xt77d7957w92 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt77d7957w92/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19331219  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, December 19, 1933 text The Kentucky Kernel, December 19, 1933 1933 2013 true xt77d7957w92 section xt77d7957w92 Best Copy Available

THE KENTUCKY

TUESDAY EDITION
SEMI-WEEKL-

KERNEL

Y

iC- l-

UNIVERSITY

OF

MILITARY FRATS

U. K.

PERSHING RIFLES UNIT
TAKES IN 52 NEW MEN

LETTERS, NUMERALS
AWARDED BY BOLES

First of Three Cadet Hops

Plans for New Deal in Football Announced by
Funkhouser

Athletic Association
Sponsors Dinner for
Gridmen

Attended by
Large Crowd

8even men were pledged to ScabBlade, national military

Members of the varsity and freshman football squnds were entertained by the University Athletic
association at their banquet Friday
night at the Phoenix hotel. In the

Saturday afternoon at

Hop which was held In
room of the Lafayette

i
hotel.
Company "C," Pershing Rifles,
also conducted Its formal pledging
and named 52 cadets as prospective
members.
The dance, which was the first of
a series of three Cadet Hops, was
attended by more than 200 guests.
Chaperones were Major and Mrs.
B. E. Brewer, Capt. and Mrs. Clyde
Grady, Dean Sarah Blanding, and
Dean T. T. Jones. Music was furnished by the Blue and White or-

chestra.

Those named in the Scabbard and
Blade ceremony, which was presided over by Luclen Congleton, president of the fraternity, are: Bert W.
McDowell, Nlcholasvllle; Ernest L.
Janes, Bardstown; Harry Traynor,
Lexington; Fred C. Dye, Newport;
O. C. Thompson, Lexington; Jack
R. Watt, Louisville; Paul Cullen,
Maysville.
Charles W. Kaufman presided
over the Pershing Rifle exercises
and announced the following
pledges: Dodge L. Whipple, Paris;
William A. Denniston, Lexington;
John J. Kelch, Jr., Baldwin, New
York; R. Lawrence Rash, Lexington; John H. Bell, Jr Paris; David
L. Flanders, Battle Creek, Michigan;
Richard H. Butler, Lexington; Robert H. Moore, Nlcholasvllle; Aaron
S. Proctor,
Owen ton; Ralph E.
Gretzinger, FrankJJort; Thomas
Riley, Lexington;- Leban P. Jackson,
Eminence; Clarence W. Franz, Ashland; Balfour Connell, Lexington;
Delwyn C. Schafer, Jenkins; Ralph
T. Huffman, Harlan; Ike M. Moore,
Lexington; Ernest W. Walker, Dunham; Joseph L. Boston, Lexington;
William F. Watt, Lexington; Robert
H. Grace, St. Augustine, Florida;
Jack C. Nickerson, Paris; Fred E.
Fugazzl, Lexington;
Charles F.
Tate, Hindman; Harold Bush, Lexington; Edwin B. Jeffress, Tampa,
Florida; Sidney M. Kelly, Lexington; Fred A. deWllde, Baldwin, New
York; Merl M. Vice, Means; Basil
J. Gilbert, Lexington; Bruce H.
Phillips, Montlcello; Samuel G. McT.
Lexington;
William
Donald,
Bryan, Lexington; Gamble C. Dick,
Versailles; Charles A. Bennett, New
Albany. Indiana; John P. Bell,
Walter RiddeU, Lexington; James M. Norvell, Danville;
Gervtn C. Wheeler, Lexington; Tom
B. Nichols, Lexington; John F.
Versailles; Edgar M. Deals,
Louisville; James E. Chester, Russell; Leonard V. Van Arsdale, Baldwin, New York; Robert L. Stivers,
Lexington; Harry Bullock, Lexington; Leonard R. Tanner, St. Louis,
Missouri; Edwin W. Boland, Ft.
Thomas; David B. Goodwin, Louisville; James B. Floyd, Lexington;
Jack A. Carvill, Dixon; Robert S.
Denny, Lexington.

keynote speech, Dr. W. D. Funkhouser, chairman of the Athletic
council, stated that a hew deal in
football was being Inaugurated for
the Wildcat teams with the acquisition of Chet Wynne as the new
head coach for the Big Blue grid
teams.
James Parks, former Cat captain
and also coach at the University a
decade atio, presided as toastmaster
and complimented the team as doing the best it could under the circumstances.
In his talk Doctor
Funkhouser stated that no team can
win unless It has the support of
everyone. The various speakers expressed hope that Gamage would
have a success as a coach in his
new situation.
Coach Gamage was unable to be
at the banquet as he was out of
town, but sent a telegram in which
he stated his regret at not being
v
"'iiiiM'iiiiiii
2X&tr--i
present. He also said that he had
enjoyed the seven years of coaching
here and wished all the success in
the world to the teams in the future. Prof. Enoch Grehan, head of
the Department of Journalism and
Lafayette Studio
a member of the Athletic council
for many years, made a short talk
and suggested the formation of
boosters club of Lexington business
men. In order to Increase interest
Lexington Liadu.
'V
in the Wildcat teams. Prof. M. E.
Ligon also made a short talk.
BETTY SEWELL
S. A. "Daddy" Boles, athletic diBetty SeweU, Middles boro, sophomore In the CoUege of Commerce rector awarded letters to the varand a member of Alpha Gamma Delta, sorority, was elected hand spon- sity players and Coach Birkett L.
sor of the University band for the coming year at an election held by Pribble denoted the frosh who
Coach
the band members recently. She was elected from among eleven can- would receive numerals.
Shively
presented
seniors
didate representing all the sororities and the independent women on the who are then be awarded the footgold
to
campus.
balls. As the trophies have not yet
arrived he called en each fourth
year man for a short talk.

;sy

tl

.

OM,

WILL HOLD Ph,?et?

INITIATION TODAY

!

Bi-Ann-

ual

'"'f8

.

Service

Annual Ceremony Will Be Phi Beta, national women's professional music
Conducted at 5:15 p. m. in ternity, held its and dramatic frainitiaMemorial Hall for Seven tion services at 2 p. m. Saturday in
Men

Shepherd church. Six
pledges were initiated.
The new members of the organFormal initiation of pledges to
Omicron Delta Kappa will be held ization are Marjorie Powell, Mrs. H.
C. Robinson,
Eva May Nunnelly,
at 6:15 p. m. today in Memorial Frances Kerr, Mrs. Josephine Prochall and will be followed by a ban- tor, and Anne Goodykoontz.
quet at the University Commons.
Following the initiation the active
Pledges to Nu circle are Wesley members entertained with a banE. Carter, Ralph Kercheval, George quet at Tea Cup inn.
Officers of Phi Beta are: ElizaVogel,
Bruce Morford, Cameron
Coffman, Douglas Parrlsh, and Wil- beth Hardin, president; Lois Robth
inson,
Jean
liam Conley.
secretary; Dorothy Lykins,
Mr. Robert W. Bishop, University
of Cincinnati, deputy of the West- treasurer, and Elizabeth Montague,
ern province of Omicron Delta Kap- historian.
pa, will be the principal speaker at
the banquet.
WILL GIVE
Dean Merton L. Ferson, faculty
advisor, Robert Johnson- - William
Koolage, and Mortimer Powell, of CAROL
the Alpha Theta circle at the University of Cincinnati, and officers of
Zeta circle at Centre college, Dan- University Studios to Present
the Good

Kampus
Kernels
Penalties for absences from class
before and after the Christmas holidays will be enforced for students
who miss classes on Thursday
mornlnr. December 11, and for
those who fail to report for classes
any hour Wednesday, January J.
The holiday officially extends
from noon, Thursday, December 21,
until I a. m., Wednesday, January S.
The penalty for a cut before or
after a holiday Is the addition of
three credit hours to the requirements for graduation.

University Choristers Give
Colorful Program at
Vespers

By HARRISON ELLIOTT
An audience which filled Memor-

ial auditorium to capacity heard the

University of Kentucky Choristers
in one of the brightest programs of
the current Vespers season Sunday
afternoon. The choristers included
32 voices selected from the men's
and women's Glee clubs of the University.
Miss Mildred Lewis, of the University music department, directed
the group. Mr. R. D. Mclntyre
opened the program with an expression of appreciation of the fine work
of all those who helped In any way
to make the program possible.
Attired in gay and colorful cosville, will be guests of honor.
tumes suggestive of Yuletlde in
Special Christmas
the
Officers oi Nu circle, which has
December 25; Weekly Fea- "merrie old England" arm, jolly
onto
choristers came, arm in
been on the campus since 192S, are:
tures Will Continue
the stage which was appropriately
Gordon Burns, president; Horace
palms, holy, laurel
decorated with
Helm,
James ShropA special radiocast of Christmas leaves, and flickering
shire, secretary-treasure- r;
Smith D.
day, mounted on candelabra. candles
secretary-treasure- r. music will be made, Christmas
The singBroadbent, assistant
over the WHAS extension studios ers grouped themselves
over the
University campus. Regular stage, some sitting, some standing,
on the
Other active members are: Hugh programs which are presented
sang three cheery carols, "Here
Adcock, George Skinner, Eugene weekly over
University studios and Come
"Deck
We
Royse, Tom Cassady, Walter Steit-le- r, will continue the
through the Christ- the Hall," and "The Wassail Song."
O. B. Murphy, Hamilton Greenmas holidays.
After singing these throe numup, James Bishop, Frank Adams,
From 12:45 until 1 p. m., ChristLuclen Congleton, J. H. Mills, Prof. mas day, Elizabeth Hardin will pre- bers the choristers tripped gaily off
the stage, and Miss Elizabeth HarR. D. Mclntyre, Major B. E. Brewer,
sent an organ recital of Christmas din, organ accompanist to the
and Prof. Roy Moreland.
music. The Lexington Jubilee sing- group, played Cowan's "Christmas
ers, under the direction of Edward
(Continued on Page Four)
M. Chenault, will be on the air
from 1 until 1:30 and will sing
Christmas spirituals.
The University of Kentucky verAlpha Zeta Condftcts Formal sus the' University of Louisville radio debate will be conducted from
Ceremony for Four
Prof. Paul H. Clyde, Instructor In
29.
1 until
2 p. m., December
who
history at the University
Junior Men
Speakers representing the two Unidoing
on
versities will broadcast from their has been work in the Orient, has
Alpha Zeta, honorary agriculture respective studios
WHAS. Ac- research recently
magazine
published
fraternity, held formal initiation cording to tentative of
plans there will ticle of distinction a In his line arof
ceremonies for four juniors last be three speakers representing both
Tuesday night In the Alpha Zeta campuses. W. R. Sutherland, as- work. The article, appearing in the
room of the Dairy building. The
professor of English, is October Issue of the magazine "Contemporary Japan," discusses the renew Initiates are Woodrow Coots, sistantof
couch
the University of Kentucky lation of the United States and
Russellville; James Clark, Millers-burteam.
Japan. Another article by Professor
Harold Jones, Lexington; and
Clyde will appear In a
Hansford Shacklette, Waverly.
Membership in Alpha Zeta is basissue of the "Journal of Intered upon scholarship, leadership in
national Law."
agriculture, and character. A canProfessor Clyde left last July for
to study
a year's
didate must have completed three
semesters in the College of AgriDean Thomas P. Cooper and the Manchuilan situation In parculture and must be In the upper Dean Levi J. Horlacher, both of the ticular and to write a new book.
College of Agriculture, will attend Before his present stay. Professor
of his class.
Members of the faculty and Ex- a banquet which is being held at Clyde made a study of the quarrels
periment station staff who attended 8:30 p. m. today at the Brown hotel over Manchurian
territory and
the initiation were: Dr. E. N. Fer- in Louisville, in commemoration of wrote a book entitled "International
gus, J. F. Freeman, R. B. Hunt. the installation of the Bank for Rivalries in Manchuria from 1U9
C. A. Mahan. Prof. P. E. Karraker, Cooperatives and the Production to 1922." He now is gathering maand Prof. George Roberts.
Credit corporation for the Louis- terial and may edit a second volume
Officers of the local chapter are ville Federal Loan bank district. in order to bring the subject up to
Horace Nicholson,
This district includes the states of date. While studying the Japanese
James Downing, censor; Richard Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, and Ten- situation Professor Clyde is tuning
Allison, chronicler: Robert Scott, nessee. Dean Cooper la one of the advantage of documents now in the
treasurer; and Duard Bay less, national directors of the Bank for Government and Diplomatic library
Cooperatives.
scribe.
at Tokyo.
Pox-wor-

The regular meeting of the Men's
Student council will not be held
Wednesday, but will be deferred
until after the Christmas holidays.
Regular meeting of the Kentucky chapter of Delta Kappa Alpha
wiU be held today at 7 p. m. at the
Masonic temple.
A meeting of the Dairy club will
be held at 7:48 p. m. today in the
Alpha Zeta room at the Dairy
building.
Cwens, honorary sophomore sorority, will hold a meeting at 3 p. m.
today In the Reading room of Boyd
hall.
will be
m. every

vacation
day, and

There will be a. smoker for the
freshman class of the Law college
tonight at 7:30 in the club room
of the Law school.
club will hold Its regu-

The Hort
lar monthly meeting at 7:30 p. m.
today In the Dairy building.

PROGRAM
Music

Agriculture Frat
Holds Initiation

Professor Clyde

Works in Orient

g;

Horlacher, Cooper

To Attend Banquet

two-fift-

chancellor:

!

forth-comi-

KENTUCKY WINS
FROM CINCINNATI

CHRISTMAS AND VACATION
(AN EDITORIAL

The Christmas holidays begin at noon, Thursday, December 21.
It Is the day to which we have looked forward for so many long
weeks. At that time we will be released for almost two weeks of
glamorous vacation. The most Important thing is how are we going to spend these days of freedom?
Most of us will go home, or at least will go away from Lexington. No matter where we go, let us not forget to act as though
our stay at the University has meant something more than a mere
matter of days spent away from home. Show by your actions that
the University is worth something to you; create In your home
town a respect for the Institution that you are attending.
It would, indeed, be unwise for us and unfair for our school
should we go back home or into a strange town and forget that
we are looked upon as representatives of the University of Kentucky. By its students is any institution Judged.
While we are on the topic of Christmas and holidays, let us
not forget that there Is a deeper reason for all this than Just a
vacation of pleasure. Some 2,000 years ago a little babe was born
In a manger; shepherds watching in the fields saw and marveled
at the star of Bethlehem moving. They followed it and came unto
the stable in which the Christ Child was born. Travelers came
from afar, bringing precious gifts to the babe in swaddling clothes.
Without this birth, Christmas would never have been.
Had It not been for the works of this Man, in what condition
would we all be today? He brought light into the world and left
it here after He had to leave his earthly home. We have our personal rights and freedom given to us from a government which is
founded upon this Bible text.
Merry Christmas to you all and a Happy New, Year!

Final Count Made
M'VEY SPEAKS
In Finance Drive
IN CONVOCATION
Y. M. Treasurer Announces
Pledging of $220 by
dents, Faculty

Stu-

Annual
Holiday "Between Us" Talk
Is Heard by
as

Final count in the student finance
drive of the Y. M. C. A. showed that
approximately $220 was pledged In
the two weeks period, according to
Joe Relster, treasurer. The donations' will be paid January 1 or
March 1.
The annual Christmas party for
members of first and second grades
of Lincoln school was held yesterday afternoon at the school. The
program, which included a Christmas tree, Santa Claus, and gifts for
the children, was sponsored by the
Y. M. C. A., Pitkin club, and the
Y. W. C. A.
Discussion groups in 22 fraternities and dormitories close this week
and will be concluded formally with
a banquet to be held In January at
which the groups having the best
attendance during the six weeks of
discussions will be the guests. A
prominent leader on the campus or
in Lexington will be selected as
speaker.

Students
GLEE CLUBS ENTERTAIN
"What Kentucky's

needs

is more

Frank

L. McVey

football team
brains," said Dr.

in his annual "Between Us" talk at a general convocation at 10 p. m. yesterday morning in Memorial hall.
"A team will never win as long
as the players want a place on the
team for support while in school.
Football should be taken up as a
side line and not as the main part
of a coEege career," Doctor MeVey
continued.

That the students should endeavor to know something about the
institution which they attend was
brought out in the address. Doctor
McVey asked the students to be acquainted with facts before criticizing a situation.
President McVey also gave his
Christmas greetings to the students
and faculty and suggested to them
I-M
to try to make those about them
happy.
The invocation and benediction
were given by Rev. George Heaton,
pastor of Felix Memorial church.
A musical program was given by
Eight Matches Each in Boxselected members of the Men's and
ing and Wrestling Provide Women's Glee clubs. "We Three
Interesting Kings," was sung by the men's
Lengthy
group with Morton Potter, Thomas
Program for Fans
Scott, and Richard Allison as soloUniversity champions in boxing ists. "Under the Stars," was sung
and wrestling were decided last by members of the Women's group.
night in the Alumni gymnasium at Virginia Murrell, soprano, 'sang "A
8 o'clock. Sixteen bouts were feaStar Appeareth."
tured on the dual card.
The auditorium was darkened and
The wrestling events were won light was furnished by candles on
by: J. Holbrook, 115 pounds;
the stage.
125 pounds;
Cobb, 135
145 pounds; Tiern-epounds; Weddle,
155 pounds; Hay, 165 pounds;
Swope, 175 pounds;
and John
Drury, heavyweight.
Holbrook defeated Banks by a court in the first National Social Service Frafew seconds of the round.
ternity Has Anniversary
and Tierney defeated WedBanquet
ding and Zimmer by time advantage respectively.
Weddle, Hay,
Swope, and Drury won from Baker,
Alpha Zeta chapter of Alpha Phi
Gaitskill, Bryant, and Jobe by Omega, national social service fracount. Cobb also defeated Hierony-mou- s ternity, celebrated its Founder's day
by a banquet at the Tea Cup inn
via the count route.
Following the wrestling matches, Saturday at 6 p. m. in commemorathe boxing bouts began with J. Hol- tion of the founding of the national
brook, last year's champion, retain- organization, December 16, 1925, at
ing his championship by a decision Lafayette college, Easton, Penn.
over M. Karsner in the 115 pound The national headquarters of Al
weight. W. E. Butler took the 125 pha Phi Omega is now at Kansas
pound championship by defeating City, and there are 29 chapters.
Following the banquet, at which
Bringardner by a decision. R. Butler, brother of W. E. Butler, winner H. J. Templin presided, Messrs.
of the 125 pound championship, Jack Crain, Jackson; Bruce Wheelfailed to keep the championships in er, Paintsville; William Brown, Wilthe family by losing his bout to liamsburg; William Gabbert, LouisJack Shepherd, ' 135 pounds. The ville, and William Dunken. Russellville were officially pledged.
next bout, W. Thomas and J.
The principal address was given
fight, provided the most flashy
and furious of any of the fights by Major B. E. Brewer on the subject, "Friendship, Leadership,
and
on the entire card. Thomas scored
of the evening. Service and the Qualities Embodthe first knock-oied in This Motto."
135
Lysowski, last year's
pound
champion, won a decision from
George Forsythe who has met Lysowski twice before.
Shanklln, 165 pounds, scored a
decision over Bob Forsythe in an
uneventful bout which was very
The Experiment station is handclose in every way. "Big City" Harling eight tons of mail this week in
ris, 175 pounds, slugged through the the form of 100,000 contracts, for
furious iirst round with G. Bryant, the growers of Burley, air cured,
and knocked Bryant down twice in and fire cured tobaccos. These consuccession in the second, and while tracts are sent out by the Agriculhe was fighting for consciousness, ture Adjustment Administration in
the seconds threw the towel into Washington and were received at
the ring, giving the fight to Harris. the Experiment
8tation Monday.
Heavyweights clashed when John Mailing was begun Immediately.
Drury, Ave year's champion of the
The contracts are to be mailed to
heavyweight class, met Bert John- the farm agents of 105 counties
son in the final tight on the Intraand signed by the farmers under
mural card. The first round ended agreement that they will reduce
with Utile or no action; however, their 1934 production either S3
Johnson was knocked to the floor or 50 per cent. Fifteen million doltwice for counts of five and eight lars are to be paid to the farmers
The second round produced more of the state who sign the contracts,
action but the fans "booed" both three million of which will be paid
contestants when the action lulled. when the agreement is executed.
At the end of an uneventful third Payments will be based on the 1933
round Drury won the decision.
sales.

Large Audience
Hears Carols of
Other Countries FINAL

WIIAS

'

J
i

NEW SERIES NO. 27

--

ANNUALBANQUET

Scabbard and Blade Formally
Pledges Seven Men
into Group

The University Library
open from 8:30 to 6:30 p.
day during the Christmas
except Sundays, Christmas
New Years day.

LAST EDITION
MERRY CHRISTMAS,
HAPPY NEW YEAR

KENTUCKY

FOOTBALL TEAM
ENTERTAINED BY

Sponsor of "Best Band in Dixie"

NAME PLEDGES
AT CADET HOP

bard and
fraternity,
the Cadpt
the dold

C?

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1933

VOLUME XXIV

Is

1
KERNEL

BOUTS

HELD LAST NIGHT
and

Brin-gardn-

y,

Alpha Phi Omega
Honors Founders

Brin-gardn-

Pid-co-

ck

ut

Experiment Station
Mails AAA Contracts

1- -3

BY

31-- 25

SCORE

Game Is One of Fastest and
Most Brilliant Tilts Ever
, Seen Here
WILDCATS STRONGER
IN SECOND PERIOD
Davis Is Outstanding Both on
Offensive and Defensive
Floor Work
By JAY LUCIAN

Kentucky's basketeers again Interpreted the expert tutelage of
Coach Rupp, Saturday night in the
Alumni gym, when they fought a
driving University of Cincinnati
quintette to a standstill and then
went on to win, 31 to 25, in one of
the best games ever seen at the
University. This defeat of the con
fident Bearcats makes four wins for
Kentucky this season In as many
starts.
Cincinnati's elongated center
Austing, warranted all the notices
of his ability to get the honor of
with 13 points, while
his opponent. Captain DeMoisev
high-scor-

er

came off second best with 12 points.
DeMoisey did a praiseworthy Job of
guarding Austing whose short free- wneeiuig snot was deadly accurate,
and who scored the first eiirht

points for the Bearcats.
The first half of the strueele was
nip and tuck with Cincinnati a trifle the better, due to their ability
to get the
f.
At one point
they led the Wildcat 13 to 9, but
ai me ena or the half Kentucky
was ahead, 16 to 14.
With the beginning of the second
half, Kentucky showed a marked
tip-of-

increase" or ability which was di
rectly responsible to the observing
eye of Coach Rupp. The Wildcats
lost the tip-oonly once or twice
during the entire second period.
Their method consisted of DeMoisey
tipping the ball to his right while
Dave Lawrence crashed in to slap
the ball out of the Bearcat forward's hands and into the clutches
of the Wildcats guards. Austing 's
freewheeling shot also lost its potency due to DeMoisey modifying
his guarding position to the tall
boy's left, for it was in that direc- tion that Austing's shot always
came. As a result, Austing made
but one field goal the second half,
and his whole team accounted for
only seven points, three of which
were via the foul route.
At various times, for periods of a
five to eight minutes, the Bearcats
were held without scoring a point,
ff

although the largest margin

the

Big Blue enjoyed was 29 to 18,
about eight minutes before the end
of the game.
Kentucky's whole team functioned as sound as a tight drum and
only their inability to sink foul
shots coupled with a few hasty bad
passes marred their display of excellent basketball.
"Little Bill" Davis again was the
flashiest man on the floor, making
several sensational shots as well as
running the life out of his man.
Lawrence, former Corinth star, was
"on" again and played an outstanding game, making some almost impossible shots.
Andy Anderson
came through with a stellar display
of guarding and passwork, holding
his man to one foul point. He scored one field goal on a brilliant dribble through the Bearcat team. His
man, Gran die, although shut out in
this game, is one of Cincinnati's
high scorers, having made Id points
in his last game. Tucker showed
up well, getting the ball off the

time and again,
partisan crowd did a thorough
Job of booing referee Dan Tehan.
The game was a difficult one to
call due to the speed of the action.

back-boar-

d

A

COMMERCE PROF.
TO ATTEND MEET
Prof. James W. Martin to
Leave December 26 for
Economic Association
ference at Philadelphia

Con-

James W. Martin, director of the
Bureau of Business Research, will
leave for Philadelphia December 26
to attend a conference of the American Economic association and allied

societies.
Djecember 26. Mr. Martin will
make two talks, one at the American Political Science association on
"General Sales Taxation in Relation to the Ability Theory of Taxation," and the other before the general session of the American Economic association on "The Scope of
Governmental Activity from the
Viewpoint of Public Financing."
The National Tax association appointed a committee tills summer
to study motor and gasoline taxation. As chairman. Mr. Martin has
called a meeting to be held December 27 at the Benjamin Franklin
hotel, Philadelphia, to discuss the
plans for the second report of this
committee on motor vehicle taxation.
He will preside at the annual
meeting of the Tax Research Foundation association w(hkh will be'
held December 30 at the same hotel.
There also will be a business meeting of the executive committee of
this organization.

--

* Best Cof
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ON TUESDAYS AND FRIDAYS

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EDITORS
Jane M. Hamilton
Edwin fatterUon

ASSOCIATE
Joe S. Relator

John F. Dar

EDITORS

ASSISTANT

Edward WatU
virainla Leo Moore
Woodson Knlfht
Jack Wild
Arthur Muth
Xlterary editor

JANE A. MATTHEWS
STARR MENDEL
JOHNNIE CRADDOCK
ELIZABETH HARDIN
WTLL1E H. 8MITH

--

Ftatur tdttor
Art Editor

iocl(

Cdltor
Aut. Societg Editor
Nancj Becker
Eleanor HUlenmeyer
Virginia Borworth
Prances Buah
Lucy Jean Anderson
Mary Chick
WRITERS
Virginia Robinson
Lorraine Lepere
Naunerla Calhoun
SPECIAL

MARY

0. TERRELL

ASSISTANT
Yd Shannon

Vei

.

FdKor

Then, on March 4, Franklin Del
ano Roosevelt was Inaugurated m
President of the United State. A
feeling of confidence swept over the
nation as this great personality as
sumed the office of the presidency.
He Inspired confidence in the hearts
of a discouraged people, torn with
the thoughts of Impending danger,
lack of food, clothing, and the rights
and piivileges that are the natural
He Imheritage of Americans.
mediately set out to rectify this
situation by means of legislation
and the power Invested In him by
the voting public.
This Christmas finds the nation
slowly recovering from the greatest
disa-ste- r
since the World War. As
business improved, factories re
opened and the general economic
situation showed signs of returning
to a normal plane, confidence was
restored In the minds of the people
of the land.
However, there Is still existent a
state of want and suffering that is
the duty of the more fortunate of
us to alleviate. Let us, on the birthday of Him who went about relieving the sufferings of His children,
seek to emulate Him. We can do
so much to aid our fellow men, who
are In need, not only of our gifts of
food and money but our spiritual
help, our smile and our hearty
handshake. Bread alone will not
suffice!
Let us do these things m honor
of Him whose birthday is soon to
be celebrated throughout the Christian world. He has never forgotten
an act performed in His honor and
will shower His choicest blessings
upon those who serve His name.

MEWS EDITORS
Ben F. Taylor

Jay Luclan

WELCOME, COACH
WYNNE

John St. John
REPORTERS

Mary

Florence Kelley
Sag Kash
Harry Kremer
Earl Bourgeois
Frank Borrles
Carl Boone
Helen Altrey
Miriam Rosen

Brand
Shotwull
David Salyera
Charles Bennett
Isabel Preston
Walter Rlddell
Leo 8 pence
A.

Malcolm

I'argaret

CUnkscalM

Sports

1. DELMAIt ADAMS
JAY LUCIAN
HENRY McCOWN

I titer

Sport! Editor
Sportt Editor

SPORTS WRITERS
J. B. Wells

Ma

Lancaster

Norman Oarlinf

.Badness U aaacer

NED TURNBULL

ADVERTISING STAFF
Ernie 8hovea
Dave Dlflord
Ike Moore
C. V. COPPMAJf

.

Circulation M easier

LET US SHARE
This Christmas, at a time when
the civilized world is torn with
strife, human suffering and even
starvation, when our brave and
sagacious President is gallantly
striving to le3 our great nation
out of the depths of a financial and
moral collapse, it would be well for
us, as university students of fore- -

sight and character, to enter into
.
L
k
4,
li
me vrue nuuuay spirit
umi, vi
sharing.
1

KENTUCKY

THE

tae Two

.1

Four years ago no person would

Chet Wynne, the young man who
for the past three seasons has performed his duties of football mentor
at Alabama Polytechnic Institute,

of the Southern

1932

conference, has accepted a call of
the University as head coach. The
University is to be commended for
securing the services of a man so
capable.
During his sojourn at Auburn',
Coach Wynne developed one of the
strongest teams jn the south. His
teams always have been characterized by a brilliant offensive, and
sturdy defensive formation. We believe that at Kentucky,
Coach
Wynne will And football material
plentiful, and potential in its power. If this Rockne protege and adherent lives up to expectations, we
shall soon boast of a superior team.
However, we should no expect too
much of our new coach. He is no
miracle worker, The success which
he has attained was gained only
through conscientious effort by himself and by members of his teams.
Coach Wynne does have the ability
of getting the most from his men.
and of blending discipline with good
humor. He is certain to be popular
at the University.
Coach Wynne will come to the
University during the latter part of
December. Let us show him what
real Kentucky hospitality is like.
Just as our boys of the football
team will be fighting for him, we,
the student body, should cooperate
with the new coach, and aid in
making the next three years pleasant and profitable for him. Welcome to Kentucky, Coach Wynne!

have believed that a country so rich
in natural resources, populated with
men and women whose veins run
with the blood of the pioneers who
cleared the land from its original
state of a wilderness, could be disrupted as has the United States.
We were, at that time, living in
regal luxury, surrounded on all sides
with bountiful crops, nature's gifts
to man, rolling plains of wheat,
acres of vegetables, edibles, and
foodstuffs. It was a veritable land
of milk and honey! Men, well versNEW RADIO STUDIOS
ed in fundamental economics and in
NEEDED
the machinations of our monetary
Since its inception on the Unisystem, declared boldly
and credit
that a millennium had been reach- versity of Kentucky campus the exed. Because of existing conditions, tension Studio of WHAS, under the
there was little fact to disprove direction of Elmer O. Sulzer, has
grown by leaps and bounds. From
such statement.
program five days
Thpn, as a bolt from the blue, the one
New York Stock Exchange, into the per week the time has been increasy
week
stocks, bonds, and shares of which ed to the present
proso many citizens had invested large schedule with three
sums of money, wavered, then slow- grams Monday, Wednesday and Friprograms,
day and four
ly crashed! So quick and so thorough was the collapse of what was Tuesday and Thursday. This scheddeclared the soundest exchange in ule is well varied with a daily agrithe world, that men were left cultural program, two popular orbreathless, hazy and unable to com- - chestras per wee