xt76t14tmc21 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt76t14tmc21/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19681107  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November  7, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, November  7, 1968 1968 2015 true xt76t14tmc21 section xt76t14tmc21 What Nixon Will Do ForTo Students
WASHINGTON (CPS) -- Richard Nix-o- n
says lie has learned a lot from campaigning for the Presidency, especially
in understanding what's on the minds of
young people.
He's been on the receiving end of
some pretty pointed messages on signs

News Analysis
carried by students. One poster held high
at a rally in Burbank, Calif, especially
caught his eye. 'Talk With Us, Not At
Us," the sign said.
The sentiment behind that statement
is indicative of what Nixon sees as a gap
between generations, a gap he thinks his
new political leadership will help to
close.
When Nixon insists he has heeded the
sign's message, it's clear to many on cam

Tie

a double-talkepuses that he is
and a real threat to academic
freedom.
The Republican nominee feels he has
made a sincere effort to talk with students, not at them. He offers a platform
that includes ending the draft through
an
army after the Vietnam
war is ended. He has established a Student Coalition to "utilize the talents and
energies of the academic community to
resolve society's problems."
Nixon also would "devise new ways by
which, through long term loans, the federal government can further assist students to gain a higher education." He
also says he would encourage private enterprise to expand its participation in
student financial aid. Nixon might support the proposal for an "Educational
Opportunity Bank" that would loan students the cost of college, with repayment
two-face- d,

dependent on future income. The GOP

r,

Platform, though, contains the old idea
of tax credits for parents and a new version: tax deductions to encourage savings
for college.
Tax advantages would also be given to
those who support private schools, the
GOP candidate says.
Nixon also supports lowering the
are old
voting age. Eighteen-year-old- s
enough to vote not because they are old
enough to fight, he says, but because
they are smart enough to vote.
Nixon promises students "a piece of
the action." Involved in "forging the new
direction in America," young people will
have a better alternative than taking to
the streets in protest, he argues.
All this sounds good to Nixon supporters. Other members of the academic
community, however, are scared to death
of what might happen to dissent and

Adminfreedom under a Nixon-Agncistration.
Their fear and Nixon's fear of or distaste for student demonstrators can be
explained as simply a difference in ideological beliefs. To someone on the left,
someone on the right seems far right;
while conservatives might be able to
stomach moderates, liberals seem too
radical.
But liberal distaste within the academic community for Nixon can be
explained and justified by examining the
candidate's remarks and record.
Nixon's the one, Humphrey-supporter- s
point out, who voted in 1917 against
a $30 million increase in the school lunch
program. In 1960 as Vice President, he
declined to cast the
vote
that would have authorized more than
w

Continued on Tage

7, Col. 1

ECemthjcecy ECieemiel

Thursday Evening, Nov. 7, 1968

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

More Kernel
Complaints Aired
At Board Meeting

i

Vol LX, No. 52

O

Ol,i

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By LARRY DALE KEELING

Assistant Managing Editor
Two members of the Young Americans for Freedom (YAF)
appeared at a meeting of the Board of Student Publications Wednesday and after discussion with the Board, one of them said he no
longer saw the purpose of YAF's petition against the Kernel.
No one from OZIQ, which is
Zell had other complaints
circulating another petition, apat the meeting. Dr. Gif-for-d about the Kernel, however.
peared
"We found editorializing in
Blyton, chairman of the
Board, had repeatedly invited the news columns," he said.
He added that YAF does not
students with complaints about
the Kernel to attend the meeting. like the editorials but that the
Steve Bright, a student mem- editorials do not bother them
ber of the board, told the board as much as the news coverage.
"In the last week or two the
that some of the members of
him they felt it Kernel has improved," he said.
OZIQ had told
Douglas Murphy, a student
was a waste of time to talk to
the board. He said they planned who said he represented no one
to take their petition to the Board but himself, criticized the Kernel
for the coverage it gives to minoof Trustees.
frontDr. Blyton had a copy of rity groups. He cited the
YAF's petition and said it sur- page story on Mike Fallahay
back his draft notice;
prised him that someone would sendinge
interview with Leothe
draw up a petition containing
errors." He listed nard Jordan, a
"such obvious
Marxist and the amount of space
three such errors:
for a DemoStudent activity fees pay for given to Students
cratic Society.
the Kernel. Dr. Blyton told the
"It seems like that up to the
two students that student fees do
Continued on Page 8, Col. 1
Kernel.
not pay for the
The Kernel is an adjunct of
the journalism department. Dr.
Blyton stated this was not true,
either.
The Kernel has no superBy CERRY HINE
United Farm Worker orgavisory control. Dr. Blyton said
he was "pretty sure" that the nizer Venustiano Olguin preBoard hired Charles Reynolds sented the plight of the Mexican
as director of student publicamigrant worker to a group of
about 150 UK students and factions to provide this control.
"I have heard by way of the ulty members here Wednesday
grapevine that certain students night.
have actually signed this petiHe said migrant grape pick
tion," Dr. Blyton said. "It
amazes me that anyone would
sign a petition filled with such
obvious errors."
He said he welcomed with
By JEANNIE LEEDOM
open arms criticism and evaluaKernel Staff Writer
tion of the paper, "but I am
also interested in truth."
Homecoming events includ"The petition was written ing a torch light parade, the
under faculty advising," said Wil- Lou Rawls concert, the football
liam Zell of the YAF, "and I game and dances and parties-w- ill
would like to apologize for the
soon be underway.
A torch light parade and pep
errors.
"Since we're not paying for it, rally will be held Thursday at
(the Kernel) I don't see what the 7:30 p.m. The parade, beginning
purpose of the petition is. If it in front of Holmes Hall, will
didn't represent our views, we proceed up Rose to Columbia,
didn't want to pay for it. The up WooiUand, past the ComFit-Ifor the
purpose of the petition was to plex and to Haggin
put the Kernel on a subscription bonfire.
The pep rally will feature
basis."

J

'

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full-pag-

Decisions,
Decisions

,

,

Students continued their voting for the homecoming queen Wednesday.
Here students make up their mind as to the five candidates they will
vote for. The five finalists will be introduced for the first time at the
pep rally Thursday night. They will be presented again at the concert
Friday night and one of them will be crowned homecoming queen at
halftime Saturday.

Olguin: Federal Legislation Is Boycott Target
are striking for
recognition.
Olguin explained that due to
the availability of more migrants
brought to the fields by the growers, attempts to strike for a bargaining position are difficult to
realize.
Migrant workers brought into

ers of California

replace striking pickers are uninformed of the labor situation
break the
and unknowingly
strike, he said.
Therefore, the National Farm
Workers of America are touring
the country in an attempt to
persuade the people to cooperate in their efforts by refusing

Homecoming Starts Tonight
a short "pep talk" by President
A D. Kirwan and an introduction of the team and five queen
finalists by Coach Charlie Brad-sha-

Friday at 8 p.m. the Lou
Rawls concert will be held at
Memorial Coliseum. Coach Brad-shawill announce the starting
lineup for Saturday's game with
Vanderbilt and will present the
queen finalists again at the concert.
At 2 p.m. Saturday the Wildcats will meet the Commodores
from Vanderbilt. During halftime
w

the band will present

a special
sltow and President Kirwan will
crown the 1968 Homecoming
Queen.
The Homecoming Dance will
be from 8:30 p.m. 12: 30 a.m.
Saturday in the Student Center
Ballroom.
--

Saturday night will also feature numerous fraternity and
group parties.
Be "in the game" and enjoy
all the UK Homecoming

to buy or sell California grapes.
The movement has attracted
widespread student support.
"The real target is federal
legislation," Olguin continued.
"So far only token legislation
has been passed."
He compared the situation
of the Mexican-America- n
farm
worker to that of Blacks a few
years ago.
The growers maintain that if
the pickers were not happy they
would not be there. They bitterly
oppose any attempts of the laborers to organize, Olguin said.
Dr. Cene Mason, a political
science professor, related plans
for local support of the boycott.
Dr. Mason is attempting to garner support from different civic
organizations to bring pressure
on grocery store managers in the
area not to sell table grapes.
Olguin summarized the success of the boycott movement
by saving that no major victories
have been recorded but that
"minor victories are being won
every day."

* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY

KERNEL, Thursday, Nov; 7, '1908

Guthrie Mirrors Composition Through Simplicity
of American history. Woodv
BOUND FOR GLORY by Woody ously demonstrates, he was somewhat of an historian, a would-b- e Guthrie has surreptitiously mirGuthrie, E. P. Dutton and Sons,
413 pp.
social reformer, and certainly rored the times in which he lived
an acute observer of his times. through the clever device of colBy FRANK BAILEY
What perhaps is most strikloquially simple, but saucy, diaTo the casual music listener,
ing about the book is that it logue.
Woody Guthrie may be no more is less the chronicle of one man's
Guthrie will by no means
than Just a name. To the diletlife and more the story thin slices enter any hall of fame in the
tante in the field, he is at least
field of American literature. But
a bit of pleasant nostalgia, if
like Detroit's Mickey Lolich with
not a revered genius.
AUTUMN
his fast ball, this diminutive song
Woody Guthrie was a song
By Beverly Benton
writer is deceptively good. His
writer, or rather a song creator. I saw Autumn today.
work is written with such unBut
his autobiography
as
She was my father.
assuming simplicity that the
BOUND FOR GLORY illustri- reader follows the story line easi- Is it that I saw his many colors-r- ed
ly.
temper,
But it takes only a couple
SUMMER
orange alertness,
of chapters to realize that all of
By Beverly Benton
Western-oriente- d
d
yellow gaiety,
I could not wonder
this
green newness?
That you were only Summer's
dialectic dialogue has been
Is it that I saw them?
heat.
reflecting a turbulent era in this
nation's history. Of course,
Is it that I love them both
Guthrie makes no pretense of reShimmering,
father and Autumn
You appeared before my eyes
lating an unbiased account of the
That I project one to the other? times. He is quite consciously
somewhat hazy
through heat waves.
speaking for those "culturally
Laughing,
disadvantaged" of the Western
It is this, but
and
You beckoned me come
states in the
Because the brown
to join your joyful game
Depression days.
falls heaviest now
and feel its bum.
In fact, the reader is given
And covers green
I will not try anymore
the impression that even when
with it brittleness,
To reach you
given a reasonable chance, he
I see Autumn
You and Summer's heat
snubs his nose at any attempt
and my father,
will disappear
to see how the other half of this
And I know Love's fear.
when Autumn comes.
country lived. But the reader
easy-to-rea-

must remember that this book
was penned before Guthrie, the
singer and song creator, achieved
his greatest fame.
When the author deals with
his own life, he tries to convince the reader that he is but
a free spirit rolling along like the
trains that he rode and wrote
about, "Bound for Glory." He
is perhaps the Thoreau of the
Western freight riders, advocating the simple, unencumbered
life where man can be essentially
free from doubts and responsibilities. Guthrie is unconvincing
as a free spirit because the depth
of thought in the book vividly
demonstrates his concern for the
type of people about which he
writes.
BOUND FOR GLORY is basically a coherent conglomeration
of the Guthrie philosophies
written so the educated and uneducated can understand. For
example, he has one of his numerous railyard cronies discuss
the "isms" thusly, "If we all
get together, social like, and build
something like a big ship, any
kind of factory, railroad, a big
dam that's social work, ain't

it?"

-

Then on the same subject,
Guthrie opines as if in some
sort of continuation, they will
"tell you we all Just mortally
got to work together, build things

together, fix up old things together, clean out the filth together, put up new buildings,
schools and churches, banks and
factories together, and own every-thin- k
together. Sure they'll call
it a bad ism. Jesus don't care
if you call it socialism or communism, or Just you and me."
This is how Woody Guthrie
hammers his ideas, a sort of
literary soft sell. The style of
the work is lively, but often
shows the strain of a novice at
literature. He leans much too
heavily on the use of the metaphor and simile to convey his
thought. At times these are outlandish and bunched much too
close together so that the reader
is more aware of the literary
device than he is of the story.
Many may now consider
Woody Guthrie and the songs
he wrote naive and passe, but
BOUND FOR GLORY waxes
eloquently for the people about
whom it was written. The book
is far from passe.

-

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CUulfle
Bdvertltlnf will b accepted en s pre-pabail enly. Ads may
be placed In periea Mendfty threat
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Friday
U THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Keens

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Rates are $1.25 fer 20 wards, $3.00
fer three eensecatlre Insertlens el the
same ad ef 20 wards, and $3.78 per
week, 20 wards.
111,

FOR SALE
'62 Ford Falcon,
FOR SALE
clutch, good condition. Asking
after 6 p.m.
Call

WANTED
ROOMMATE wanted to try new
perience in living. Modern

Parking, private entrance.

1.
Virginia Ave.
WANTED Roommate
2 bath, nicely
at the Royal Arms.
now. Good for next

new
$150.

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furnished apt.

Must move In
semester. Call
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5N5t

FOR SALE 1964 Renault Dauphlne;
266-64good condition, $493- 7NSt

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APT. FOR RENT Eff. iurnlshed; 3
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Transylvania Park or phone
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SEWING

THE KERNEL

READ

of all kinds: UK
ALTERATIONS
vicinity. Reasonable rates. Phone
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CLASSIFIED COLUMN DAILY

NOW . . .
STUDENT DIRECTORIES
ARE AVAILABLE!

Three Cheers for the
Winning Teams
Villager and Ladybug
Good taste is always trident in
Villager and Ladybug fashions . . .

Pick your's up in the Student Government
Office Room 102, Student Center

and Ladybug . . . always in
the best of taste . . . always just the
right thing for the right event.

Villager

Tuesday

It is easy to put together the perfect
skirt and shirt with The Villager c&lor
coordinates such as this voile body
shirt topping a dirndle wool skirt.
Both are available in blue, or melon.
Skirt $20.
Sizes
Shirt VI.

Thursday
2:00 to 5:00 p.m.

Must present valid University

Ladybug cheers for the Americana
suit. Redwhiteblue combine for the
sharp look of today . . . wool.
SSO.
Sizes
Villager and Ladybug available
Downtown, Southland and
On-- 7

Friday
I.D.

OPENl Fri., Sot., Sun.
SHOWING

A HILARIOUS

LOOK

THIS WEEKEND

AT A MUCH HERALDED SUBJECT!

DEBORAH KERR DAVID I1IVEN

-

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Nr -- "o

ROBtRT COOTE JUDY GEESON
Cob

by

Dtlun

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ALSO

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PAUL NEWMAN
FREDRIC MARCH

ON - THE - CAMPUS
1

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RICHARD DOONE

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ftomw
cinemascope

DIANE ClLENTQ

CdftyDta

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Nor. 7, 1968 -- 3

Experience Should Help Director With Closed TV
By SALLY

MITCHELL

Dr. Paul Owen, Director of
Media Services, came to UK with
a wealth of experience behind
him, which should help him to
make the new closed circuit television station here a success.
A music scholarship to Pomona College in California
started him on his way as a
singer and choral director with

Fred Waring before World War there, he took courses and got
II. After the war, he returned to his Bachelor's degree.
In I960 he was made Station
professional television and small
parts in motion pictures. "In Relations Director of National
1953 television was new and alEducational Television in New
most anyone could get in it," York and in 1962 went back to
said Dr. Owen.
Houston and took a part-tim- e
A friend persuaded him to go job in order to finish his graduate
to the University of Houston to work.
set up the first educational teleHe received his Ph.D. in sovision station. While he was cial industrial psychology early

Fourteen Coeds In Contest
For Miss Christmas Seal
Fourteen University of Ken- Cheri Hughes; Alpha Xi Delta
tucky coeds will compete for the Sorority and Sigma Chi Fratertitle of "Miss Christmas Seal" as nity Aim Jolly; Chi Omega Sothe 19G8 Christmas Seal Camrority and Kappa Alpha Fraterpaign gets officially underway nity Barrie Greis; Delta Delta
this week.
Delta Sorority, Theta Chi and
Farmhouse Fraternities Helen
Locally the contest is sponsored by the Blue Crass TB and Hyde Parrish; Delta Gamma SoRespiratory Disease Association rority and Phi Kappa Tau Frateras part of the annual Christmas nity Susan Rasor, Delta Zeta
Seal fund drive.
Sorority and Pi Kappa Alpha
Students at UK and all resi- Fraternity K at hy Smith; Gamdents of Lexington and Fayette ma Phi Beta Sorority and Delta
WilCounty have been mailed letters Tau Delta Fraternity-Bet- sy
containing Christmas Seals and son; Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority,
ballots. Each $1.00 contribution
Tau Kappa Epsilon and Phi Gamto the campaign entitles the conma Delta Fraternities Katherine
tributor to one vote in the con- Ellison; Kappa Delta Sorority,
test. There is no limit to the Sigma Nu and Alpha Gamma
number of votes.
R1k Fraternities Amelia Symp-soContestants may also contact
Kappa Kappa Gamma Sotheir friends and relatives rority and Lambda Chi Alpha
througliout the Blue Crass Area Fraternity Susan Wachs; Pi
Beta Phi Sorority, Sigma Phi
(Bourbon, Fayette, Harrison, Jessamine, Scott and Woodford Epsilon and Triangle Fraternities-Britta Cobb; Zeta
Counties) who can cast their Betsy
votes on the same basis.
Tau Alpha Sorority and Sigma
UK candidates and the organizations they represent are: Alpha Clii Omega Sorority, Alpha
CHRISTIAN
Tau Omega and Phi Sigma KapSTUDENT
pa Fraternities Susan Lambert-son- ;
FELLOWSHIP
Alpha Delta Pi Sorority and
Kappa- Sigma Fraternity Carol
Jo Fathergill; Alpha Gamma DelEasily accessible to residents of
ta Sorority, Phi Delta Theta and
Coopersrown, Complex, FraterZeta Beta Tau Fraternities

in 1967, and came to UK shortly
afterward. "Kentucky offers a
real challenge; here's an ideal
place where TV can be used to
bring out instructional material,"
he says.
The first phase of the station
will be completed by spring. It
will carry broadcasts to Somerset,
Jefferson, Eastern, and Hopkins-vill-e
Community Colleges.
Dr. Owen described the three
functions of the closed circuit

Tapes also will be produced
state and commercial television.
The equipment now is Just
on the threshold of being tuned.
Dr. Owen wants to do new things
with the station: "We don't want
to do the same kind of things
that have been done in the last
15 years in television."
for broadcast over

If you

station as:

Alpha Epsilon Fraternity Susan
O'Brien.
The contest will end at midnight, Thursday, December 12.
To count in the contest, all contributions must be turned in to
the tuberculosis association or
postmarked by December 12 at
midnight.
The candidate receiving the'
largest number of votes will be
presented with a trophy from
the tuberculosis association.

-

must

Messages to students other
than instructional; advisements,
registration.
y Members of the faculty in
Lexington can speak to faculties
of the community colleges.
Use for adult continuing education.
"With TV we can bring all
the latest things to them."
Television sets eventually will
be set up in the Chemistry-PhysicLaw, Engineering and new
Arts and Sciences buildings and
Dickey Hall. The distribution
center in Taylor Education will
send programs on various channels to these buildings.

burn,
burn

carefully..
burn
legally.

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HELP SM0KEY

VZj4

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CtAK fKtVtNl
FOREST FIRES
IN THE SOUTH

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nities, and Sororities.

UNITARIAN
CHURCH
of Lexington

t7"f

,

502 Columbia Ave.
SUNDAYS
10:15 a.m.
Worship
Study Croups
1
p.m. Mondays;
Open

3

Wednesdays

Forum-Tue- sdays

6:30 p.m.

William Buck, CSF President
Larry L Brandon, Campus Minister

277-624-

yv.svf.

Campus
Religious
Liberals

'

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'

.

9:15 a.m.

Sunday 7:30 p.m.
115 Student Center

"EVERY CHRISTIAN
IS CALLED"
Acts 8, Romans

1

t

i

Dr. Ross

Economist
Episcopalian Vicar

Author, Missionary

I

.

10:30 a.m.
"A HILARIOUS
FAITH"

Mark

Refreshments
on the house

f

14:41-4- 4

m

I

I

.

,

7:00 p.m.
"GOD AND THE
FACT OF
SUFFERING"
Psalms 121

Sunday

at the Church
10:30 a.m.

RELIGIOUS

EDUCATION

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PROGRAM

The Kentucky Kernel
Th Kentucky Kernel, University
ol Kentucky.
Station, Umvurkity 40606. tcoud cum
Kentucky
,
Kentucky.
poUM paid at LJUn-tonMailed Ave time weekly during tn
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during th summer
Published by the Board of Student
"ost Uttlce
Publications, UK Cadet in Box and
la4
Bun as Um
pubiind conunuousiy as toe Keroei
'Advirujiiag published herein Is intended to help the reader buy. Any
talM or mntleadUitf dverUelul should
be reported to The Jtdnwrs.

4.

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CHURCH
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lmi

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Shoes courtesy of Baynham's

SILHOUETTE WITH
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THIEU.IT!

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... OR J, SHIP OUT!

EITHER YOU SHAPE UP . . .

NS,

...MORE MONEY

NO
NUTHIN'!

GEE.

I

NERVE

WlSt

TO SAY THAT!

The Republican Future
The direction this country will what they will do now that they
be taking in the years upcoming have been given the reigns of govwas largely determined Tuesday ernment.
The issue of the Vietnam war
when voters showed their preferis probably the most important
for the old Republican workence
horse, Richard Nixon. As the returns matter facing the nation today and
came in through the election day Mr. Nixon has avoided almost all
comment1 on the matter. Hopefully
and into the small hours of Wednesit became increasingly obvious he will now undertake to end the
day
that the present administration of
Johnson and Humphrey was repudiated, however lightly, and the
programs of the Republican party
chosen. But exactly what we can
look forward to under the new administration is difficult to determine.
One of the reasons for the uncertainty is that Mr. Nixon will
be facing Democratic majorities in
both houses of Congress, and it
is not now known what type of
working relationship he will be able
to establish. The possibility of a
factional Democratic-Republica- n
coalition does exist.

war as soon as possible in a humane
manner, saving lives rather than
face.

Throughout the campaign we
have been taken aback by the
statements of Nixon and Agnew
on what they call "law and order."
Their general demeanor has given
little cause for comfort to concerned

But the main reason we are
now unable to determine what lies
ahead in the next four and maybe
eight years is that the Republican
candidates, personified in Mr.
Nixon and Spiro T. Agnew, his running mate, have not clearly spoken
out on the issues. We have only
been able to gain a slight feeling
of what the men represented and

By DARRELL RICE
And HOWARD MASON

Kernel Editors
OZIQ met publicly for the first time
Monday night and revealed at last its
breatlilessly-awaited- ,
vaunted
highly
plans for upgrading the Kernel. By implementing the recommended reforms, the
wide consensus of opinion has it that
the Kernel soon will be able to achieve
all the potence and driving force of the
Morehead Trail Blazer.
Briefly, the suggested reforms consist of:
Revamping the Board of Student Publications to include six student members
(all appointed by the president of Student Government), three faculty members (all appointed by the President),
the Vice President for University Relations (i.e., Clenwood Creech), a professional journalist, a representative from

the Alumni Committee and the permanent
chairmanship's being held by the Vice

President for Student Affairs.
The board is to be recognized as the
publisher of the Kernel and the editorial
policies are to evolve from it.
is to be selected
The editor-in-cliielection, all applicants
by campus-wid- e
to have been screened beforehand by the
board.
Subsequently, the board is to appoint
the editorial page editor, the managing
editor and the business manager. The
remainder of the staff is to be selected
by the editor and submitted to the board
for ratification.
Editorials are to be written by five
students selected by the board to represent
diverse political viewpoints.
As many of these ideas represent the
conditions under which the Trail Blazer
operates, there can be little doubt but

that the Kernel also will soon be readying unprecedented heights of journalistic
excellence. In fact, even the Trail Blazer
does not have all these remarkably enlightened standards under which to operate; therefore, the Kernel might be
expected to even surpass the Trail Blazer's record. Civen time, of course.
The editorials evolving under such a
system might well be expected to deal
with such lofty topics as admonitions
not to write on desks, not to run or yell
in halls, and not to ride motorcycles
on campus. On a more positive note,
students could expect encouragement to
display school spirit, to study harder,
to attend church regularly and to dress
properly for all occasions.
Perhaps the point of greatest appeal
in this plan is the one calling for a
election to fill the editor's
campus-wid- e
position.

minority groups and student activists who are pressing for progressive social change. We now hope
Mr. Nixon and his vice presidentelect see fit to reverse the direction they have been taking and
to move positively to solve the
racial and social problems facing
the nation today.
While such a move seems essential to the future of the country, there is reason to doubt that
it is forthcoming.
Perhaps this all points to the
major fears we have about Tuesday's election. Much has beeri written about the conservative backlash
coming over this nation as represented by the support given both
Nixon and Wallace. The issue seems
especially relevant in this state
since the election of our present
governor, a conservative by most
any standards.
This country cannot afford to
move backwards. These are important and troubled times in the
nation, and new solutions are
needed. The old solutions, offered
us throughout much of the campaign, will not do. We can now only
hope Mr. Nixon and Mr. Agnew
will
the issues and act
more intelligently in their governing capacities than they did during
the campaign. The nation's future
depends on it.

Realizing the import of the election
(and, pragmatically, the high costs), a
wise and economical move would be to
merge the editor's election with the campus liomecoming queen balloting. Then,
as most magnificently conceived, the half-tim- e
of the homecoming football games
would provide the ideal setting for the
crowning of both winners.
Another advantage to this plan would
be that both campaigns could be conducted simultaneously with wall posters
and all. However, no one would want
to intermingle the trivia of the editor's
election with one of such magnitude
as the selection of the homecoming queen.
Therefore, this factor would necessitate the building of a second "wall"
for the editor candidates' literature. And
perhaps this is the only drawback to

OZIQsplan.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Nor. 7,'

1908-

-5

Kernel Forum: the readers write
To the Editor of the Kernel:
All Nigerians, respective of their
views on the current crisis at home, have
heartily welcomed efforts being made by'
members of the world community in helping innocent victims of the civil war.
These victims are found on both sides
of the fighting lines hence the UNICEF's
Relief." But uncaption: "Nigeria-Biafr- a
fortunately, most of these"humanitarian"
efforts have always had a political overtone, as
by the Kernel in its
issue of 29th October, 1968.
The Federal Government of Nigeria
will certainly not allow itself to be dragged
into the irresponsible game of feeding
the world on lies. And so it is that the
rebel propaganda,
with
unchallenged
bases in New York City, Los Angeles,
Miami, etc. has been taken
the U.S. public. While it may be
futile at this time to go into the details
of events that led to the current war,
I commend to the Kernel the report on
the situation by Assistant Secretary of
State Joseph Palmer II, first U.S. Ambassador in Nigeria, presented to the
Senate
on Africa, August
27th, 1968.
The Nigerian Government has gone
great lengths in permitting the unprecedented in a domestic affair: it has allowed representatives of the Organization of African Unity, United Nations,
Sweden, Poland, Canada and Great Britain to travel along with the Federal
troops and watch and report the conduct of those highly disciplined soldiers.
So far the observers have published two
reports, both categorically denying rebel
charges of "genocide," and stating instead
that the situation is "in fact the opposite." The Canadian representative,
Maj.-GeMilroy, is currently at Ottawa
to report on the situation as he found it
to the Canadian House of Commons.
Hailing from the former Eastern Nigeria (now carved into three States by
the Federal Government), and belonging
to a n on-- 1 bo minority tribe, I have become sickened by an endless line of
letters from relatives and friends relating
vicious atrocities perpetrated by. Ibos
against my people for our opposition to
secession. What people refer to as "Bia-fra- "
is merely a state of mind conceived
by the Ibo tribe and nourished by international adventurers to oppress and
dominate smaller tribes, and exploit the
resources of these smaller tribes.
Tekena Harry
Graduate Student
.

n.

To the Editor of the Kernel:
My appearance before the law school
was commented upon in your editorial
in The Kentucky Kernel, October 16,
1968.

Your criticism of the undersigned is
neither just, temperate, nor decent. I
do not expect you to publish the comments of Larry Roberts, the senior law
student of the university law school upon
whose invitation I appeared at The
Speakers Forum, but I enclose herewith

a copy of his letter to me so that you
will be better informed, at least.
I agree wholeheartedly with Dr. Krog-dahl- 's
criticism of The Kentucky Kernel
and its operation. You, of course, are
responsible for its conduct. It does not
represent the views of the students of the
University of Kentucky. In my opinion,
it misrepresents them badly. Unless you
can make arrangements to clean it up
at the earliest possible moment, it is
my thinking that the stinking sheet ought
to be abolished. The taxpayers of Kentucky ought not to be called upon to
finance such tripe.
You ought to be interested to know
that there were between three and four
hundred law students at the Forum meeting on Monday last, and not a single
one, of them expressed approval of the
conduct of The Kentucky Kernel.
Frank Ramsey, Judge Sutherland, and
others are presently reviewing your policy
and it seems fairly certain that, unless
you gain a semblance of decency in short
order, you will soon disappear from the
scene.
A. B.