xt77h41jj471 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt77h41jj471/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19331124  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 24, 1933 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 24, 1933 1933 2013 true xt77h41jj471 section xt77h41jj471 Best Copy Available

I

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

FRIDAY EDITION
KERNEL

SEMI-WEEKL-

UNIVERSITY
APPOINTMENTS UK Greeks and
RELEASED FOR Independents to
CADET OFFICERS
Major llrtwer Announces
Promotion of Seniors
in R. O. T. C.

Be Film Guests
Phoenix Amusement Co. Expresses Appreciation of .

Student Attitude

L'.SHOP NAMED TO RE
As an appreciation of the student
U. K. CADET COLONEL
attitude against the "rushing" of
Phoenix
Harry Clo Is Second In Rank; downtown theaters, the
Amusement company, operators of
Captains Named on Staff
the Kentukcy, Ben All, Strand and
of Colonel
State houses, has extended an in.

Appointments for the R. O. T. C.
regiment from the advanced classes
in Military science were announced
yesterday by Major Boltus E. Brewer, head of the military department.
J. C. Bishop was appointed colonel to be in command of the regiment and H. E. Clo was selected
as lieutenant colonel and will be
second In command.
Those appointed captains to serve
on the regimental staff were as
follows: B. B. CoJiins, adjutant;
Ralph O. Edwards; J. P. Hardwlck;
S. D. Broadbent,
Officers selected to command the
t.
first battalion were: W. H.
lieutenant -- colonel; W. R.
Dallas, major; P. C. Dye, major.
The staff of the first battalion will
be composed of O. E. Burns, E.
Oaillard, P. W. Donaldson and J. A.
Styles, all first lieutenants.
The second battalion will be commanded by C. W. Kaufman, lieutenant-cHon-hors-

and C.
Lieutenants E.

.

KENTUCKY

ZZt

GYM, 9 TO 12

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1933

VOLUME XXIV

olonel,

OF

SUKY DANCE
TOMORROW NIGHT IN

jLr

A.
L.

Paynter,
Janes, J.

major.
L. Campbell, L. H. Congleton, W. A.
Jacobs were selected for the staff
of the second battalion.
Other officers who were appointed
are: Company A, T. C. Cassady,
captain; L. E. Asher, J. E. Wilder,
S. E. White, H. V. Bastin, first lieutenants; D. E. Bay less, W. Coffey,
P. P. Combs, H. W. Mattingly, E. D.
Whipple, second lieutenants.
Company B, G. C. Thompson,
captain; J. L. Coovert, E. R. Turn-bul- l,
N. L. Ooebel, R. L. Broadbent,
first lieutenants; J. P. Adams, W.
E. Butler, J. H. Cavlns, J. W. Friend,
T. D. Parrish, C. D. Blair, second

vitation to the entire student body
of the University to be its guests.
Complimentary tickets, good for admission at any performance at the

company's amusement centers, will
be distributed to groups of students
today.
In order that no student or group
of students will be discriminated
against in the distribution, Uie fraternities and sororities will be
grouped alphabetically with the independent men and women receiving their tickets In blocks to be
Interspersed In the giving of the ducats to the fraternal lodges. According to officials of the company,
the tickets will be given to the students until all have been guests of
the company.
"We extend this invitation In
appreciation of the voluntary action taken by members of the
in
faculty and student-leaders

eliminating, apparently

time, the practice

of

for aU
"rushing"

theaters."

PHOENIX AMUSEMENT CO.
(Signed)
Morgan Elliott.
The plan of distributing the tickets will take the form of giving the
pasteboards to the heads of the various fraternities and sororities and
allowing them to distribute the ducats to their active members and
pledges. The Independents will receive their tickets in a similar manner. The amusement company has
secured the names of the actives
and pledges of all the groups on
the campus and will allot the number of tickets accordingly.
For the first time in many years,
no attempt has been made to
lieutenants.
Company C, P. E. LeBaron, cap- "rush" any of the Lexington thetain; H. H. Dearing, E. E. Settle, aters. Out of appreciation of this
H. B. Greenup, J. I Kesterson, C. fact, the Phoenix Amusement comJ. Gottlieb, J. P. Stewart, first lieu- pany has proffered this generous
tenants; W. S. H. Flshback, E. C. gesture to the student body. Each
O'Rear, J. A. Carrick, W. E. Cowley, week a group of students will be
J. B. Croft, L. M. Parker, O. E. the company's guests. The groups
designated will be announced
Pero, S. S.,Soaper, second lieutenants.
through the medium of The Kernel.
Company E, L. M. Gross, captain;
A. Auton, C. D.
B. W. McDowell,
Kelly, R. H. Ratliff, first lieutenants; R. W. Gum, M. M. Jones,
second lieutenant.
Company P, L. H. Cloyd, captain;
J. R. Allen, W. T. Bishop, W. D.
Thompson, W. P. Peterson, first
lieutenants; P. P. Cullen, J. M. Annual Proceedings for 1933
Published by Law Journal;
Grimes, C. H. Talbot, second lieu-

BAR ASSOCIATION
TENDERS REPORT

tenants.

Editors are Wyatt, Gess,

G, R. G. Kercheval,
Moberley, and Moreland
captain; J. A. Rice, O. L. Crutcher,
H. S. Traynor, C. M. Ball, first lieuAnnual Proceedings of the State
tenants; W. M. Carrel, A. R. Steph- Bar association for the year 1933,
ens, G. R. Miller, second lieutenpublished by the Kentucky Law
ants.
Journal for the association, have
been completed.
The proceedings
were edited by Wilson W. Wyatt
and William B. Gess, of the State
Bar association; Kirk B. Moberly,
Bar association editor of the Kentucky Law Journal; and Prof. Roy
M. Moreland, faculty editor of the
Law Journal.
The Proceedings have been delivered to all members of the association, numbering approximately
1,000. This volume contains the
annual
minutes of the thirty-secon- d
Thanks "Four Bits"
association, held at
In Joe Jordan's popular "Four meeting of the 13
Frankfort, July
and 14, 1933, and
Bite" in The Lexington Leader
yesterday afternoon appeared the includes Important addresses delivered at the meeting by prominent
following much appreciated commembers of both ttie state and naplement to The Kentucky Kernel:
Among the
scooped
The Kentucky Kernel an extra tional bar association. were: "Our
principal
addresses
the world by getting out
Growing Federal Power," by Hon.
Wednesday night on Gamage's
Clarence S. Martin, president of the
resignation.
The student
American Bar association; "Unidid a good workmanlike
Conditional Sales," by
form
Joe tn a hurry. They had not Judge and 8. Willis, Ashland; "The
only a story of the resignation Lawyer S.
and His Practice," by
under a black streamer head with Swlnford, president of the M. C.
State
inches
letters two and one-ha- lf
"The
high bat also a picture of the Bar association for 1933; Judge
1930,"
coach and a story reviewing his Practice Act of Dietzman,by of
the
Richard Priest
ent'jre career.
Appeals; and
"Come to think of it, did you Kentucky Court of of Kentucky,"
Lawyers
"Some Great
ever see a crowd mobbing a hot-caby Hon. Bailey P. Wooton, attorney
salesman tn a frenzied attempt to purchase his wares? (I general of Kentucky.
sUrted to say that The Kernel
sent some of its extras to the
Golgnol theatre and between acts
they were selling like hot cakes.)
Company

Kampus
Kernels

Jour-naHs- te

ke

Former Kernel Head
Accepts AP Position

There will be an Important meeting of Phi Mu Alpha, honorary
music fraternity, at 9 a. m. Saturday.

B. Ardery Leaves
fYankfort to Assume

William

New Duties

UniversiArdery,
of the Dairy club will ty William and former
of
stucknt
be held at 7:45 Tuesday, November
The Kernel, has accepted a position
28. Speaker will be Doctor Buck-ne- r,
on the Associated Press bureau at
returned Nashville,
who has recently
In a few days he
from Italy. Banquet arrangement will leave Tenn.
Frankfort where he has
will be discussed.
been correspondent for the INS
service.
All members of executive and
of The
Ardery was
of Pan - Politlkon Kernel during the scholastic year
are asked to meet In the Kentuc- 1831-3- 2 and hi the spring of '32 left
klan office, room 54, McVey hall, school to accept a position as corat 4 p. m. Friday, November 24.
respondent for the INS service in
All fraternities and sororities are Frankfort.
When he takes his position In
at
requested to hand in snap-sho- ts
Nashville, he will Join another Unithe Kentucklan office.
versity Journalism graduate, KenpoNew members of Cwens will meet neth Gregory, who accepted a
sition
at p. m. Tuesday, in the Boyd central with the Associated Press
filing bureau at Nashville
hall Reading room.
following ft period of work on the
Lexington Herald. He was graduAlpha Phi Omega, national
fraternity, will entertain at ated from the University In 1927
7:30 tonight in the Y. M. C. A. and was a charter member of the
rooms with a smoker in honor of Kentucky chapter of Sigma Delta
All active Chi, honorary Journalistic
prospective members.
(Continued on Page Four)
A meeting

editor-in-chi-

editor-in-chi-

social-servi-

ce

ef

ef

Who's Afraid
Of the Biff
Had Kampus Kat?
So many students have Interviewed the Kat editors as
to suppressing
the bit of
scandal about themselves that
the editors, in convocation
assembly, passed the following rule:
Anyone with a skeleton in
his clothes closet and wishing
not to have said skrleton exposed to the horrified gaze of
his fellow students, by purchasing a ten dollar ad In
said Kat, may suppress said
story.
Forged: THE EDITORS

STROLLERS MUST

PAY ASSESSMENT
All Members of Dramatic
Club Charged $1.25 Each

for Certificate of
Membership

NEW ROLL TO BE MADE
members of Strollers are re
quired to pay an assessment
of
J1.25 before December 2 in order to
remain in the organization, and all
future Strollers will be required to
pay the same amount. Upon paying the assessment
the members
will receive a certificate of membership in the organization.
All former members who do not
pay the assessment by the required
date will be automatically dropped
from the organization,
regardless
f the amount of work done.
Another rule that will be inforc-e- d
December 2 is that any member who is absent from three consecutive meetings will be automatically dropped from Strollers, unless
a legitimate excuse is formally
written out and presented to the
group. Even then a
majority of the members Is necessary In order to reinstate a person
into the organization.
A new roll will be made up from
the names of the old members who
have paid their dues by December
2.
The money should be paid to
President
James Fahey, W. T.
Bishop, or Cass Robinson, Stroller
advisor.
Starting December 2 all meetings
will be held on Wednesday at White
hall. - Each meeting will be announced a week ahead of time In
The Kernel. Most of the following
meetings will be social ones. Different speakers will be called to
give talks to the different groups
in costuming, lighting, properties,
acting, and make-uAll debts have been paid and the
surplus has been deposited in the
bank, according to W. T. Bishop,
treasurer. Money to pay yie debts
has been obtained through the
and
Stroller tryouts, assessments,
from the Stroller dance.
At the next meeting the executive committee will present Ideas
for the programs and plays, which
will be given on an average of once
a month. Members of this committee are Misses Mary Templin
Faulkner, Jane Ann Matthews, Messrs. W. T. Bishop, Jimmie Fahey,
and Cass Robinson.
Books on the different phases of
dramatic production have been reserved for the benefit of the members and eliglbles to read. The
books are in the reserve reading
room in the library.
AH

two-thir-

p.

Ky. Band Will
Give Dance for

Uniform Funds
By SUNNY DAY
Kentucky's band needs snappy
new uniforms: consequently, Kentucky's bandsmen are now hot on
the trail of that Illusive stuff called
cash with which to purchase said
uniforms.
The first step towards achieving
the new outfits will be a dance on
December 8 in the Alumni gym at
which time the best orchestra the
boys are able to procure will furnish the music. In connection with
the dance, tihe band will hold its
sponsor election, and plans are now
on foot to make it the dance of
the season.
Measurements have already been
taken by a Cincinnati company for
the new uniforms and it was hoped
to have them by the Thanksgiving
game, but since the time Is so short
and a large cash payment must be
made on delivery, it will not be
possible to do so.
The new outfits will be dark blue
trimmed in white. The coats will
be of the open collar variety (instead
of those chokers we now use) permitting the wearing of white shirts
and blue ties. Also the coats will
have four pockets, bordered with
white, white shoulder peaks, and
white cross belts. The caps will
be somewhat larger with a longer
bill, and the trousers will have a
white stripe down the side. Then
watch those boys keep step! The
capes will be kept to be used when
needed, especially for use during
hot weather without the coats.
This is the type of uniforms the
members of the organization are
working for, and having the
individual purchase a new outfit
after having paid for fans ons he is
now wearing, would be
little too
(Continued on Page Four

NEW SERIES NO.

Harry Gamage Resigns as
U.K. Head Football Coach
"It Is all In the (tame," said Harry
Gamage, head coach of the Wildcat
football tram since 1927, as he turn-I- n
hi resignation to the Athletic
council of th University yesterday
afternoon. His resignation, which
will go into effect June 30, 1934,
was accepted by the council.
Gamage asked to come before
the council and make, a statement
and the athletic body consented.
The coach stated that he knew he
had not been successful at Kentucky and although he had received
bad breaks and although several
players had "laid down," he had ho
alibis. He then asked the council
to accept his resignation.
Coach
Gamage will continue his duties
during the rest of the present
which will be concluded with
the Thanksgiving day battle with
Tennessee on Stoll field.
Major Boltos E. Brewer announced, following the meeting of the
council, that he intended to resign
as a member of the Athletic council
of the University. Major Brewer
was appointed last year by President McVey and the Major said
that he intended to submit his res
ignation to the President at once.
No action has been taken yet by
Doctor McVey.
When asked by The Kernel last
night for a statement, Mr. Gamage
said that he had enjoyed being in
Kentucky, and that he appreciated
everything the students and faculty
of the University had done for him.
"I have been unfortunate while
here In having received bad breaks
and injuries," the mentor continued.
When asked as to his further plans,
the resigned football mentor declined to make a statement.
The resignation came as a surprise to many of those "on the
Inside," and to fans and players
alike. The Cat coach had received
much adverse criticism during the
last two years, when his team failed
to come up to expectations due to
injuries and Ineligibilities.
Just who will succeed Gamage is
still rife speculation, as the council
announced it is open to offers from
any and all coaches who desire to
apply. A committee appointed to
procure a new football coach is
r,
composed of Chairman W. D.
William Rodes, and Wallace
Muir. They will come to a decision
as soon as possible. At first it was
determined not to consider this
matter until the season was over,
but last night's meeting gave a new
complexion to the affair. Several
applications have been received by
members of the council, but none
were considered official by that
body, and will not be acted upon
unless more definite information is
received.
None of the other coaches at the
University are affected by Gam-age- 's
resignation, the council announced. Action as to their status
will be taken later. All their contracts expiie at the same time as
Gamage's with the exception of
that of Adolph Rupp, basketball
mentor, who has another year to
go on his present contract.

Herald Managing Editor to
Address Dutch Lunch
Club at Noon
Today
Y.W. BOARD WILL MEET
Thomas R. Underwood, managing
editor of The Lexington Herald, will
speak at noon today in Patterson
hall to members of the Dutch
Lunch club. The subject of his talk,
which will be of humorous nature,
is "What's Wrong wih Kentucky?''
The Dutch Lunch committee,
which has been serving meals each
week, will be Introduced at this
meeting. Members of the committee are Mrs. Ida Tllton, Mrs. Hume
Bedford, ohairman of the Y.- W.
C. A., and Mrs. Mildred
Neal
Schnieder.
weekly schedule of Y. W. C.
The
A. activities is as follows:
Monday, 3 p. m. Book hobby
group, Y. W. C. A. offlce. Women's
building: 7:15 p. m. Sophcmore
commission. Women's building; 7:15
p. m. Contract bridge group, Patterson hall; 8:00 p. m. Astronomy
group. Women's building.
Tuesday, 4 p. m. Knitting group,
Women's building; S p. m. Ball
room dancing group, Patterson hall;
7:30 p. m. Tap dancing group, Patterson hall.
Wednesday, 3 p. m Art hobby
group, Women's building; 3 p. m.
Music group. Women's building; 3
p. m. World fellowship. Women's
building; 4 p. m. Social service
group, Women's building.
Thursday, 5 p. m. Senior cabinet,
Women's building.
Friday, 12 noon
Dutch Lunch
club, Patterson hall.
Girls who wish to join any of
these groups are asked to see Augusta Roberts in the Y. W. C. A.
offlce for further information.
The Advisory board of the Y. W.
C. A. will meet Thursday at 4 p. m.
in the Women's building. A discussion on the subject, "Changing
Religious Concepts," will be held.
Also plans for financial projects will
be discussed.

sea-Fo- n,

Funk-house-

KYIAN

REEASES

BEAUTY RULINGS
Queen of Pulchritude

and
Her Attendants Will Be
Presented at Dance,
December 16
IS GOAL

FAIRNESS

WILDCATS BEGIN
FINAL WORKOUT

RESIGNED

FOR LAST GAME

Wildcat Gridiron Mentor Has
No Alibies as Season
Nears End

T. R. UNDERWOOD
TO MAKE TALK

The beauty queen and her five
attendants selected each year in the
contest sponsored by The Kentuc-kiawill be chosen at the Kentucklan Saturday night, December
16,
in the Alumni gymnasium.
Names of the entrants for the contest must be filed in the Kentuckian
offlce by December 1.
Candidates for beauty queen will
be presented between 9 and 10 o'clock the night of the dance and
selection will be made from personal appearance and from photographs submitted vy the candidates.
Announcement of the winner and
the five attendants will be made after the fourth
At that
time The Kentucklan will present
the beauties with flowers.
Judges for the contest will be selected by a group of faculty members chosen by George Vogel, editor
of the yearbook. In an attempt to
make the contest as fair as possible
the names of the Judges will not
be released until after the contest.
Pull page photographs of the winners of the beauty contest will be
Included in the feature section of
the annual. The picture of the
beauty queen will be printed in
College Humor and in University.
Last year, pictures of the contest
winners appeared
in the local
papers.
Naming of candjlclajtes for the
contest is based on the sales campaign which has been conducted by
representatives of the sororities. For
each group of five Kentuckians sold,
one girl may be entered in the
beauty contest.
n,

Dr. Paul Dengler
Makes Address
At Convocation

k.

Dr. Paul L. Dengler, Vienna, spoke
on "Austria and the Peace of Europe," at general convocation at 10
a. m. Tuesday, in Memorial hall.
Dr. Henry Beaumont Of the psychology department introduced the
speaker.
Miss Augusta Roberts,
secretary of the Y. W. C. A., gave
the invocation. Doctor McVey, who
presided at the convocation, announced that he would be the
speaker at the December convocation.
Doctor Dengler gave a brief history of Austria and of the condition
of Europe after the World War. He
explained the present condition of
Europe and how Austria figured in
the present status of affairs. He
told of the plans of Dollphus Zeng-le- r,
chancellor of Austria, as seen
by the people outside of Austria
who are interested in the destiny
of the country.
Doctor Dengler was brought to
the University under the auspices
of the Institute of Education ot
DEAN COOPER REELECTED
New York city, under which he has
At the annual convention of the been lecturing since he came to the
Association of Landgrant Colleges United States in 1925. Since comand Universities held last week in ing to this country he has underlecture tour
the Stevens hotel, Chicago, Dean taken a nation-wid- e
Thomas Poe Cooper of the College which took him through 46 states
as Hawaii.
of Agriculture was reelected
and as far south
reasurer
of the organization.
He has been a director of the
Pres. Frank L. McVey attended the
Institute of Educonvention with Dean Cooper.
cation in Vienna since 1926. Since
he came to this country he has
served teaching engagements at the
University of California. University
'
of Denver and was visiting Carnegie professor at the Universities
of Colorado, Kansas, and Indiana.
secretary-t-

Gamage Benches Several of
the Regulars to Try Out
Second Squad

'

.V

,7'

.,

i

SPECIAL ATTENTION
IS PAID TO BLOCKING
Scrimmage Drills and Work
on

Fundamentals Is
Program

;

with less than a-- week of practice
left before they meet the powerful
University of Tennessee Volunteers.

;'

Thanksgiving Day on 8toll field,
and playing their last game under
the tutelage of Head Coach Harrv
Gamage, the University of Kentucky Wildcats, with a greatly altered
lineup, are working strenuously in
an enori 10 enect what they hope
will be a winning combination.
After the collapse of the Big Blue,
when they met Tulane's Green
Wave last Saturday in New Orleans

j

COACH

HARRY GAMAGE

SPORT RENEWED
FOR U. K.

CO-ED-

S

Basketball
Revived for Women
Students; W.A.A.
Is Sponsor

Inter-sororit- y

Coach Gamage appeared thorough
ly aisgusiea witn tne showing made
by some of his regulars and promised that he would place a fighting
team on the field when the Cats

meet the

Is

TOURNAMENT PLANNED
basketball, for some
time stricken from the list of
women's athletics, will make its
appearance shortly before Christmas when a tournament will be
held under the auspices of the
Women's Athletic association. Nearly every sorority and one independent group have entered a team.
No definite plans have been decided
upon as to the nature of the award
which will be given to the winning
team, but tentative plans include
the giving of an appropriate cup.
All teams must have a certain
number of practice sessions before
the tournament starts. Practice will
begin immediately and will be held
Enin the Women's gymnasium.
tries for the contests have not been
closed yet, and any sorority or independent group wishing to enter
a team may do so by submitting an
entry blank, properly filled out, to
Miss Rebecca Averill at the Women's gym.
All members of the hiking group
are asked to be present for a meeting which will be held in the reading room of Boyd hall at 1:30 p. m.
Saturday. Persons desiring to Join
the group must sign up In the gymnasium before 5 p. m. Friday.
The Walkers club will meet in the
reading room of Boyd hall at 2:15
p. m. Sunday to formulate plans for
the coming year. Miss Helen Jones,
manager of volleyball, announced
that volleyball practice is held
daily in the Women's gym from 4
to 5 p. m.
Inter-sorori-

J

ty

SUKY SPONSORS
DANCE SATURDAY

Vols.

Carrying out his promise, he has
benched several of his regulars and
is giving his former second and
third stringers a chance to fill the
vacant first string berths.
As usual, the Cats appeared weak
in their blocking and the coaches
have been working hard all week
as they have all season, in an effort to get their charges to realize
the importance of good blocking.
In the scrimmage held Wednesday afternoon against the second
team and also against Coach Bir-ke- tt
Lee Fribble's yearling squad,
the newly composed first team, consisting of Frye and Long at ends,
Wagner and Fish, at tackles, Darn-ab- y
and Parrish, guards, Dickey at
center; Jack Jean, Hay, McMillan,
and sometimes Sympson and Ayres
In the backfield, wereable to push
through a heavier and more
team composed of several former first stringers for several
gains.
Before the scrimmage ended, Joe
Rupert was shifted back to the first
team. Kercheval and Ernie Janes,
the Cat's "iron men" were not used
in Wednesday's scrimmage as Coach
Gamage decided to give these stellar
performers a couple of days' rest
before the Tennessee tilt.
The Big Blue probably will continue their scrimmage drills along

with their fundamentals for the
remainder of the week and probably
will wind up their practices with
a heavy scrimmage next Tuesday
afternoon and a final light workout
Wednesday afternoon.

U. K. to Broadcast
On National Chain
Program to Be Part of
Hook-u- p

Coast-to-Coa-

st

Over

Columbia System
Part of a national hook-u- p over
the Columbia broadcasting system
will originate from the University
studios of station WHAS from 8 to

9:15 p. m. Tuesday, November 28,
when the Kentucky Colonels' review
st
goes on the air in a
broadcast.
This broadcast, which was arranged by Governor Laffoon and is
endorsed by General Johnson, is
for the promotion of the NRA
movement and will be participated
in by Kentucky colonels all over the
coast-to-coa-

Band's Expenses on Recent
Trip to Birmingham, Alabama, Will Be Reimbursed
by Receipts
SuKy circle will sponsor a dance
from 9 until 12 p. m., Saturday, in
the Alumni gymnasium. Andy Anderson and his orchestra will furnish music for the dancing which
Prowill include six
ceeds from the dance will be used
to assist in financing the trip which
the band recently made to Alabama
and to meet other expenses such as
homecoming cups, and possibly,
donations to the band for uniforms
and to the Union building fund.
The special committee of 8uKy
which has been in charge of arrangements for the dance is composed of Alice Lang, Jack Faunce,
and Martha Lowry.
Charles Cox and Allan "Pete"
Reininger were selected as members
of the cheering team at a meeting
of SuKy circle, Tuesday afternoon.
These two cheer leaders will begin
their duties at the Thanksgiving
game. They will be presented with
the regular uniform of members of
the cheering team next year.

Relations Group To
Attend Conference

United States.
The program which will originate
here will Include the University
Philharmonic orchestra playing
medleys of Southern songs, and
Miss Anna Bell Ward, who will sing
"My Old Kentucky Home." This
will be the first time that the University Philharmonic orchestra has
played over the Columbia network.
Miss Ward will announce the numbers of the orchestra and will introduce Governor Laffoon who will
speak from Frankfort. Miss Ward
is Secretary and Keeper of the
Seals of all Kentucky Colonels.

THANKSGIVING
SERVICE PLANNED
Y.W.C.A. Will Sponsor Worship Ceremonial to Be Held
in Memorial Hall; Reverend
Heaton to Speak

Rev. Oeorge Heaton, pastor of
Felix Memorial Baptist church, will
profes
Dr. Amry Vandenbosch,
speak to students and faculty at
sor of political science, and several the Thanksgiving service to be givmembers of the International Re en In Memorial hall at 7:30 p. m.
lations club will leave this morning Tuesday, November 28. His subject
for Louisville to attend the Ohio will be "For What May We be
Valley International Relations club Thankful In 1933?" The program
hlch Is now In ses- will be sponsored by the Y. W. C. A.
conference,
will
sion there. Dr. Vandenbosch
The ceremonial will be the second
speak tonight on "The Dutch East of a series of worship services to
be given by the Y. W. C. A. this
Indies."
BEAUMONT'S CLASS
Sir Herbert Ames, former finan year. Lois Robinson, chairman cf
GOES TO CINCINNATI cial director of the League of Na- the worship committee, and Elizations, spoke yesterday at the con beth Hardin, music chairman are
A class In the personnel depart- ference on "How ana 10 wnat ex
in charge of the program. The
ment, under the supervision of Dr. tent May the Treaty of Versailles recognition service was the first of
profesHenry Beaumont, assistant
Be Revised." He will speak this the series in ceremonials, and others
sor of psychology, went to Cincin- morning on "How Oermany Came will be given at Christmas and
morning for the in and Why She is Leaving the Easter.
nati Wednesday
purpose of visiting the Proctor and League."
Reverend Heaton is leader of PitGamble company located there. I Business and student sessions will kin club, having been reelected this
of the class were guests be held tomorrow at the conference, year. He has been in constant deMembers
at a luncheon given for them by and the meet will close with a tour mand for student wqrk since he
came to Lexington several yeajs
the company and later were con- .covering points of interest In
ago.
ducted through the factory
Austro-Amerlc-

,

21

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EDITORS

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WRITERS
May Lancaster

the student body for some time.
"Austria and the Peace of Europe,"
was Doctnr Denpler's subject and
the entire situation In tlint
was discussed and In such a manner as to make everyone present
thoroughly enjoy the talk.
The sneaker declared that he
wanted It to be clearly under? J.xl
that he did not speak for any group
of people and that the views given
were his own and not those of
some other person or group. He
connected the ancient history of
the Austrian Empire with the present and showed how It kept all of
the different waning peoples together. He pointed out that there was
real unity In the old Austrian Em
pire and that this was accomplished In a large measure by the culture which they had developed.
Doctor Dengler brought out the
interesting fact that the chief matter which prohibited the reign of
peace In Europe was the memories
of hatreds which had been built up
and kept alive over a period of
years. This Is essentially, we will
all agree, the chief reason why
peace cannot be permanently as
sured throughout the world.
Doctor Dengler's discussion of
Hitler and the reaction which took
place In Austria towards the Hitler
movement was Interesting from several angles. According to the speaker, there were two classes In Austria In regard to Hitler. First, there
was the class of young people, university students, who favored the
Nazi movement and secondly there
was the class of older persons who
were associated either with the Socialists, the Catholic church, or the
Jews who were all very much opposed to Hitler. The latter group
seems .to have won out because
they have succeeded In putting
Chancellor Dolfus, whom the speaker described as a very capable man,
in office.
The address was concluded by
Doctor Dengler stressing the cultur
ed aspects of civilization and saying
that by the methods of culture and
education, peace could only be pre
served.
The Kernel commends Doctor
Dengler upon his excellent address
and hopes that it will again be the
privilege and pleasure of the Uni
versity, to act as host to him.
1

Norman Garling
NED TURNBULL

..Basins! Mandatt

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