xt77m03xw39h https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt77m03xw39h/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19700401  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April  1, 1970 text The Kentucky Kernel, April  1, 1970 1970 2015 true xt77m03xw39h section xt77m03xw39h Campaign Profiles: A Summary Of Platforms

By JEAN RFJMAKER
Assistant Managing Editor
It's that time of year again.
The campus political machinery is in
high gear. It's time for the Student Government election campaigns.
This year's campaign boasts of about
the usual number of old and new faces.
One of the old faces is that of Jim
Williams, who is running for president
of Student Government. Williams also
t
ran last year on a
platform in
which he promised:
"To be lionest.
y "Not to get hung-up- .
"To be
"To build bridges, to blaze trails
and to forge bonds of mutual human
five-poin-

open-minde-

understanding.
"To keep students from getting the
shaft."
If his campaign appears to be a big
William

put-o-

says:

"I'm as serious

running for president) as I ever
was." He added, however, that "if you're
not Steve Bright and you're not Ched
Jennings, it's hard to be serious."
(about

Williams does not have a vice presi-

dential running mate.
SG representative Bill Dawson and
his running mate, Don Waggener, represent the newly formal Student Issues
Party,' SIP).
Among the proposals advanced by
Dawson and Waggener are.
The suggestion of a free
service in the Student Center.
An improved ticket distribution system for basketball games.
A centralized agency to aid students,
especially in the area of their minors,
in obtaining the courses necessary to
check-cashin-

g

graduate.
Both Dawson and Waggener are political science seniors and plan to attend
UK's School of Law next fall.
Presidential candidate Gary Smith and
vice presidential candidate Dan Crabtree
are stressing volunteerism in their SG
campaign. They feel that the emphasis
in the past has been on "radical" organizations and that "students have been
forced to be apathetic."

ft '

In order to gain the needed student
reform, they feel that students must be
active first and they see their volunteer
plan as a means toward that goal.
Neither Smith nor Crabtree have been
affiliated with SG in the past. Smith is
a junior majoring in pre-mcand psychology and Crabtree is a sophomore majoring
in history.
John Stainback is running independently for the office of vice president
because he feels that other candidates for
vice president will not "disagree" with
their presidential running mates.
He has said that he wants "to provide
a fly in the ointment." He says he "will
not be a silent vice president."
Stainback was a candidate for SG
representative during last spring's campaign.
Among the old faces in this campaign
is Steve Bright, who is running for president. He and his running mate, Skip
Althoff, claim they wage an
campaign and plan to move away
d

issue-oriente-

from

the "present

prestige-oriente-

d

d

Stu-

dent Government."

Bright has been a SG representative
for three years. Last year, he was speaker
of the Assembly. Presently, lie is the chair-

man of the Student Services Committee.
Last year, he made an unsuccessful
bid for vice president as Bruce Carver's
running mate.
Althoff is presently a member of the
University Student Advisory Committee
(USAC) and was formerly clerk of the SG
Assembly.
Ched Jennings and Boger Valentine
round out the slate of presidential and
vice presidential candidates. They are
stressing a "continual need to improve
services for students" and the need for
Student Government to have a strong
elected leadership to unite the various
factions on campus.
Jennings and Valentine were both appointed to the SG Cabinet by president
Tim Futrell. Jennings is a junior political
science major and is the director of student services. Valentine is a sophomore
and is the director of student housing and
dining service for SG.

i

J

THE KENTUCKY

4

EC
-

Wednesday, April

E RNEI
University of Kentucky, Lexington

1, 1970

Vol. LXI, No. 116

Presidential Candidates
Speak, Answer Questions

SG

Kernel Photo by Kay Brookshire
candidates for SG president, voiced

Jim Williams, along with other
his platform Tuesday night before meetings of campus organizations. Williams managed to entertain the audiences by adding some
humorous comments about the election and Student Government.
The other candidates also took their turns in explaining their
platforms and making their campaign promises.

WLM Members Oppose

Census Discrimination
Women's

Liberation
Movement (WLM) of Lexington announced at a press conference Tuesday that it is "joining many groups across the nation in urging women to consider wording in the 1970 Census Form."
The members protest the use
of "head of the House, followed
by a space for "wife of the
head".
Liberation
Women's
urges
women "to fight such discrimination" by considering the following three types of action:
Boycott the Census-ref- use
to mail in a "discriminatory"
form.
Mark both wife and husband
as head of household.
Mark wife as head, and fill
in husband as husband of
head.
Leave "head" and "wife of
head" spaces blank and fill
in children first, then wife
and husband by marking
"other" and filling in exact
relationship.
In explaining why theWLM
thought the government was
practicing discrimination in the
Census Forms, it was stated that
the "Civil Bights Act of 196 i insures women equal opportunity
in employment. If women are
equal in our society, there should

The

be no such insidious assumptions of her inferior ability to
head the family on the home-froor in the financial front.
We must end sex discrimination
being practiced by our
nt

By PAT MATIIES
Assistant Managing Editor
And
RON HAWKINS
Kernel Staff Writer
Candidates for the offices of
Government
Student
(SG)
president and vice president addressed members of the
Inter-fraterni-

ty

and
Councils Tuesday night
in the Student Center. Later
Tuesday night, the same candidates addressed a forum spon
(IFC)

Pan-hellen- ic

sored by political organizations
on campus,
pus.
Ched Jennings and his running mate Roger Valentine
concern over how they
wanted to help develop a better "relationship"
among different factions on campus. They
included the Students for a
Democratic Society, Greeks and
non-Greek- s.

"We want to help the Greeks
to build a new fraternity row",

was a statement by Jennings.
Both candidates said that they
could work together to effect
their plans. Valentine is not a
member of a fraternity and
stated that he had no desire to
be.
Steve Bright, a long-tim- e
member of the Student Government and a candidate for president, said "we can't afford to
let the Student Government
presidential campaign turn into
a popularity contest."
In his first political attempt,
Don Waggener, a vice presidential candidate running on the
same ticket with Bill Dawson,
said "I know a tremendous
number of students who are
interested in uniting the campus."
inFollowing the
troductory speeches, members
of the audience asked questions.
Joe Maguire, who ran as a
vice presidential candidate last
spring with Thorn Pat Juul and
five-minu- te

was soundly defeated, asked
Jennings how he proposed to
join the diverse campus groups

together.

Jennings said that he and his
running mate, Valentine, hoped
"to get together with all students in trying to meet their
Please Turn To Page 3

Kunstler
'Off-Campu- s'

William Kunstler, defense

schedule,

Free University Seeks Organization

JANE D. BROWN
Kernel Staff Writer
In an appeal issued to all students, faculty, and anyone "educationally aware,"
Paul Wertheimer, next year's Free University
coordinator, stated "what the Free U needs
now is organization. And this need must be
fulfilled by everyone whether black, white,
Greek or freak interested in furthering their
education and the education of future genBy

erations."
The Free

U at UK, now just about one
year old, was initiated by Spud Thomas, a
graduating senior. The movement is nationwide. Its motto, as stated in a bulletin
from the University of Chicago's Free U,
sa s that a Free University strives to stress

"creation rather than production, involvement rather than obligation, and spirit alxjve
investment."
Wertheimer elaborated on tliis statement,
saying that as he and members of the Free U
view it, "education is a radical concept,"
and as such "it must change with time."
The purpose of the Free U is to form a
'
laboratory for education experimentation

as well as to serve as a learning process.
' "Our purpose is not confrontation but

communication, not polarization of the acabut popularization,"
demic community
Wertheimer continued. "We are making an
appeal to the student body as a whole. It is
not political. It is apolitical in the sense
that we are not trying to change anything
but education. The Free U is the vanguard
of educational progress."

Added Participation
In order to implement this progress, next
year's coordinator sees a need for added
support and participation from all interested
persons. He means, he says, participation
in every aspect, from organizing to communication to actual experimentation.
In its short past, the Free U has remained almost wholly unstructured, but under the guidance of Spud Thomas, a "strong
foundation" was laid. lit organizing now,
Wertheimer thinks that "we will hold on
to the foundation and build on it, thus
making it more valuable and more viable."
Continuing, Wertheimer said, "I think

at-

torney for the "Chicago Seven,"
will be at the Holiday Inn North
Saturday night as part of the
"Law Days" program.
The Law College program is
dosed both to the public and
the press.
SDS previously had asked
Kunstler to speak at UK but he
reportedly could not fit it into his

in having more people in responsible

posi-

tions, more people will become involved,
and therefore their voice for change on campus will become louder and louder."
Stable Free U
In forming a mote stable structure within
the Free U, Wertheimer has worked out a
tentative plan for four new committees.
The Public Relations Committee wiil serve
an "internal" communications function. It
will disseminate facts and information in the
form of pamphlets and letters about the Free
U to members of the community, administration, faculty and student body.
The other committee dealing with communication will serve as "a sort of secretary." It will carry on an exchange of ideas
and progress reports withother schools across
the country that also have Free U systems.
As in other organizations, the Free U plans
to have a Treasury Committee devoted to
financial matters. Although expenditures are
minimal, Wertheimer sees a need for this
committee as a place to collect donations,
issue money for public relations materials,
Please Turn To P&re 7

* 2 --

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL. Wctlnc mI.iv, April

1,

1970

Don't Get Caught In The Big Squeeze

mankind is much more civilised
By GWEN RANNEY
Women's Page Editor
or so it has been said. Women today are wearing a living
Once upon a time, oli, alxnit
five hundred years ago, men stretch version of the chasity
belt . . . the girdle.
didn't trust their wives, especialThe irony in this restricting
ly when these husbands went
crusading on long extended "bus- constricter is that women will
iness trips" in the Far East.
voluntarily place themselves in it
Of course this was at a time often against the wishes of the
male. They rationalize this tumbefore there were private detectorture and waist wrenching
tives, so the Medieval Man had my
in their constant effort to look
to think of another way to insure
his wife's loyalty. . . theceinture better.
There is hardly a female alive
de chastete, alias the chasity belt.
over the age of fifteen who hasn't
With her iron drawers on, the used the
in
as a
husband was certain that his wife her battle girdle bulge. weapon
of the
couldn't run around. He just put
This "weapon" comes in a
the chasity belt on his wife,
variety of shapes and styles: regclamped the padlock on and ular girdle, panty, long-leand
locked her in.
with or without hose fasteners.
This was probably the first Some are
designed to squeeze
time in history where the male in the derriere, others the
waist,
imposed such a tiht restriction
or the hips, and still others have
the female wardrobe.
concerning
ahold on the stomach.
More Civilized?
Girdles I)o Harm
Hut now four centuries later
This is a
according to

...

.

one medical source. According
to him, "the biggest harm a girdle
can do is that it will do the work
the stomach muscles should do."
And a big tummy is the result,
because the muscles are too weak
to be held in naturally.

the long run, girdles
actually defeat their purpose.
Such cases are rare but too
much pressure on the abdomen
from girdles can cause high blood
pressure, fainting spells,
So in

tor that
Thank
eoodness
healthy invention . . the panty
hose. Today's girdle now Just
.

needs to hold in

not hold up.

Yet some women will still hold

out and hold on to their "security binders."

Five Pounds Slimmer?

g

no-n- o

V1

'J

The

Dorm Qhej
RANNEY

By GWEN

J
South Of The Border Surprise
Hola!! Senoritas! Do you have
mucha hunger in your dorm rooms
late at night?

HELP WANTED
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
The YMCA of Greater Lexington
is presently
applicaaccepting
tions for counselor's jobs at YMCA
Daniel Boone residence,
Camp
camp for the Summer. College
students of good Christian character, who have a desire to work
with young boys, and who possess some camping skills are eliContact the YMCA at
gible.
255-565- 1
for more information
or come by 239 East High Street
and pick up an application.

Ah, si.
see what you need:
South of the Border surprise
.

.

I

cas-erol-

V

For this recipe you'll only
need: one can of tomales, one
can of chili con came and sliced
cheese.

i.

I

Turn on your pop com popper
and let it get hot. Next line the
popper bottom with the tomales.
Let them cook for awhile. Turn'
them over to prevent burning.

I-

-

Cover the tomales with chili.
NOW TURN OFF THE POPPER!!! Let simmer and top with
cheese.

Photomontage By Dick Ware

WE

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five days a week and circulated among 16,000
students.

The Kentucky Kernel can
boost your sales by placing your merchandise in a
market that has proven
itself to be consistent.

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Don't wait for it to come
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go get 'em
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The Kentucky Kernel

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the hanger and on you. The secret? Fit.
So if you want good fashion in the season's newest colors and fabrics, think
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THE KERNEL

CLASSIFIED COLUMN DAILY

AN EXHIBITION & SALE
presented by
LONDON GRAFICA ARTS
a member of the
London Arts Group
More than 400 original etchings,
lithographs, woodcuts, and
screenprints including works by:
CALDER, CHAGALL, PICASSO,
VASARELY, REMBRANDT and
LONDON ARTS' PUBLICATIONS
originals from $10 to $4000

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
Room 206

Thursday - April 2,
10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

1970

Iernel

The Kentucky
The

Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40500. Second class
post. ice paid at Lexinnton, Kentucky.
M.iiled live times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Hoard of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4abti.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1913.
Advertising published herein is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
talse or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION
Yearly, by mail

KATES

Per copy, from files

$9 45
$.10

KERNEL TELEPHONES
Editor, Managing Editor . . v
Editorial Page Editor,
Associate Editors, Sports
News Desk

Advertising, Business, Circulation

2321
2320
2447
231V

* TIIF. KENTUCKY KERNEL. Wednesday, April I, 1970

BSU Newsletter
St resses Blacks
Ity MARY N. SUT1 ITU LAND

Kernel S t a IT Writer
Members of tlic Mack Student
Union (HSU) have started a
newsletter
to emphasize
the
Mack student and his activities
on c ampus.
The first issue of the newsletter was distributed at Tuesday
night's meeting of the liSU.
Iknnie Howl, editor, stated
that by next fall the staff will
try to publish a newspaper for
the black student on campus.
Until then the newsletter will
come out every two weeks.
Howl also stated that he does
not want to see cither publica

V

tion become "just pages of announcements," nor does he want
to see friction between black and
white readers.
"If an article appears in the
Kernel, then any rebuttal should
be sent to the Kernel and not
to the HSU's
paper," said Howl.
The HSU announced it is supporting the entire Students for
Action and Responsibility (SAR)
ticket in next week's Student
Government elections.
Hale urged all members of the
HSU to participate in the Martin
Luther King Memorial Service
which will be Thursday 7:30
p.m. in Memorial Hall.

I
V
-

v,

president Ron Hale makes a point at Tuesday's meeting.
BSU members have launched a newsletter to emphasize the black
student and his campus activities. The first issue of the newsletter,
edited by Bcnnie Bond, was distributed at the meeting. The group
also discussed who they would support in the
SG
Kernel Photo By Kay Brookshire
elections.

DSU

Newsletter

and to receive credit for it. He
added, however, that "I think
there is a need to get instruction
by the military olf campus."

He sajd courses in military
science should be taught by
people of "qualified academic
status." He said he did not think
BOTC should be "driven off"
campus.
In opening remarks, Bill Dawson decried the "idealism" of his
He said, "We've
opponents.
heard tonight a great deal of
idealism. More than anything,
idealism divorced from reason."
Don Wagcncr, Dawson's running mate, criticized the "one-ma- n
show" put on in the past by
SG presidents. He claimed Bill
Dawson "has creative ideas, but
realizes he doesn't have all the
answers."
Jim Williams, candidate for
SG president, entertained the
audience with humorous comments about Student Government and the election.
Williams said his administration "will be known as the 'Big
Deal. "
on what he
Gommenting
would do if elected, Williams
said he would do away with
Trotskyites-trait- ors
SDS.
'They're
to the revolution," Williams commented.

Qualified Specialists Needed
For Air Pollution Control
Clean air standards may be a
bone of contention
between
regulatory agencies and industry
for some time to come, but the
growing need for trained personnel in the field of air pollution
control is a subject on which
both groups agree, says a University of Kentucky engineering
professor.
"There are many more jobs
available for technically-traine- d
personnel in the field of air pollution control than there are
qualified specialists to fill them,"
says Dr. Robert B. Grieves,
chairman of the UK Department
of Chemical Engineering.
An attempt to fill the personnel gap is underway at UK,
where a traineeship program in
air pollution control was launched 18 months ago.
Financed by a $300,000
grant from the National Air Pollution Control Administration of
the U.S. Public Health Service,
the program is one of ten of its
kind in the nation. It is a cooperative effort of three UK

CLASSIFIED ADS
Katri are $1.33 for 21) wordi, $3.00
fur three consecutive insertions of the
iimt ad of 20 words, and $:t.?5 per

week, "0 words.
The deadline Is 11 a.m. the day
prior to publication. No advertisement
may cite race, religion or national
for renting
origin as a qualification
rooms or for employment.

Skylark convertible; 1967.
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able Are ion interested in becoma Montessoii
teael er? The
ing
Montessoii Sihool of Lexington, Kentucky is ofleting $1,000
tou.iid tuition. The training retinues a summer and nine months
ot intei nsiwp. You are tnen obligated for a year to teach in our
school. Male or female may apply. A
Bachelor' degree in any field is required before the start of training
this summer. Please obtain application from Placement Olf ice and mall
to Jon Shepard, 610 Warrington
Drive, Lexington, Kentucky 40302.
The deadline for application is April

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master's degree students in training and the first Ph.D candidate
began his course work in January."
Kentuckians receiving trainee-ship- s
include James E. Jones,
Mayfield; William D. Glenn and
William L. Brangers, Louisville,
and Harold Peters, Frankfort.
Peters was granted a leave of
absence from his post in the
state Air Pollution Control Commission to complete his specialized training.
are open to
Traineeships
and mathematics
chemistry
graduates as well as to chemical,
mechanical and civil engineers.

The Kentucky Kernel
Applications are now being
taken by Publications Adviser
Charles Reynolds
for next year's editors of
and The Kentuckian
Aspirants for editor arc asked to deliver a
summary of attributes and reasons
for desiring the position, together with a transcript of all college work, to Mr. Reynolds
in Room 113 of the Journalism Building betwo-pag- e

FOR SALE "Kustom" 200 amplifier,
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In its first year of operation,
the traineeship program produced three specialists, two of
whom have gone directly to
work on Kentucky's pollution
control program for the Kentucky Air Pollution
Control
Commission. The third accepted
an assignment in Virginia.
"Interest is growing," says Dr.
Grieves. "There now are ten
e
and several part-tim- e

The Kentucky Kernel

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Completely furnished,
electric kitchens, electric heat.
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SGP residential Candidates
Continue Their Campaigns

Continued From Page One.
demands in a way we can help
benefit the entire University."
In the later session, a specific
question of campus unity was
put to Jennings. He was asked
by Maguire if he would use Student Government funds to pay
for the release of SDS members
if arrested. Maguire pointed out
that the University of Tennessee's SG president had allocated
SG funds for the bail release
of UT students.
After several hesitations and
qualifications, Jennings said it
would depend upon the individual situation. He said he could
not spend SG money without
the support of the assembly.
Maguire then asked if Jennings would use his power to
gain such support.
Jennings again replied that it
would depend upon the situation. Jennings finally refused to
say if he would provide funds
for students' release in any
situation.
Steve Bright was asked alxjut
accreditation of ROTC courses.
The person questioning Bright
said that Bright was enrolled in
several military science courses.
Bright said he thought that
students should be allowed to
take "any course" they wanted

-.- 1

and downtown.
Parking.
4
31M-A1-

APARTMENT for rent on Rose street
one half block from Euclid, $97.50
a month, including utilities. Available after Mav 9. Call
31M-A-

fore April 6.
The Board of Student Publications will
meet later in April to choose the editors.
Applicants will be interviewed by the board.

6

FOCUS

f

BrT

FOCUS ON THE FUTURE

MONDAY, APRIL 6th
Speaker: Dr. Dean Jarcs, Political Science Dept.
Topic: The Environment
Speaker: Dr. Gene Mason, Political Science Dept.
Topic: Politics in the Future
TUESDAY, APRIL 7th
Speaker: Dr. Donald Nugent, Dept. of History
Topic: The Future of Mysticism
Speaker: Dr. C. J. Crcmcrs, Dept. of Mcch. Engineering
Topic: Moon Rocks
Focus will start at 7:30 p.m. in the Student Center Theater, April
6, 7. There will be a reception following each program in Room
214 of the Student Center.

* The Other Side Of Literacy Tests

The question of literacy tests

for potential voters has arisen again,
in an area other than the Deep
South and finally earned a Supreme

Court hearing to settle the matter
once and for all. Thelatest furordc-velope- d
in Washington state where
farma group of Mexican-America- n
ers were denied voting privileges
after failing a literacy test.
Opponents of the literacy tests
are using the same arguments they
used during the Mississippi trouble
of a few months ago. They say
the Mexicans were denied their

voting rights on purely racial
grounds and in flagrant violation
of the 14th Amendment.
Granted, literacy tests can be
misused to prevent certain minority groups from expressing their
unhappiness with the establishment; this was proven to be the
case in Mississippi. Tests in the
d
South were
shown to be too difficult for many
college students and administered
only in areas where Negroes could
swing an election one way or the
other. Such debasing tactics have

caused many to abhor the ideas
of any kind of literacy test at the
polls.

The idea can be viewed in
another context however. As abominable as it might seem, there are
still places in this country containing individuals who can neither
read nor write. These people habitually reside in areas untouched
by the news media and can not
afford such luxury items as televisions and radios.

deeply-prejudice-

The question then is can these
people actually give an intelligent
account of themselves at the polls?

Kernel Soapbox
By USAC M EMB ERSHIP
During the past year, the Universiy
Student Advisory Committee has investigated many matters of concern to UK

students. From our investigations have
emerged proposals for bettering a number
of aspects of UK life. Some of these proposals, in skeletal form, are listed below.
The current Student Government elections present a major opportunity to work
for bettering UK. USAC will not endorse,
nor would it be proper for us to endorse,
any particular individual or group of candidates. We do feel, however, that the
proposals which follow should be supported by your Student Covemment.
USAC hopes that each of you in the student electorate will ascertain where the
candidates stand on these issues and vote
accordingly. We believe that responsible
candidates cannot avoid taking a position
on such major issues as these.

Mandatory evaluation of instruction

by students should be adopted for use
in merit evaluation procedures.
Departments should be encouraged to
set up more extensive and intensive advising procedures, including the use of
to advise freshmen and
upperclassmen
sophomores on some matters.

Along with the purely illiterate

The UK grading system should be are a mass of individuals who can
substantially revised, including the ex- be considered little more than litto general studies
pansion of pass-fai-l
requirements.
y The general studies requirement program should be evaluated with an eye
to expanding it in some areas and greatly
improving the quality of instruction available through it.
All major academic divisions of the
University (departments, schools, colleges
and the like) should establish Student
Advisory Councils to provide a formal
channel for student academic concern.
All major academic divisions of the
University should have at least one fully

erate. They have either forgotten
or never known the political precepts on which this country was
founded; what's more, many don't
even care. This ignorant mass is
ineasily swayed by the two-b- it
stigatorthe man willing to buy
their vote or drive them to the

participating and voting graduate representative and one such undergraduate
representative in their decision-makinbodies if they offer programs at those
g

respective levels.
Students, faculty, and administration should work together to significantly improve the quality of undergraduate
instruction, which is less than notable
at UK.
These are examples of the types of
issues with which responsible candidates
should be concerned. Make this a campaign where these important issues get
the attention they deserve.

Kernel Forum: the readers write
Wall) Is Willing

Having heard rumors of a "Wally Urvis

for President write-i- n campaign" for several weeks now, I finally ran into Wally on

campus last week. Wally told me that he
would accept a draft for Student Government President. Mr. Urvis doesn't believe
there is any way he can win the election
without going through the Mickey Mouse
campaign trail bit, but he would appreciate every write-i- n vote he can get.
Wally is the type of person this campus
has needed for years. Wally is the only
person who is willing to stand up to the
University Administration as well as to
groups such as the cant-pu- s
SDS. Wally is truly an independent
thinker and is worthy of every voter's
consideration.
KEITH MOREHEAD
Engineering Senior

Desires Priority Change
The Presidential and Vice

Presidential
candidates seem to advocate the increased
expansion of Student Government into
academic affairs. The primary issues are
obvious: extended pass-failiberalized
academic requirements, improvements in
the advising system, and recognizance of
the Free University.
The biggest problem in the past concerning these areas has been the Assembly. Not enough representatives have
l,

openly ami actively fought for academic
reforms. The majority lies in those representatives who wau to primarily concern
themselves with things like busses anil
coke machines.
This is not to degrade the student
services area. It is simply that the Assembly must also be nude, to be coitctriuil
with the trul important areas of the
University life: academic affairs. Now,
this is where the simple mathematics
comes in.
We must elect more representatives
who consider academic affairs the top

polls with the aid of cheap, nonsensical rhetoric. The shame of the
situation is that this ignorant mass
is no small minority and can be
numbered among those who supported George Wallace in the last
presidential campaign.
The
vote was granted
because the majority thought young
persons were able to assimilate
tht enormous quantities of election
propaganda and make a rational
decision at the polls. Most have