apply in Room 129 of the Fine
Arts Building.

Boeing 707 Crashes

AirBRUSSELS. Belgium, Feb. 15 (AP)-Sab- ena
lines authorities speculated tonight that trouble In
a Boeing 707's control system led to the crash that
killed 73 persons today, including 18 young American figure skating stars.
The transatlantic plane spun out of control in
in a sunny
The general counsel of the American Jewish Congress circling for aa landing and crashedaddition to 61farmpasBelgian farmer In
yard, killing
will deliver a Blazer Lecture at 11 a.m. tomorrow in Cuignol sengers and 11 crew members. The wreckage burned.
Theatre.
Among the 49 Americans who perished were Mrs.
.
.
.
Supreme Court decisions inter- - Maribel Vinson Owen, 49. of Winchester, Mass., and
(
c. , .
BU1
f R1nts'.
two daughters. Mrs. Owen, nine times U.S. figure
.
ligious liberty' and the relation- - Liberties the, an
was
American,
ship of church and state in Amer written by Pfeffer in 1956. His skating champion, was coach for the two girls, both
members of a UJS. team heading to Prague. Czechon the "Separation
tea, will
book was "Creeds in Comfor the world
of i Church and State A Oreat latest
a. study of religious con- oslovakia, to open Feb. 22. figure skating championpetition,''
American Experiment."
ship due
flict in America.
The lecture Is sponsored by the
U.N. Chief Will Not Resign
Pfeffer has served as counsel
Departments'
History and Polit- UNITED NATIONS. N.Y-- , Feb. 15 (AP) Dag
iral Science and the College ! n cases before the U.S. Supreme
Court involving teaching religion Hammarskjold defiantly rejected today a Soviet
Law
He said
public schools, distribution of
that he resign as Secretary-Oenera- l.
Pfeffer has written numerous
books dealing with religion and religious tracts by public school, to do so would only bow to the aim of the Soviet
nd Sunday observance laws,
a time of
Union to paralyze the United Nations at
the separation of church and
He has lectured at several crisis.
state. He Is a graduate of City
of New York and the American universities and serves
Hammarskjold addressed the U.N. Security CounCollege
to the American cil this afternoon after Adlal E. Stevenson, spokesNew York University Law School, as consultant
man for the new U.S. administration, accused the
A chronicle of United States Civil Liberties Union.

Jewish Writer To Speak
At Friday Blazer Lecture

"VL

-'.
erated for a
collapsed."
Kennedy recalled
a

University. The business failed.
according to Kennedy, when one
bookstore could of the student employees pilfered
Kentucky
lure Series.
sell books at lower prices than the bookstore's cashbox and left
school.
Mr. Rathbone will read selec- - Kennedy's or Campus.
tions from Sir Arthur Conan
Allen Poe. A. E.
Doyle,
Edgar
Housman. Robert Browning, and
William Shakespeare,
Concert

'

A committee consisting of two
two sophomores, and
two Juniors will direct the Fresh- Camp next fall.
The camp, sponsored by the
YMCA and the YWCA, is offered
each year to inform incoming
freshmen of the University.
Freshmen chairmen are Vivian
Shipley, a Kappa Delta pledge
ana a memoer oi me rresnmen x
and Trent Smith, a Phi Delta
Theta pledge and treasurer of the
Freshman Y.
Bettye Choate, Hopklnsville, a

"If they think they can sell
books any cheaper than I do, they
Just don't know anything about
the book business." Kennedy said.
Morris, now in his 31st year as
manager of Campus Book Store,
said he adheres strictly to national price standards in the sale of
textbooks.

Soviet Union of virtually declaring war on the
United Nations by proposing both an end to the
U.N. Congo operation, and the firing of the U.N's
chief executive.
Stevenson's speech at a morning session sup
porting Hammarskjold was interrupted by the wildest demonstration in U.N. history. At least 21 persons were injured as American Negro demonstrators
shouting for the slain Congo leader, Patrice Lumumba battled U.N. guards in the public galleries
and U.N. corridors.
Hammarskjold declared that under normal circumstances he would consider withdrawal of confidence by a permanent member of the Security
Council as reason to resign.

Mobs Attack Embassy
Vengeful 15
Mobs
Feb.

(AP)
CAIRO,
demanding vengence
for Patrice Lumumba's death set fire to the Belgian
here today and stoned the nearby U.S.,
Embassy
British, and United Nations offices.
The violent outburst was the latest of a series
that have seen attacks on seven Belgian embassies
or consulates around the world In the past three
days:
US. officials said the demonstrations are stirred up by Communist agitators, who plan the actions
in great detail.

* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY

KERNEL, Thursday, Teh. 10,

19G1

Annual Leadership Group
To Meet Each Thursday
i,

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ID Cards

What Kind Of Drawings?

left) pen and ink classical landscape by Marco
Kiccl. 18th century Venetian, $100 (lower right)
red and black chalk studies of cows and asses by
$3i).
Nicolas Berchem, Dutch (1620-168-

Trend To Original Drawings
4if raets Manv Bargain Hunters

EN ALI
PHONE

"You're buying a small part of
the artist's creative process.
"When people first came in
they'd buy an artist's name. Then
they'd get interested, learn styles,
do research.
By now we have
a little club. she says.
"Thev'll call ud and say 'You
remember that little drawing I
bought last year? Well, last month
I went to Italy and saw the palnt- ing for If."
f course, there are a few snobs
the drawing collectors, she
admits, but mostly they're people
wno want originals and can't af- ford tne famous old paintings,
io 'uu lllcy ta"
"r
up a good original drawing. jui
should be careful if you pay
you

than that."

Authenticity of the artist Is not
always easy to pin down, and re- putable dealers spend a lot of time
In Europe locating and attribut- ing drawings.
,.0,d drawlngs are getting harder
all the time to find," she says.
"Many collectors of 18th century
England ordered by tne carload.
When they died the drawings were
found in their original papers,
ttPTM

NOW SHOWING!

uclid Annu
Clwvy
NOW SHOWING

"The Wizard of
Baghdad"
Cincmiscop
Color by D Luke
Diane Baker-B- arry
Coe

IID(
"Misfits"

1IMIHGTOM

ENDS TODAY
STARTS

TOMORROW!

SU3E"WqflG
"X
fMiiM

Day Of Prayer
Observed Sunday

MORNING

50c Adults

&

10.30
m.; 3 00-p.m.; 2:30-3:3- 0

SESSION
Children

$1.00 Adults
75c Children

4:30-7:0- 0

p.m.t
p.m.l 3:00-S:4- S
4J p.m.; 7:30- - 50 p.m.
7:30-9:3- 0
p.m.;
p.m.;
0
p.m.
p.m.;

0
2

854

E.

-

"NORTH
Cary brant

High St.

HOT CORNED BEEF
PASTRAMI SANDWICHES
RYE BREAD
KOSHER DILLS

BY

NORTHWEST"

and Eva Mario Saint

Starts 7:00

Admission

OSc

"THESE THOUSAND MILLS'
Don Murray and Richard Agan
ALSO

NOW OPEN
9:00 'Til 9:00 Daily
9:00 'Til 6:00 Sundays
Call
for Takeout

"WOMAN OBSESSED"
Susan Hayward and Stavon Boyd

JAM SESSION
THE PACESETTERS

TONITE
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.

And Every Thursday Nile
8:00-12:0-

Crystal Ice
Club

Restaurant

FRIDAY

. . . Now Open

For Your
Convenience

uinrnkJATC

0

Also
THE STARLIGHTERS

SATURDAY

50c
RENTAL SKATES
ARRANGE A PARTY NOW
Coll

"rtwif-

"WRECK OF THE MARY DEARI"
Gary Coopor and Chariton Hotton
ALSO

GREENWALD'S
DELICATESSEN

FEATURING

Ice Skating Indoors Or Outdoors

OTHER SESSIONS

THEM'OULD Of

AND DANCING

GARDENSIDE PLAZA
SHOPPING CENTER

p m.;

A

941 Winchester Rd.
"FINE FOODS, LOUNGE

C CRYSTAL ICE CLUB

MON. THRU THURS.
FRIDAY
10:30
0
SAT.
10:30
0
SUNDAY

J. I illCnlSLFl
jfALI I)m.rtfnccnr

RESTAURANT

CM

1

Dr. J. Walker
Is Appointed

Dr. John N Walker, a native of
Erie. Pa., has been appointed as.
sistant professor of agricultural
engineering.
Dr. Walker holds B.S. and M.S.
al
engineering-degrees in
from
Pennsylvania State University and a Ph.D. degree from
Purdue University.
Before coming to UK. Walker
was an officer in the U.S. Navy,
Extension Asrifultural
Engineer
The Universal riy of Prayer for the Pennsylvania siauon, ana
for students will be observed Sun- a graduate assistant ai ruraue
of the
day by campus religious organl-ration- s. University. He is a member
American Society of Agricultural
The Day of Prayer is an ob- Engineers.
servance bringing together Christian student organizations for a
service of prayer and dedication
N
to the mission of the church. The
DIRECTORY
day Is being observed throughout
the world.
student
Most denominational
groups and YMCA and YWCA are
In planning the obcooperating
AdmhiiM 7S
Start 7:00
servance, June IJohanan, chairman of the committee, said.
HELD OVER!
-- A
A service will be held at 1
FfVIft IN THI BLOOD"
Zimbatiit,
o'clock Sunday night at Wesley EfrcmDanton and Jr., imtk Klly, Kay
Angio Dickinton
Rev. James
The
Foundation.
ALSO
Angell, minister of Second Presby"A BREATH OF SCANDAL"
terian Church, will be the prinChavallor
Sophia Loron and Mauric
cipal speaker.
The service will be led by several foreign students Including
Jim Beshi from Egypt. Ann
Thompson from Scotland, and
Admittion 75
Alex Haines from India.
Starts 7:00

PUT MORE FUN IN YOUR LIFE

CINEMASCOPE
Color by D Luke
ALSO

J

LA FLAME

LACE"
Rex Harmon
Doris Day
"WILD RIVER"
Monty Clitt Leo Remick

of Mike1

Dick Shawn

Impress Your Dote
Take Her To . . .

IrM P.M.

DAILY

responNibilitirs.
Two members of each campus
organization are invited to
tend the conferences. Trudy Webb,
vice president of the ywca cao
inct, is in charge or attendance
representation.
Members of the steering cominclude Brenda
Dooke,
mittee
Lanny Oott, John Craycroft, and
Cecil Bell.

rnhip

DRIVE-I-

apparently unpacked and unappreciated. Art dealers had a field
day, but such finds are rare nowadays."
Helene's favorite period is the
baroque of 17th century Italy. "It
has the strength and power the
18th century lacks. It's more
sophisticated, In many cases."
She doesn t pusn mass sales.
There's an advantage to getting
prints one at a time, she thinks.
"y0u grow to know all about it,
and love it."
Drawings used to be put In
albums, but Helene thinks they
should be hung although not in
aired suniigni, wmun jaut-s- .
Her advice to people wno aren i
sure they want to collect draw-les- s
ings Is to haunt museums. "Just
go and look. The more you look
the more you learn. Pretty soon
you'll be able to distinguish between periods, artists and styles.
Then you're hooked."

"MIDNIGHT

"For The Love

Ouest spenkers nnd outstanding
campus lradcrs will be featured
during the conferences. They will
campus leadership, or- and
parliamentary
ganization,
procedure.
have been
The conference
planned primarily for underclass- -

ID cards will" be given out
from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Friday,
Feb. 17 in the lobby of the Coliseum.
students are to present their
pink fee slip. If they have pre- registered. The blue, temporary- stamped II) cards must be presented In order to receive a
permanent ID card.
I'.lue ID cards will not admit
students to the I'CLA basketball
game.

Here are the sort of originals available: Upper
left) pen and ink head of an old man by Donato
Crete (18th Century Italian, Bolosncse) S13;
French '
(I'pper right) Edme Bourhadon (1698-17Cfigures "Trade of Paris," 5200 the pair; (Lower

For people
NEW YORK (P)
With Old Masters taste and reproduction pocicetbooks, the trend
Is to original drawings.
Anv rinv von ran see a Wife
with money saved from household
nr a hnsinpssmnn on his
ovran
lnnz-hmir nr a rinwnner with a
thrifty bent who asks her chauf- feur not to wait, go into a house
n New York's fashionable East
Gixties.
There on an upper floor they'll
tables and
rpend hours sitting at
pouring over original prints In
the European-styl- e
gallery run by
and
blonde Helene Seiferheld,
(Stephen Spector, classmates at
Columbia University years ago.
"The Interest In drawings is
tremendous now and 10 years ago
there was none at all," says
Helene, onetime debutante, fashion model, art history major, and
uv. Yn,n rrnnnn ' CV1Q iiciul r coll
o
.
,
j
a m.c Sui
u.c
pamunsN
more interested in original draw
ings, she collaborated in opening
one of two galleries in town dealing exclusively In old (up to 1850)
drawings.
"Drawings have such strong
she explains.
personalities,"

The YMCA and YWCA will hold their annual series of
leadership conferences on four successive Thursdays beginning March 2.
mrn who anticipate future lead.

NICKY ZANE

BUFFALO TAVERN
ire

fcATP"

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday,

Has a Past

Cashmere.

Social Activities

very nature of cashmere limited
its versatility. Certain kinds of
dark, Heavy guard hairs were al- most impossible to separate. The
results were colors with specks in
them, or a grayish cast. White
had a brownish tinge.
"Now we can make white as
Janice Cornelius, Alpha Delta
white as white," Dery says. And
with dyes have PI, Junior education major from
experimentation
to Jim Withrow,
,
brought about techniques that al- - Harrodsburg,
,M " V'"' lu"""l,l-'""
""
low perfect color match of sweat- ers and skirts, even under ultraviolet lights.
Along with technical changes
have come style Improvement.
That is why men like Arthur The standard pullover and cardi
Carol Hensley, Alpha
Jean
.Dery, president of one of the gan sweater has given way to Delta Pi, freshman psychology
of every variety in sweat- - lor from Blackev. to Harrv Arch
country's largest cashmere garment manufacturing
companies, ers, skirts, dresses, slacks, coats, bold, a former UK student from
flinches not a whit at the mass hats everything but underwear.
Paris.
low selling price
production and
of chemistry's fuzzy fibers.
"A cashmere sweater is a prestige item like a good mink coat."
lie says. "You can get something
for blouses, skirts and dresses that
By JEAN SPRAIN WILSON
will Justify themselves to figure
AP f ashion Writer
cheaper to look like it but nothMass produced clothing that will requirements,
ing that Is as alive, or drapes
as well, or wears as long.
conform to the most difficult to
Further progress Is expected in
Since the Roman Caesar's time fit figures will be next year's big the challenge to produce warmth
and specifically during the past advancement to be announced by without weight. The textile man
10 years) man has enhanced the the textile magicians .
predicts that soon it will be pos- Researchers will also be making sible to brave wintry blasts wlth- goat hair a bit by whitening It,
mothprooring It, and matching it progress on fabrics that change out top coats. Under garments
perfectly with colored fabrics of with the weather, material that insulated by thin layers of foam
other fibers.
can be dry cleaned in their own will enable the body to maintain
However even without these closets, and garments which may its own heat.
20th century improvements, Kash- - be purchased ln quantify and dis- Whipped Air
Also on next year's horizon are
mir shawls woven of prehistoric carded like paper napkins,
were highly prized by
These latter fabric materials socalled fluffy crepe that have the
patterns
ancient Emperors. Although the will require additional
experi- - deep pile of wool without weight.
flbers came from Inner Asia, they mental years before marketing, Like cotton candy, they are made
were first made Into scarves and though, claims Gomar Ward. As of fibers whipped around air.
shawls ln Srinager. capital of mill coordinator for one of the
Still ln infancy are
Kashmir, which resulted in the nation's largest producers of man- - fabrics, stiffening
agents now
name of cashmere for eveiy thing made fibers, he keeps his eye on used as coat and dress interliners.
made of the marvelously soft, test tubes of the world's labora- Within the next five years Ward
warm goats' hair.
tories.
expects to see the fabric manu
Later the woven material was
Stretch Fit
facturing same principle adapted
traded like rare Jewels by French
Stretch fibers woven in subtler to disposable towels, aprons and
and British courts, then fashioned forms than before will make cus handkerchief s, even men's col- into scratchproof underwear to
g
mass produced gar- - lars and cuffs.
No Overcoats
keep royal blood warm ln drafty ments possible. Ward believes. Al
castles.
ready elastic fibers have been used
Eventually disposable outerwear
From the beginning of the 16th in bold forms such as socks, tights, will be a part of every woman's
century. Empress Eugenia, wife of girdles and bathing suits. But Just wardrobe, he says, however, scien- Napoleon II, started a vogue for ahead are sheerer stretch fabrics tists must teach
cashmere
scarves
the
imitate the draping quality of
despite
NAME GAME
wovens.
hefty price of $500 each.
A cashmere sweater still costs
to thermal
What's in
sensitive
ALBANY, N. Y.
Fibers
more than other a name? In the Capitol District:
considerably
change are still in the thinking
kinds. But then a single sweater
John P. Justice is an Albany stage at this point, claims the
textile man. But our new ability
requires a year's yield of fleece lawyer.
from four to six horned, short-leggNewton J. Vet is commander of to travel rapidly from one climate
goats high in the inpene- - Fort Orange Post, American Le- - to another demands clothing that
areas
mountainous
of num.
trable,
will retract to be cool or expand
Inner Asia. (The higher the goat, Gordon L Bankcr is president to provide warmth.
the finer the fleece.)
of Union National Bank of Troy.
"Textile men can imitate any- And it takes another year for
textile thing, yes, even mink coats."
Frank A. Taylor is
the hair to reach a port for ship- worker in Rensselaer.
claims the man who has watched
ment to the textile mills.
Leonard E. March of Schenecenough miracles to happen to
The soft fleece is plucked, or tady was an Army colonel.
know. "But we won't try mink.
combed out by hand, collected bit
And Fred Betts has worked at Woman would still prefer the real
by bit from bushes where' the Saratoga Raceway.
thing."
animal scratches
itself during
molting time. Then bales of it
spend months winding around the
ADAM PEPIOT STUDIO
Great Silk Road in China on the
shoulders of coolies, on the backs
"Your Photo Deserves The Very Best"
of yaks, camels and horses, and
510 E. Main
floating on rafts supported by
animal
skins until it finally
reaches civilization.
Following the industrial revolution, England and Scotland led
the world in sorting, cleaning,
ENGINEERS-SCIENTIST- S
thinning, and weaving it into
tweaters. But ln the past two decades this country has claimed
a part of tlie world market.
Still, until very recently, the
By JEAN SPRAIN WILSON
AP Fashion Writer
Today men turn fibers out of
te.sttubes that look and feel like
cashmere, but their Imitations
have limitations.
They can do nothing to match
the romantic lore (or long wear- ing quality either) of luxury hulrs
from an Asian goat's belly.
Not much else in tne feminine
wardrobe today hns n hlstnrv hf
crosses as many centuries, or
touches as many cultures and
walks of life as something

Recently Wed

En agement

Tomorrow

No

Overcoats

Pin-Mat- es

Sharon Cornell, Alpha Delta Pi,
freshman in Arts and Sciences
from Owensboro, to Stu Riley,
Lambda Chi Alpha, senior Dhvsics
major from Erlancer.
Oralea Ziegler, Alpha Delta Pi,
Junior elementary education major from Louisville, to Tom Enrti-cot- t.
Pi Kappa Phi, senior chemistry maior at Duk tlnivpr;ltv
Linda Harbison, Alpha Delta PI,
freshman commerce major from
Louisville, to Mike Gray, Kappa
Alpha, Junior at Georgetown
PUBLICITY COMMITTEE
The Publicity Committee of the
will meet at 4 p.m. today
in the "Y" Lounge of the SUB.
Robert Anderson, editor of the
Kernel, will speak on "Methods of
Newspaper Publicity."
Guests are cordially Invited.
COSMOPOLITAN CLL'B
The Cosmopolitan Club this
semester will sponsor a tour of
Kentucky, a yearbook, and an International dinner.
The tour, planned for April 3
to April 8, will take students all
the way from Harlan to Mammoth
YWCA

Division of
UNITED AIRCRAFT

FUN!

CONTACT LENSES
Eliminate
Acquire

Eyeglasses
Chic Look

that

Phone
For Appointment

.

already been dissolved, and soak
for about five minutes,
Agitate slightly but avoid, rub
bing. Rinse without agitation, at
least twice In cool water. Roll in
bath towels and spread on a dry
towel. Dry away from the heat.
Adjust the sweater to the size and
shape of the paper cut-ou- t.
Keep sweaters flat in a drawer
to retain their shapes. Hang' suits,
coats on heavy hangers.
After each wearing air and
brush the garment before putting
it away.

FUN!

FUN!

If you're having a party this is a must; Entertain
your friends with the most clever, most humorous comedy idea ever offered to the public.
Never before has a record of this type been presented. Complete with hilarious tie-i- n
illustrations.
Send for your copy of "LEW BEDELL AND FRIEND".
Recorded by the author of the best sellers "SEE, YOU
DON'T HAVE TO LAUGH TO HAVE FUN" and "WILL
MY REAL FATHER PLEASE STAND UP". Send $2.00
in cash, check, or money order to
1
28, Calif. Postage will be paid by us.
Fun-148-

STUDENT SPECIAL
Corduroy Suits
Continental and

Ivy

Styling

$22.95 and up

Bulky Knit Shawl

Collar Sweaters

CORP.

Latest Fall Tones

$6.95 and up

will interview on

Latest in Fall and
Winter Outerwear

Look Better
with

Cave and to Paducah, Fort Knox,
and Louisville. A concert-showill go along on the tour and will
perform in several towns.
The international dinner will bo
held April 22 at the Second Pies- I... ," V Z. "urenUJi.
The club is open to both Ameri
can and foreign students.
EDUCATION ASSOCIATION
The Kentucky Student Education Association will meet at 6:30
p m- ton,Kht ln the Social Room
of the SUB.
The association will have a party
for the Lincoln School students.
BETA ALPHA TSI
Beta Alpha Psl, accounting honorary, will meet at 7 p.m. today in
the SUB.
Guest speaker will be Mr. K.
L. Weary, manager of the Cincinnati federal general accounting
agency. His topic will be "Changes
in the General Accounting Office
since World War II."
FRENCH FILM
The Alliance Francaise will show
a French film, "Voici La France"
at 3:15 p.m. Sunday In the Music
Lounge of the Fine Arts Building.
Following the movie a talk on
"The Love of Good Food Is the
Best of Sins" will be given by
Simone Salles.

Be Kind To Cashmere
Here are tips for prolonging the
life of garments made from the
luxury fiber, cashmere.
Wash most items instead of dry- cleaning because the laundering
agitation renews the softness of
the fiber and keeps it fluffy. How- ever, check instructions written on
the tag of the garment to be sure
of what you should do.
To wash a sweater: Make a pattern tracing the shape on a piece
0f paper. Submerge in warm or
cool water in which the soap has

HAMILTON STANDARD

AC SOCIETY
The American Chemical Society
will meet at 4 p.m. today in Room
214 of Kastle Hall. Dr. William
D. Ehmann of the Department of
Chemistry will speak.

3

Teh. If.

ENGINEERS BS. MS, Ph D degrees in EE, ME, MET for
de?
outstanding career positions in analytical, design and
vclopment engineering.
SCIENTISTS BS, MS, PhD degrees in Thysics, EE, ME
for challenging new study programs in Missiles & Space
systems, Electron Beam Technology and our Research
Laboratories.

Jackets, Surcoats,

and

Full Length Coats

Formal Rentals
Discounts to Groups

LEXINGTON

OPTICAL CO.
133 W. Short St.
A typical project under development: the air induc
bomber.
tion and environmental systems for the

'hiEEip
1

17 S.

azii

Upper

Gall ci Son

* Past Meetings Dismal

The Kentucky Kernel

Labor-Manageme-

University of Kentucky

pontage paid nl Lexington, Kentucky.
week during the regulnr
year except during holldayt and cxami.
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

.

.

Council

nt

Spcnnd-rln-

Published four timet

Bob Anderson,

Editor

Mike Wenninger, Managing Editor
Newton Spencer, Sports Editor
Bohhie Mason, Assistant Maruigtng Editor
Lew King, Advertising Manager
Beverly Cardwell and Toni Lennos, Society Editors
Skip Taylor and Jim Channon, Cartoonists
'
Business Manager
Nicky Fope, Circulation
Terry Ashley,
THURSDAY

Nohris Johnson, Seus Editor

NEWS STAFF

Newton Spencer, Sports

Michele Fearing,

Associate

Doing High Schools' Job

The University of Illinois served
notice last Novemlwr that it wanted
no illiterate freshmen and would not
tolerate any such applicants.
In abolishing its Rhetoric 100, a
noncredit remedial English course,
Illinois decided to throw the problem
of providing proper training in English back to those who created the
problem the state's high schools.
Illinois has much the same problem that has plagued the University
of Kentucky for years; as a state
school it is required to accept all students who graduate from accredited
high schools in the state. It, like Kentucky, has had to accept many students whose proficiency in their native tongue is astonishingly low.
Now Illinois has jumped on' the
bandwagon and joined a growing
national trend toward eliminating
courses that attempt to do in a few
hours a week for one semester what
lower schools should have done over
a period of years.
Needless to say, the University has
its own such course. Its title Eng

lish 1 is not impressive as Illinois'
Rhetoric 100, but its purpose is essentially the same. Its task is an extremely difficult one for it must trans-frosemiliterates into students capable of not only passing freshman
composition, but it must at the same
time prepare these people to meet
the demands that will be placed upon
their writing ability in other courses.
When we consider the expense
and effort of maintaining several sections of remedial English as is done
in the fall semester, we wonder
whether the expense is justified. The
question is primarily one of whether
the University should devote the
time of its instructors to something
that lies entirely within the realm
of the state high schools.
In view of current Kentucky high
school evaluations, we feel that the
lack of proper English instruction certainly will be made known and standards eventually raised.
Perhaps removing the crutch of
noncredit freshman English would
speed the process.

Independent Social beProgram
what the
to
Independents at the

University
have always complained that they
have never had a suitable social pro-

gram.
For the past few months, the
Women's Residence Halls Council
has been planning a new project.
The plan was to have two or three
dances a month in the women's dormitories and to rotate the dances from
one dorm to another.
The plan got rolling this past
Saturday night as Holmes Hall took
charge of the first dance. Approxima