xt773n20g14z https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt773n20g14z/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19680916  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September 16, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, September 16, 1968 1968 2015 true xt773n20g14z section xt773n20g14z Tie Kentucky Kernel
Monday Evening, Sept. Ifi,

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The South's Outstanding College Daily

18

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UNIVERSITY

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OF KENTUCKY,

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LEXINGTON

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Vol. LX, No.

11

Wallace's Speech
To UK Audience
Is His Usual One
By DARRELL RICE

Managing Editor
George Wallace's convocation address at Memorial Coliseum
Saturday was billed as "a major campaign speech," but the
points made by the third party presidential candidate could have
been checked off like a grocery list from his previous speeches.
Nevertheless, Wallace drew went to
another, then back to
vocal cheers from the crowd of
the first, and so forth. But his
about 10,000, although on several
could be grouped
occasions he also drew jeers in dispersed points
roughly under several headings.
nearly equal volume. Many of
On academic freedom:
the persons in the audience who
"I believe in academic freeKernel Photo by Hownrd Mason stood at times and cheered in the
dom. I believe we should be able
g
march in oppo- frenzied manner that has become
On the left, members of the campus
to say we shouldn't be in Vietsition to George Wallace and shout insults to "hippies," on the typical of Wallace crowds were nam . . . but not
advocating
right, marching against them and for the Alabama Presidential UK students, not older people.. a communist
victory or help to
Wallace's speech was a rambcandidate. But those on the right are really on the left, too, we
the Communists."
think. But some said they weren't sure, and they might be right. ling affair in which he talked
He said of supporting the comSee the story below for further reactions.
on one subject for a period, then
munist cause in Vietnam: "It's
not academic freedom; it's not
free speech it's pure treason."
"I'm going to have my attorney general seek an indictment against any professor seeking a communist victory."
and
On big government
" pseudo- - intellectuals : "
"When has it become necessary for someone 1,000 miles away
to tell the people of Kentucky
where their children are going
and was greeted by a complete able to perceive the protrusions
know if I'm supporting the right to school or who's going to teach
reversal of the polar stereotypes.
in the hippies' cheeks, but many man or not," a not unexpected tfiem?"
While eight "straight-look- were unable to cope with the remark.
The former Alabama goverreversal of stereotypes.
ing"
pickets paOther Wallace supporters' nor added that he is against
raded and while a number of
could not overcome the stereoto
Aren't They?"
"bussing little chiklren
neatly-attire- d
members of the
who can't
type and were sure the hippies suit some pointed-hea- d
After watching the hippies
Community Alliance for Responwere "goofing on" them. "You park his bicycle straight."
sible Social Action passed out parade for several minutes, one can look at them and tell they're
"I'm going to turn back to
woman asked uncertainly,
leaflets, some 35 elderly ARE
aren't not Wallace people," said one. the people of this city and this
hippies,
"They
scroungy, bearded, beaded, san"They're either doped up or state the absolute control of their
d
daled,
schools and cities
"hippies" (as they?" thought
"I
hippies were for ignorant."
they called themselves) demonOn "anarchists:"
"I think they think it's a
said a Wallace sup-xrtstrated for nearly two hours in McCarthy,"
"When a group of anarchists
happening," said a resolute middlewho appeared dismayed
-class
matron.
support of the fonner Alabama
lie down in front of my car,
the prospect of association
by
Even Wallace was somewhat it will be the last car they lay
governor.
with the "freaks."
e
Power
in' they're for bewildered by the group when down in front of. If there are
"They're say
Carrying
placards reading him . . . but I think they're they gained his attention during any of you in Lexington who
don't believe me, after I'm elected
"Turn on with Wallace," "Keep against him," said another in a his oratory.
It was a typical Wallace president I'll come back and you
America beautiful, get a haircut," doubt-fille- d
drawl.
speech, complete with catch can try me."
"Sock it to us, Ceorge," "AmerSome Wallace-ite- s
were con"We've got these free speech
ica love it or leave it," and vinced the hippies were serious. phrases, simplifications, Wallace
"Hippies for Wallace," and "Hippies lave SOME sense," witticisms and emotional appeals folks in the country who believe
to the working man.
in free speech for all but those
shouting slogans like "law and said one.
The microphone was overly who don't agree with them. These
order now" and "we're for
Another stated, "Ceorge says
power," the group was cu- he has the Negroes for him, why loud, causing reverberations from are the ones folks are getting
can't he have the hippies? He the back of UK's huge Coliseum tired of."
riously received.
On the other political parties:
of the crowd of 10,000 has all the people for him." and adding even more force to
Many
Wallace's strong voice.
About two years ago as a
that turned out to hear Wallace
'Someone Like That'
result of anarchists roaming the
Old Lines
were supporters of his from across
A third said, "If someone
streets and that's what they are,
Like the monologue of a
the state. Some of them were
like that is for Wallace, I don't
Continued on Pate 2, Col 1
on Pace 8, Col. 1
left-win-

Confused?
Many Were

Turn On With George'

Stereotypes Reversed As Hippies
Demonstrate In Favor Of Wallace
By GUY MENDES

Associate Editor
George Wallace, a man who
has contributed greatly to the
political polarization of this country, visited Lexington Saturday

New Party
Assails SG
By LARRY DALE KEELING

Assistant Managing Editor
"Student Government is a
castrated eunuch with anemia."
At least that's what Tlom Pat
Juul says. Asked if his statement was redundant, he replied, "So is Student Government."
Juul is a member of a slate
of candidates running for SG
representatives in Wednesday's
election and titled "Students for
Action and Responsibility"

(SAR).
Continued on Page

5, Col.

1

anti-Walla-

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KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Sept.

TIIE

18

10,

Wallace Gives UK Audience Stock Speech

Con tin or d from Tafe One

anarchists they can put you in'
.jail for not selling your house
,to someone. When those people
(politicians in the other parties)
succumb and will put you in Jail
because of a few anarchists in
the streets, they are not fit for
the presidency."
"The difference between the
two parties is that between;
Twecdledee and Tweedledum."
On law and or den
"We're going to stand by oun
police and firemen when I become
president. If it were not for them,
you could not even ride in the
streets, much less walk in them."
Somewhere along this time,
student came
an
walking rapidly up an aisle
toward the podium. He was be-

'

anti-Walla-

ing followed by a Wallace supporter who was taunting him.
As

the student

turned to

leave

with much fanfare from
the audience Wallace jeered at
the newsmen, "Cet him on tele-

vision."
A group of
hippies" gathered in one section of
the Coliseum began chanting
"law and order." Wallace apparently could not hear the words
and assumed they were mock"pro-Walla-

ce

ing him.

"Cet them on television up
yonder," he said, pointing at the
hippie types. He then undertook
his usual procedure when confronted with hostile protestors:
"You fellows don't know how
many votes you get me every
time you come out. I'm going

to try to talk my producer into
getting you to travel with us."
The "hippies" then began
"We want
chanting louder

Wallace."

Someone
behind Wallace
called his attention to the chant
and the candidate looked up in
surprise, saying, "Oh, they're

us."

for

"Let's get back to law and

order."
"Yeah." (from the hippies)
"You can't even walk in the
shadow of the White House any
more without being in danger

..

.

"

On the "communists in the
defense plants:"
The American Independent
party candidate berated "Communists working in the defense

mwirw r
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i

Kernel Photo By Howard Mason

Protecting
A Candidate
a

I

plants while Communists are killing our men in Vietnam."
"When I become president,

we will get every Communist out
of the defense plants."
On Vietnam:
"I hope to see the Paris negotiations are successful. But if they
fail, then I shall lean on the
Joint Chiefs of Staff.
On foreign aid:
Wallace said the problems of
the cities are created "because
we're giving all our money
away," noting that countries who
received foreign aid usually were,
not appreciative.
And something for the local
folks:
"We in our part of the counof the
try are well aware
great traditions of athletes from
your university." He mentioned
basketball coach Adolph Rupp,
football coach Charlie Bradshaw
and former football coach Paul
"Bear" Bryant, who now coaches
at Alabama.
He also directed some remarks
specifically at young people.
"I realize there are imperfections in our system of government," Wallace said, "but we
must destroy the imperfections
and not the structure."
"To those young leftists who
say they don't believe in a materialistic society, let me tell them
the communist countries have
never turned down any ma-

...

terials."

He also addressed himself to
of Lexington and Kentucky State Police and Secret Servicemen
surrounded Presidential aspirant George Wallace and ushered him into the "racist" charges that have
o. i
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"itauuruH buibcum aaiuiuay mcroiOK, lor a rresiaeniiai vonvocauon imij been hurled at him. Noting that
oiuca
his late wife had garnered the supas a "Wallace Rally" in ads placed in the Lexington papers by his
port of Blacks while running for
A pack
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CI DEM A

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from Nobel Prize Winner
JOHS. V. JENSEN'S novel
"GUDRUN" Winner of the Danish "Bodil"
for "Best Actress of the Year"

TODAY and TOMORROW

1

Today

f

8

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STRAND

V

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Societies Pro Legibus, undergradupre-la- w
honorary. Is now accepting
applications for membership.
Write or see Tim Futrell, clerk, at
117 Bradley Hall.
The American Institute of Mining
Engineers will meet at 5 p.m. in
Anderson Hall Room 257.
"Katherine Peden for U.S. Senate"
supporters will meet at 7 p.m. in Student Center Room 245.

ate

Dr. A. N. J. den Hollander, chairman of the Department of Sociology
and director of the American Institute, University cf Amsterdam, the
Netherlands, will speak at 8 p.m. in
the Student Center Theatre on "Cultural Conditioning and the Mind of
the Scholar."

filmed in beautiful Copenhagen

"NO ONE SHOULD MISS IT!

NOW SHOWING!
FIRST LEXINGTON

RUN!

STUNNINGLY BEAUTIFUL"

What a beautiful opportunity to let' the younsed
how lovely the human body can be and how

pure its nakedness!
Andersson-Jorge-

AMvKwCtrmf -- Marten Sdijfetrf

BuckhojPoul

n

Production

Dean of Students Jack Hall

described the behavior during
the convocation as "excellent for
the most part."
Dr. Dirwan did, however, appeal for order at one point in
the program following a minor
commotion in the aisle.
About 100 students wore arm
bands to show their disagreement
with Wallace, and few, if any,
engaged in disruptive protest.

NOW SHOWING!

JWkhUjgLSdColorrntST ""n6
Photographed In

Lailla

governor in Alabama in 19G6, Wallace said "we have the support
of people of all races and colors
in the United States."
Wallace also said that he and
his supporters have been called
"crackers, rednecks and pecker-woods- "
by "people that look
down their nose."
"But when we get together,
we are a potent force." He went
on to say he would be on the
ballot for the Nov. 5 election
in all 50 states by Sept. 17.
"We are going to carry this
state on Nov. 5," he added.
Wallace arrived more than one
hour late for the convocation
because his plane was delayed
by fog. During the wait period,
Wallace supporters began chants
that also drew boos.
UK Acting President Dr. A.
D. Kirwan opened the convocation by emphasizing that all the
major presidential candidates
have been invited to speak at
the University.
Wallace was introduced by
Dr. Paul Sears, chairman of the
Faculty Senate Council. As the
candidate mounted the platform,
he attracted both enthusiastic
cheers and jeers.

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All men Interested in trying out for
the swimming and water polo team
should report to the Coliseum Pool
at 3:15.
Sigma Alpha Iota Musicale, Laboratory Theatre. Fine Arts Building,
6:30 to 8:39 p.m. No admission charge.
Student Center Board Coffee House

Ser'es, "Donnery and Rudd," Student

Center Grille, Monday through Thursday, 8 and 9 p.m. and 8:30 and 9:30
p.m. Friday and Saturday. No admission charge.

Tomorrow
The UK Young Democrats will
sponsor a social mixer at 8 p.m. in
Student Center Room 245. Freshmen
and transfer students are cordially invited.
"Kentucky Personality Series." Dr.
John Reeves, Student Center Theatre,
7:30 p.m. No admission charge.
Associated Women Students dorm
elections will be conducted Tuesday.
The organizational meeting for the
University Student Forum under the
direction of the Speech Department
will be held at 7:30 p.m. in Student
Center Room 109. All interested students are invited.
The Board of Trustees is meeting at

2 p.m.

in

te

Board

tration Building.

Room, Adminis-

Attention UK Students
The UK
YOUNG DEMOCRATS
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17

will sponsor a

(Let Your Success Show A Little)

SOCIAL MIXER
at 8:00 p.m.

Your JOHN ROBERTS representative
will be

Tuesday, Sept. 17, 1968
in Room 245 Student Center

at

Kennedy Boole

Store

to personally help select your symbol of
academic achievement . . . Your Class Ring!
Is'1

!i

ii.iihLih'.likimaiipliliiiiiih

Hi

Freshmen and Transfer Students
are cordially invited
Special invitation to the IERNEL Staff
to tcitness that the Democratic Party
is NOT dead.

* "Jr
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Old Pals!
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Pueblo Facts
The confirmation Thursday by
the State Department that theU.S'.
Navy intelligence ship Pueblo had
been under instructions at onetime
to violate what North Korea considers its territorial waters is revealing, and should point the way
d
toward a
d
and
settlement of the affair.
Robert J. McCloskey, State Department spokesman, said in a news
conference Thursday that a document on board the Pueblo when
it was seized authorized "surface
limit off
patrols to the three-mil- e
North Korea" and contained "general instructions on conducting reconnaissance operations." North
Korea, however, claims territorial
waters as far as 12 miles off its
shores. McCloskey did add, however, that the early document was
superseded by an order which
set a clear limit of 13 miles.
long-awaite-

much-neede-

While it has been generally assumed up to now, due to administration statements, that the 82
members of the Pueblo crew, captured on Jan. 23, would be freed
when the United States made a
simple statement of apology, recent
indications by Secretary of State
Dean Rusk have now clouded this
view. Rusk has been hinting that
North Korea has now hardened
its line and demands more than
the mere apology.
It is difficult to draw any firm
conclusions from this hodge-podg- e
of statements and guarded indications. The administration has
not been especially clear in stating what' actually is going on, and
they have been even more cloudy
in telling the American public what
the purpose and actions of the
Pueblo were before it was seized.
The United States needs to
realize that it is dealing with the
lives of 82 men aboard the ship
and work from theje. If an apology
is what is needed, then perhaps
one should be made. The order to
violate the territorial waters is certainly an indication that this might
have occurred. Again, Americans
must learn that saving lives is much
more important than saving face.

ly

In an effort to create a sense of pride,
belonging and tradition in the University
community, this column will today attempt a brief delineation of the high points
of the History of the University of Kentucky.

Tie Kentucky ernel
Tlie South' Outstanding College Defy

University or Kentucky
MONDAY, SEPT. 16, 1968

ESTABLISHED 1894

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
Lee

B. Becker,

Editor-in-Chi- ef

Darrell Rice, Managing Editor
David Holwerk, Editorial rage
Tom Derr, Business Manager
, Associate
Guy M. Mendes,
II. G. Mason, Fhotograpliy Editor
Jim Miller, Sports Editor
Joe Hinds, Arts and Entertainment
Chuck Koehler,
Dana Ewell,
Janice
Larry Dale Keeling,
Terry Dunham,
Assistant Managing Editors

Editor
Editor
Editor
Barber

Good, But More
Both the English Department and the Chevy Chase Cinema should
be commended for their successful efforts to make the film version of
James Joyce's Ulysses available to University students at a reduced
cost. Ulysses is a fine film and one which many University students
should be anxious to see. For 90 cents, students can now purchase
a ticket from the English Department to do just that.
Occasionally, however, other films of major artistic importance
come to Lexington. It would be helpful to the student body if some
arrangement could be worked out with the management of the local
theaters so that going to a good film would not place an undue strain
on a student's finances.
Conceivably, even, Student Government might be interested in looking into this area of service to students. This is, after all, something
from which more students might benefit than a European travel service
or even the Ombudsman.
Regardless of who undertakes the project, however, it should be clear
that it is a chance for some University department or group to meany
enteringfully influence the availability of
tainment. There is certainly little enough of it now available.
high-qualit-

.

off-camp-

Davirf HoJwrk

being until someone found out that University is a better title than College and
so set up a college for the colored folks,
leaving the University for the white folks.)
Anyway, while the place was still
known as Kentucky State C)llege, there
The University of Kentucky, which is were great times to be had by all. There
located in Lexington, is one of the top were frequent instances of drinking spiked
cider in the cow barns of the Ag school,
ranking state universities in the country.
Located on one of the highest points and more than once young ladies were
seen holding hands with young gentlein scenic Lexington, it commands a striking view of such local attractions as the men. The town looked with great alarm
Pralltown (Community, Kennedy's Iiook on these activities but would not go
near enough to the University to try to
Store and Kuclid Avenue.
The University was founded in 1SG5 stop them.
by a group of ministers of undertermiued
Then, after a brief interlude of the
denominational allegiance who viewedthe First World
War, the twenties arrived.
venture as "a wild laik, verily a thing
(During the War, by the way, there was
of great idiocy." The exact truth of this
fun on campus. Young men carried
statement was not realized until much great and shot
guns
anvtiody whose name
later.
sounded even faintly Teutonic. The welThe original name of the University fare state in this country got its start
was the Kentucky State Gllege. (There during this period, for the wliole German
is now a Kentucky State College located Department had no classes to teach for
in Frankfoit, but it did not come into four years. They did have tenure, liow- -

ever, so they still received pay. One
member of the department left, but the
rest stayed on in varying capacities. One
was even promoted to keeper of the
horses in the Ag Scltool.)
At any rate, the twenties were a time
of great revelry on campus. The great
sinkhole where the Student Center now
is located was created when a still set
up by the seniors of the Chemistry
exploded, scattering sour mash
for a distance reputed to be upwards of
three miles. Large ortioi)s' of this spilled
onto the football field and made the turf
there wildly alcoholic, so that the Wildcat football team actually won four home
games that season. Strangely enough, all
four of those games were played on the
same afternoon, against Xavier University, the Lexington Police Department,
the Kentucky National Guard, and the
Lexington Chapter of the WGTU.
With this great heritage of action and
scltolarship, it is no wonder that the
University finds itself on the solid footing
which it now enjoys. The great towers

which now rise to mark its prominence
in the community show clearly how far
the institution has come since that fateful
first building made of rough-hew- n
logs.

It is quite clear that great strides
have been made since that time when a
few hearty stalwarts met to defend the
honor of their Alma Mater in a contest
over a bloated pig's bladder. It is quite
clear that the great strides which the
University has made in the fields of
humanities and sciences are far beyond
what the rude founders of this institution
ever could have imagined.
When they founded this University,
there was one doctor within five miles.
Now there are 53 specialists w ithin shouting distance. There was only one house
in Lexington with indoor plumbing; now
the only houses without it border on the
University. Then there was no neutron
accelerator in town. Now the university
has one. With these improvements in mind,
who can doubt the future growl h of the
University or its presrut greatm

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Sept. 1f,

WORLD REPORT
From the Wire of the Associated

NATIONAL
News work Magazine, The
Gallup I'oll, The New York
Times, and a California state
poll report Republican Richard
Nixon leading Democrat Hubert
Humphrey and American Independent Party candidate George
Wallace.
INTERNATIONAL
SAICON
Thousands of Allied troops battled enemy soldiers in savage fighting south of
Da Nang Sunday. They also hit
paydirt with the seizure of 38
tons of military booty in other
scattered areas, a military spokesman report ed Monday.

-

Press

-

STOCKHOLM Sweden's Social Democrats, rulers of this
welfare state for 3G years, won a
major parliamentary victory Sunday, taking absolute control of
the lower house for the first time
since World War II.
The victory freed the party
of dependence on Communists
in the lower chamber.

Kernel Photo By Dick Ware

-

PRAGUE
Premier Oldrich
Cemik gave assurances Sunday
d
night that despite new

Midway in Wallace's speech a young man wearing a black arm band walked
from the rear of the Coliseum to the front of the podium, and shouted to
the Presidential candidate. Many thought it the worst heckling incident of
the speech. Those seated on the floor heard him complain of one of Wallace's
supporters who newsmen said had been heckling him and who followed
him to the front of the Coliseum. "Get this bug off me, George," the youth
shouted. The Secret Serviceman at the left ordered both the youth and his
heckler, in the black shirt at the extreme right, to their seats.

Soviet-demande-

censorship

Unseated,
Unsettled

laws,

Czechoslovakia's journalists, editors and creative artists "will
have enough room for their

work."

'SAR' Party Assails SG, Presents Platform

Continued from Pate One

The other candidates

run-

ning on the SAR slate are Merrily Orsini, John Cooper, Joe
Maguire, Annette Marie Bru-fla- t,
Robert Duncan, Paul Johnson and Joe Isaacs.
SAR, according to its platform, wants to change Student
Government's constitution, improve parking and bus facilities, increase the power of the
student ombudsman, study Uniit
facilities, inversity
crease communications with the
colleges, improve
community
dorm facilities and policies and
reorganize student affairs on the
student level.

EDITOR'S NOTE: The SAR
Party Platform is printed below.
All candidates are invited to submit their own platforms to The

Kernel

before 8

pjn. Monday

night for publication in Tuesday's edition. They should be
typed double

pared, and, to be
proportional to the space allocated SAR candidates, not
longer than 50 words. They
should be brought to Room 114
in the Journalism Building.

non-prof-

First Party
According to Juul, this is the
first time a party will have its
name on the ballot.
He said in order to get around
the rule against having party
names on the ballot, each candidate submitted SAR as their
first name.
He said studies would be
it
facilimade on UK
ties, which he called monopolies. The Complex sundry shop,
the UK Press, and the Physical
Plant Development were included in his list.
non-prof-

Marlow Cook
Here Wednesday
Republican senatorial candidate Marlow Cook will speak
Wednesday, September 18, at the
Law School courtroom. The Jefferson County Judge will talk
on Vietnam, the draft and law
enforcement, and will answer
questions from the audience after
the program.

J-BO-

The S.A.R. Platform
Students for Action and Responsibility is a union of candidates for
positions in Student Government, who
Believe that the Modem Government
can and shuaid be active and
to the students at the Unibeversity of Kentucky, and we can
lieve that the status-qu- o
has not,
obnot, and will not IniflU these
jectives.
The members of S. A. R. have
I.
in the past shown themselves to be
active, interested stadenta In and oat
of the present straetaro and who repcross section of tho stadent
resent
body and who have worked together
and separately In tho last two years
for:
A. More realistic women's hoars.
B. Sponsored tho original representation plan for Off Cam pas and
Dorm stadents.
C. Originated the Football Ucket distribution scheme.
O. Opposed
attempts at gerrymand-erin- f
dorm and off campas
E. Feacht for the RlfhU Code for
stadents.
F. Fought afalnst two year forced
heating contracts.
G. Battled to keep President Oswald
and his liberal policies.
II. Championed
the legal and moral
right of freshmen to ran for Stadent Government.
II. S.A.R. wants to:
A. Change
Stadent Government's
Constitution.
1. Eliminate
the contradictions
and faulty language of the constitution.
t. Allow first semester students
to run in order to achieve a
more representative
Student
Government.
B. Parking and Bus Service:
1. To continue our work
In ob
taining adequate student parking.
2. To study the possibility of low
rise parking unit construction.
S. To
study the possibility of
overhead and, or tunnel passfor student ase
age ways
across main thoroughfares.
4. Tho
construction of bicycle
paths.
5. Increased bus lervico around

campus.

Ombudsman:
power to Implement
into the affairs
of the University.
t. To make the ombudsman a student selected rather than faculty selected pcot as wac
la mot year's seadoat
refereadam.
D. UaJveoaMy
Fa thill su :
1. To direct tho tax marvia ad
facilvantage a aha
ities U the stadcats.
2. To lavesUgate
the prolt mar- gins of anlversity monopolistic
facilities.
S.
associated
groups
should personally assame financial responsibility for their
ase of Student Center and
C.

1. The

Noa-Proe-

University faeUIUes.
E. Community Colleges:
I. The establishment of a program
to inform, community college
studeaU of the University of
Kentucky's academic and social Ufa.
I. Bettor communication bet wee a
stadeat
eemmaaity colleges'
tats aatd tad eat Gov
at UK.
To acwak aarrtandaa of melasma
aad si sasi a seaoe of awareness fa dormitories aad the

stca-nro-

2.
S.

4.

University at large.
Improve dormitory faculties.
Ceatrallse dormitory
aeIaI
programming.
Revision of dormitory policies
ay siaaent groaps.

G. Reorganisation of Student Affairs on the Stadent Level:
1. The
centralised and efficient
2.

S.

ase of stadent fands.
Stadent policy derisions mast
he returned to students through
democratic methods with student approval.
The
of all student
programming for the parpose
deriving aaasimum beaefit
from tho Ualversity's cultural,
academic, social, physical and
aaaeial resources.
We believe stadents and student organisations have certain freedoms and responsibilities; and. that this University must recognise the right
to exercise those freedoms and
responsibilities.

Jt

4.

Sheaf fer's big deal gets you through
term papers, 3 book reports,17 exams,
52 guizzes and 6 months of homework.
Sheaffer's
Sorry about that. write twicebig deal means can
as long. Because
you

you

g
Sheaffer dollar
get the
ballpoint plus an extra
49$ refill free. All for just a dollar.
How much do you think you can
write?
ir r i r
The world's longest writing dollar ballpoint pen.
lone-writin-

long-writin- g

a

ri
oncAmzn
01

ill

.

ft- -

APPLICATIONS

Applications for positions on tho University
of Kentucky Judicial Board are now available
at the following locations:
Dean of Students Office, Student Center,
Complex, and Medical Center.
Positions are open to all students above the
Freshman class.
Applications must be returned before
September 30, 1968

I
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(?''.

ill

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* O--

KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Sept.

TIIE

UK Runners
Win Opener
UK's
team
opened its schedule Saturday
3
with a
win over Cumberland at the latter school's foir-mil- e
course.
UK's Vic Nelson ran number
one in the meet in the time of
21 minutes 55 seconds.
Cumberland runners Bobert
Moore and Tom Denny finished
second and third, but UK runners
took the next three places and the
meet.
Freshmen Gary Moss and Don
Weber looked surprisingly strong
to take the fourth and fifth spots
while sophomore Jerry Sarvadi
finished sixth. UK's Bob Morley
was eighth.
UK.'s next meet is Saturday at
Morehead with North Carolina,
Cumberland and Morehead.
cross-count-

?

ry

tTYr,

IB,

fudged feint

18

Tide 'Comeback? Hopes
Rest On Kelley, Sophs

I

The Kentucky

1967 proved an oddity in Southeastern Conference
Alabama wasn't first.
Paul "Bear" Bryant saw his Crimson Tide lose a tiht match,
and the title, to Tennessee. Bryant vows .that the. Tide will be
jack in there pitching this year
There are two. thing Bryant at tailback .with fellow sophs
Thil Cliaffin, and George Ranais banking on.
One is Joe Kelley, Kenny ger in at the fullback and (linker
"Snake" Stabler's backup man jobs.
Helm could be ousted by infor two seasons. Kelley passed
cumbent Tommy Wade at tailup spring practice to play baseball, but he's still the key to back while Ranager will carry
on the 'Bama tradition of great
Bryant's plans.
The second thing Bryant is flankers such as Ray Perkins and
counting on is a green, green Dennis Homan.
Tackle Alvin Samples leads
backfield. The other three back-fiel- d
an experienced offensive line.
positions will be manned
Paul Boschung, like Samples, was
by sophomores.
moved from defense to offensive
Potential Great
Ranager
in a move that should reap beneLarry Helm, 180, will start fits.

The year

21-2-

football

I

;:

Kernel Photo By Gene Hancock

Lyons

For Six

Dicky Lyons, 98, crosses the goal line after
scurrying 10 yards for the score in Saturday's
control scrimmage at Stoll Field. Lyons
ran what head coach Charlie Bradshaw
called, "his finest effort of the fall."

Sports

Downtown

Eastland

t'W

Receiving In Good Shape
With Experience, Depth
EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the fifth in a series of seven
articles on the UK Wildcats.
By CHIP IIUTCIIESON

position-by-positio-

n

Kernel Staff Writer
With all the attention given the UK quarterback candidates
this fall, it seems as though many people have forgotten the pass
catchers.
A major injury at the tight end
a group, may well rank equally
position a week and a half