xt773n20g189 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt773n20g189/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19691105  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November  5, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, November  5, 1969 1969 2015 true xt773n20g189 section xt773n20g189 Kmtucecy Kemotl

Tunis
Wednesday Evening, Novembers,

19G9

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Second VP Sc reening Committee Denied
By FRANK COOTS

Assistant Managing Editor
President Otis A. Singletary has denied a request
which would set up a second screening committee for
the selection of a new vice president for student affairs.
The request, which would in effect permit the screening of the Morris advisory committee's recommendations
for a new vice president, was presented to President
Singletary yesterday afternoon by Steve Bright, Barbara
Ries and Ceoffery Pope on behalf of the Student Government Committee of the Whole.
Committee Holds Hearings
The committee of the whole has been holding hearings
into the selection process for a new appointee to the office. The committee is concerned about "secrecy" surcommittee headed
rounding the Singletary-appointe- d
by presidential assistant Alvin Morris and feels the committee was "stacked" to recommend a certain individual
for the job.
Although Bright termed his meeting with Singletary
"kind of discouraging" and "very unproductive," he did

add that "We have accomplished one thing: the decision
probably will not be made immediately.
"President Singletary will probably take another look
at what has been done so far. If we liaven't done anything else, the president is going to have to be more
careful now."
President Singletary was not available for comment
last night.
Bright said Singletary "categorically denied" all the
issues raised by the committee of the whole and "felt
satisfied with what the Morris committee had done."
SG Hearings Make Selection Difficult
He also said Singletary feels the SG committee's
hearings have made the selection process more difficult
since a person would not be inclined to accept the
student affairs position because of the unfavorable
publicity.
"What dismayed me was that he (Singletary) couldn't
accept the fact that we would raise the issue before the
selection is made," Bright said.

Bright said those who would be affected by the "unfavorable" publicity would not be acceptable to the committee of the whole anyway.
Tim Futrell, SG president and a member of the Morris
committee, said he "agrees" that the committee of the
whole's hearings "will raise a number of difficulties"
with regard to getting someone to accept the post.
"If the committee of the whole had any effect
(on the selection) it would be circumstantial," he
said.
Futrell refuted Bright's claim that the hearings
would tend to cause the selection of someone acceptable to the committee of the whole.
He said, "If it has any effect, it is more likely to
have a negative effect." Futrell was quick to add
that he did not actually feel this would be the case.
Bright said he did not know what the SG committee would do now. "It is up to the committee of the
whole to decide what to do. There is not much that can
be done now."

Sen. Morse Advocates

StrengtheningOf Education
By DAN EGER JR.
Kernel Staff Writer
"We could improve the public policy formulation process if
you were to establish procedures

to introduce into the mainstream

of your professional organizations
concepts and ideas for the improvement of our school systems," former senator Wayne L.
Morse of Oregon said at UK

Tuesday night.
Morse,
advocating the
strengthening of education on all
levels, spoke before a large crowd
at the Student Center Ballroom.
His lecture was the third in a
series of four sponsored by the
College of Education on educational policy.
Although "the annual ex pend- -

itures from all sources for all
levels of education is in excess
of $58 billion a year," Morse
stated, it is a capital investment
in creating wealth and improving the quality of national life.

"We are buying the future
capacity, if we will make use
of it, which will permit us to
regenerate our physical environment." Morse added that "political freedom grows out of the
seedbed of literacy."
"Our educational policy formulation process is one of high
and continuing importance," he
added. Educational policy is
largely one cast in the form of national legislation with applica-Mors- e
continued.
"The end result is not the
work of one man or woman or
ten, rather it is the vector which
results from the interplay of a

forces," he added.
in a pluralistic soof our component
tremendously valuable contributions to make to
our collective life. We need all
the good ideas we can get so
that we can clothe them with the
robes of statute and bring them
into being at an earlier date than
would other wise prevail."
- .He held that the entire process
is one of "highly rational procedure of trial andj?rror."
In conclusion, Morse urged
that "we get more people, who
have contributions to make, into
the act."
"The system is not perfect,
but the principle of correctabil-ity- ,
of feedback, can produce
sound and viable programs over
time and with much careful
thought," he concluded.
great many
"We live
ciety. Each
groups has

i

1
II

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Student Directories Available
JSJ

Student directories are available and may be picked up in the
Student Government Office, Room 204 of the Student Center,
between 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. weekdays.
The directories in the office are available for
students.
Copies will be provided to students living in the residence halls.
The new student directory was published by Student Government
and contains addresses and telephone numbers of students and a
complete listing of departmental telephone numbers.

Kernel Photo by Kay Brookshlre

Morse Supports

Education

Former Senator Wayne L. Morse
of Oregon discusses focuses on
the improvement of schools as he
addresses a large crowd at the
Student Center Ballroom Tuesday night.

V-

I

"V

-

v

"
-'-

i
i

Washington

By RICK FITCH
College Press Service
WASHINGTON (CPS) -- It's Thursday,
Nov. 13, and you've come here, to the land
of taxicabs, marble monuments and rich
hippies, to be in the Big March.
Hungry? Better have pocket money. The
New Mobilization Committee to End the
War in Vietnam isn't about to supply free
food to several hundred thousand people.
A place to stay is something else. Call or
1029
write the Mobe office
Vermont Ave. 10th floor), and the chances
are they can stick you in a nearby church
or college. Mobe's housing division already
has rented blocks of motels for those who
can afford to pay. Due to the housing shortage and the possibility of as many as 500,000
persons showing up, Mobe is asking all those
who can pay to pay.
At 6 p.m. get over to the Arlington
National Cemetery in Virginia. Mobe wants
about 40,000 people there for a "March
Against Death." You'll be given a placard
bearing the name of a U.S. serviceman
killed in Vietnam or the name of a South
Vietnamese village ravaged by the war. It
might be a good idea to bring along some
2,

i

Election Day
UK students supporting

Lexington-F-

ayette
County politicians
campaigned vigorously Tuesday
-e- lection
day. These UK Young
Republicans passed out literature
for Cene Cravens, who lost the
12th district senatorial race.

Moratorium-What- 's
blankets. They're estimating onlv 1.000 neo- ple will be able to begin the single file procession each hour. You may not leave the
cemetery until early Saturday morning.
When you do, you'll cross a bridge over
the Potomac, go past the Lincoln Memorial,
the reflecting pool to the Washington Monument, and the Executive Offices, stopping
In front of the White House to read the
Inscription on your placard into a loudspeaker.

Then it's more walking. Past theTreasury
Department, FBI, Justice Department, and
statue of Gen. Ulysess S. Crant to the steps
of the Capitol, where you'll drop the placard

Into a casket.
Big March Commences
At 11 a.m. Saturday the Big March commences. Go to the Mall In front of the Capitol (between Third and Sixth Streets). It

shouldn't be hard to find. If the attendance
predictions are to be believed, a sea of
people should stretch most of the way to
the Washington Monument. More people
than In 1967 when at least 75,000 came for
the Pentagon march. More than In 1963
when 250,000 came for the civil rights march.
All kinds should be there. Religious people

Going On?
like Quakers and members of the National
Council of Churches. Yippies. Political people like the Socialist Workers, Communist
Party, and the New Democratic Coalition.
Friendly people like the American Friends
Service Committee. And maybe radical people like SDS, the Black Panthers, and the
Revolutionary Youth Movement.
You'll march back up Pennsylvania Ave.,
not in single file, but with everyone else.
Hopefully, the parade permit granted by the
Justice Department will allow you to use
the street as well as the sidewalk. If not
the 1,500 to 2,000 trained (by Mobe) marshals will have their hands full herding
people. Shades of Oct. 15 when the peace
revolution had to wait for the walk sign.
At the 12th Street intersection, look to
your left. There sits J. Edgar Hoover's bastion. Chances are his men are
watching you.
Blue striped D.C. patrol cars and
paddy
wagons should be in abundance since the
police department has all available men on
duty. No one knows but everyone expects
that the National Guard antVor U.S. Marshall have been put on alert. And
everyone
Continued on

Ygt

8, CoL

1

* 2

-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Nov.

5, 19G9

Pretentious Extremes
Can't Ruin 'Isadora'
By BRAD CRISSOM

Kernel Staff Writer
"Isadora" is a movie I liked
in spite of myself. It's hard not
to, for there are moments of
surpassing beauty: a set shot
of a touring ear
in the Seine on a foggy Paris
morning, the camera lingering
lovingly on a Riviera party and

summarizing the experience of
the 1920s, Vanessa Redgrave
catching both tiie artistry and
naivete of Isadora as she dances
a metaphor of sexual intercourse.
But there are also rococd extremesIsadora's Soviet period,
for instance, is handled much too
pretentiously. Even these,
though, for a person who is
moved by the quiet intensity
of the film and its haunting
distance, might be explained
away. We see things from the
of Isadora herself,
and this curiously unfree "free
soul" would indeed perceive the
world in such gaudy distortions.
Director Karel Reisz shows
enough for us to guess at the
reasons why this
point-of-vie-

w

turn-of-th-

e-

Godden's Novel

Explores Abbey

College Students Welcome, meet your friends crfN

The Camelot Lounge

century interpretative dancer is
reduced at the end of her life
to an aging emancipated Auntie
Mame. She is a suffragette with
an important difference she can
dance like Aphrodite.
But her zeal for the Greek

1761

Now presenting the Soul Sentry featuring Bobby Jons
Hear the sounds of Booker T and the M.G. s
The 5th Dimension; Otis Redding and many more

way is empty; she is moved by
a freedom that does not recognize responsibility. She must
serve Art, but her worship has
no reference in meaningful human
life. Thematically this point is
carried by the death of her children, an event which haunts her
to her beautifully symbolicdeath.
Women's Liberators, learn from
thy pioneers.

"Isadora" is currently enjoying a healthy run at the Cinema,
a fact which is not particularly
the film is
understandable:
neither engage nor exploitative.
It can be constmed that way;
if you need the stimulus of Isadora baring her breasts, then go
for this reason. Movies nowas
anyway. But
days are
also gain something
you might
from seeing Vanessa Redgrave
use her body for Bach. At any
rate the strains of "Bye, Bye
Blackbird" filtered through four
decades of cultural history is not
an unpleasant way to spend a
rainy afternoon.

Gardcnsidc Shopping Center

5-- 9,

Go-G- o

Girls

Soul Sentry

9-- 2,

From modern country to the best in soul.
BRING YOUR DATE OR MEET AT THE CAMELOT!
(You must be 21 to enter)
A FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT REPORTS

Jjyilllxiy uwL EV
J

.

tug-of-w- ar

time-wh-

The Kentucky

Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
pos.ac" paici at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer

FRIDAY, NOV.

Memorial Coliseum

,

SUBSCRIPTION

HATES

Yearly, by mail
Per copy, 'rom files
KERNEL

$IM3
$.10

TELEPHONES

Editor, Managing Editor
Editorial Page Editor.
Associate Editors,. S porta
News Desk...
, ..
i.
Advertising,- - Business. Circulation

,.

i

.I

Z321
2320
2447
2319
i

- 8:15

Central Kentucky Concert and Lecture Series

On C ampy
Dmterviiews

for Computer Sales
and Systems
NOVEMBER 7
BS, BA and MBA candidates:

interview RCA, on
campus, for our Computer Sales and Systems Program.
The Program consists of ten weeks of formal training
at Cherry Hill, New Jersey that will provide you with
a broad knowledge of the field of your choice
Sales
or Systems followed by an assignment at one of
our field sales offices located throughout the United
States. You will be working.directly with the complete
Spectra 70 family of computers which are highlighted
communications and
by large-scal- e
time-sharin-

g

applications.

your placement officer to arrange an interview.
Or write to RCA College Relations, Dept. CSS,
Building 205-1- , Camden, N.J. 08101. We are an

See

equal opportunity employer.

4i.

f

7

Admission: All full time students by Activities and
All others by season membership
I.D. cards.
cards only.
No ticket for single performance.

grab-bag-

session.

Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK ost Office Dox
Hetfun as. the Cadet in ltm and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1815.
Advertising published herein is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.

E

NBC News Correspondent

X

"In This House Of Brede,,,
by Rumer Godden. Viking $6.95.
Associated Press
What goes on inside the walls
of a modern monastery? This is
the story Rumer Codden tells in
her novel about a middle-age- d
English career woman who becomes a Benedictine nun.
Real people live at Brede Abbeywomen with sharp tongues
as well as prayerful hands . . .
some who scrub floors and some
who publish poems.
The nuns' tales are many: the
dead Abbess has run the house
into debt for an altar piece by a
famous sculptor . . . after all
other inner battles are won, a
new nun (the book's heroine,
Phillipa) must confront the
daughter of the woman she
blames for her child's death
a Japanese oil tycoon descends
on the abbey with five would-b- e
nuns who speak no English and
bring their own rice and fish.
The abbey plays its own
with changing times: Must
the mass be sung in English?
Will the long skirts and wimples
give way to dress more practical
and less meaningful? Should the
bright daughter of a railway
porter be admitted to the sacrosanct choir?
Nothing is sensatonal in this
glimpse behind the grille. (The
en
word "sex" appears one
the typesetter had to split
the word "Sussex" at the end of
a line.)
All is told in the same tranquil tone the author uses for
describing the birth of a batch
of kitchen kittens.
All the more exasperating to
find, every once in a while, that
you're reading with wet eyes.

Ml

OUCM

p.m.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL. WYdnrsd.iv. Nov. f.

Applications Available At Placement Service

U. S. Public Health Service Offers Temporary Jobs

By MICHAEL WINES

omore year ami interested in
Kernel Staff Writer
health.
e
The U.S. Public Health
Thinking of lining up a summer job early? The Placement
'PHS), as part of its Commissioned Officer Student TrainService already has an interesting,
position waiting ing and Extern Program
for you if you're past your soph- is accepting qualified applicants as summer workers in
:
a
its nationwide health programs.
Those wishing to work during
WON?
the summer of 1970 must apply
no later than Dec. 1, 1969, but
1he
positions are open throughout
the year. Application blanks are
available in the Placement Ser- Ser-vic-

well-payin-

!CO-STEP-

g

RENT

1

Late Model

NOW PLAYING!
"Once Upon A Mattress"
A different and wild musical

Typewriters
and Adders

comedy
Show Times:

Tuesday through Saturday
Dinner, 7:00 p.m.; Show 8:15 p.m.

),

vice office in the Old Agricul-

pharmacy, sanitary science, therapy, and veterinary medicine are
also eligible.
PHS Employment Temporary
While the employment with'
Selections for summer 1970
the Public Health Service is only will be made during February.
temporary, it can open the door
to a lifetime career in the health
field. The jobs are considered
training grounds for students inUK's first "hard rock" conterested in health fields, and
cert, featuring the Pacific Cas
many applicants are able to con- and Electric
together with
tinue with the PHS as commissioned officers. The Public Health Motherlode, is planned for8p.m.
Nov. 22 in Memorial Coliseum.
Service is one of seven "unifThe tickets for the concert,
ormed services" of the United
and those who are able sponsored by the Student AcStates,
to secure two years active duty tivities Board, go on sale today
in it after college erase their at the Central Information Desk
in the Student Center.
military obligation.
Tickets are priced at $2 and
a summer's work in
Though
COSTEP won't lessen time in $2.50.
The Student Center Board has
the military, it may provide a
chance to travel. The PHS oper- announced that the featured act
ates health-car- e
programs and at the Coffee House this week is
conducts research throughout the the Coffee, Cream and Sugar.
ture Building.

SMITH

CORIA

Closed

on Mondays

BY RESERVATIONONLY

Standard

Typewriter Co. II
393 Waller Ave.
I1
r
Imperial Plata Shopping Center

Call: Louisville, K
or Simpsonvilld Jky.

451-49722-883-

6

United States, excludingHawaii,
asand the one to
signments may carry a student
anywhere in the country.
officers receive a housing
and travel allowance, too, and
are paid the same as a Navy
ensign or an Army second lieu-- ,
tenant from $476 to $501 a

On

VhMiU Im4 fcw
i

JVNrff

m4 U.S. 40

impsonviui, nr.

.V--

,

-

h

CO-STE-

P

month.

255-632- 6

pm-gra-

Hard Rock Concert Planned

four-mont-

Sunday
Dinner 5:00 p.m.; Show 6:15 p.m.
Dinner and Show One price

SALES & SERVIC

Assignments in thcCOSTKP
are made according to
of training and skills a
student has and thecurrcnt needs
of the Public Health Service.

COSTEP Positions Limited
Most COSTEP positions are
r
limited to second and
students in professional schools,
or students in master' or. doctoral programs in health," education, hospital administration,
psychology,
sanitary science,
public health, social work, sociology, and other sciences.
Students in dental dietetics,
engineering, medicine, nursing,
third-yea-

Anyone interested in applying
for chairman of the Publicity
Committee for the SCB may pick
up applications in Room 203 of
the SC. Interviews for the position will begin at 7 p.m. Thurs-

day.

JOB OPPORTUNITIES

FOR SALE
1963 CUTLASS

Phone

coupe,

V-- 8,

automatic.
2904N

8.

Sedan (Sunroof).
Excellent conditioners till has 6.000
miles of warranty lelt Phone
after 5 p.m.
30ON5
TYPEWRITER.
Olympbr'with foreign
characters, $40. Draperies, white,
floor length 12 It A. 8 ft, $20. Call
278-81-

310N6

3.

K ARM ANN GUI A $200 or best

1959

-

CLASSIFIED

1968 VOLKSWAGEN

To be eligible, a student must
have two years of a baccalaureate
field
program in a health-relate- d
at the time of his assignment.
Students already enrolled in a
professional school are eligible at
the beginning of their freshman
year. They should expect to return
to school after each COSTEP
assignment, and they must not
be obligated to another branch
of the military service.

The group will perform two
sliows nightly through Thursday
at 7:30 and 9 p.m. Friday through
Saturday there will be shows
at 8 p.m., 9 p.m. and 10 p.m.
The Coffee House is in Room
245 of the SC. Admission is $.25
for each person.

offer. Must sell quick. Call Carlos
1.

MALE

OR FEMALE help wanted
Weekdays from 11:30 a.m.-l:3- 0
p.m.
Starting salary, $2.00 per hour.
2321 Versailles
McDonald's Drive-IRd.
23Stf
n,

NIGHT MANAGER wafted week-dafrom 4
p.m. Phone
for appointment
4N10
NEED YOUNG MEN 21 or over for
afternoon and evening shifts Saturday and Sunday. Meals and uniforms
furnished. Apply to Lotts Sandwich
Shoppe, 1951 N. Broadway at
269-99-

6N7

31QN4

DRUMS

1

Drum Set.
complete
black pearl finish. Rogers
Including stands
and traps. Also 2silver Ludwig
.tanrT 1 1 in. Avedis
V?T?
116 in. Zildjian symbol; 2 20 in. ZUQjian symbols; worth
U teke $625- - Cal1
SJ?r&1,000- 4n8
hi-h-

1964

CARVAIR

500

economical transportation. Call
or write Box 668, Centre College, Danville.
5N7
269-20-

WANTED
NEEDED

Talent for th Fingletoad
Resort Coffee House at Transylvania.
Folk and Jazz: lnstfeimentalists. singers, readings. CallNIeff Thomraon.

3N7

1.

ROOMMATE

ment
Call

with

255-30-

wanted to share apart-derr- t,
male atu
age 23.
4N10
after 4p.m.

SERVICES
PIANO SERVICE Reasonable prices.

All work guafjutteed. Trained by
Steinway 6c Sons in New York. Mr.
9
Davles,
y
VIVIAN WOODARDfconsultant)
Ext. 3267 or Georgetown,
nights. Order (your Christmas gifts
30O5N
S
early.
24S-N1-

9.

863-08-

Graduateudents

ATTENTION

Did

you know that Quiex Copy Service,
located at'Walevs Book Store will
give you the fastest service available
on your thesis and dissertations? 4N10
TOR RENT
for rent fortwo
utilities paid. Ten minuses walk girls;
from
campus. Call 255r548'after 5 p.m.

APARTMENT

lr

FURNISHED

310N6

APARTMENT

available
Immediately, for one or 2. Next to
St. Joseph's Hospital. $150 per month.
Inquire
regarding aptr 4.
278-23-

4N10

FOR

Anniversary Special

Faculty member going
on sabbatical leave wishes to lease
home to University family. Available
15. Stonewall. Furnished,
Dec.
4 bedrooms, 2 baths, family room,
attached garage. $200 per month;
5N11
deposit. Ext. 2708 or
RENT

ar

2.

bedNEW unfurnished.
room apartments, 5 minutes drive
all utilities paid;
from UK.
pool, laundry, sound conditioning,
central air, master TV, draperies,
ll
carpeting, storage and
more. Call
5N11
5 p.m.
after

BRAND

$130-$16-

1

1
S3

ROYAL

Week Only

wall-to-wa-

266-44-

1,

4,

-

REWARD
REWARD for return of woman's cluster ring, lost in Clasaroom Bldg.,

Tuesday, Oct 28.Plprte return. Symbolic wedding jMlhd. Call
310N6
after 4 p.m.
d
LOST Small brown
stuvocabulary listof-foreident Name on JtoyerrMartine Guig-nie- r.
Reward offered. Call
266-41-

.

note-boo- k;

wire-boun-

gn

4N10

LOST
My brown looseleaf notebook,

LOST

Body Shirts
'IN' Look of

The

Today!

last seen between StollField and
Fine Arts Bldg. It foujKfplease call
after 11 p.m. NeedWas soon as pos4N10
sible for a course. Call
LOST Male collie puppy. Tan with
white paws, white tipped tall, and
blaze. Call Billy Forbes, ext. 88011.
N5

LOST

&

'

liN

For the 'IN9 man who is always on
top of the latest in styles.
Hundreds of colors and styles to
choose from. . . . from $5.98
it's new, Kents has it!

rr

71

Diamond

if-

ward. Call

-

S. UPPER

DOWNTOWN

Open Monday till 9 p.m.

P

brown-rlmme-

Re-

d.

5N6

84461.

MISCELLANEOUS

Daniel BoonRldlng Stable,
Highway 227, IMi wiles from Boones-bor- o
Park toward Winchester. Trail
rides and moeVuight rides on Friday
and Saturday nights. Phone

HORSES

5.

3N23

IT HAS BEEN DONE!
DW, 6M.

A Very Special Selling

of

Cno Dunfti ")irrnrV Dirt rrr
120

Glasses;

MM
Tine

1

iHt

jewelers

Mate (terse Ire

JNwerft)

RF. PD.

5N6

ROAD
0

RUNNER
ofFine
CHICIKX& PIZZA
Delivery

890

E.

269-234- 2

High

;

* The Kentucky

Iernel

Univfjisity of Kentucky

ESTABLISHED

1894

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5,

1969

Editorials represent the opinion of the Editors, not of the University.
James W. Miller,

Editor-in-Chi-

Freedom And The Draft
Former Attorney Ccncral Ram-'sc- y
Clark lias once again pointed
out a major flaw in that jcreat American institution, the Selective Service. Testifying before a Senate
panel, Mr. Clark warned against
using the draft to punish antiwar
protestors.
Clark's comments come at a time
when the Director of the Selective
Service, as well as a great number
of the local draft boards, have

with prison if they participate in
causes alien to the ideas of those

in power.'
America has become so paranoid
in regard to promoting the national
cause that the most trivial of actions can cause one to loose his
liberty. The mere act of not carrying a draft card can greatly harm
a young man. If he carries a placard
of protest, his local board can
review his draft status and send
threatened antiwar demonstrators him to kill for a cause he finds
with a withdrawal of deferments. repugnant.
In pleading for Congress to reThis obviously violates the right
of free and open dissent, and trans- peal delinquency rules, Clark noted
forms the draft into an instrument that these rules are often used unof punishment.
constitutionally to limit legal proIt is a sad comment on the qual- test and stifle freedom of speech.
ity of American political leaders Clark suggested fines be substituted
if they refuse to accept adverse as a means for dealing with those
comment on the official policies who proved uncooperative. These
of their government. Most people fines would replace the practice
are sensitive to criticism, but this of speeding up induction of those
sensitivity is usually transfered into who participated in antiwar prochannels which will eliminate the tests. "We pay a high enough price
cause for the criticism, not into for any war," Clark said. "Why
channels to remove the critic.
should we pay an even higher price
Those Americans who are first by blighting, perhaps permanently,
to deny a person his liberty if he promising young lives?" c
Ramsey stressed the importance
strongly opposes the actions of his
government are precisely those who of the draft's not interfering any
of Amer- more than is necessary with the
warn against the take-ovica by another ideology which will daily lives of those it affected.
threaten its population with con- Only on the day set for induction
centration camps and overt use of should the individual have to pay
penal institutions. How can the.se for his beliefs. If at that time he
people be made to realize that this refuses to be inducted, he will
is exactly the course they are pro- have to pay the penalty, but not
moting, differing only in that it before.
is not a foreign ideology? The
This is an unacceptable attitude,
United States has provisions for but it is certainly an improvement
concentration camps, as well as over the present system of denying
.provisions for punishing dissenters the freedom of a free person.
er

Baitability

Parties in a judicial process
should be unbaitable.
This principle is being borne out
in the Chicago eight trial. The defendants charged with conspiracy
to incite a riot during last year's
Democratic National Convention,
have sought to turn the proceedings
into a circus. Judge Julius J. Hoffman has been baited with taunts
and insults by the defendants and
their counsel. He had Bobby G.
Seale bound and gagged, then subdued by federal marshals when
Seale broke free. "Medieval!"
shouted the defense. The prosecution argued back, and the judge
rejoined that he shouldn't have to
"sit here and listen while a defendant calls him a pig."
The defense is of course trying
to destroy the trial itself, rather
than simply argue their own case.
This won't win their cause any
support. Their provocations are
hurting them in the public's eye.
Nonetheless, by letting such irritations get to him, Judge Hoffman
has let himself be drawn into the
emotional wrangle. And this isn't
helping the image of objective justice.

,

.

The defense's attempt tousethe
press is easy to see too. The defendants' antics are not mere
looneyness, but knowing performances meant for. the nation's eyes.
,

,

There is no evidence the press cov-- ,
ering the Chicago trial has been
injudicious. It seems to haverecov-ere- d
from its own emotional partisanship in Chicago affairs since
the convention disruptions when
some of its members were bloodied.
The press is itself a crucial element
in the American judicial process.
It should be represented in the
courtroom. But it must be careful
too not to be emotionally polarized by the trial's circusness or
"used" by the courtroom antagonists.
In Massachusetts, the State Supreme Court recognized some of
the shortfalls of the Chicago eight
trial. By chosing to the press the inquest into Miss Kopechne's death
they were ensuring decorum. An
inquest, of course, isn't a trial.
The findings on whether Sen. Edward Kennedy or anyone else
should be tried for some misstep will
be made known either when the
transcript is eventually published
or in the course of an actual trial.
The Chicago eight legal affair
must be concluded, whatever the
wishes of the defendants. Sorry a
spectacle as it is, it holds a lesson
for press and presider and public
alike that one must be impassive
and unexcitable, as well as wise,

to be just.
Christian Science Monitor
.
.
.

"So you don't like the actions of the nation that gives
you your rights and freedoms huh?"

Kernel Soapbox
By CHARLES V. BEALL
Many people, including myself, have
for some time been perplexed by the
prevelance of a society of meek, milktoast
eaters with "cat got my tongue," ambitions, occasionally led by a CAD (Character Assassinating Dud) shouting:
"Ho, Ho, Ho, and abottle of rum,
Build a batch of bombs, bullets
and guns.
Send all the Santa Clauses off to

War,
.
While we keep all the women and
have all the fun.
From my two and a half semesters
of campus observation, I believe that
students who indicate they have observed
a little bit of editorial bovine feces flying
through the air (e.g. via Chicago) must
have an E. S. P. (Extra Sensory Perspective) and if this ability causes a want to
"restructure" our society, who am I to
say they are SCUM (that is, tainted by
Marx) when the present structure appears
to be made of wood and tainted with
termites.
But we all know that Santa Claus
is a figment of the child's imagination,
even though adult born and nourished;

so perhaps the bullets and bombs will not
be effective.
In this fair land of the free press we
are afflicted by (Brainwashed Radical
Activist Teachers and Students) BRATS,
who I am told wish to destroy the present
system, but as any sixth grader knows;
a post eaten with termites is light as a
feather and just as sturdy, therefore not
in need of destruction, but in dire need
of replacement. Poor BRATS, same ld
story; too little, toe late.
A small group of humanity known as
SHEEP and SMUT (Students Hurrying
to Emulate Everything Popular) and (Students
Today) are accused
of being an Army, directed by the SCUM
and the BRATS. It is hard for me to
fathom the reasonableness of the perpetrator of this statement; although I do
see an excellent allegory on the present
establishment.
Now we come to the chief of totalitarianism POP or Father, but it seems
a new designation has been devised:
Professor Organizing Protestors and they
do not force, but permit, the classes
of students listed as SCUM, BRATS,
SHEEP, and SMUT, to function and
grow! Now I consult you. "How does
this go against your grain or does it
stick in your craw?" "Professors teaching
scum and smut to sheep and brats."
"Oh, Well, it's a free press and I musn't
violate his constitutional rights."
However, when next you read an article in the Kentucky Soapbox, delete
the word soap and insert SWINE (Students Wildly Indignant about Nearly
Everything), as the connotation of the
acronym is slightly more fitting.
Perhaps others than students should be
wildly indignant about: 5.5 million children under age G, and 9 million under
17 in U. S. families which are too poor
to feed and house the children adequately.
Fifty percent of the hospital beds are occupied by the mentally ill. The cream of
the crop are used for cannon fodder, the
fodder of the crop are exempt from war
and used for breeding, to improve the race.
? .Y.
V.VYe-Cand more AD:S.;V
i

.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Nor. 5, l9-- 5

Strip Mining 'The Stream Villain

By JOSEPH CACLIARDI
Kernel Staff Writer
The life and death of an East-

ern Kentucky stream was presented visually at an Environmental Awareness Seminar Monday night by Dr. Roger Barbour,
professor of zoology.
The villain of the p