xt773n20df9g https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt773n20df9g/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky University of Kentucky 1955 course catalogs  English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky course catalogs, 1865- Bulletin of the University of Kentucky, Summer Session, Vol. 47, No. 2, 1955 text Bulletin of the University of Kentucky, Summer Session, Vol. 47, No. 2, 1955 1955 2013 true xt773n20df9g section xt773n20df9g BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
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{ JUNE I3 — AUGUST 6
I UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
9

 registrar of the institution which conferred their bachelor’s degree.
• • High school graduates are invited to start their college careers in
        the 1955 Summer Session. Special courses are planned for enter-
ing freshmen and special attention will be given to them, to the
  end that their collegiate careers will be richer, more profitable,
more economical, and more meaningful.
o
S u m m G r S E S S I O n LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS
Room applications for single men should be made to the Dean
of Men and be accompanied by a deposit of $10. The rental for a
dormitory room per individual is $40 for the session. The Univer-
    6 sity Cafeteria will be in operation for both men and women.
Women’s applications, accompanied by $10 deposit, should be
CURRECULA made to the Dean of \Vornen. Refunds will be made only if
notification of cancellation is given at least thirty days before the
The University of Kentucky, a land-grant institution, will offer term opens. All residence halls for women will be open. The
eight weeks of regular summer session work; also inter~session and cost to the individual student for dormitory room is $44.
post-session courses. Courses will be offered in six colleges—Arts Persons applying for accommodations for the duration of short-
and Sciences, Agriculture and Home Economics, Engineering, Law, term courses are not required to send deposits. They should,
Education, and Comrnerce—and in the Graduate School. however, mail in the title and length in weeks of the course or
Over and above its program of liberal education, the Univer- courses desired, as well as indicate the beginning and ending dates.
sity Summer Session provides numerous opportunities for persons
to prepare for specific Ioccupations. The opportunities are in CULTURAL AND RECREATIONAL RESOURCES
numerous fields: Industrial Chemistry, ]ournahsm, Medical Tech-
nology, Pre-Medicine, Pre—l)entistry, Pre-Nursing, Music, Library The University of Kentucky is located in Lexington, the center
Science, Public Service, Art, Bacteriology, Geography, Geology, of the famed Bluegrass region, a delightful country of scenic
Psychology, Radio Arts, Social Work, Sociology; Agriculture in beauty and of transcendent historic interest.
its various phases (such as Pre-Forestry, Pre-Veterinary, Home Many of the fabulous horse farms, some containing more than
Economics); Engineering—ArchitccturaI, Aeronautical, Civil, Com- a thousand acres of lush, blrregrass—covered land, .are in this rich
munications, Electrical, Mechanical, Metallurgical and Mining; region. During the Summer Session, tours are conducted to many
Law; Elementary and High School Teaching, Educational Super- of these estates, among which are Elrnendorf, \Valnut Hall, Calu-
, vision and Administration; General Business, Commerce-Law, In- met, Castleton, Dixiana and Coldstream. In addition, points of
dustrial Administration, and Secretarial \Vork. historic interest. including Ashland (home of Henry Clay), Gencral
john Hunt Morgan`s residence, the home of Mary Todd (wife of
CREDIT HOURS Abraham Lincoln) and the Keeneland Race Track, may be visited.
l_ During the session, nationally known speakers, lecturers, work-
Nine semester hours are considered thc normal load for under- shop directors, and specialists in many fields will visit the campus.
* graduates. For graduate students, the normal load is six hours; Several unusual musical and dramatic presentations are planned.
the maximum is nine. Graduate students who earn six or morc The Student Union Building, the Memorial Coliseum, and the Fine
graduate credits and who remain in residence throughout thc Arts Building will be open for student use. ·A well balanced social
Summer Session are assigned nine weeks of residence. University and physical education program has been arranged. Students may
students do not have to fear acceptance of credits at full value participate in such activities as swimming,. tennis, golf, dancing.
by accreditation associations and other colleges and universities. band concerts, movies, picnicking and camping.
Moreover, U. K. credits always rnect thc tests for employment,
whether by government agencies, by corporations, by private CALENDAR
companies, and regardless of the field. This is a very important
consideration. In certain categories of employment, students and Classification will be on Monday, june 13; registration on
graduates of land-grant colleges have a distinct advantage for Tuesday, ]une 14; and classes will begin \Vednesday, ]une 15.
employment over other students and graduates. Tuesday, ]une 21, is the last day one may enter an organized
class. Friday, August 5, the Summer Session Cornrnercernent will
FEES be held. The Summer School will end at Saturday noon, August 6.
For the Summer Session, thc full-tirne fcc for all Kentuck
students, except those enrolled in the College of Law, will ble SCHEDULE OL CLASSES
$32.50 and for students in the Law College $34.00. For out-of- The bulletin entitled Schedule of Classes will be issued in
state students, in all colleges except Law, the fee will be $62.50. April. If you desire one or more and/ or further information, write
The fee for out-of—state students in the Law College is $65.50. to Dr. Hambleton Tapp, Co—ordinator of the Summer Session, Ad-
) rninistration Building, University of Kentucky, Lexington, or to
ADM|$S|ON the University Registrar.
Applicants for admission should write to the Ofiice of the STATEMENT OE COURSES ·
University Registrar for application forms, stating whether they
wish admission to the freshman class, to advanced standing, or Courses numbered 1 to 99, inclusive, rrray be taken only for
to the Graduate School. Application and transcripts of credits undergraduate credit. Courses numbered 100 to 199, inclusive,
l should be filed in advance with the Registrofs Office. Students may be taken for credit by juniors, seniors, and graduate students,
entering with advanced standing and those entering the Graduate provided that a course so numbered may carry graduate credit
School should present transcripts from each institution they have only with the approval of the student’s graduate committee.
attended. Graduate students who are not candidates for degrees Courses nurnbcred 200 or above are open only to graduate stu-
may be admitted on the basis of an oilicial statement from the dents.
l

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English, Speech and Dramatic Arts Library Science T
  Qf la, h—English Composition I01a-d—Workshop for Beginning Librarians  
3a, b—Survey of English Literature 127b—Books and Related Materials for Children ’
a G—Essentia]s of Speech and Young People
Arts Qnd Sclences ¢30—Business English l29—Cataloging and Classification
35—Stagecraft 133—Reference and Bibliography
f`$8—Oral Interpretation 139—Library Practice
§gé—g£c Grammar of Structure and Usage 145—8rgariiz¥tionh of Library Materials
— aucer 186- isua eac ing
· 110a—Shakespeare: The Comedies 201a-d—Pr0blems in Library Science
A"“°""Y °"d Pl‘Y"°l°9Y rggir-éxrnarigan Lngranrra aagr 1830 (2.§g—'é`he ca11ega1rrnr1)lUnivarsity Library
. _ - . a- omparative iterature .. — overnment u ications
§_g}g:]_.;::;;yy ‘%£;;?:f3,g;nd Physmlugi l37—rS]r;1r%o Production in School and Com- 254—Seminar
%gg—Archgecture of Ehe Human Skeleton 1461 Djscissiou
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ros-&$‘.L‘Z.i§r1€ES.‘if` i52spi?§.13S$"§l‘Zig’M.rabaiaa. }g§;gn$§;·;;=r=g0}g*{)gg!tgg_g¤¤·;lng;> iggkloggr { M¤*h¤m¤r·¤s and A¤*r¤··¤·¤v
1g9_C€uLllm· Physiology · Teilihcrs D em 6 or 1 Basic Mathematics
},5?iHilés'°l°gYh [tf Elglifrclsié 2l4a—Seminar: The Major Victorian Poets _ _ 2-5;,1jd Geometry
"‘ nl Ewa"' m yslo ogy 215(`I.jS€l`|1lIl2lI'Z Dramatic and Rhetorical Cr1t1- 4-Elgmcngm-y Theory of statjstjcg
Clsm 5—College Algebra
. . 2241-5 ' z : E l"h L` z f 1600- - · ‘· . .
Aaaraar Languages aaa Lrraranrraa ‘ia§3""" “g “ “°""‘” "’"‘ }§_§‘3§§g;"iilg;,,2§ *‘“·’“°'·
C1-a and C1-b—Refresher Course in Beginning   ;{;:§;?§mgggm€t¤,
Latin fm Teachers 20·1—Differential Calculus
l¤—B·¤ri¤¤i¤r Lair-1 G¤¤¤r¤v*·v ooierarggrai éaigriirrr
ih-Elrmsrtsry Lam Readme §5-iarararadir.rg Calculus
7°—G*°€l<. M>’¥h¤l¤¤>’ . . 2-l*€si¤¤¤l Gwrnrvhv ¤f the W¤rl`;1=}I{l€a(é{]\;ilgZ¤$}0riatin }g(£—gggg;'agk}y gi  Cimerica l2l;-Irll;grTirc(iloF1;(llt;aEl`(l1l;l;>ry of Numbers
· — — r o _ . ·. .»
C150—Demonstration Class in Beginning Latin 102—Regional Geography of Latin America $02_AlgLhriuL Cl"`/is
41 Number Theory
(june 15-]uly 9) _ _ 103—Regional Geography of Europe ~ _:
C150—Workshop for Latin Teachers (lune lo- Introductory Field Studies—Monterrey, Mexico
july 9) Ixnrerineclrzitlohlirelgt Sgudiei/?Monterreyi;4 Mexico Modern Foreign Languages
rrvamet n,< . ul<>i:y _;(i;,-O,,m,,L., Ul (;m,p,gy losn, li-French Literature of the XVIII Cen-
1()3a—d—Independent Work in Anthropology 5oh__Out]im_r uf Ccologv tow
203n`d_RcS€m.Ch Pr¤bl¤·¤# in Anthropology 2()a—Lal>oratory Work in Elementary Geology l(l7i\» ll—All_Vi\1\UL’ll Ffclwll C0HVB1’Si1ll0¤ and
23a, l>—El0mcntary and Field Work in Regional CUlllD0$lllO¥'l _ _ '
Geology—Crcsted Butte, Colorado l(Wa-tl-lndcpcndcnt Work in I·rench
Art ll8a. ireriaia warir in Regional Geology- 291=¤—H<»m=¤¤c·· Philnlmzy
H) P by S h I Al Crvslcrl Butte, Colorado Sith 2—El¢’lll¢*l;lilTY Gérnlilll (L_ )
a- u ic c oo r * a, —. cconr- ear cmian iterary
lOb—Public School Art 23a, b—Second-year German (Medical)
$1a, l1—Painting (non-art uiaiors) _ 24a, lm—Second-year German (Chemical) ,
61-Elementary Drawing History 25—Elementary Aural-Oral Practice in German
65a—Painting 27a, b—Elementary German Conversation and
' l55—Art in Elementary Schools _ 4a—Modcm Europe to the French Rcvolution Composition
175a-d-Independent VVork: History, Criticism 4b-Modern Europe since the French Revolution 28a—Introduction to Classical and 19th Century
177a- l51b—The American Frontier 186a-d-Independent Work in Spanish
57—Bacteriology of Water and Sewage l80¤·Hl$t0¥>’ of the Old South _
1()3..Pg(h0g€njc Bacteriology 247a-d—Seminar in United States History .
l()4-App]jgd Bacteriology 320a-d—Seminar in Modern European History Muslc
l]_1-Gen€ml Pathology Seminar in Civil War and Reconstxuction 15 16 17 18 31 32 A
120a-b—Hospita1 Lab. Practice ¤·<1,_ ¤·’ 200-Epidemiology 214—Advanced Instrumental Conducting I 
22"A“alYh€¤l_Ch0m1$l_Y)' 212a—Puhlic Health Administration 224lJ—Advanced Musical Analysis zi
30a, b—Orgamc Chemistry 242—Administration and Supervision of Public if
L1'ga,Ib—Advancii:dr:mrrganic Chemistry School Music l
·-· nstrumenta na ysis _ {
125—Advanced Quantitative Analysis SCl‘l00l cf Journalism _ E
133- ualitative Organic Analysis Pl‘||l0$0Pl\Y I 
145- olloid Chemistry 2l—Etymology `V
181—Chemical Literature r 102——Cominunity Journalism _ :Z1—lntroduction to Philosophy  
221—Sem1m1cro Quantitative Analysis l14—Newspaper Advertising and Promotion €31—Elementary Logic __
290a-l—Research in Chemistry 12()—Seminar in Public Opinion 120—Great Religions _
339a—T0pics in Organic Chemistry 125-Magazine Article Writing 220-Research in Philosophy j 
 

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Physical Education Zoology
1-6—Service Courses (Beginning Swimming, 1_P"i“°iI’1°$ Of Animal Bi°10gY ' °
Tennis, Archery, Folk Dancing, Badminton, 11_N“t‘·“'€ Study      
Horseback Riding, Horsemanship, Beg., 106`Emb’;y°i°gy .
inten and Adm Polo) Cé§)8lg/flslrinzfiigls of geology (heredity)
- · · _ · · - e ica ntorno ogy · · ·
§§_§3;;;;·;g 333 3;;;,;*; {,5;; ,%*5;;,;,,, prdmerns in emerging, reused), pmsi.0t,gy A*=*··*·=·=*···¤' ¤¤¤···¤¤~··¤
_ . . . _ . , - log), _ _
60 Physical Education in the Elementary School (205a d); Embr? °1°gy and _ Hlsm l—Arch1tectura1 Rendering
__ (206a-d), Speciation (216a-d), Herpetol- . .
85 izumpmg (Horseback) 0 and Mammaio (22iu_di 4ii-Architectural Design
g$·I <%¤€$t1‘§\PtDli*55$¤S€ gy gy 6a—Advanced Architectural Design _
— n erme ia e ressage
140-Oigaxaigzation and Administration of Physi-
ca ucation
142-ceneinng Advanced Fddtbeii Civil En ineerin
143—History and Principles of Physical Educa- C   f A . "' 9 9
tion 15-G l S '
%gg§Pl§ysical(Eéiiucation gn tl]:/F Secondary School 0   0     16b—E:-ii; Stilrliyeeyiiiilg
— ports ciating or en ° 17-Hyd ogra h' S ` g
180—Administration and Organization of Rec-       18—Maplping parild Tucigggigphic Drawing
reation 81-Testing Materials
181—Camping in Education _ _ 107—Soil Mechanics
182-Intramural Sports Agricultural Economics 110a-Reinforced Concrete i
184—Advanced Dressage 1 _ _ 110b-—Reinforced Concrete
1 186—Equitation Teaching 0}·A¤¤¤¤l*2·*¤l Coapcnmon 120—Hydraulics
19s-Fe1k Dance Leadership for School and 1gé?·M¤rl<<>¤¤¤ T¤l>¤¤¢¤ d d di 123-Hydraulics Lab.
V Community _ ' . I i14;E'l 0l»aic0FMarl<§/i Gm GSI TWP Can mg 151-Water Supply and Waterworks '
` 240-Graduate Seminar in Pl'lYS1Ci\l Education umn , mm ’m€*g°mL“ Y0 ems l52—Scwers and Sewage Disposal
242-—Problem Course in Physical Education 120_P‘"°‘l“°“°“ E°P“0‘“'°S d. 159—Design and Operation of Waterworks and 2
{ Zgg-{irogieins in gdministration of Athletics G~·d¤¤¢¢ caurws umm mg to demand' 1 Sewers
g 2 - ro ems in ecreation 71a—'I`heory of Structures
* _ 171b—'I`he0ry of Structures
  Agricultural Entomology   gimctmcs
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  Physics 1OS—£Z1;2;1gm1c Entomology: Fruit and Garden 174_Gmi;?hiC Soiuglgss
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  1a—General Elementary Physics 104—Economic Entomology: Farm Crop Insects ,
1 Sa, 3b—G$neral (College Physics d and Animal Parasites
: S l . 'I b ff· · t ' ' '
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, .ummcr csswn. gronomy l1—Electrica1 Laboratory i
i _ _ _ . 21R—P`c`pl fEl t'.lE ' '
 I   Production and Management §5i;§P§§c;pig;lgg Eiggggggi Lgigmeermg
i P |'g·' | ' ' L · _ __ T I _ — ectrica t ·
E OI IC3 SCIENCE   lorage Crops i?Z%_§ieCti.icni Cglghtglg Laboratory
— 5i_A , ni G . , T ,   ‘ . . — ternating urrent C'c `ts, L tur
i 1<>1—i?Z·i?¥ U'i·r—e?i¥%?¥"l<¥f£·¤»·—s iiif§;ii?:,i?;;' .£:5**’;2;;‘F‘;,§;;$$ na.-A¤_emn¤g cum Qlircliiits, If:.,.,r§,.,,,
, 140_Rum] Local Government 21Ou_h¥ii(_qi_;“_Ch in Soils ll5R—Dircct Current Machinery, Lecture *
i65_W0iid politics ··‘ · ‘ 115L-Direct Current Machinery, Laboratory J
I 172—Kentucky Government and Constitution {-§?:Eg°'Jt{lf'_?: Circuit A¤¤lY$1$
A Animal lndustry igliiigizliiigir
ii IMF; L. Smnk P Od Hm 152:1-c—Indcpcndent Problems
I *"·*·*···'¤¤* 27 r‘i3`r>J§3m»r ¤r‘dé‘°i5~~ hd »·s~· y izisivzzizssm-iialisséssxzre
 5 yiiitrciglréctijon Lullkycholcgy ‘i(§4Q}S‘§1L;;§,§g$Q{g§i0n 161L-vnennrnfrnbe Electronics Lei,. ‘
i 1Z1¤§*$ii`Zid,,§° YS; `ir$’$yoini.r ions-n-speeii.1 prenems in Animal Husbandry igggjggig giiggiig Lab ,
i14_Abi.iOimiii Psychoicgy l29a-b—Spec1al Problems in Dairymg i65_Fi€ids and Waves ‘ ·
r _ · 221:1-b-—Rcscarch in Dairymg
124 Mental Hygiene
l27—Introduction to Industrial Psychology 241“'l’_R°Scm°h in Poultry 1
1BOa—Speech Correction: A Survey 284“'b"§°S°@rfl&,inbixnlmel I;“vm°i“N . .  
1 l30b—Speech Correction: An Introduction to 289**1)- Pccm m ems m ‘““"“ “mt“’“ Engineering-General {
' Therapy *
l33—Introdnction to Clinical Audiology _ Applied Mechanics Z
_ 150-Psyol-iological_Testing Animal Pathology 3_Smtics 3
        102—Infectious Diseases of Domestic Animals   I
,  Ology 1g0—Strengtb of Materials {
I 222-Systems of Psychology and their History F¤?€$l'TY 1 7_MEC}mmCal Vlbmmms I
$§iZEi·’£$i`e(gii$L°"ielziieiiiriiéig I““'“‘“°“‘s 115·W°°d C°“°““°“‘“g E""l[‘°°'"" °'“""‘? . . i
311a-h—Practicum in Student Personnel i?_gl€l“*Zm9l’>’ E¤Hl¤€€1'l¤l; Drawing ;
315a-b-—Practicum in Speech Therapy _ _ O)- escriptive Geometry · :
· Farm Ellglneetlllg ..—Mechamcal Drawing (For students in Indus- i
{ trial Chemistry)
R d_ An   Shcpd F M h_ 18—Advanced Engineering Drawing  
 A a IO S — vance arm ac mery
 é éa-§agio 'llgoday H E _ M h _ I E _ _
.» .-— ' n uncing cme conom cs cc amca n ineerin 1
ir 185a.;]R?dio nSgript-Writing _ _ I 9 9 3
‘ 106c-Radio Productions g—Dl'?*€tl?$ for Nurses l5a—Mannfactnring Processes Q
i -0—Cl¤th;¤g _ _ 15b-—Manufacturing_ Processes _
i 2.8-Clothing and Pattern Designing ]()0n-M¤chmc Design »
  _ 101—Principles of Nutrition ]07-Fiuid Mechanics {
i Social Work I0§i\—EXP€1’1m0¥`{¢¤\l COQl{€\'Y 108—Internal Combustion Engines ‘
;· —i care ericc — . __.. ·_ r
I 105 Ch'1d w ii s v' S ni(ii_i~§i»($ii(sl1iig7sSi1vd1ii`d:1t1°n }$gh"’§I"°h°“i°"l L"b°"“°"' i
r 122-Fieia of seem work 11s¤—rded for Special Cccasions __ 122Q_Sf’,‘Q‘,§}§‘,Q‘,'§
  i;$r£*‘*i°*$;$i ioivixieah Sasa mit iiiariacszldpaziiaz m M and Nu ***** on ¤=6~¤·· ernr I ¤¤····»¤s¤¤¤ E··¤i¤¤ Le I
_ a, — u ia 1 - —- · i
Q;  126—Costume Design ·
 i 128a—Special Problems in Clothing and Cos- ‘
 _° _ tume Des`gn Metallur ical En ineer`n
  SOCl¤l0gy 130a-b—lnteridr Decoration Projects 9 9 I 9
  3 Sb S _ (_ A d th W xd i§$—i°l?y   Pliiy Matéermls C60—Metallurgica1 Lab. and Shop Practice
  a, — ocie ies ronn e or —· n an eve opmcn .
2 103—Criminology 161—Consumer Problems ‘
 ; 106—Principles of Sociology l62b—Home Management and Family Relation- _ _ _ _ I
in 109a-The Family _ ships Lab. Mining Engineering ·
 i 132a, c—Intergroup Relations (june 18-july 2) 259a——Specinl _Probiems in Child Development v
I 202a-j-Special Problems in Sociology and Family Living 131-Mme Surveying Pmcuce  
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  C0"¢9€ of I-¤W . College of Commerce
i Department of Elementary Education
20—Arts and Crafts in the Elementary School
§g;-g0ng;ct nf Laws 42—T§s·3¢;(l;i3ig Arithmetic in the Elementary Economics
— roperty IV (Future Interests) _ _ _ _
141__Pm_mm_Ship C.44¤Ch1ld Development and the Curnculum 3-EgOnomic History of the United States
· C150_-Public Utilities 110-tag/vn§§§g0lAns and Crafts in the E]em@¤— 7a-Principles uf Accounting
C]_66_S8les __ I I _ _ 7b-Principles of Accounting
C13!} Student Teaching in the Elementary 51 P- ·l { E ·
· 142-Employment Relations School (open only to those who have had _ I-{Help cs 0 ccnomlcs
teaching experience in zi regularly organ- 52‘P*'m°*Pl€S of Econmmcs
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_ iu at vancc in orc er a prerequisites may 104_Public Finance
College of Education be ¤*·¤¤*<<= _ 105-Mm, and Banking
172-Thu teaching of Reading 107 S _ _ 1 M th d
l78—Childrcn’s Literature _ mhsqc? E 0 _ _
196—Sci¢:ncc in the Elementary School 112u—f_Indw1d“nl Work m Economics
Diyigign of Adminishayign 212_Thc Elcmcnmry School 115—Value and Distribution Theory
101—$¢h¤¤1 0rz¤¤i=¤fi¤¤ msi., bqnaopmdont work in Elementary Ed- 166"P‘°"s°Y‘“°l P'°bl?ms .
202—L0cal School Administration ucnlion 167—T¤¢9¤¤l Wvrk ¤¤{ E¤¤¤¤m¤¢S
210:1, b—Independent Work in School Adminis- 229-Thc Elementary Principal 200_B“$m°SS Economics
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` 225—Supervisi0n of Instruction D t t f M l _ 203—Hist0ry of Economic Thought
232—High School Administration epa'. men ° us C Educah°" 212a—Research Problems in Economics
301a, b—Rescarch Problems in Educational Ad- 248—Advanced Methods and Materials in Music 218“—E°°“°mi° Th€°"Y
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{ 244—IIist0ry und Philosophy of Music Education c°mmerc€
Division of Foundations of Education 7¤·PFi¤¢i1€S ¤f E¢¤¤¤mi¢S
V 119 Th El S h 1 P 1 Department of Secondary Education 7b—Principlcs of Economics
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132 b I t R I t. S . 1 Student Teaching in Art
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Schools °l77a, b—Student Teaching in Music _ rmc1p€s_° Mm etmg
  275—Advnnccd Problems in Philosophy of Ed- °193—Studcnt Teaching in Business Education ?6n_IntermEd{at€ Acccunhpg
` ucntion 2M_·1·hc Scccudmy School .)6b—Intcrmcd1:1te Accounting
  248:1, l:y—Indupcndunt Work iu Secondary Edu- igé“'°gS"{°""t“;d“l Job Tmmmg
L  Division of Instruction °“ “’“ "` usmcss “W ,
II7—Curp0mli0n Finance
`Z Department of Business Education 3 _ 118—C0st Accounting
}· _ _ _ Opqn nuly to those who lmvu had teaching 1(,9_C _d·t 1 St t_ A 1 -
.4 l58a—Tenchmg Secretarial Subjccts experience in a regularlv organized school. A - ‘“ "“ I mu “ °m°"t na ysls
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gy versitics 145—OHicc Management
*5 _ _ _ _ · 171—Statistica1 Quality Control
I _ Department of Curriculum and Instruction Dwlsmn °f Vocahonal Educahon 217_C°"p°"‘t° Fi¤¤¤¤i=·1 Policy
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l 186_t;Z;u;l Tsschliiagpc 1 mn) 179-Determining Content in Vocational Agri- Sho"' coulse
. . . , culture 1770, b, c—C0llege Business Management (]uly
E 227_Prmclpl8s _°f Cunjlculum Cmlstructmn 28O—Mcth0d in Teaching Vocational Agriculture 25·A¤E¤$¥ 6)
l 234_Pmbl€ms m Curriculum Makmg 285—M0dcrn I’r0hlcms in Agricultural Education . .
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  287b—SeIccting Teaching Materials  ws both graduate and undergraduate
l 2S7c—Adult-Farmer Schools
» one Feature of 28'7c—Tcnching Farm Shop
    28'7f—Y0ung-Farmer Schools
a _ · · · ,
l Seminar in Intergroup Relations ·89“» b Research m A¤¤<=··**¤m1Ed¤¤=·*·<·¤ s\|I'I\m€I' Sésslcn
(Soc. Cl32 a or b 3 credits; Ed.
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_ with the COOD€V3HOn of the Na' C166z1-d—Pr0blcms in H Econ ' s Ed c·1- - - ·
~ tional Conference of Christians and tion (Improvement il;“9Ioao1iin?¥oodsf` June 13*-C|¤$$'f|€¤l|O¥'l
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gation and Integration. Jung 25_|_GS{· date to en-
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I $*¢g¤<·¤t¤*V€¤d*¤§¤¤¤gj*¤¤*jI S;¤¢¤_¤· mnmie Analysis *6* °" °'9°'”'z€d
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staff representing eight depart- 171b—Principles and Philosophy of Industrial Aug, 6—End Of Summer
ments and three colleges; and Ed¤<>¤tw¤ _
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