xt773n20d80f https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt773n20d80f/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19420224  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 24, 1942 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 24, 1942 1942 2013 true xt773n20d80f section xt773n20d80f ON PAGE TWO
That Stuff Should
Kept In Brooklyn

VOLUME XXXII

Kernel

rfE Ken rucicY

U

He

Z246

I

UNIVERSITY
FI(. ION. KK.MIlICkV.

Carol nit Conanl was presented as
queen of the annual Scabbard and
Blade military ball Saturday night
in the Union ballroom. Miss Conant.
student, was
Junior engineering
named honorary colonel and regimental sponsor She is a member
of Chi Omega sorority.
Honorary lieutenant colonels selected were: Sara Ewing. regimental
executive: Maureen Arthur, first battalion sponsor; Gene Ray Crawford,
second battalion sponsor: and Louise
Ewan. third battarion sponsor. Ann
Austin was chosen honorary' major

and. regimental adjutant.
Scabbard and Blade pledges presetted at the dance, which carried
out the "V for Victory" theme, are:
Bob Amnions. David McCord. Monroe Lear, Atlee Wilson, Bob Hillen-meje- r.
Jack Casner, Joe Bohnak.
Gerald Sheaffer, Norman Beck. Winston Blythe, Ward Darnell. Ed Hank.
Winifred Ellis, Jim Carroll. Clarence
Morehead, Lee Parker Witt. Omar
Rathff. Ben Lowery, Earl Hadden, J.
E. Adkins. William Floyd. Harry
Feamster, Sam McElroy. John Keller. Grant Lewis, Tom Walker. Marvin Akers, Mel Brewer and Vincent
Splane. '

NATURE OF WAR
IN SEVEN POINTS
GIVEN BY DUPRE
World Anarchy,
Maladjustment Are
Principal Causes
Seven points as to the nature of
the war were set forth yesterday
by Dr. J. Huntley Dupre. professor of
history', in an exclusive 'interview
with the Kernel.
"It is an enlarged, magnified edi8
war. which
tion of the
was a titantic struggle between
1914-191-

rival, competitive, capitalistic, imperialistic national states, temporarily united into two great armed alliances." was the first point expressed.
'Secondly, it represents the periodic war conclusion to the tensions

natural to the international,

politi-

cal, and economic anarchy that our
world, state, and economic system
is.
"In the third place, it is symptomatic of a great popular mass movement of peoples in the world to
acliieve greater economic security
and to enjoy a greater degree and
quality of social justice.
"Next, it represents the spiritual
and moral, as well as political and
economic malaise and maladjustment in our world.

vr

.ft

I,

Resignations Of

ROTC ANNOUNCES

II TM

V KH'.Rl'ARV

L'l.

14

Twenty-fiv-

Jones, Gresham,
Robinson Named
Battalion Adjutants
and company officers
hav been appointed and military
promotions made by the military
science department. Col. Paul C.
Paschal,
head of the military
science department, announced yesterday.
Appointed
battalion adjutants
were cadet captains Charles R. Jones
Jr.. first battalion: Russell L. Gresh-asecond battalion: and H. Clayton
Robinson. Jr. third battalion.
Promoted to cadet majors were
David A. Brown. Kenneth England,
and Claude E. Hammond. New cadet
captains are A. W. Lee, Robert Plaga,
G. W. Schlegel, C. R. Jones Jr., and
H. C. Robinson. Jr. Newly appointed
first lieutenants are B. S. O'Nan.
A. T. Burke. L. W. Barnes. T. A.
and Ben H. Lowry.
Ma-ha-

e
appointments were
approved, 6 leaves of absence granted and 14 resignations were accepted
by the executive committee of University of Kentucky board of trus- mectie Friday in the offices
or president Herman L. Donovan.
A leave of absence was granted
to Prof. Bertram P. Ramsey for
the period of the war emergency
In order that he might serve as research physicist in the magnetic
mines division of the United States
naval ordnance laboratory.
Leaves were also granted M. G.
Karsner of the physical education
department, and William Hopewell,
assistant director of student publications and graduate manager of
the Kentucky Kernel
printing
plant, in order that they might
enter army service as reserve officers.
TAKES STATE JOB
Permissions were granted Mrs.
Mary King Kouns, a member oHhe
physical education department, to
accept appointment as director of
the physical fitness program for
women in the state, an appointment offered by Dr. Arthur T.
state commissioner of

n.

Other appointments are:
first battalion William R. Black.
cadet lieutenant colonel, command- -'
ing; Lynn Allen, cadet captain, commanding company A: William A.
Tucker, cadet first lieutenant, second

in command company A: Russell
Patterson, cadet caotain. commanding company C; Roy R. May Jr.,
cadet first lieutenant, second in health.
command company C.
of leave from
An extension
Second battalion Albert J. Spare,
teaching duties in the library scicadet lieutenant colonel, commanding: Russell L. Gresham, cadet cap- ence department for the remainder
company
tain, commanding
E; of the school term was granted
George F. Nollau. cadet first lieutenMiss Margaret I. King, University
ant, second in command, company librarian, who has been suffering
E; Royce R. Taylor, cadet captain, from a broken hip.
commanding company F.
Other leaves allowed included
Third battalion Joe A. Gayle,
cadet lieutenant colonel, command- - those of WiUlam F. Threlkeld,
ing: Samuel Carlick, cadet first Todd county assistant farm agent,
lieutenant, second in command military duty; G. E. Williamson,
company I; Richard S. Hulette. caj Graves county farm agent, military
dct captain, commanding company duty; Mrs. Mary Ada Sullivan,
K: Joseoh W. Dunlap. cadet captain, leave extended to July 1, duties to
be continued by Mrs. Emma Jane
commanding company L.
assign- - Walker as library requisition clerk
Junior
ments include
J. and bookkeeper, and Mrs. Marie
M. Moran. assistant director of the
M. Wilson. O. G. McBeath; techMiss Jennie
nical sergeants. R. O. Conway, first University cafeteria.
battalion: Lee Witt, second battal- Mae Trigg was appointed to this
ion: and Marion N. Berry, third vacancy.
battalion.
Other resignations received inStaff sergeants: Arthur H. Sawyer,' cluded those of Mary & James,
first battaliorn; W. M. Floyd second graduate assistant in botany; Ellen
battalion; and E. F. Hadden. third Minihan, physics secretary; Henry
battalion.
Thomas Overby, zoology assistant
First sergeants: Leonard Allen. A: to enter military service; Lawrence
Marvin Akers, B; J. A. Bohnak, C; Oliver, zoology assistant to enter
C. N. Beck. E; Omer Ratliff, F; military service;
Harriet Estes,
Ralph Eschborn. G; John Hurst, I; graduate assistant in philosophy;
Winston Blythe, K; and James Lear, Harold J. Jones, chemistry instrucL
tor; Major LeRoy Miles, transferred
Color sergeant is Brooks Coons.
to army duty at Fort Behning, Ga.;
Ben H. Parham and Glenn H.
Shoun, general education grant personnel, entering military service;
Miss Ella Given, dairy clerk; Rex
Of teen, bureau of business research
assitant; Raymond Dudley Johnson, secretarial assistant and Harold
Hartzer, pressman. Kernel Plant.
APPOINTMENTS
Appointments
included
Miss
Vivian Dyer, graduate assistant in
the bureau of government research;
Bruce Rawlings, graduate assistant
in botany; Cofer Sunderman, Richard Gard and Hugh Moore, labora
tory assistants in geology; Luther D.

w

j

master-sergeant-

V

s,

I

Prater, parttime graduate assistant
in political science; Robert W. Miles,
Jr., student assistant in philosophy;
E. C. Milton and Henry D. Shanltlin,
graduate laboratory assistant in
psychology; Mrs. Josephine Mitchell, farm economics clerk; James
S. Howard, Casey County agent;
Kermit Mills, Rowan county assistant county agent; W. Russell Reynolds Jr., Martin county agent;
James I. Stephens, Fleming county
agent; Miss Florence Morgan, Experiment
Station Administration

clerk.
Dr. Verne C. Fryklind, director
n
in the armored
of
force school at Fort Knox; Miss
Norma Cocanougher and Miss Vera
Gillespie, secretaries in the
tional education department; L.
Gill, training director at Gilberts- Miss Willie Curtis
ville dam;
Wright,
assistant in secretarial
practice and typewriting; Miss Mary
Barnes, student library assistant to
succeed Miss Mary Jane Stalcup, resigned; Miss Ruth L. Hysong, night
supervisor of residence halls for
women; Misses Margaret Cohen and
Dorothy Dean, assistants in the perwwxtAwi1 tr'nfmmmmiM m, i 4 sonnel office.
aii.M
iiunuinj iL.iii-jThose present for the meeting, in
AVK ATCJl'K VAI.K
to Dr. Donovan and W.
l niniiii l.i null tllfii
nlli'i l lute, light, addition
ami
flutnti't
Gayle Starnes, secretary of the
n the last game in which they board, were Judge Richard C. Stoll,
as they watth the final tnniih
would have a ihutce in fai I u i fnl e in n Wtldtnt uniform on Lexington, chairman; R. P. Hobson,
Louisville; Lee Klrkpatrick. Paris,
I he
Alumni iimnaiuni 1hi
weie Iminl In the bent h by and Frank D. Peterson. University
.

,''

'tint t"ul tt'ii1'

teacher-educatio-

s

37

Wildcats Tangle With
Underdog Florida In
Opening Round Of SEC

Executive Board

AND PROMOTIONS

NUMBER

11112

Also Accepted By

1942 OFFICERS

Bv Florida In 1934

OF KENTUCKY

Caroline Conanl Reigns TRUSTEES GRANT
SIX,
AsQueenODJilUaryliall LEAVES TO25
APPOINT
Military Honorary
Presents Pledges
At Annual Dance

ON PAGE FOUR
Kenturkv Was Lpst

TOUKNEY TLAY
BEGINS THURSDAY
Tennessee Vols
And Alabama Tide
In Same Bracket

Detroit Minister To Talk
At Convocation Today
Dr. Henry H. Crane, minister of j
the Central Methodist church of
Detroit, will address the first University convocation of the semester at 10 a. m. today in Memorial
hall. The speaker

By BOB ADAIR
Kentucky's
Wildcats will meet
Florida's 'Gators at 9 o'clock Thursday night in the last game of the
opening round of the Southeastern
conference basketball tournament, to
be held at the Louisville Armory
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday of

by

Is presented

YMCA-YWC-

I'niversity classes whedaM
for the third hoar Uday will be dismissed for the eonroealioa in Mem'1 orial hsUl. Fourth hoar elaaaes will
"M begin promptly at 11 o'elorh, it was
All

this

;;.fi'

week.

Drawings for tournament berths
were held in the office of Bemle A.
t
Shively. Kentucky athletic director.
X:
Sunday afternoon. The committee
in charge of the drawings was comI
!
announced.
posed of Shively, John Barnhill.
Tennessee football coach, and Henry
President Herman L. Donovan will
Red Sanders. Vanderbllt football
preside. The invocation, by Dr. Hor- mentor. Upper bracket teams In'
1 ace Sprague of the First' Methodist
clude Louisiana State. Georgia Tech.
church of this city, will be preceded
Alabama. Mississippi State. Georgia.
by an organ prelude from Mrs.
:
and Tennessee. Teams drawing
Lela Cullis.
lower bracket positions were Tulane
In addition to addressing the
Mississippi.
Vanderbllt,
Auburn.
convocation this morning, the minFlorida, and Kentucky.
ister will speak to Y groups at 7
, BARBARA REHM
TOt'RNTY STARTS THURSDAY
p. m. in the music room of the
sponsor of
... . . . was reelected
Tournament play will get under
address the noon meeting of the the "best Band in IHxie" this way at 2 o'clock Thursday afterl Pitkin club and an open meeting weekend.
noon in a clash between GeorJTS
Tech and Alabama. The winner of
of University and townspeople at
this game will meet Louisiana State,
7:30 p. m. in Memorial hall.
MORE CROWNS FOR CONANT
one of the four teams which drew
Ordained as a Methodist minister
last year, was in 1916, Dr. Crane graduated from
Cute dnnliur Cniuint, Amv, "V queen
a bye. in the first game of the
quarter-final- s
Friday afternoon.
named honorary colonel of the University ROTC regiment at the Wesleyan university where he was
Georgia will engage Tennessee,
a member of Delta, Sigma Rho.
2,
Scabbard and Made Vntory ball in the I'nion Saturday night. Omicron
the defending champions and this
Delta Kappa, national
With Iter is Iran I'olts. Scabbard and Blade resident.
year's favorite, in the second game
men's leadership honorary, and DelThursday afternoon. :cheduled for
ta Delta social fraternity.
.Seniors who entered the seDrawing a bye. Mississippi
3:30.
During 1917, Dr. Crane acted as
cond semester and who expect
State will meet the winner of thi
secretary in France and
YMCA
game at 3:30 Friday.
to complete their work ior gradEngland, and after his return served
uation, either in June or August.,
In the lower bracket. Tulane drew
as a minister in several northern
n
a bye and will meet the winner ot
cities. He was a delegate in 1931 to t and who have not made
the Vanderbllt Auburn scrap, which
for degrees, are requested
the Uniting Methodist church con- is on tap for 7:30 Thursday night.
to do so on Monday. March 2.
ference and to the general church
Broadcasting of recorded music to
will not be required to wear the conference in 1940.
Kentucky and Florida will battle in
- This applies also to all gradsweater ses- - customary name tags ne added
the regular
uate, students who expect to " the second game Friday night.
sion will be tried from 4 to 6 p. m.
S
..We.re reorsanlzmg tne sweater
SATURDAY
complete their work for graduate
in the Union ballroom.
Semi-fingames will be held at
session organization, trying to get
degrees. The applications should'
1 o'clock
and 2:30 Saturday afterGeorge Dudley, Sturgis, has been, be filed in Room 1. AdministraInstead of the usual student or- - back to the simplicity and Infor- noon and the championship battle
chestra's music, tunes will be played mality cf the first sessions two years elected by the Student Union beard ' tion building.
ago, Lewis, initiator of ths after to replace Ben Lamason, who is
will take place at 8:30 Saturday
As the commencement
lists
on 'the Union victrola console on
noon dances, said.
night.
now stationed at Maxwell Field. Ala- are made from these cards, it is
the second floor and broadcast over
Requests by students for parti-- 1 bama.
Being placed in the lower bracimportant for file application at
the four loudspeakers in the ball- - cular records will be received on a
ket, Kentucky will not meet any
this time.
table near the ballroom door before been actlve ln Unlo affalrs for the
team which they played! during the
room's public address system
'
regular season unless they advance
"This system worked perfectly 4:30. A member of the Union board past year
to the finals, and it is possible that
when it was initiated at a private music committee will operate the
they will meet a team which they
party for members of the Union victrola console.
haren't played even if they go fha'
Dress for the affair is informal.
board last year, and I believe stufar.
There is no admission,
dents will like the recordings better
The seeded teams, in the order of
On the today's dance committee
their selection, were Tennessee. Kenthan an orchestra." it was said yes- are Lewis, chairman; Marie Brac-- I
tucky. Alabama, and Auburn. The
terday by Grant Lewis, in charge of kett. recordings: Roberta Parker, adVols should be heavily favored over
By -- STINK I" TVGH
today's sweater session.
vertising; and Martha Booher, reGeorgia and Kentucky will proStudents who attend today's dance ception.
From beloved parents come such "Ladybug," was born a bright shade bably be expected to thump Florida.
rea sne naa scariei iever. uemay gj'9
asinine "John Henry V.' as Percival, oi
cause of her unusual coloring which However. Georgia Tech
Algernon, Clarence. Maybelle and resembled that of the friendly little the Crimson Tide a real battle and
many dopesters are picking
Hepsibah but from sympathizing bug. she was called "Ladybug."
over Auburn, although the
Patrons of Guignol have styled Commodores lost to
friends come consolation in the form
the Plainsmeu
Fowler. "Poppa" but he
of nicknames.
"during the regular season.
says. 'I cant imagine why unless it's twice
TEN 'CATS TO MAKE TRIP
It sometimes happens that choos- - my dancing years." Also of Guig-ui- g
Highlight of the Sunday afternoon
Coach Adolph Rupp will not anof Agriculture, played the
between a given name and a nol fame is ' Bumpsy" Boughton,
musicale was the second number on
Schubert's serenade as a harp solo nickname is nothing more than who was thus designated by the late nounce the ten Wildcats who will
compose the tournament squad unthe program, the Symphony Number which was received most enthuspicking the lesser of two evils but Sam Nuckols.
til! tomorrow night. However, the
8 in B Minor, or Unfinished Sym- - iastically by the audience.
Those unfortunate students who
on the other hand the nicknames
Baron indicated that eight of the
As an encore Miss White chose may be
phony by Schubert which was the
failed to pass Cleo Dawson Smith's ten cagers were fairly well estab-most appropriate, as in the
I
"The Grand Arpeggio" which de- case ot Coach Adolph Rupp, various- courses nicknamed
"Honey"
her
second presentation of this number
lished and that the other two would
monstrated a smooth flowing style. ly known as "Maestro," "Baron," and Smith, from her practice of saying be
by the University philharmonic orselected an the basis of their per
Next the orchestra played the ex- "Man in the Brown Suit."
chestra under the direction of Prof.
The latter "I'm very sorry, honey, but you've formance in practice today and topressive "Valse Triste" by Sibelius.
flunked." i Anyway that's the way morrow.
is derived from his superstitious
title
Carl Lampert.
Ermal Allen. Waller White.
Concluding number of the afterhabit of wearing a brown suit for I heard it.
The cellos and bases brought out noon was
Mel Brewer. Jim King. Captain Carl
the spirited waltz. "Vienna good luck at all games.
From the
departthe theme very beautifully in the Life." Special mention should be givStaker. Marvin Akers, and Kenny
Horse-fiel- d,
"Daddy" Boles explains that his ment comes one lor Margaret
England are almost sure to be among
first movement with the rest of the en to the string section for
their nickname
language instructor, namely
will
originated during his colthe ten. The remaining
orchestra remaining in the back- fine Strauss interpretation.
"Ponypasture." Then there is Coach probably be selected from three Tic-clege days. He and a football teamground. The second movement was
Milt
Encores were Schubert's "Ava
Moseley. called "Old Man
Lloyd Ramsey. Vince Spiajie.
mate were walking together and Frank
done extremely well with careful Maria"
and "America,"
popularly and Ad rain Back.
someone said, "You look like a father Mose," Joe Sliephard.
consideration given to each theme.
to that boy." From that day, he said, known as "Sheephead," and Elmer
The Wildcats will depart for
Overture to "The Barber of SeSulzer, alias "Brorno."
Louisville Thursday morning, ache was known as "Daddy."
6y Rossini was presented as
ville"
From physical characteristics come companied by Coaches Rupp
and
"LADYBUG" MIRTH V
the opening selection. Attacks and
Kentucky's fencing team dropthe cognomens of Professors M. E. McBrayer. Trainer Skipper Mann,
releases were well done with much ped a
Perhaps the most unusual story Potter and L. L. Dantzler. Potter is amt
4
decsion to the Vander-b- it
student manager Bill Evans.
thought given to style and expresswordsmen in Alumni gym Sat- behind a nickname is that of Mrs. better known as "Shorty." and Atheletic director Shively. who is in
sion.
urday afternoon. All matches were Ray Murphy, secretary of the music Dantzler as "The Great White Facharge
of tournament arrangedepartment. Mrs. Murphy, tagged ther."
Louise White, senior in the College engaged with the foils.
ments, will probably leave earlier

r

I

v

ill

i

y

I

.

i

...

Apply For Degrees
On March
Chamberlain Says

Sweater Session Will Try
Recorded Rhythm Today

appii--eitfo-

--

Dudley Elected

'SEMI-FINAL-

,

Unusual Nicknames Replace
Percival, Algernon, Clarence

Highlight Oj Sunday Musicale
Is Symphony Of Schubert

Van-derb-

ilt

Dtor

;

well-lov-

i

es

o.

Foilsmen Lose
12--

Guignol To Present 'All Wilderness'
'

Plbly

the youngest cast m
Guignol history will play Eugene
O'Neil's "Ah. Wilderness," which
opens at the University-civi- c
little
theater on March 16.
In addition to eight University
students, three high school and one
grade school actor won parts in
the only major comedy from the
n
pen of America's
playwright.
Lawrence Yates, assistant professor of English, will star in the
forthcoming production as Nat Miller. In this his first University
theater appearance. Mr. Yates will
best-know-

Lexington, remembered for her part
in "Kind Lady."
Story of the play concerns the
problems, joys, and sorrows of the
Millers, a typical American family,
living during the nostalgic period
around the turn oi the century.
Atmosphere is similar to that of
"Our Town."
"Ah, Wilderness", which was revived recently in New York, was
substituted for "The Little Foxes".
previously announced for the March
IS date after ballots cast by the
audience of "Ladies in Retirement"
the
preference
a
indicated

fr

A

Guignol innovaiton

wiH be the

construction of two small sets in
front of the curtain in the present
positions of the stairs leading to
the stage. These will represent a
beach and a bar room respectively.
The main set will represent the
Interior of the Miller home.
University students in the cat
are Joe Famularo as Arthur Miller;
Grant Lewis as Wint Selby; Claude
Trapp as David McComber; Betty
Wells Roberts as Belle; Francis
Roland as Nora; James Snyder as
the bartender; and Granville De- -

Jean Abel Adams, member of the
University seyetiriaj staff, will
play the role of Lilly Miller, and
Wallace Briggs, member of the University school faculty, will take the
part of Sid Davis.
Ray Rand, high school student,
will play the juvenile lead. Richard
Miller. Other high schoolers are
Catherine Taylor, Guignol regular
who has been mentioned in Hollywood, and Hettle Knight. Henry
Clay student. Grade school representative is Jack Burton.
Frank Fowler will direct Uie proiv
duction. Technical
supervisor

Add This Prof.
To That List Of
Absent Minded
Ah-hSo ll a true? Professors really are that way.
An instructor in the psychology department thow people act
and why they act as they do'
came to class last Friday morning with roll book in hand.
According to custom he began
calling names from his little list.
After he had called six or so
without getting a single "here",
he stared at his students with
amazement.
"Goodness! Is this Friday?" he
exclaimed and dashed out after
the correct roll.
a!

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
NFWRPAPFR OF THE UNIVERSITY

OFFICIAL
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Wool miner
I'.H Nn i FNMfvrR

PAT RNIDRR

KfrnH.

We're 'Against' The Flaws,
Not The Whole System

hasn't been
night we saw
the iMtoiest.
season.
Normally,

one more lonimrni 10 .nil) alxiut
k Imsincss.
Ii - a common l.illaiv of those who arc nit-- i
icd 10 jump up and swear thai the Ktsoii
making tin- criticism is "agninsi thorn." even
i )i xio
this criticism mav have leen leveled at
inl one asei of the whole business. Thev take
i In
.t
ui It ih. a leanse voii point nut a weakness in i heir makeup vnu arc 'Irving to "fjet rid"
nt i hem.
Ii is i In- l.ill.iiv of misguided patriots who hoi
lii "unpatriotic" at a lit it ism of the government:
ill the (H'ople wlm liai se that a newspajxr is
it disapproves of
"aj;aiiisi li;4 business"
liiili
in the war eflort: of people
business'
x ho
shoiii "treason" at criticism of the arm
.mil n.nv.
1 his
same lall.Kv. us might Ik' exX"eted.
with out Hell Week piece last Fridav.
when it was immediate l charged that Tut
Ki km i was "against fraternities."
list to set the record straight, this is wrong.
c aie not "against fraternities." We think that
as long as tliev plav square with rushees and act
like iilied eople. thev are all right.. We think
that fraternities ate givid for some people, had
lot others: we think that thev plav a pan in
freshman naining. organization ot campus affairs, housing, social events, and in nianv other
wavs which would le nnlv partialis' filled under
an other svslcm.
Rut we are "against" fraternities misleading
rushees with false information and trying to
piessure freshmen into their organization when
ihe know that it will not le the best thing for
them: we ate "against" the excesses and abuses
ol 11(11 Week.
These an- weaknesses in the fraternity system,
which, on the whole, is a sound one: they are
weaknesses which, for the good of that system,
are going to have to lie cleaned up either hv the
t
ftatetnities themselves or In some outside
WV

!

i

this Mill

au-tho-

itv.

don't

We. as well as fraternity leaders, hojx' it will
Ik- done the liii wax.
Rut. if the fraternities can not exist except
through deception and bv a psettdo "spirit"
b Hell Weeks, then the entire system
should go.

1

to say.

Rut last

Saturday

something which struck ns as about
most narrow minded tric k fit the
we

J?

said anvthing alxiut lxoing at
games this year, because there

To the Editor of the Kernel:
I feel that the recent letters appearing in the Kernel regarding the
use of the Carnegie record set are
entirely unfair and misleading. Mr.
Don Irvine, who so flagrantly charges
that the collection is "mismanaged",
has given the impression that the
music department is selfishly attempting to deny the use of the
major.
records to the
This is not true; the principal purpose of the executive director. Dr.
Capurso. and the rest of the music
department in the administration of
the Carnegie set is that it be used as
widely as possible for the enjoyment
and cultural benefit of all students
and townspeople.
The rules of the room provide
that a music major's selection shall
be no longer than anyone else's, and
that two selections from the music
major list cannot be played consecutively if there is any unplayed
selection on the regular list. I vigorously contend that the single regrettable and Isolated instance reported by Mr. Don Irvine iwho is
a visitor to
the Carnegie room) is not a proper
basis for such o wholesale condemnation of the management.
To explain the Carnegie record li- non-mus- ic

go.

llurhj!roumh Of Ifnr lii7 Pence
ltin

n ilir fititil tttiaUment ol
Mi St lirrmnn'n pnpulm "Pht1nttofh
tut titi- ItVir." ftfirrrd as an introdur-ii'tIn tin kiRMi's srrir of "Rack-muiu- i

llrti niri Pcttcr"
ol nriirlfs .rritlrti h
I nl.rr.it.
Inrulh tlirm
ol hfttlnrl:
tin. Mi. St fo nnan's Jiiftr ii rtfirint-t':rith ptrittmioH of llrtittfi's ltQt"t
fill liioitl'on Houu. hu.'
of

til

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t

Looking at the war from this
one heartening fart
;ibout it all becomes clear. No people,
in this day and age. can accomplish
by means of war such an objective
as that into which the German people have been led.
In ether words, the Nazis cannot
possibly win the war, for their very
objective calLs for total and impiac-nljl- e
opnosition from every other
most of all. from ourselves
unci Great Britain which can never,
in our own interests, end until the
Germans are wholly and unquestion-ftbl- y
beaten
The German defeat can be prebecause,
dicted so categorically
plainly, their insane ambition is
bucking, like a teeble animal, a long
glacier-lik- e
evolution still moving
inexorably on its way. We are on the
sine of that evolution.
Looking back over the past, we
indeed that human society has
gradually unified itself; but also that
this lone evolution has taken place
through peaceable agreement and
adjustment among peoples. There
has been an accompanying development of political freedom of peoples
pom the subjugation of others. There
have been exceptions, but they only
prove the plain historic rule.
ADJUSTMENT
process
Can this evolutionary
change its very nature? The only
v ay it can continue is still by adjustment and apreement among peo- -

Rv

oV
brary from a longer viewpoint, the
following facts may be presented.
When the Student Union building
was completed, the executive director
of the music department was instrumental in having the records moved
from their old crowded location to
their present comfortable room, in
the Union building, where a competent librarian is kept in charge.
Worn or broken records are reare
placed
promptly;
additions
made whenever possible. A complete
card index is kept of all records, and
complete statistics are kept regarding the use of the set, the
selections, etc.; all of these
items are paid for out of music department funds.
In addition, records are gladly
loaned to "any responsible group;
between September, 1940, and August. 1941. 246 recordings and 14
scores were borrowed from the set.
During the same year, statistics
show that 12.9 percent of all requests for the year were played for
English majors (Mr. Irvine please
note. who led the list by departments. Second were commerce majors with 11.1. third Romance languages with 10.1 percent and in
fourth place mufic majors, wTth 9.8
percent.
To bring the record up to date, the
statistics for the week February
1942. show that the average daily attendance of those students not making requests was 43 persons; the
average number of requests played
daily for
majors was 19;
and the average number of requests
for music majors was less than 3
selections. There were only two requests for music majors played on
each of the first four days of the
week while six were played on Friday.
Let it again be emphasized that
the Carnegie room is for everyone,
educational, and
for recreational,
cultural purposes. Any suggestions
leading to an improvement or expansion of its services will be welcome.
J. PARKER LABACH
most-play-

3,

non-mus- ic

THE LAST BEST HOPE

0

EA Rill

It's about time that
with the long evolution of

caught up

world-politic- s

pies, but now consciously iastead of
unconsciously.
The Germans cannot win this war.
no matter how great their transitory military successes and they
may still have some because the
organized will of all the rest of mankind will never allow them to achieve
the control they seek; much less to
maintain it.
Nazi idea that the
The logic-ma- d
"technical means exist" to achieve a
world empire held in subjection by
force ignores only one thing: two
billion human beings.
THE PEACE
This conception of the nature of
the war has a final great value: it
clarifies the burning question of the
peace that must De set up.
joint Churchill-Rooseve- lt
The historic
proclamation maps out a
blueprint of broad principle upon
must proceed.
which construction
The heart of that statemen remains
and peace-aithe simple war-aithat has been proclaimed by
these leaders and all their followers
many times: "Hitlerism must be
destroyed."
But what is "Hitlerism?" As we
have seen, in its essence it is an
avowed eflort of the Germans to
control, for their prime benefit,
an already unified world society. Necessarily, then, the basic aim of our
side must be to defeat that effort so
utterly that it will never be tried
again; just as an idea of "secession"
in the United States has forever
gone from the minds of Americans
PRESERVE THE UNION
When Mr. Roosevelt and Mr.
Churchill keep on stating, then, that

world-economi-

unscrambled, is growing closer
and more intricate with every year.
It must be matched by a world political organization which limits the
sovereignity of each and every nation
in certain vital respects and at the
v. y Irat in one respect: that no
pocple may hereafter try to gain
for itself bv armed force what it
cannot gain by peaceable effort.
IT IS NECESSARY
"Unless th:s notion of a necessary
subordination of absolute sovereignty
to the common good of the human
race, is accepted as a basic principle there will be no stable peace
Every cracker barrel commentator
can foretell that. We shall have one
more patchwork Versailles, to be followed
when the old men die by
another war even worse than this.
Forgetting their own history, many
Americans today blanch at the mere
words, "limitation of sovereignty."
Yet they would fully agree that, in
our own long interests, worldwide
war must end Thercf are few Americans few thoughtful individuals
anywhere who do not now understand there must be set up somehow what has been called a 'peace
enforcement union "
Enforce peace how? Order is
maintained among the inhabitants
of every nation bv the police. This
interna! maintenance of order is the
fust function of ".sovereignty." The
need for it in every organized community mav be considered the very
origin of "the state."
ENFORCED PEACE
When we extend this not