xt779c6s070j https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt779c6s070j/data/mets.xml   Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station. 1970 journals 193 English Lexington : Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station Progress report (Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station) n.193 text Progress report (Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station) n.193 1970 2014 true xt779c6s070j section xt779c6s070j , k` t   ” ) K
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19

 Table 6. Summary ef Sgring Oat Varietiesl
1-Year 2—Year 3—Year @-Year
Average Average Average Average
Variety 1970 1969-70 1968-70 1967-70 é
Yield, Bushels Per Acre ·
Andrew 23.5 30.2 @7.@ @6.5
Brave 20.7 2@.8 @5.9 @9.0
Clintferd 27.7 3@.6 @8.2 @6.5
Diana 38.1 38.8 -— —-
Grundy 2@.0 30.9 -- —-
Jaycee 26.3 30.3 @5.1 @8.7
M0. 0-205 26.3 22.1 38.2 36.2
Multline E 70 23.6 29.9 -— —- ·
Nedaway 70 30.9 -— -- —-
Pettis 25.7 27.3 39.6 @0.7
Average 26.7 29.9 @@.1 @@.6
Ledged at Maturity, Percent
Andrew @8.8 73.1 73.8 79.1 *
Brave 56.3 78.1 72.9 79.1
Glintferd 22.5 57.5 @6.7 55.6
Diana 5.0 30.6 -- —-
Grundy 55.0 70.0 -- --
Jaycee @2.5 71.3 75.0 81.3
M0. 0-205 52.5 76.3 79.2 83.8
Multline E 70 12.5 @@.@ -- -—
Nedaway 70 23.8 —— -- --
Pettis 66.3 83.1 83.8 87.8
Average 38.5 6@.9 71.9 77.8
Height; Inches ·
Andrew 29.8 35.9 36.8 38.@
Brave 29.3 3@.3 35.8 38.1
C1intE0rd 27.8 31.3 32.6 3@.1
Diana 26.8 32.1 -— -—
Grundy 27.5 31.8 -- --
Jaycee 26.3 32.0 33.2 3@.@
N0. 0-205 31.5 35.3 37.@ 39.8
Nultline E 70 26.5 32.6 -— -—
Nedaway 70 31.8 -- -- --
Pettis 31.8 30.1 37.3 38.8
Average 28.9 33.5 35.5 37.3
20

 i Tab1e 6. (continued)
 
. Variety 1970 1969-70 1968-70 1967-70
a
Date Headed! N0. Days After March 31
' Andrew 63.5 60.4 62.6 61.0
Brave 63.8 60.9 63.6 60.4
C1intford 63.5 60.8 63.5 62.2
Diana 64.5 61.1 -- --
Grundy 62.3 59.8 -- --
Jaycee 63.5 60.4 62.8 60.8
M0. 0-205 63.5 60.5 63.4 62.6
Mu1t1ine E 70 60.5 58.6 -- —-
Nodaway 70 63.0 -- -- ——
Pettis 63.0 59.6 62.1 60.2
Average 63.1 60.2 V 63.0 61.2
Test Weight; Pounds Per Bushel
Andrew 24.3 24.6 26.1 26.1
Brave 21.6 22.4 24.6 25.3
Clintford 25.0 25.5 27.3 27.5
Diana 26.4 26.5 -— --
Grundy 22.8 23.7 -- -—
Jaycee 20.4 21.2 23.5 24.1
Mo. 0-205 22.6 23.8 25.6 25.7
Multline E 70 26.1 26.2 —- ——
Nodaway 70 25.6 -— -- --
Pettis 24.2 25.4 27.4 28.0
. Average 23.9 24.4 25.8 26.1
 
1 Grown at Princeton in 1967, 1969 and 1970.
Grown at Lexington in 1968.
21

 OAT PRODUCTION IN KENTUCKY
Importance _
Oat acreage in Kentucky has steadily decreased for the V
past 20 years, but yield per acre hass steadily increased.
Harvested acreage in 1950 was 56,000 acres, with an average ‘
yield of 24.0 bushels per acre. By 1969 harvested acreage de-
creased to 18,000 acres but average yield increased t0 48 bushels
per acre. In 1969 nearly two—thirds of the oat acreage was seed-
ed to winter varieties and one-third to spring varieties.
Winter and spring oat varz`etz`es should not be
interclzanged. Spring oats are unsatisfactory when fall planted y
because of winterkilling. Winter oats planted in the spring do ‘
not head normally and produce a low yield of grain with poor
grain quality.
1950-70 K6-.10Ck, om Acreage mi mms
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so l .1. Acres l 100 I
.45 j 90
AO K { BO
35     7O ig
i 30{ {60 E
¤¤ 354   50 E
20     40 2
isi P :10
10i   20
0   l 10 `
ol--- 1 - -- 1 -   -—-J
Seedbed Preparation
A good seedbed should be prepared for oats. Plowing is
the best but if this is not done the ground should be disked
enough to form a good lirm seedbed. This will probably require
two or three deep diskings.
22

 Fertilizer and Lime
T Optimum pH range for growth of oats is 6.0-6.5, and
` lime applications should be made as necessary to maintain that
range. A soil test is the most accurate way to determine lime
needs, and with the soil test results the following can be used as
l a guide for lime requirements:
S0iZ QH Lime Needed, T0ns{A
Below 5.3 3-4
6.1-6.7 2-3 _
Above 6.7 None
A soil test is the most reliable guide for phosphorus and
potassium fertilizer applications. The following can be used as a
guide:
P/wsj)/iorus Soil Test P/zosp/torus (PAQO5) Needed, Lb/A
A Low 80-120
Medium 40-80
High None
Potassium Soil Test Potassium ( K 2O) Needed, Lb/A
Low 40-80
A Medium 0-40
High None
The amount of nitrogen to apply for oats will depend
upon the proceeding crop. Thirty to sixty pounds per acre of
nitrogen should be applied if oats are preceded by corn. The
nitrogen should be applied in a split application for winter oats,
with one-half applied in the fall and the remainder in the spring.
23

 Method of Planting
To insure rapid germination and good growth oats I
should be drilled instead of broadcast. Drilling will insure good
seed coverage and place the seed in contact with available
moisture for rapid germination.
Planting Rate
Winter oats should be planted at the rate of 2 bushels
per acre. lf planting is delayed, the seeding rate should be
increased up to 4 bushels per acre. Spring oats should be plant-
ed at the rate of 2 bushels per acre.
Planting Date
Winter oats should be planted in the last week of ·i
September in northern Kentucky and the first week of October
in southern and western Kentucky. Winter oats are not as
winter hardy as wheat or barley, and winter killing is therefore
more often a problem. It is important to have oat plants well
established before cold weather arrives. Spring oats should be ‘
planted as soon as possible after the middle of March.
Disease, Insect and Weed Control
Wild garlic may be a problem in oat fields. This weed
can be controlled by spraying with 2,4-D in March or early
April. Oats are the least tolerant of any of the small grains to
2,4-1), and spraying may also cause damage to legumes seeded in
the oats. The rate of 2,4-D per acre should be one—half to one
pint of 4 lb/gal of the amine or ester formulation. This rate will
also control dock and plantain.
Two diseases which may be a problem in oat fields are
smuts and the rusts. The best control of disease can be achieved
by planting certified seed of disease resistant varieties.
Armyworms and grasshoppers are the two insects most
likely to be a problem and both of these can be controlled with
the use of Sevin. This material should be applied at the rate of 2
pounds of the 50% wettable powder per acre.
24 2M—7-71