xt77m03xsz7k https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt77m03xsz7k/data/mets.xml Lexington, Ky (Fayette County) University of Kentucky 19081909 The University of Kentucky catalogs contains bound volumes dating from 1865 through 2007. After 2007 course catalogs ceased to be printed and became available online only. course catalogs  English University of Kentucky This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. University of Kentucky course catalogs, 1865- Catalogue of the Officers, Studies, and Students of the State College of Kentucky, Lexington, (1908-1909) text Catalogue of the Officers, Studies, and Students of the State College of Kentucky, Lexington, (1908-1909) 1908 2012 true xt77m03xsz7k section xt77m03xsz7k ,  CATALOGUE I
  c>1= THE i I
 I OFFICERS, STUDIES, AND STUDENTS J {I
  OF Tm; It
  STATE UNIVERSITY,  
 ‘ LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.
 I »  
 I SESSION ENDING JUNE 3, I909. · l I ‘, ‘
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     ~ .1‘   RIA?  ,
_. UNIVERSITY CALENDAR. 2 .
Z   g
Z 1909. *
'  Summer Schools open ................ ]une 7th to Aug. 2I5t. I
7;  Examinations for Entrance ............ Sept. 2nd, 3rd, 4th. · '
  Examinations to remove conditions ..... Sept. 2nd, 3rd, 4th.
_ Registration ........................... Sept. 2nd to Sth.
~ First Term begins ......,............. Thursday, Sept. 9th.
  Thanksgiving ......... . .............. Thursday, Nov. 25th.
i" Board of Trustees meet ............... Tuesday, Dec.` 14th. V
' Christmas Holidays begin ............. Friday, Dec. 24th.
ML 1910. `
$7 Second Term begins .................. Tuesday, ]an. 4th.
‘ Second Term of the Academy begins. . . Monday, ]an. 31st. l `
VVashington’s Birthday ............ ....Tuesday, Feb. 22nd. ‘ , 1
FQ Union Society Contest ................ Tuesday, Feb. 22nd. · ._ 1,
· Third Term begins ................... Monday, March 215t. _. _ 4
. Patterson Society Contest ............. Saturday, March 26th. i _ ,
° Final Examinations begin ............. Monday, May 23rd.
j Board of Trustees meet ............... Tuesday, May 3ISt. '
F Class Day ....,....................... Wednesclay, June 1st.
A Alumni Banquet ...................... \Vednesday, ]une Ist. ,
  Commencement ............... . ...... Thursday, ]une 2nd. · . ‘ . _
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 iii? SCHEDULE OF ENTRANCE EXAIVIINATIONS
.     “ l909
  TT .
        , Thursday Friday Saturday
  Sept. 2. Sept. 3. Sept. 4. `
  Algebra ................ rr- r B11. 9-11 .-1.11. _
.§g{gl; ti i_}v¥._.Q. Astronomy ............. 9-10 A. M. 8- 9 A. M, L
  Botany ......... . ,...... 10-11 A. M. 10-11 A. M. ,
    Chemistry .............. 11- I P. M. 9-11 A. M. ,
  j` y Civics ............ . ..... 8- 9 A. M. _ j
    _   Drawing ............... 9-10 A. M. ]
  " A English ....... . ......... 11- 1 P. M. 11- 1 1".M. ‘ .
    I ‘ French ................. 11- 1 P. M. 11- 1 P. M.
JJ   _ · Geometry (Plarel ...... 3- 5 P. M. 9-11 A. M.
  Geometry (Solid) . ..... 3- 5 P. M. 3- 5 P. M. ,
lil   ` German ........ . ....... 3- 5 P. M. 3- 5 P. M. ]
    _‘ ‘ __ Greek ...... . ........... S- 9 A. M. 8- 9 s\.M. ,
  U History ................ 9-11 A. M. S- 9 A. M. 5
ii   1 History (American) .... 9-10 A. M. 9-10 A. M.
is   [ Latin ......... . ......... 3- 5 P. M. 3- 5 P. M. ·
ji` A Manual Training ....... 3- 5 P. M. 3- 5 P, M. - y
;` ° Physical Geography ...., 3- 5 P. M. 3- 5 P. M. —
l Physics ................ 9-11 A. M. 9-11 A. l\l. i -
‘1.» Physiology ............. 9-10 A. M. 9-10 A. M. -
Tl`rigonometry .... . ...... 9-11 A. M. 11- 1 P. M.
·. '_ Zoology ................ 3- 5 P. M,
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   .. ` '   |‘  . .
TI·IE STATE UNIVERSITY.
IS ` HISTORY. . 4
4   GRLCULTURAL and4 Mechanical colleges in the . · lh
[,*;. 7;, United States owe their origin to an act of Congress
  entitled “An Act Donating Public Lands to the sev- i
Y   I d · · · · ,
  era States an Terr1tor1es4wh1cl1 may provide Col- .
‘ Li.- leges for the benefit of Agriculture and the Mechanic
XI- Arts," approved July 2, 1862. The amount of land donated was
XI, 30,000 acres for each Representative in the National Congress. Un-
\’l. der this allotment Kentucky received 330,000 acres. Several years
XI. elapsed before the Commonwealth established an Agricultural and
. Mechanical College, under this act. ll/hen established it was not I
placed upon an independent basis, but was made one of the colleges V
Xl. ` of Kentucky University, now Transylvania University, to which ,
lf. institution the annual interest of the proceeds of the Congressional
land-grant was to be given for the purpose of carrying on its V
M- A operations. The land—scrip had meanwhile been sold for fifty cents ,
M· per acre, and the amount received—$165,0oo—invested in six per V `
cent Kentucky State bonds, of which the State became custodian   :4
M. in trust for the College. _ ·‘ , .
M. The connection with Kentucky University continued till 1878. . .~
M. when the act of 1865, making it one of the Colleges of said Univer-
M. · sity, was repealed; and a commission was appointed to recommend _
M. 4 to the Legislature of 1879-80 a plan of organization for an insti-
l\I. ’ tution, including an Agricultural and Mechanical college, such as ~
M· the necessities of the Commonwealth required. - A ~ -
M· The city of Lexington offered to the Commission (which was l
also authorized to recommend to the General Assembly the place
which, all things considered, offered the best and greatest induce- '.
ments for the future and permanent location of the College) the
City Park, containing hfty—two acres of land within the limits of 4
the city, and thirty thousand dollars of city bonds for the erection A
of buildings. This offer the county of Fayette supplemented by 4 I  
» twenty thousand dollars in county bonds, to be used either for the _ 4 .
erection of buildings or for the purchase of land. The offers of i   I 4
I * f
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  {    A _ ·
A     2 THE STATE Umvrnsiry -
  L/ 1.; ufl t `
    · ‘ Lexington and the county of Fayette were accepted by the General
    _;§ ., ` Assembly.
    By the act of incorporation and the amendments thereto, con-
  stituting the charter ofthe Agricultural and Mechanical College
  of Kentucky, liberal provision is made for educating, free of
  A tuition, the energetic young men and women of the Common- V
    wealth whose means are limited. An act of the General Assembly -
    of the Commonwealth of Kentucky approved March` 16th., 1908, —
  changed the style and title of the institution from Agricultural .
    and Mechanical College to that of State University, Lexington, v_
  ‘;*. 2 ‘ Kentucky. The University, with the additional departments which T
  ' A shall, from time to time, be opened as the means placed at, the   A
  ti disposal of the Trustees allow, will, it is hoped, in the not distant {
  _, gi, future do a great work in advancing the educational interests of Y
  Kentucky. Being entirely undenominational in its character, it  
 {ff appeals with confidence to the people of all creeds and of no ~
  ·_;= creed, and will endeavor, in strict conformity with the requirements t
  , of its organic law, to afford equal advantages to all, exclusive  
  ` privileges to none. The liberality of the Commonwealth, in sup-  
Q   plementing the inadequate annual income arising from the pro-
}j _ [ j ° ceeds of the land-scrip invested in State bonds, has enabled the
    _ ' Trustees to begin and carry on, upon a scale commensurate with -
tr",} the wants of our people, the operations of the institution whose
libc; . management and oversight have been committed to them by the ‘
 i , . ` W t- General Assembly of Kentucky. E ~,.
g   . SCOPE OF STUDIES.  
·; ln the act of Congress making provision for the class of insti— ,
_` ‘ tutions to which The State University belongs, it is declared ·"that p ·
Q their leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific =`
·,, ` and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach  
such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the lf,)
, ‘ mechanic arts, in order to promote the liberal and practical educa-
{ tion of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and profes-
I. sions of life." To the three departments of agriculture, the me-
· c— chanic arts, and military science, contemplated in the act as indis-` _;,
` pensable, an Experiment Station has been added by the United i
‘ . I States, and liberal provision has been made for instruction in all {
I·;i" ` ` branches of science and in the classics, so that this institution is l ‘
*,.·l= "M - .. . _ . `   . .· ··~· ·“*“ "'

 » Q ' ..·`·i¤  ,
 _ GENERAL INFORMATION 3 ·
ll far more than an agricultural and mechanical college, embracing I
as it does, not merely the three original departments, but-eighteen
ig others. 1
,f ` DEPARTMENT OE EDUCATION.
l` , In 1893 the college authorities, in response to a demand for .
gl “ advanced instruction for teachers, organized a full collegiate course ` ·
’ leading to the degree of Bachelor of Pedagogy. In 1906 two full . 1
11 collegiate courses, each with Education as a major, were substi- . . I
1’ . tuted for the course established in 1893. One leads to the degree `
h 1 A of Bachelor of Arts in Education and the other to Bachelor of '
i   Science in Education. . ·
1
f .
it { KENTUCKY EXPERIMENT STATION.
O   The Agricultural Experiment Station of the State University
S I was established by the Executive Committee of the Board of Trus-
C l tees in September, 1885, when the Department was organized and ` .
" . a Director appointed. In 1886, the Station was recognized and
" named by the General Assembly of Kentucky. In 1887 it became _
C the beneficiary of the first annual appropriation of $15,000, under
h ‘ E the Hatch Act _pr0viding for the establishment of Agricultural
C , Experiment Stations for the States and Territories. In 1906 "for
S ` the more complete endowment" of Agricultural Experiment Sta- ` i
‘v. tions, an act of Congress, known as the Adams Act, appropriated ‘ ._ _
to each State and Territory $5,000 for the year ending june 30, ,. \ v_
IQO6. and the same sum with an increase of $2,000 per annum for i ` , .,
five years. after which the maximum of $15,000 shall continue
Qc ~A without change. I
C P ` The work of the Station is directed to two objects: 1. To a eon—
1   stant succession of experiments made by specialists, in order to
E   learn which applications of science will insure the best returns from , ‘ p
·"* the farm, the garden, the orchard, the vineyard, the stockyard, '
- and the dairy. 2. T0 the publication of bulletins announcing such .
- results of the experiments as are found to be valuable to the ·
I M people of Kentucky who seek profit from any one of those prime ‘
S -5 sources of wealth—the soil, the flock, and the herd.
1 , The results of experiments have been published in nineteen i
_ l annual reports and one hundred and forty bulletins, and general
°   I appreciation of their utility is shown in the fact that, while no i ` ,'
1 · 1
. Q-TI?
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.  _'   { A 4 THE STATE UN1vnns1TY  
   < ·,   T
      `, bulletin is sent except upon application for it, the mailing list of l
 ,3 V the Station contains about thirteen thousand tive hundred names,
    and is ever increasing. _
 _’   `With an ample endowment, a large and commodious building `
  planned for the purpose, adequate apparatus, a good experimental [
  farm conveniently situated, and a staff of twenty-one scientists en-  ;
  gaged in seven divisions of research and in correspondence with T
li :    other stations, the Kentucky Experiment Station is not only an "'
H     i important adjunct to the University in the education of students for I
    j l· the leading industrial pursuits, but, directly or indirectly, through ,
  ' the continual diffusion of knowledge for the beneht of so large a ge
  proportion of our populat1on, it is extremely useful to the Com- {9
  ig,f,· m0nwealth_ i
  at-;{;_¤,<· P l
    LOCATION.  
,,`;fitt  
  The State University is located in the former City Park, in the i
  · southern part of the city of Lexington and near the Cincinnati
:`il~j`=‘ ’ ` Southern Railway. The site is elevated and commands a good
 ·_   _ ,_ view of much of the city and of the surrounding country.  
_Q iii a Lexington, now a growing city of forty thousand inhabitants, is 1 _.
  `1 in the heart of the far—famed Blue Grass region, a region distin·  
  if  guished for fertility and healthfulness, wealth and beauty. Numer- l_
  ff? i n. ous schools and churches, an intelligent and refined population, well  
  " H paved streets, handsome buildings, extensive waterworks, and an L
lj   ; unsurpassed system of street electric railways make Lexington at-
  ; ’ » tractive as a seat of learning and place of residence, while the
  ’ — splendid stock farms scattered over the large body of fertile
'   country around it afford advantages hardly equaled elsewhere for V
  the student who desires to become familiar with the best breeds
in of horses, cattle, sheep, and swine in America. Moreover, with ‘
·. railroads diverging in seven directions, Lexington is the railroad  
‘ · center in Kentucky, and in direct connection with Louisville, Cin-
if i cinnati. Maysville, Huntington, and Chattanooga, and with more ;
V" than seventy counties of the Commonwealth. And when to the l
. I ., electric railways now in operation to Georgetown, Paris, Versailles, EQ,
·i and Frankfort, those projected to \Vinchester, Richmond, and Nich- (R
. olasville shall be added, the hourly trains of these roads will enable l
  " students residing near them to attend the University conveniently  
li   from their homes. [
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 ° GENERAL lNroi