xt773n20d836 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt773n20d836/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19430430  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April 30, 1943 text The Kentucky Kernel, April 30, 1943 1943 2013 true xt773n20d836 section xt773n20d836 The Kentucky Kernel

ON PAGE TWO- Spring Is Here
And We Mean

II

L.LXIM. TON. KENTUCKY,

Z2

MOVIE OF UK

SIX NAMED TO

Mrs. Overton Talks

SUB OFFICES

Mrs. Grace Sloan Overton,
specialist in the field of marriage and family relations, why
has been on the campus duriiv;
the past week for the
Religion in Life program, will lead her last discussion at 4 p.m. today in the
Muhc room. Union building.
At this meeting she will answer questions about
relations.

AFTER RECOUNT

A

Voting Wednesday
To Settle Tie
By Two Nominees
After a recount of votes in the
election for Student Union board
members yesterday afternoon, six
candidates were named to the
board.
A special election will be held
from 9 to 4 p.m. Wednesday in the
Union to vote on Helen Harrison
and Nancy Shropshire who tied in
the number of "ballots received.
Those elected mere Edith Weisen-berge- r.
Jay C. Doyle, Jimmy Hurt.
Parker,
Floise Bennett. Roberta
and Robert McNeill.
A recount mas requested by the
Independent party after the vote
tabulation disclosed the tie.
The situation was similar to that
which occurred lest year when the
Constitutionalist party asked for a
recount on the vote for the Student
Government association president.

men-wom-

SGA ADOPTS

CONSTITUTION

Petitions Asked
For Its Passage
Official adoption of the new Student Government association constitution was made by the student
legislature at its regular meeting
Tuesday night.
Petitions signed by approximately
500 students were brought to the
meeting asking for the passage of
the amendment providing for the

CAMPUS LIFE

'

TO BE MADE
Technicolor Film

f

A

r
Vo

Will Be Narrated,
Shown In State

el

jr I

Designed to preserve a record of
University activities, the completed
picture will be shown to citizens
throughout the state. Dr. Plummer
explained. It will be a documentary
film, with sound and narration added.
Shots will be taken In the various
laboratories, McVey hall, the Biological Sciences building, the mathematics department, the University
radio studios, the engineering college, the physical education department, the law college, the agriculture college, and at other places on
the campus. Besides pictures of
students and professors, the film
will include photographs of soldier
trainees.
Plans for the film were begun last
January when the Board of Trustees
authorized its production and
ident Herman L. Donovan appointed
a committee to work on the project.
Besides Dr. Plummer. the mem-pile- d
bers of the committee include E. G.
Sulzer, director of public relations,
'secretary: Dr. Howard Beers, pro- fessor of rural sociology; Dr. C. G.
Latimer, professor of mathematics;
Louis Clifton, director of University
e,
'extension; Dr. Francis McGuire,
sistant professor of physical
lurgy; Louis E. Nollau. professor of
engineering drawing; Dr. Maurice
'
Seay, head of the department of
educational administration; Miss
jane Haselden, assistant dean of
Ronuwewi U,
and H
sistant professor of electrical en-ogineering.

FRIDAY, APRIL 30.

NUMBER

r ttw r

,0i

a

y""

"W

t

a

lied Sliulllintr Crisis Arises
As PallcrsOll Hall Vacated

rr

Dorm Will Be Ready
For Occupation By
Trainees Monday

By

'Evacuation of Patterson hall, old- est residence hall for women at the
is nearing completion in
preparation for the arrival of sol- dier trainees early next week.
Moving will be finished tomorrow
and the dormitory will be ready for
its new occupants on Monday, ac
cording to Mrs. Sarah B. Holmes.
dean of women.

room of the Union building.

,

FOR SGA HEAD

WaUins

Alice

"At last there Is a way for every
one of you to cooperate and contri- - .
bute in the war effort." were the
words of Miss Margaret Lester, head
of the women's residence halls, as
of the Army's
she told 350
plans to move into Patt halL
At 5:00 Tuesday afternoon com- pulsory meetings were held on the
campus in which residents of the
women's dormitories, housemothers.
and house presidents were informed
that an additional 200 Army trainees
were being sent to the University
and that Patterson hall was to be
evacuated for the first time since
its erection In 1903.
That was when the peace and
quiet of a warm spring day broke!
Excited and frenzied girls began
making plans.
"Where are we going to live? Is
this room going to be vacant? You
all move in with us," were the cries
within the halls of Patt, Boyd, and
Jewell. Residents of Boyd and
Jewell were told that they must
"double up," living three and four
in a room, in order that the girls
in Patt hall could be accommodated,
It was planned that double-deckbeds would be placed In the rooms.
Then the arguments began. "I'm
on top. Say, who had this
room in the beginning?" This was
soon settled by, "I know, we'll ro- -

struggling with the problem of how
many girls could be taken into the
sorority houses. After a decision
was reached regarding that
tion. it still wasn't ended,
Many meals were left untouched
as more arguments arose. "Hey. we
can't get four girls in this room.
Who's going to live on the sun
porch? I think the actives should
have preference over the pledges."
was heard in every house on the
campus.
as
Wednesday was designated
packing day. Trunks were carried
out from the storage rooms and the
began sending home such
precious articles as the new formal
and the fourth picture of the boy
friend. Everything but the bare
necessities had to go.
Thursday was moving day and
naturally a great deal of confusion,
"There simply isn't enough drawer
space. Looks like I'll have to hang
this coat up on the roof," was
heard in every room,
Even the "buzzing" system in
Boyd and Jewell halls had to be
box
rearranged and the
problem caused many headaches,
Today is probably as confused as
the other two were. Traffic
terns have more than likely been
installed in the halls so that the
situation can be relieved to some
extent. Yes, It's something almost
tate."
However, there was another side unheard-o- f,
but it happened, and
of the picture. Housemothers began we hope you lived through it.
j

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Patt Erected In 1903
OF FORUMS Residents of the dormitory, which
has housed women students since
SLATED TUESDAY its erection in 1903. are being moved
into Boyd and Jewell halls and
sorority houses for the remainder
and
"If God is both
of the quarter.
?ood, why has he not prevented
Some rooms may accommodate
this world catastrophe of war?"
women, others will have three,
This is the question to be discussed four
by Rabbi Julian Fleg at 7 p.m. and some will have only two. Mrs.
Tuesday in the Music room of the Holmes explained. This is, howev-

THIRD

new document.
Roll call vote revealed that all
legislators present favored the constitution, which will become effective as soon as it is approved by
the University faculty.
Roy Hunt, chairman pro tern,
er, merely a temporary measure.
Union building.
Vincent Spagnuolo. Cumberland, fcaid that Dr. Leo M. Chamberlain,
During the summer quarter, only
r.nd Jimmy Hurt. Hardburly, have dean of the University, has assured
The forum discussion is the third enough women will oe taken to fill
him that the faculty will consider
In a series of weekly discussions on
been named as the official candithe rooms In the two dormitories
religious matters being sponsored
dates of the Independent party for the constitution soon.
and sorority houses. Other arrangerepresentaseElection of student
Topics were
by the
president and vice president,
ments will be made before the fall
tives will be conducted under the
lected by votes In the recent campus quarter.
of the Student Governprovisions of the new constitution.
survey.
ment association.
Patterson hall will be completely
Twenty-nin- e
legislators
will be
At a special party rally WednesBruce Kennelly, Covington, will separated from
the other dormiaccording to
group voted to back chosen, apportioned
day night, the
be the student chairman of this tories before
the arrival of the solby colleges, sexes, and
forum.
these two candidates in the coming
diers, Mrs. Holmes said. The bridge
classes, as provided in the document,
e'.ection.
Rabbi Fleg. spiritual leader of connecting it with Boyd hall will
According to the statistics comConstitutionalist candidates have
Israel, liberal Jew- be preserved for the use of the
Temple Adath
by the apportionment commit- not been announced.
ish temple, is a graduate of the women.
Spagnuolo. commerce junior, has tee, representation will be divided
Hebrew Union college. Cincinnati.
as follows:
128 Housed In Dorm
served during the past year as a
Ohio. There he earned the B. H.
Arts and sciences, four upperclass
representative of his college in the
Although only 128 women were
and the M. H. L. degrees. This colwomen, two
SGA legislature. He is sports edi- Vomen, five underclass
Mrs.
lege is the oldest rabbinical semi- housed in the dormitory,
tor of the Kentuckian. staff writer upperclass men, and three under- Holmes believes that approximately
nary In the United States.
and former advertising manager of class men: law, one man; agricul- He serves as Jewish chaplain at twice that many soldiers will be
two upperclass women, one
The Kernel,
of 'the
the U. S. Public Health Service hos- ccved in.
woman, and one man;
Kewman club, and a member of
Regulations for women students
pital and as Hillel counsellor to
the Activities and House committee engineering, two upperclass men,
living in the dormitory will not be
the Jewish students at' the Univerman.
and one underclass
of the Student Union board.
changed, she said.
sity and at Transylvania college.
Education, two upperclass worn- -j
Hurt, arts and sciences sopho"Mention might be made." the
wornMajoring in psychology, he re I
more, is now serving as a represen- en;' commerce, one upperclass
dean added, "of the good sports- an, one. underclass, woman, and one
oeived his A.
from Mis
tative to the- SO A legislature for
mansnip the girls have shown about
graduate, one woman, and
souri university, graduating with
the second time. He is president of
matter. They have accepted
man.
major field. He this crowded conditions
distinction in his
the Pitkin club, treasurer of the
the
and the
D. Ketchum, asso- Dr. Marshall
is a member of Psi Chi, national
Piyor Pre-msociety, secretary of
troubles of moving with good naciate professor of economics, was
honoral psychology fraternity.
t"ie YMCA.
ture and good humor. The staff
of the K
advisor
Rabbi Fleg has had considerable appreciates such an attitude."
book, and vice president of the In- named to act as financial
of the legislature to succeed Dr.
experience in the field of religious
dependent party.
Men students, who were moved
C. C. Carpenter, who has resigned
education and is a member of the from the men's dormitories last
from the University faculty.
m
the executive board of the
week have found rooms in town.
KH
Legislators absent from the meet-- ;
Teachers' associMcQuown, Givens
ing'were Ruth
ation.
28
Under, the direction of Miss
Dixon, Ralph Hucaby, Holland P.
Thrasher, and Winston Hendrick- - bara Jean Feiker, instructor of
Dr. Amry Vandenbosch's
talk,
'
physical education, the fifth annual
"The Future of the Small States," sonThe legislature will meet at 7 recital of modern dance will
will be given Friday evening. May
p. m. Tuesaay in room in, union
28. Dr. J. Huntley Dupre announced
presented by Tau Sigma Thursday
.
building
Plans are being made for
Tuesday.
and Friday, May 6 and 7. The pro- day, which will be held
Dr. Vandenbosch, former political
gram will be held in Guignol theater
Dr. W. S. Taylor, dean of the col- Saturday, May 8. this year, it was
science department head, has been
at 8:00 both evenings, and tickets lege of education, will be awarded announced by Julia Johnson, genserving with the State department
in Washington for the pasX year.
at 35 cents may be purchased from an honorary doctor of laws degree eral chairman.
May 11, by Union college, Barbour-villThe May 28 date was chosen beActivities for the day will begin
Tau Sigma members.
7
when Pfeiffer hall, the new
cause his Washington duties proThree parts, technique, studies, women's dormitory will be dedicat- at 9 o'clock when meetings will be
hibit Dr. Vandenbosch from speakheld for all scrority officers, and
skating parAn
and composition will make up the ed.
ing at an earlier time.
these meetings will take place evty will be held at the rollarena
Technique will include
program.
Dr. Taylor received his bachelor ery hour until 12 o'clock.
on National avenue at 9 p.m..
limbering and stretching move- of arts degree in 1912 at the Uni- May 7. sponsored by the Out
Mrs. Elizabeth Scofield, national
ments; studies will include three
ing club.
'
J
'
of
depicting
elements
Hill rilivr th main orlrlroce at iht
numbers
Tickets may be obtained at
Ph. D. in 1924 at Columbia univer
luncheon held in the Lafayette hothe Information Desk of the
dance composition: focus and di- -: sity.
tel at 1 o'clock Saturday noon. She
rection, resultant rhythm, and dy- Student Union building at a
pro- - wU,
ne w
io iio,
speak on ..gororit
0rganiza.
namics; and composition will be
special rate of 24 cents.
fessor of education at the Univer - II Mnn rhiriniy War ..
made up of dances costumed and
I
slty of Texas. He was head of the
,
acted with lights.
'
department of rural life at Penn
Four group compositions will be
for Panhellenic day includes Julia
sylvania State college. State ColBy Lucy Thomas
presented. These include "O LIT
lege, Pa., from 1918 to 1920, and was Johnson, chairman; Betty Proctor,
)ueKtion: What are your plans
Lamb" and "Aesthetics of Machin
depart- in charge of the luncheon; Eloise
for the summer?
ery" with music by Louis Danz, and a member of the staff in the
Bennett, in charge of tickets; Edith
ment of public instruction in Penn
"Celebration" with music by Alex
Weisenberger, in charge of decoraBill Stephenson. Commerce, senRnwlpv Fourth in this erouD is sylvania from 1920 to 1923.
ior: To stay In school and keep
, music of yes. Since that time he has been the tions and placecards; and Sarah
Since 1800 the human race has wgr
a suile
Louise Milward. in charge of the
some of the old summer school co- increased at a rate, which if conterday The . "Aesthetics" dance L.is dean of the college of education of group who will take minutes of all
eds company.
.
tinued from 200 to 500 years, would a novel oemonsirauun ui uic the University.
the meetings.
Brtty Proctor, Agriculture, sen- create an impossible situation. Dr. rnythm and MVinA mn m modern
ior: Just loafin' around with big
machinery.
ideas for next fall.
ganic chemistry, stated Thursday
Priscllla Oraddy and Mary Shaw
Colonel l Caldwell, A&S, senior: night in the third lecture by outwill perform solos. Actives and
No use asking me that, I'm going standing professors in the arts and pledges of Tau Sigma, sponsor of
Lexington,
Faulkner,
Elizabeth
sciences college.
to the army.
Ann Barron,
However, the chemist continued, the recital, include: Harris,
Mildred Porter, Agriculture, freshJean was elected president of the StuSara Rodes. Marian
dent Art club last Monday night at
UftUI WHCVICU UIl UlC glum l.i ut t.ii
Records of J. P. Morton and Com- man: Chemistry.
bbe Betty Proctor. E hel SnUth. its weekly meeting.
race indicates a gradual decrease
pany, Louisville printers, stationers
Meier Taylor, Agriculture, sopho- In
Ellen O'Bannon, Priscilla Graddy
the growth of population. This
Other officers elected were Nancy and dealers in office . supplies for
Graddy
more: I don't know, that depends may mean, he explained,
that we and Mary Shaw. Priscilla
Ellen Taylor, Lexington, vice presi- approximately uo years, have been
on Uncle Sam.
is president of the group.
have nearly approached the limit
Associate members include: Marie dent; Margaret Ann Hartman, At- ooiainea oy tne university. These
Shirley Meister, A&S, freshman: of exploitation of the basic concepts
r;
and records contain interesting and val- Brackett, Norma Niswonger, and lanta, Ga., secretary-treasureI'm going to stay home and take it of matter and energy, limiting the
Betty Lee Fleishman, Lexington, uable history of nineteenth century
easy.
people that can exist by Norma McMahan.
number of
Louisville.
Bob Wait will publicity chairman.
Frank Hukill
Junes C Eaves, Math instructor: out inability to further expand also appear in and recital. Ushers
The next meeting of the club will
The University will put them in
the
III have plenty of soldiers to keep these basic concepts.
program will be members of be held at 7:3 Monday night in the archives which will be established
Dr. Barkenbus pointed out that for the
nie busy.
Biological Sciences building.
B
Beta.
Drr Thomas
the practical use of these basic Phi
Elizabeth Goggin, A&S, freshD. Clark, professor of
riding, and concepts of matter has made posman: Tennis, horseback
history, went to Louisville and sup- development of the in
sible the
Red Cross every Monday night.
ervised the collecting of the ma- new
Mary Lillian Davis, A&S. fresh- dustrial age, the creation of
terials to be brought to the Uni- ways of harnessman: Summer school is definitely materials and new support
versity.
of more
out. I'm going home to the farm ing energy, and the
Dr. C. C. Carpenter, professor of
Hundreds of books published by
people on the earth.
and relax.
copies
Patterson Literary society will be- - economics, has retired from the the company and letter-ures- s
Explaining tliat since 1808 man
University faculty.
Neut Bard well, Agriculture, sen-ijof correspondence written with quill
looked upon matter as being ei a new practice when it opens its
has
He has taken the position of Price p,.,
boat.
Chauffeur on a P-inciucjed in the collection.
made up of units called atoms com- - next meeting to men, women, and
Wynnelte
Textbooks written by Noble But- White. A&S, sopho hin-- ri
atoms to form faculty members. All persons inter- - Executive with the Lexington Ol
ith other
,
and
,
ler, Louisville schoolmaster,
more: Half of it in Florida, the
the speaker outlined ested will be admitted at 3 p.m. flee of Price administration.
No one has been added to the factextbooks written by S. G. Good- other half on our farm in Georgia moiujar structure of matter. When Tuesday in the Union building.
Just sitting.
Bob Amnions, arts and sciences ulty since the commerce depart- rich and edited by Butler were pub- one exchanges atoms in a molecule,
Engineering, he said, entirely different kinds of senior, will speak on "The Novel ment has decided to contract its lished by the company. The Butler
Arvln
and Goodrich Readers an- and Public Opinion." A period of work, accordingt. to Dr. ,Edward
freshman: Your guess is as good as matter are formed.
...II
wiesi., J i
ui uie college, ui. wai' tedated the McGuffey Readers.
of lectures will open dLcussion will follow.
aiine.
Next in the series
'
These and other valuable source
Several other open meetings will shall D. Ketchum, assistant profes- p.t rntirrti AA.-sooliomore : be an address on The Future of the
over material will be placed in the Unl- visit my brother In Small State by Dr. Amry Vanden- - probably be held this quarter, it sor of economics, has taken
Loaf mostly
vorsitv lihrarv
Dr "rpP'r'F 1aSM
j twvwtj, Pr"f"iiO''
of political Sflfimo was t.rUW""el
V,e Hrrny

SPAGNUOLO RUNS

'

Army Gets

Skating Party
Set For May

ic

e,

'SO THE7

,.u, iu,

Population Limit
Has Been Reached,
Barkenbus Says

Elizabeth Faulkner
Heads Art Club

Patterson Literary
Open Meeting

Printer's Records
Are Obtained
For Library

j

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A committee composed of Dr. Niel
' Plummer, head of the department
'
fnliru
Smv
nf Irtttmalium- - T"V- head of the department of educa;

tional administration: and Elmer
G. Sulzer. director of public relations, has been appointed as Kentucky representatives to aid the
national advisory board in its annual selections for the presentation
of the George Foster Peabody Radio
awards.
These awards are made each year
by the Henry W. Grady School of
Jaurnalism, University System of
Georgia, in cooperation with the
National Association of Broadcasters, to recognize those radio stations, networks, programs, and individuals that have made an outto public
standing contribution
service and entertainment. These
have been called "the Pulitzer prizes
of radio."
Six classes to receive the awards
are the program, or series of programs. Inaugurated and broadcast
during, the current year by a regional station which has made an
outstanding

contribution

to

the

general welfare of the community
which the station serves; programs
meeting the same requirements but
j having
inaugurated and
been
broadcast by a local station: outstanding reporting of the news:
outstanding entertainment in dra
ma: outstanding emertammeni in
music: and outstanding educational
program.
The University radio studios and
radio station KOAC. Corvallis. Ore.,
received the award this year for a
series of radio transcriptions on veMiss Jennie Trigg, director of the nereal diseases prepared by the UniUnion commons, stifled the rumor versity and broadcast for the first
of the Union cafeteria's closing, by time over KOAC.
stating that the cafeteria will con-- I
tinue to operate as usual.
ut The
Thi snlrlipf-f- t will w
time as students, but will have
their own line and will be seated at
,1,
of the Football room.
tne
SIie aUded that banquets and par- - '
ties wlH
curtailed in the future
because of the lack of sufficient
space and food pojuls.
plans to remain
Grm
Student Government . . .
open,
.
association legislature will meet
at 7 p.m. Tuesday in room
Union building.
Westminster
KleC'ted
.
.
fellowship will meet at 7:30
.
Elizabeth
Hickman, agriculture p.m. Sunday at the Maxwell Street
junior from Bowling Green, was Pretbyterian church.
Lewis Riley
elected president of the University Berea college student, will speak.
H club at a meeting held Tuesday
Fvriim . . .
Sne succeeds Reid England
nlent.
will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday
of Tompkinsville.
in the Music room. Union building.
otner onicers elected were Ausbon Dutch Lunch . . .
J"dd, Donansburg,
. . club will meet at noon today in
Mildred Dunn. Benton, secretary;
Mary Searcy, Sinai, treasurer; and the Football room. Union building.
Dr. E. F. Farquhar. of the English
Holland Thrasher, Ellington,
department, will speak.
porter.
Bacteriology . . .
Carl W. Jones, field agent in
. society
will meet at 7:30 p.m.
club work, and J. W. Whitehouse,
state leader in
club work were Monday in room 127 of the Biologi-e- a
S'"tenpw b"jlfll!K
Club artvi.sors.
;

Kampus
Kernels

.

l'-7.

Elizabeth Hifkman

President

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T

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Retires From Staff

ut-ai-

i

ed

Dr. Carpenter

j

TO GIVE AWARDS
Three Chosen To
Aid Peabody Board

Union Cafeteria,
Grill Will Remain
Open As Usual

r-

Miird,

GROUP NAMED

Con-clufi- ve

DAY SLATED

Honorary Degree
At Union College

ce

s

We thought army men preferred blondes or redheads or
even brunettes. But our theories have been blasted.
evidence shows that
they prefer, cf all things, tenors.
Calls to the armed sen ice.
according to Miss Mildred Lew.
is, director of the University
Choristers, have depleted the
tenor section of that organization. "But we still have plenty
of basses and barytones," she
added.
The situation has become so
serious that Miss Lewis is calling frantically for tenors to sing
at the baccalaureate services.
"There are probably on the
campus many singers who have
belonged to high school music
groups but who have not identified themselves with any of
the University musical organizations," she said. "Their services are needed. They do not
have to possess a fine voice but
one that will serve adequately
in a group."
Student tenors are preferred
for the work but faculty mem'
bers will be accepted.

PANHELLENIC

Dr. Taylor Receives

Tenors-Chorister-

Lewis Calls

Tp r'II71?T
lllVljll

j

post-offi-

Frantic-Mis- s

DANCE RECITAL

-

j

er

ed

III
v

co-e- ds

j

ivau

Dr. Vandenbosch
To Speak May

l"

DORMS TO HOUSE
SPECIAL TRAINEES
Colonel B. E. Brewer
To Be In Command
Of Service Group
Approximately

500

enlisted

men

arrive at the University early
next week, probably Monday. ly
form a basic engineering unit under the Army Specialized Training
program, according to an announcement from headquarters of the
Fifth Service command. Columbus.
will

Ohio.

j

metal-undercla- ss

nt

Win

From Cinty Today

I1M3

PATTERSON HALL

.i

17.

Tats To Seek

500 Soldiers Arrive Monday
To Form Engineering Unit

M

Motion pictures of life at the
University will be made around the
middle of May. according to Dr.
Niel Plummer, head of the journalism department and chairman
of the committee to plan the movie.
technicolor film will
The two-rebe titled. "The University in War
and Peace."
The script, written by Dr. Plummer, Is now before the committee
RABBI JULIAN F. FLEG . . .
A professional
for consideration.
photographer, who has just com. . . will speak at the third
pleted a similar film at the Univer
sponsored jorum at 7
sity of Indiana, will make the pictures. He is expected to arrive May p. m. Tuesday in the Music

v.

FOU- R-

OF KENTUCKY

UNIVERSITY

VOLUME XXXIII

ON PAGE

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rt"l'eet

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Evacuation and rearranging of
Bradley.
Breckinridge,
Klnkead,
and Patterson halls is being completed so that the soldiers may o
housed there. Meals will be served
to the engineers in the Union commons.
No runs For Advanced Men
Definite plans have not been
made about second year advanced
r,
course students. It is hoped.
that they can remain in their
present locations, according to Dr.
Leo M. Chamberlain,
dean of the
University.
The new group, to be designated
is the 1548th Service unit, will be
under the command of Colonel B
E. Brewer, head of the department
of military science and
Brewer Is also at the head
of the 1525th Service unit, which
is taking special engineering courses
and is housed at the Phoenix hotel
Courses for the first group of
trainees will last approximately 12
weeks. Other goups. who may arrive later, will probably undergo
longer courses of instruction.
how-Tve-

tactics-Colone-

l

Schedules Arc Made
Schedules of classes for the men
have already been prepared, and
they will be taught by regular
'members of the faculty, who wi'!
be relieved of their other duties.
No soldiers will attend classes with
egular students. It has been announced.
Class hours for the soldiers will
:oincide with those of regular stu
dents in that they will begin on the
hour and continue for 50 minute.;,
lasses will meet by sections and
the soldiers will move from building to building in groups.
No Buildhngs Designated
No specific buildings o rooms
have been designated solely' for
soldiers.
Soldiers will definitely be in clasa
38 out of 46 hours each week.
Dean Chamberlain explained.
Regular military regulations will
be enforced concerning
hours for
the soldiers.
Classes in physics, chemistry,
nathematics. history, and English
will be taught to the soldiers. If
any third term men arrive, they
will take courses in engineering
drawing.
Records To Be Kept
set of records will be kept so
that the trainees may receive
credit for work done here if
they apply for it afer the war
ends.
The arrival cf these men will
oring the total of military men receiving training at the University
to approximately l.TtH). There are
at present about 950 men stationed
at the Phoenix hotel. 62 advanced
ROTC students,
and 200 basic
ROTC students.
A

col-te- ge

Dr. McFarlan
Is Author Of
Geology Book
Dr. A. C. McFarlan, head of the
geology department, has recently
published "Geology of Kentucky '
which he hopes will serve as an aid
in the development of mineral resources in the state.
His book,
printed by the Waverly Press. Inc..
Baltimore, Me- l- is dedicated to Professor A. M. Miller, who was head of
the department of geology from 189?
to 1925.
The book contains basic information on the geology of the state
which will be useful to the mineral
industry. In it. Dr. McFarlan emphasizes outstanding minerals of
Kentucky such as coal. oil. gas.
clay, and tlourospar. He explains
that the occurrence of minerals U
not a "hit and miss proposition,"
but is determined by the geological
conditions of the region. Therefore,
he writes about the characteristics
of different regions and the reasons
for the special developments of each
region.
Also discussed are many of Kentucky's natural scenic features such
as Cumberland gap. Natural bridge,
arifl

Tamtnpt.h

* Best Copy Available

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THE KENTUCKY KERNEL ,
OF KENTUCKY

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PI'Hl.IsniTD WEPKLY DHRTNO THE SCHOOL YEAR
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REPORTERS:
June Baker. Mary Lillian Davis.
Janet Edwards, Eetty Lee Fleishman, Luigi Prance,
Bemice Herman, siiiiiey Meister, Stuart Snyder.

are to he considered the
All ginned articles mnd Cftluwi
themselves, tttid tin suit
lit the
ct,tiitti
rette.t the iptttUm of The Kernel.

Today: Our Weallier Editorial
We have hided our lime and vail oil lor just
pi opit ions moment. At last it lias come. Today we exercise a traditional right of knurl
riie
editorial
eeliiois. We arc going
almui tin- weather.
ihe-

-

We lon"t know what it is that Ixsiows
an anilioiiiv.
ii h n a
to
It mav be that he is running for oil ice, it mav
lx that he graduated from high school. n ii
inav le that he has read the first and last chap-ici-Anv-waof some current "inside"
it is assumed that in Incoming editor o
Iiif Kfrnfi, on a,so iK'foines an authority
on the weather.

s

v

Since ve found ihe first cluster of ihkH snuggling in the green bhicgTass a month ago we
have been thinking of our weather editorial.
On a slip of paier in a cubby hole of our desk
we wrote the words "spring is here," for future
lefei me.
native Kentuokians, we ate verv
pioiid and verv loin hv about our weather. Wo
have practiced withering glances for hours
our mirror, to direct at anv uninformed
hen-tiwho claimed that the weather in his own
Male was sujerior 10 ours.
Now

Ix-in-

our weather is unusual. W'e
idc ourselves on the fact. W'e rerognic every

W'e know that
pi

April snow flake as an unanswerable argliincnt
hat Kentucky weather is unusual. None of
oiir (California "heavy dews" for us. W hen it
rains in Kentucky it rains, and when it snows
ii snows. And when it tains and snows al the
Mine lime, that's just what it's doing.
I lie epitome of ungraicfulnes for our wonderful aiiclv in weather was iironounccd last
week hv sotne furriner from an eastern metropolis. "Kentucky weather will only lie unusual
he
when it gets 10 le like weather should lx-.siiiuglv proclaimed as he dodged between snow
Hikes.
So vou sec it's obvious that ignorant jHitple
fiom other climes need to le informed on the
changes in season. What bettor authority to
make final pronouncement on the subject than
of Thf Kirmi r
the

hail storms, rain storms, or snow
or llllH'IHlmg UKiav. I iik. Kkr- ii
and iini (uio allv announces thai
i.i
M'RINt. IS IIKRK.
(II lliis is a military sen el. fo'givc us pit'.')

lixlav we lok that slip of paper from iis
place and went outside. We plucked a blade ol
glass from the MeYoy hall lawn and gingerlv
Iclt its text tire. W'e dropjx-- a dandelion Mem
imo a tol of water and watched it curl. We
interviewed an old man with rheumatism.. And
then we counted the couples lounging on the
expanse in from of the library. And so. con

o
When llit- 1). Mid sirikes up "Mv Old keiiiixkv
Home" at ( iliurc liil Downs tomorrow alierniMin.
hundreds of l'niersii siiidems. dressed in ihcir
spring linest. will Ik- gathered in excited groups
alxiiil tlieir l.idios.
Now everyone who ionics lo the I'niversilv
should
able lo speak with the auihoiiiv of
an
ol the kenniikv Derbv. for the
benelil ol out landers. So since var