xt77d7959p5f https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt77d7959p5f/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19690328  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 28, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 28, 1969 1969 2015 true xt77d7959p5f section xt77d7959p5f 0

li jh11 Ui llC 1MTOCECY

SClEMMIEL
Vol. VK, No. 119

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Friday Evening, March 28, 19G9

Juul Ruled Ineligible To Run For
Student Government President
By LARRY DALE KEELING

point average falls below the min-

who was eligible. He said the
list that was returned did not
have Juul's name on it.
"There were several declared
ineligible," Richmond said.
' 'Thorn Pat (J uul) was one of those
declared ineligible because of

Assistant Managing Editor
Thom Pat Juul was ruled
ineligible to run for
Student Government president
Thursday and, at present, his
name will not appear on the ballot for the April 9 SG elections. grades."
The University Judicial Board
A candidate for SG presidency
will hear his case Tuesday and
must have an overall grade point
make a final decision.
of 2.5 or over.
Scott Richmond, chairman of average
said the
Juul, a graduate student, has
the elections committee,
of all candidates for all better than a 2.5 in graduate
names
his
offices had been submitted to the school. But, combined with
determine undergraduate grades, his grade
Registrar's Office to
scho-lastical- ly

Williams, Tapp Strive
To Be 'Taken Seriously9
By LARRY DALE KEELING

Assistant Managing Editor
While all the political uproar surrounds the "BigThree" Student
Futrell-Gwin- n
and
Government presidential teams (Carver-Brighthe fourth team has been largely unheard from. The
other team has James D. Williams running for president and Rodney
Tapp for vice president.
the holes in the
Williams and Tapp label of criticizing
others' platforms.
themselves "untraditional and
"We are striving to be serunconventional." They are runious and we also want to be critning a serious campaign with- ical of the other candidates. We
out all the usual political camcan't have a deep platform and be
paign trappings.
critical of the other candidates
"We don't have the power at the same time."
to run the usual type of camWilTapp added that he and
paign," Tapp said. "But we're liams feel they could run on the
just as capable as anyone in five points and still present their
the thinking department."
on the issues.
WilliaWilliams said, "I think the views main
The
point in the
most important thing we want ms-Tapp
campaign is to make
to get is credibility. Our first
Continued on Page 7, Col. 1
victory was to get on the ballot. Our second will be to be
taken seriously. We're not committed to anyone, unlike some
By GEORGE J EPSON
of the others."
Kernel Staff Writer
That's not the only difference
Tim Futrell and Jim Gwinn,
team
between the Williams-Tap- p
and the other three. While the presidential and vice presidential
others all have fairly lengthy plat- candidates respectively for Stuforms, Williams and Tapp have dent Government, released their
platform Thursday night. They
only five statements:
"To be honest.
placed emphasis on their ability
to "produce as well as to propose
"Not to get hung-ucreative new programs and
"To be
"To build bridges, to blaze ideas."
trails and to forge bonds of a
Many of their "creative ideas"
have to do with the Student Govmutual human understanding.
"To keep students from get-- , ernment organization itself. They
have labeled their plan the "Dyting the shaft."
"We could run a regular plat- namic Executive Plan" and in it
form and become just one of the advocate such changes as estabfour," Tapp said. "But then we lishing an intern program to make
would have to defend it, instead training in Student Government
t,

Juul-Maguir- e)

imum.
His point of contention is
that his graduate grades should
not be combined with the undergraduate grades. He contends
that his graduate school record
is all he should be Judged on.
Juul said he wasn't at the
meeting of the elections committee and was not informed of the
decision until 6:30 p.m. Thursday. He added that the decision
was going before the
only because he had insisted.
"As a graduate student, I am
eligible," Juul told the Kernel
Thursday night. "There are outside factions and forces responsible for this action."
He implied that the administration was responsible for combining his graduate and undergraduate grades to disqualify him
from the election.
Juul said he had filed his ap- Continued on Page 3, Col. 1

p.

d.

By DAN GOSSETT
Kernel StafT Writer

The Community Alliance for
Social Action
Responsible
voted Thursday night
(CARSA)
to suspend active support of the
boycott on California table grapes
in favor of influencinglegislation
that would benefit all of the
nation's migrant workers.
Bill Rauch, former chairman

of CARSA, said, "No one any

ganization.

Futrell and Gwinn hope to
establish weekly open meetings
between the cabinet, the press
and students so SG members
can explain their programs publicly.
The

"Dynamic Executive
Plan" would also create a new
"Administrative Bill Executor"
post to supervise the execution
of all bills and resolutions passed
by the SG Assembly.
Cabinet positions would be
Continued on Pare 8, Col. 1

VI

Kernel Photo By Kay Brookshire

Cool

Thom Pat Juul was still handing out
copies of his platform after he had been
ruled scholastically ineligible to run for
SG president.

Juul

y

'y

J
y

A

o

meeting last night
where they proposed a three point program to set up a "free and
autonomous" universtiy.

The UK cliapter of SDS held a reorganizational

longer is in favor of the grape
boycott as it now stands. Even
some of the grape workers are
distributing literature that calls
for help in ending the boycott.
What we have to do now is
draw up petitions to send to
congressmen that would place
all migrant workers under the
protection of labor laws."
Several of the members are
concerned about the influence of
large labor unions on the boycott,
Rauch
particularly the AFL-CI"I have heard disturbing
said,
would
rumors that the AFL-CIexorbitant dues that
charge
would be as large a burden on
the workers as the conditions
they now work under."
The only controversy that occurred about the change in
CARSA' s "direction came when
the group debated whether it
should insist that migrant workers be protected under the minimum wage laws.

The newlv elected chairman

of CARSA, Geoffrey Pope, freshman in Arts and Sciences, said,
"Too often, the farmers that hire
migrant labor aren't financially

able to pay a minimum wage.
Forcing these farmers to do so
would be the same as forcing
one family out in the streets to
house another."
The section on minimum wage
was voted out of the proposed
petition.
In other business, CARSA
members decided to distribute
a poll to all the candidates for
the Student Government Assembly that would reflect their
stands on vital issues facing the
University.
Pope said, "This is to be
entirely an educational service
to the students. People vote for
the candidates that have the most
publicity and don't even know
what the candidates stand for."

SDS Reorganizes
By DAN GOSSETT

Kernel Staff Writer
newly reorganized Students for a Democratic Society (SDS)
t
outlined a
plan Thursday night for changing the University into a "free and autonomous" institution. In a policy
statement issued Thursday, SDS states:
"The educational institutions
The second area SDS will
must be changed if a radical
investigate is whether there is
is to be established.
democracy
classified govermental research
They must be be freed from miliand governmental
being carried out at UK. Dick
tary, business
Pozzuto, chairman of SDS, exInfluences."
pressed concern over whether it
To accomplish that "autoSDS plans to investigate is a legitimate function, legally
nomy,"
three areas jof campus life, one or morally, of any university to
of which iJ the existence of ROTC conduct 'research on matters like
germ warfare and related fields.
at UK.
SDS member Don Pratt asked,
The third area SDS will be
"Is it valid for the United States concerned with is the UniverArmy to come onto campus and sity's relationship with the Selecoffer courses that would directly tive Service System. Pozzuto said
funnel college graduates into the
"I know that in graduate
military service? If it is, then school, the University regularly
IBM, Trane and any other sends the Selective Service a reemployer could come onto camport on each male student and
pus and train their recruits using his present status in graduate
University equipment and ausschool. It should be up to the
pices."
individual to deal with his draft
Several people rebutted Pratt board, and not the responsibility
on the grounds that no one has of a university."
the right to remove a course
In other business, C rah am
from the University if there is
d
sufficient demand for it from Watkins suggested that a
on Pace 3, Col. 1
the students.
A

three-poin-

i

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Bach Again

I

J

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available to interested underclassmen and recruiting a fleet
of administrative assistants to aid
in the daily operation of the or-

-

y

7

CARSA Suspends Grape Boycott

Futrell Releases Platform

open-minde-

7

demon-Continue-

* 2

-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, March 28,

19G9

Demonstrators Face Financial Aid Reprisals

DyJOHN ZOI
College Press Service
If you Ret, or hope to net,
financial assistance from the federal government to help pay college expenses or to finance projects and are worried about losing
it by participating in a campus
demonstration, pay heed to the
following. Clip and save, and
reread before you run out to
join the next
These are the programs involved; National Defense Education Act (NDEA) loans, Educational Opportunity Grants,
loans, College
government fellowships, National Science Foundation (NSF) and National Aero

nautics and Space Administrathe Department of Health, Edution (NASA) grants. You can be cation, and Welfare (HEW),
denied aid under these programs which provides the money for
under certain conditions.
the programs mentioned above.
The Nixon Administration has The lawmakers attached a proformally brought to theattention vision that says "no part of the
of college administrators provifunds . . . shall be used" for aid
sions of two acts passed by the to any student or faculty member
last Congress. While the Presi"convicted by any court of gendent feels the academic communeral Juiisdiction of the use of or
ity, not the government, should assistance in the use of force,
preserve campus peace, he clearly trespass, seizure of property unintends to have the laws enforced. der control" of the college "to
The Johnson Administration prevent officials or students from
chose to look the other way beengaging in their duties or purcause of the confusion in this suing studies."
sensitive area.
Can Suspend Aid
The first Congressional act
So your school's financial aid
pertinent to campus unrest is office has an obligation to deny
he 1969 appropriations bill for
you aid during fiscal 1969 if you
disrupt campus life and are convicted of a crime during the disruption. If it wants to withhold
aid or an application while your
case is pending, it can.
SALES
RENTALS
SERVICE
Aid
f
is mandatory and
TYPEWRITERS
AND ADDING' MACHINES
automatic only if ycu are convicted of a crime.
ADLER ELECTRIC AND MANUAL TYPEWRITERS
If you participate in a protest
MACHINES
PRINTING CALCULATORS
but are not arrested, a provision
CARBON PAPER AND RIBBONS
of amendments to the Higher
Education Act of 1968 applies.
252-02- 07
You can be denied only if your
school determines that you" willfully refused to obey (its) lawful
regulation or order" and that the
refusal ''was of a serious nature
and contributed to a substantial
Adm.$1.50
disruption of the administration"
of the institution. The school
(
( vs. The
can decide whether it wants to
The Undergraduates
investigate, and could determine
sit-i-

innocence by liberally defining
the terms "serious" refusal and
"substantial disruption." If it
determines guilt, aid must be
denied for two years.
The amendments also carry
f
a provision requiring aid
if the school determines that you
have been convicted of a crime
such as that under the appropriations act. But this section is apparently superseded by the manf
in the appropriadatory
tions act.
Statement Softened
When the two acts were passed
last fall, educators issued loud
cries of interference with academic freedom and integrity. Recognizing their insistence on inPresident Nixon
dependence,
tempered his expected "law 'n
order on the campus" statement
delivered more than a week after
he had promised it. He issued
a dire warning with a mild proscription that the universities
should keep their own houses in
order.
He began by calling the
anti-riprovisions of the
two acts "moderate . . . and justified" by underscoring the need
to protect society from assaults
on the processes of free inquiry.
But he said there is a second
issue "of far greater concern: the
preservation of the integrity, the
independence, and the creativity
of our institutions of higher
learning." He went on to warn
that campus violence is threaten- cut-of-

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"New Initiatives"
He said he has directed
H.E.W. to "launch new initiatives toward easing tensions in
our educational community. And
the President took note of "depersonalization of the educational experience." "Other institutions," he said, "must reshape
themselves lest this turn to total
alienation. There must be university reform including new experimentation in curricula such as
ethnic studies, student involvement in the decision-makinprocess and a new emphasis on faculty teaching." The President
noted that "student unrest does
not exist in a vacuum but reflects a growing social unrest
affecting much of our world toindignation
day.
by, society will solve none of
this. We must resolve the internal contradictions of our comg

Self-righteo-

munities."
The delay in issuing the state-

ment presumably was caused by
disagreement over how hard a
stand to take and deciding just
what the federal government can
do.
"Fascist Backlash"
Nixon's stand has for the moment laid to rest the question
of direct federal intervention on
troubled campuses. But the provisions his statement says will
be enforced are under discussion
in the House higher education
subcommittee chaired by Rep.
Edith Green
The Green committee has
heard testimony for and against
aid
Noted psychologist
Bruno Bettleheim argued that
measures taken to ease campus
unrest should not be punitive.
He warned that undesirable repressive measures might be imposed to prevent chaos and severe
count erreaction to campus protests and said the greatest danger
of student protest is a possible
"fascist-typ- e
backlash," not protest itself.
Representatives of the National Education Association and its
student affiliate SNEA called for
repeal of the provisions because
they are "vague, unenforceable,
unduly repressive, and unjust."
"Rather than trying to put down
student unrest," said NEA staff
assistant Mel Myler, "we should
be searching for student particiof the
pation in decision-makin- g
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said, "is fundamentally the task
and responsibility of the university community."
Nixon made no mention of
intended federal prosecution of
radicals who cross state lines to
foment disorders, a possibility
that has been discussed in the
Attorney General's office.

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Friday, March 28,

-3

19G9-

Newsman Discusses U.S. Space Program

By TOM HALL
Kcmcl Staff Writer
Peter Hackes, NBC Defense
Department correspondent, covered the past accomplishments
and future hopes of the U.S.
space program last night. His
talk was part of the Central
Kentucky Concert and Lecture
series.
Hackes was introduced by Dr.
VVasley Kroghdal of the Astronomy Department as a man who
had begun his broadcasting in
Louisville, but had moved on to

"better things."
These "things" include TV

and radio announcing, as well run, but they couldn't get her
as reporting on national defense, trained to bark out of both sides
of her mouth," he quipped.
NASA, the FAA, the Atomic EnerOn the serious side, he said
gy Commission, the joint chiefs
of staff, the Supreme Court and that whereas 10 years ago a mere
10 percent success rateon satellite
the White House.
Hackes poked fun at the TV launchings was considered to be
establishment and at California an achievement, "we now have
politics before lecturing on space a 93 percent rate."
The next moon flight, Apollo
travel. He said TV is a "medium" because "so little is either 10, will spend 63 hours charting
rare or well done." Then he strange gravitational irregularities of the moon's pull, possibly
digressed into the area of California politics, where old Holly- caused by buried masses of metal,
wood stars have found a new says Hackes. They will also test
market for their acting talent. their Lunar Landing Radar and
"They tried to get Lassie to the ascent and descent engines.

Apollo ll's landing module
will spend 22 hours on the face
of the moon, and "six Americans
should walk on the moon this
year," he predicted.
He also offered comparisons
of the space program's first feeble
efforts and today's flights. For
instance, he said, the rocket that
put up the first U.S. satellite
developed only 83,000 pounds of
d
thrust and put a
into space. Today, the
Saturn rocket develops7.5 million
pounds of thrust to hurl a n
payload at the moon.
pay-loa-

Kernel Staff Writer
e
Peter Schrag,
for Saturday Review, said here
Thursday night that university
students are splitting into two
camps "technicians" and "feel-ereditor-at-larg-

s.

Schrag defined a "feeler" or

Juul Disqualified
Continued from Page One
plication for office on the first
or second day of filing so that'
any complexities of his being
a graduate student could be dealt
with. But nothing was done about
the application until the filing
deadline when all applications
were sent to the registrar.
He said he had wanted the
complications dealt with at an
early date so that liberal students
on campus would have a candidate.
Juul said that his being a graduate student was part of the reason he was disqualified. He is
the first graduate student to run
'
for the top SG post.He said transfer students who
run for SG office do not have
their transfer grades counted
toward their eligibility to run.
He said that only the grades they
make at the University are
counted.
He gave as an example Merrily Orsini, who ran for the SG
vice presidency last year.
Juul contends that undergraduate grades should have the
same relation to graduate grades
as transfer grades have to grades
made here at the University.

one who

to do
thing and my own
noted that such stunot satisfied with an
educational system which he said

as
"my own
bag." He
dents are

turns out "technicians" for the

.

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The Kentucky

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The Kentucky Kernel, University
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Mailed five times weekly during the
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Published by the Board of Student
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published continuously as the Kernel
since 1815.
Advertising published herein Is intended to help the reader buy. Any
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Uil
News lHk
Circulation 2Ji
Advel Using. Business,

The editor said that as a
result "more and more people
are joining the ranks of spankers"
and "the more substantial needs
of education are being ignored."
He identified as among the
important tasks of universities
a need to "become a critic of
society" and to "convince people
there is still something worth

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Schrag warned that "The radicals and the liberals have been
the creators of protection for the
old
institutions."
He explained that "People
who a few years ago had never
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Continued from Page One
st ration be planned for the Republican Governors Conference
scheduled to meet in Lexington
the first week of May.
"President Nixon and Vice
President Agnew both will be
here, and if we can get support
from a few other organizations
to put on a real mob scene,
we can really get some points
across," Watkins said.

c

benefit of society.
Still, the Saturday Review editor claimed, the majority of students and the public are apathetic
to issues in general.
learning."
He said most students "have
learned how to play the system"
and that most people "perceive
Higher, education as football
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games, beauty queens .and

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Space-ag- e
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Editor Says Students Tlay The System'
"doer"
wants
By RICK FALKNOR

The staggering expense of the
space program is justifiable, according to Hackes, not only for
space exploration but because of
the technological developments
of the program which have civilian applications.
His list of such applications
included:
Graphite for tobacco pipes.
A meteor sensor to diagnose
Parkinson's disease.

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Metrocdor

Susannah York Coral Browne

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DAIRY TREAT

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* Mad Melvin
Listening to Defense Secretary Melvin Laird describe to his Senate
audience the virtues of bigger, better ABMs, wc got the feeling that it
was a performance needing a psychedelic backdropof swirling colors and
lights, revolving patterns and words that recede and zoom and melt
into other words with other meanings. It needed sound and beat
and lightning flashes, for it was a performance designed not to inform
but to excite, not to convince but to bedazzle.
There is little to be gained from a
argument over Mr.
offers is not fact but a premise, the
Laird's particulars, for what he
premise that the evil men of the world are arrayed against us, and that
we must move now to defend ourselves against anything they may do
at any time in the future. It is to this thesis that we must now address
ourselves, not to any orderly discussion of whether or not ABMs will
work or whether or not we need them. It is an argument based not on
logical discussion but emotional appeal, and it deserves the emotional
response of outraged protest.
Mr. Laird admits, as did President Nixon before him, that there is
no evidence that either Russia or China desires or is planning an attack
on us. But because it is possible that they may, we must prepare
against it. He admits that the ABM, no matter how ruinously expensive, will not protect us against a missile attack; but we must build
it because we don't know anything better to do. And by implication we must build also every new weapon that is devised, not because it is needed, not because it will work, but because if we don't
someone may take it as a sign of weakness and attack, or an attack
will succeed that otherwise might have failed.
The beauty of Mr. Laird's argument is that it cannot be disproved.
Reason and logic may reveal it for the empty, dangerous thing it is,
but there is no way to prove that the Russians are not plotting to blast
mankind into a nuclear doomsday, or that the wily Chinese are not
devising their won suicide by a missile attack on us. Scientists may
insist but they cannot prove short of launching and resisting an actual
attack that they ABM will not work. Mr. Laird and his Pentagon
defenders of the military industrial complex do not have to prove their
points. They merely have to be the ones to risk what may happen
if we don't prepare for the worst. Their strength is not logic but fear.
It is the devil theory carried to the absurd. If it is true, then there
is no escape from the dread future in which all our power and wealth
must be devoted primarily to the grim task of survival. If it is true then
we cannot rest as longas a nation exists that could conceivably threaten
us, or any weapon remains undeveloped that might protect us. If our
biggest missiles frighten the Russians into building even bigger missiles,
and their missiles force us to resort to bigger missiles yet, and so on in
a never-endin- g
cycle of deadly escalation, so be it. For if Mr. Laird is
we have no alternative.
right,
We are being offered a world in which words lose their meaning.
Only months ago we were being told that the ABM was absolutely
vital for the protection of our cities; the same men now say that ABMs
can't protect the cities and aren't needed for that purpose anyhow.
Months ago these men were telling us that the missile sites for which
we were spending billions were invulnerable to attack; now we are told
we must have ABMs to protect these same sites from attack by other
missiles. Only days ago Mr. Nixon assured us that only a few ABMs
were needed because recent Russian history showed a nation primarily
concerned with defense; now Mr. Laird warns that we cannot neglect
any aspect of defense lest the Russians spring for our throat.
We are beingoffered a world in which spending for death leaves nothing to spend for life, in which our cities rot and our waters reek and
our people groan from the burden of taxes, while we build more stately
mansions underground from which to kill other men, frightened and
frightening as ourselves. This is the cycle of madness, and somewhere,
somehow, it must have an end.
The Courier-Journt
point-by-poi-

nt

al

Applying Yourself
Recently a variety of advertisements urging students to apply
for various committees have been
running in the Kernel. These matters characteristically attract little
attention but are of great importance in the workings of the University.
Much of the current stagnation
in the programs here results from
this situation. These committees
are designed to give concerned students a meaningful opportunity to
participate in University functions.
However, it is all too frequently
the case that those people applying are doing so only to put together a long list of activities for
job applications or as a part of

their fraternity's or sorority's activities. The result is that these
students often have no real conception of their job or any real
interest.
Some of these committees which
should be considered by students
who are truly concerned with the
proper functioningof the University
include the University Student Advisory Committee, the Board of
Student Publications, the Student
Center Board, the Focus Committee and various departmental committees.
If any of these committees or
others are of interest to you, act
soon because the deadlines for applying are fast approaching.

View From The Right
By

L

E. FIELDS

EDITOR'S NOTE: The opinions expressed in this regular column are those
of its author and do not necessarily represent the opinions of the Kernel.
It has not been too many months
since the Johnson administration, under
pressure both political and public, made
the decision to'halt the bombing of North
Vietnam.
Prior to that time, every raid brought
a deluge of cries from those opposed to
the war, primarily radical student organizations, concerning the atrocities committed by American pilots.
Hardly a day went by that we weren't
given accounts of the bombings of hospitals, churches and the number of North
Vietnamese civilians that had been killed.
Members of SDS and other radical student organizations paraded around campuses with picket signs proclaiming their
nation's leaders as war criminals.
Likewise many of our own "allies"
denounced our bombing efforts as senseless slaughter of innocent civilians. The
end result of all of this disapproval and
dissent was the cessation of all bombing in the North.
While all of this was going on, what
were the "innocent" North Vietnamese
and Viet Cong up to in the South? A
few examples: A
son of
a village chief had both of his hands
cut off by the Viet Cong. His crime?
None. This was simply a warning to the
people of his village that they were not
to vote in the upcoming elections.
The entire population of a village
were herded before the home of the village chief and were forced to watch,
along with his children and pregnant
wife, while the chiefs tongue was cut
out. While the chief was bleeding to
death the VC went to work on his wife,
slashing open her womb. His
son then had a bamboo lance driven
through one ear and out the other. Perhaps the worst casualty of the incident
was the chiefs young daughter. She was
permitted to live after witnessing her
family's slaughter.
A captured VC confessed. "The first
time we entered the village, we arrested
on the spot fo