xt77pv6b5b37 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt77pv6b5b37/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19680409  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April  9, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, April  9, 1968 1968 2015 true xt77pv6b5b37 section xt77pv6b5b37 Tie

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ERNEL

The Soutlis Outstanding College Daily

Tuesday Evening, April 9, 1968

UNIVERSITY

Kentucky State
Closes Camp us

By SY RAMSEY
FRANKFORT (AP- )- Kentucky State College
Monday proclaimed
a premature Easter recess, hoping to end
nearly a week of disorders
uy ixegro SUKieiHS.
earlier in the day about 100
A brief visit to the campus
Negroes gathered at the campus
Monday by a reporter and phoentrance along U.S. 60 and barred all whites from entering. More tographer, who skirted broken
than 90 percent of the 1,200 stu- glass and hasty barricades, yielded no definite statements or comdents are Negro.
Massed across the street in ments by either students or facruisers were State Police, who culty.
But later Mr. Hill said, "This
did not attempt to enter the
was an emotioned react ion. "And
campus.
But last night, officers said one Negro student, leaving for
they had to use tear gas to quell home, commented to a reporter:
"It worked, didn't it? They let
bands of students who smashed
display windows of two nearby us out early."
Students and teachers stood
auto dealers and hurled rocks
around aimlessly, were not inat passing motorists.
Total damage was estimated clined to talk with outsiders and
at nearly $15,000. No one was advised them to leave quickly
through a rear exit.
injured.
The city of Frankfort, without
Maj. L.C. Ples, State Police
Field Commander, said KSC sufficient law forces, was depending on State Police to keep
President Carl Hill had "sugthat his men keep away order.
gested"
City Manager Dean Hunter,
from the campus, presumably to
avoid antagonizing the students. also the acting police chief, said
Continued on Pace 8, Col. 4
The Easter vacation was to
have begun Thursday, but was
proclaimed at noon Monday
which also eliminated a scheduled memorial service for Dr.
Martin Luther King.
The outbreaks appeared to
have been prompted by more
than one factor.
By SUE ANNE SALMON
Last week, before Dr. King's
"Martin Luther King was a
death, an athletic storage build- man for all seasons, a man in
ing was destroyed by fire and the finest sense of the word.
crude fire bombs were thrown Are we
willing to be that kind
into the library.
of man?" Dr. Lawrence Tarpey
Those incidents were attributasked.
ed to student resentment against
Thus did Dr. Tarpey, aspurported campus and social re- sociate professor of business ad-

I

OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

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Paying Last Respects

The body of slain Negro leader Dr. Martin Luther
King lay in state at a funeral home as young
black men filed by to pay their last respects.

The Nobel

civil rights leader was
murdered by a sniper's bullet April 4.
Prize-winnin-

g

'We Cannot Be Free Of Each Other'

Nonviolence Seminar Eulogizes King

strictions.

"influence of Dr. King," seminar
speaker Wendell Berry, assistant
professor of English, said "Dr.
King represented the fact that
all men are involved in each
other, that we cannot be free
of each other."
Dr.. Joseph Engleberg of the
College of Medicine reiterated
Mr. Berry's idea: "We are inevitably our brother's keeper because of our interrelated reality."
"In a sermon Dr. King once
preached in Albany, Ca., he told
the people if he was ever killed
while working in the civil rights
movement he wanted it said that
'He died to make me free.' "
Dr. Tarpey said "I think part
of an old slave song he knew
continually ran through Dr.
King's mind, 'And before I'd be
a slave, I'd be buried in my

ministration, tell 44 students and
Then came mild destruction of teachers at the Nonviolent Way
property around the campus and of Life seminar Monday night
occasional harassment of passers-bto think about Dr. King's definition of a man:
During the weekend, Negro
"The ultimate measure of a
students, contended a coed was man is not where he stands in
insulted by whites as she stroll- moments of comfort and
ed outside the campus. They
but where he stands at
blamed the alleged incident for times of
challenge and controthe new disorders.
versy.
Earlier, however, the bus sta"The true neighbor will risk
tion had reported somethingodd: his
position, his prestige and even
many KSC students are from his life for the welfare of others."
out of state and leave on weekAfter reading a poem he had grave.'
ends, but this time there was no written "years ago" under the
"Until last Thursday, Martin
such exodus.
Luther King was the greatest
exponent and teacher of nonviolence in the world," Dr. Tarpey
added. "He used the nonviolent
approach in civil rights by pracby
ticing moral force in
boycotting and by preaching."
y.

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Wendell Berry read to the Nonviolent Way of Life Seminar Monday
night a poem he had written "under the influence of Dr. King."
Berry said the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. "represented the fact
that all men are involved in each other

..."

Tarpey said.
"The whole of Dr. King's
life is best summed up in the
word 'love' not the love most
people know of, however.

"His type of love was expressed by Jesus who said on the
cross, 'Father, forgive them for
they know not what they do.'
"Martin Luther King had
much reason to hate, but he kept
forgiving his enemies. I challenge
anyone to suggest Martin Luther
King was weak or did not have
great strength in turning the other
cheek."

No one answered

his

Classes Won't Be Meeting
During Dr. King's Funeral

Classes have been called off from 2 to 4 p.m. today-t- he
time
the last rites of Dr. Martin Luther King.
ine omciai university state- - civil rights leader Dr. Martin
mem reads:
Luther King."
Dr. A. D. Albright, University
"Except for essential operations that must be maintained executive vice president, said
without interruption, the Univer"the suspension of University
activities will enable faculty, staff
sity will suspend its normal
schedule of classes and other and students to observe telecasts
activities from 2 to 4 p.m. on of the funeral services or to spend
the time in meditation on Dr.
Tuesday."
"The period coincides with King's contributions to racial
the last rites in Atlanta for slain peace in America."
set for

Maximum Penalty For Pratt

By DARRELL RICE
day men may learn to live in peace and love."
Former UK student Don Pratt and former
Prof. Sedler argued in court about the dilemma
poverty worker Joseph Mulloy, both of whom re- young men face when the draft forces them to
fused induction this year, received maximum senperform actions they consider to violate their
tences of five years in prison and $10,000 fines consciences and urged that this be taken
into
Monday morning in U.S. District Court for vioconsideration in sentencing.
lating the Selective Service law.
"We anticipated the maximum penalties from
Judge James Cordon ordered the sentences in the beginning," Prof. Sedler told the Kernel MonLouisville.
day afternoon.
Professor of Law Robert Sedler,
"I tell people who come to see me about these
attorney for both men, said he will file appeals, cases to expect the full penalty," he said. "This
but Judge Cordon refused to release Pratt and Mr. is in accord with a trend seen more and more
Mulloy on tond.
across the country."
Asked about the severity of the sentences, Prof.
They are being held in Louisville until they
are transferred to a federal prison.
Sedler said he feels the "whole system is wrong-t- he
Pratt read a statement condemning the war in
draft's forcing people to do something against
Vietnam before he was sentenced. The statement their consciences."
He said the two have full mail privileges but
appeared as a letter in Friday's Kernel.
Mr. Mulloy said "what I have done will some- that visiting privileges will not start until 10
days
day be praised as a truly patriotic act, and some from confinement, or April 19.
ate

1

The 1964 Nobel Peace "Prize
winner demonstrated his nonviolent approach in Kentucky last
spring when he advised "serious
black leadership in Louisville not
to demonstrate at the Kentucky
Derby but instead to reorganize
the city's political power," Dr.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, April

2

9, 19G8

Cooper Rogers Platform

EDITOR'S NOTE: Following
is the platform written by Student Government presidential
candidate John Cooper and his
running mate Linda Rogers.
We were somewhat dismayed
by the resignation of Dr. Oswald, and we felt that if the
student body led by Student Government would have backed him
in such stands as academic freedom and his stand against the
proposed speaker ban, he would
not have resigned. Hence, the
purpose of our running is to continue through the student body

atmosthe
phere which Dr. Oswald initiated. We are, therefore, running
on the following platform:
liberal-progressi-

1.

We are opposed

and all outside political
I
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Super

Mother Superior
VS. Groovy

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Two candidates for Student Government president, O.K. Curry
(top left) and John Cooper (top
right) offered their platforms to
a student audience last night.
A

Sister George

mi

Candidates

third

candidate,

Herbert

Creech, failed to appear. Elections have been scheduled for
Wednesday to choose a president,
vice president and 16 represen-

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Starts Wednesday?
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Show Times

ROBERT TAYLOR

(Other Than Text)

1220 HARRODSBURG RD.
2121

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NICHOLASYILLE

RD.

257 N. Lime

Near 3rd

22

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TUES. Lost times for "FIRECREEK"

OPEN EVERY NIGHT
Just a short drive South on

Want

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one-fourt-

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Sound Off?

You will have a chance to express your views
on the issues of the day!

U.S. 27

CCoftlhieirDirDe

NOW SHOWING!

.r-"":i'iH'-

DENNIS
BOOK STORE

145 N. UPPER ST.

2, 4, 6, 8, 10
CASTMAN COLOR

I

ence in campus
feel that this is an encroachment
upon our rights as students to
obtain a rounded viewpoint on
topics closely related to present-da- y
American society. We feel
that it was such political encroachments that have occurred
in the recent year that led to
the immediate resignation of Dr.
Oswald. We feel that such political interference is an insult
to the University's student body,
faculty and administration.
2. We believe that the student
body should be represented in the
selection of the University's new
president. We believe that the
University is composed of three
bodies students, faculty and administration which are separate
but equal. This is why we feel
we should be allowed to participate in the selection of the University's new president.
3. We are in favor of academic freedom. We feel this is the
Central Kentucky's Largest

AtgeisGo...

MIUON

to any

interferactivities. We

foundation of obtaining a higher community college student who
education. We believe that any is changing to the Lexington campus should be allowed to p resubjects ranging from John Birch-isto Communism should be register along with the rest of
this campus's student body and
allowed to be discussed on camnot in the middle of the summer.
pus.
We also feel that community
4. We are in favor of the installation of a pass-fa- il
system for college students who date students on the Lexington campus
at this university.
undergraduates
should be allowed to sit together
We feel that this system should,
however, only be applied to at football games. We strongly
h
of the Unicourses which are electives, that feel that
is, courses which are not used versity's student body should not
be as mistreated as the communto fulfill general requirements
and courses that are not on a ity college students in the past
student's plan card. We will sup- have been.
9. We are in favor of subplan
port the faculty's pass-fa- il
and try to get it installed by next stituting night sticks for guns
for campus police. We do not
semester.
5. We are opposed to any form view this as an attack upon
of a speaker ban. We feel that the integrity of the campus pothis is not only a transgression
lice, but merely as a precauupon the student's right to hear tionary safety maneuver.
10. We are not in favor of
both sides of an issue, but also
the towing away of any student
is a transgression upon the speaker's right of free speech which is vehicle unless that car is viogranted to him by the First lating a city parking ordinance.
We feel that this is nottheproper
Amendment.
solution to the University's park6. We are against the forcing
of sophomores to live in dormiing problems.
11. We are in favor of more
tories. We feel that just because
a student pays $280 ($9S0 for "C" parking areas. Even though
students) to become parking towers are in the planeducated does not mean that he ning, the problem needs to be
signs away his rights both as a solved now. We believe that it
citizen of Kentucky and of the would not cost the University
United States. We feel that this very much to demolish some of
act is totally illegal, and we plan the empty houses on Rose Street
and then to lay gravel. We feel
to do something about it.
7. We strongly advocate the that a limiting of "C" permits
addition of more courses on the to only upperclassmen is not the
American Negro. The courses we correct solution to the parking
problem.
propose to add are:
12. We. are in favor of the
A Sociology 200 course on
American Negro society. This food service adding a two-mecourse will be a part of Area plan of lunch-dinnto their preVII in the undergraduate requiresent plan. We are also in favor
ments.
of selling meal tickets to
An English 500 course on the
students.
13. We feel that Student Govfolklore of the American Negro.
A course on Negro music
ernment should take the initiative
from spirituals to rhythm and on matters directly related to stublues.
dents. We believe that SG should
8. We feel that community
become a body which acts as
college students deserve a better well as reacts. We feel that SG
deal. Technically, the communhas a great amount of potential
but that many former members
ity college student is supposed
to have the same rights and privplaced personal glory, personal
ileges as students on the Lexinggain and politics above the good
ton campus. We believe that the of the student body. We feel
that this is the primary reason
of SG's reacting only to situations after they have been created,
a reaction that is not only too
late but also too insignificant
to remedy the situation. We feel
that this failure to act is the
greatest drawback of SG. We feel
that this is why students wish
to abolish SG. We believe, however, that we can instill in SC
a new life which would tap their
unused potential. We want to
make SG a body which is representative of students. We want
to, in fact, make SG a student
government.
We would like to add that we
are not politicians, only two students who believe in student
rights. We thoroughly believe in
every principle which we have
stated, and we are not afraid
to stand up and fight for what
is right, even if it means stepping
on somebody's toes.
.
We believe that it is time for
Student Government to stand up
instead of lying down and playing dead.

fPedem)

Candidate for United States Senator

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WILL BE ON CAMPUS
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STARTS WED.
"

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WedoTiesday". April 1
at 10:00 a.m.

She wants to hear what you think about the

crucial issues in this critical period of time.
So if you want to sound off about your beliefs and tell them to someone who wants to
listen . . . come to the (Catherine Pcden Mobile
Press Office. It will be parked at various polling booths on campus. The first stop will be
the Student Center Building. Don't forget tho
time Wednesday at 10:00.
Paid for by Katherln

Peden Campaign

Committee,

Boyce F. Martin, Chairman

The Kentucky

Kernel

Th. Kentucky Kernel, University
Lexof

Station, University
Kentucky,
ington, Kentucky 40500. Second class
postage five at Lexington, Kentucky.
paid
Malltd
times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
tension.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box ttd.
begun as the Cadet In IBM and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1919.
Advertising published herein Is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION

RATES

Yearly, by mall
Per copy, from files
KERNEL

11

$.10

TELEPHONES

Editor. Managing Editor
Editorial Page Editor,
Associate Editors, Sports
News Desk
Advertising, Business, Circulation

1331
320

!

1319

* J
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL,, Tuesday, April 9, l8-- 3

Ask Student Power

Curry, Bryan State Views

EDITOR'S NOTE: Following
is the platform staled by Student
Government presidential candidate O. K. Curry and vice presidential candidate Wally Bryan.
We will insure that student
opinion is obtained and is represented to the University administration and the Commonwealth at all times. Students
should be represented and we
should have their opinions before going to the administration.
We will fully utilize the newly created office of ombudsman
in obtaining the opinion of all
students.
We will conduct campus referendum on major student issues
in obtaining the student opinion.
We will frequently publish a
Student Government Newsletter
to more fully inform the students

of the activities of their student
government.
Before Student Government
can do anything for students,

utilize ixnitions of student power and authority on
it must

campus.
We will utilize fully the newly created position of a student
member on the Board ofTrustees
which we helped to implement.
We will insure that the students
are represented in every University policy decision.
We will insure that student
members of University jx)licy-makin- g
committees (faculty, adstudent commitministrative,
tees) are continually representing the students in those policy
decisions.
The purpose of Student Government should always be to
diligently serve the student body
in every manner possible.
Student Government should
fully cooperate with the dorm
governments to the benefit of all
dorm residents.
We will continue our firm
opposition to any action by the

Creech, 'Anarchist,'
Asks For Individualism
EDITOR'S NOTE: Following is the platform of Student Government presidential candidate Herbert Creech, expressed in his own
words.
1. To give students a chance
to affinn or reject Student
Government as a whole.
2. To provide an atmosphere

of individualism and
for students and

organ-

izations.
3. To affinn the rights given
by the American Constitution.
4. To reject vested interests
and the needless establishment
of more institutions
5. To encourage direct action

by interested people, rather than

unrepresentation

6. To break down the "University community" into the
status of an "ordinary' commu-

University administration
compel students to live in

SG ELECTION '68
LIST OF CANDIDATES
to

mitories beyond the freshman
year as a flagrant violation of
student rights.
We will cooperate with dormitory governments in procuring
for them the authority to estal
lish open house visitations as
frequently as the dorm residents
desire.
Parking is one of the greatest
campus problems and students
should be directly involved in
seeking solutions.
We will utilize any and all
methods to stop the towing of
registered student vehicles by the
University.
We will utilize any and all
methods to secure the
constniction of parking
towers for student vehicles.
We will sponsor an Academic
Code to accompany the Student
Rights Code.
This code will include a
t-faculty
board empowered to
alter unfair and capricious academic grading.
This code will include the
provision that students be allowed to take one course each
semester, outside their majors,
on a pass-fagrading basis.
We will continue and improve
all existing programs such as
Focus '68, Student Faculty Week,
Student Information Team, Faculty Evaluation Booklet, Student
Directory and the Travel Service.

VICE PRESIDENT
(Choose 1)

John Cooper
Herbert Creech

Wally Hryan
Linda Rogers

O. K. Curry
REPRESENTATIVES

(Choose

16)

Linda Lou Bailey
Woody Raker
Steve Bright
Susan Camenish
Betty Ann Carpenter
Debbie Clarke
Joe Dawahare
Bill Dexter
Rhonda Jane Foran
Tim Futrell
Jeanne 'Sugar' Garbee
Anne Calhoun Groves
Jim Gwinn
Bill Haden

studen-

Mithael Loscy
Frank McCartney
Lynn Cobb Montgomery

Monty Hall
Bob Hallenberg
Lynn Hamrick
Thorn Pat Juul
William S. Kendrick

long-promis-

Dick Webb
Joe Westerfield
David Lee Wicks
Linda Lou Williams
Otto Daniel Wolff

Kathy Murphy
Scott Richmond
Barbara Rinehart
Jucly Saalfeld
Mary K. Stoll
Jim Stott
Jhn Thomas

Jane Tomlin
Keenan Turner
Raymond II. Vail
John A. VanArsdall

Jerry Legere

il

'Htft

7. To encourage the growth
of voluntary associations and the
decline of formal Student Government.
8. To break down the stratification of college society.

use the

Fraternity
Presents the Second Annual

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Featuring The

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Playterinvents the first-da- y

tampoif

(We took the inside out

to show you how different it is.)

Time: Friday, April 12 - 9:00--1 :00
Place: National Guard Armory, Old Frankfort Pilccjj
Price: $2.00 drag or $1.50 stag.

FREE ICE AND CUPS!

EVERYONE WELCOME!

Cor

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dor-

Outside: it's softer and silky (not cardboardy ) ;
Inside: it's so extra absorbent... it even protects on
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In every lab test against the old cardboardy kind . . .
the Playtcx tampon was always more absorbent.
Actually 45 more absorbent on the average
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Because it's different. Actually adjusts to you.
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tampons

* Cooper-Brya- n
Herbert Creech calls for an end
Wednesday you will be asked to
vote in the Student Government to Student Government and promelections. There arc three candiises to resign if elected.
dates for the presidency, O.K. CurThe difference between Curry
and Herbert and Cooper lies in their ability
ry, John Cooper,
Creech.
to carry out their platforms. O.K.
Each is qualified for the spot Curry has far too many tics to the
as all are capable, sincere candipresent administration and toother
dates. The difference in your choice pressures on this campus to really
is in what the candidates stand
be effective. He calls for a strong
for, and on this point the choice executive in SG, yet offers no dybecomes obvious.
namic program to work strongly
for. Curry's election will mean
calls for:
O.K.Curry
another weak year for the weak
(1) utilization of the ombudsSG.
man,
(2) student refcrendums,
Therefore, we endorse John
(3) utilization of the student
Cooper for Student Government
trustee,
President, and Wally Bryan for Stu(4) a newsletter,
dent Government Vice President.
(5) student representation
they will form an efbodies, and a host of Together,
coalition between an imother goodies. Wally Bryan, as the fective
and innovative newvice president on Curry's ticket aginative
and an experienced and capshows good thinking on Curry's comer
able veteran.
part in choosing an able running
Together they will work to bring
mate. Bryan will carry the ticket
Student Government out of the
for Curry because Curry has such
doldrums into a viable
a negative image on this campus. inactive
and able to lead
Then take John Cooper. He calls program willing
The
the campus, not follow the whims
for: an end to political influence
of the Fumbling Forty who make
from Frankfort on this campus,
Review
up "campus leaders" at this
student representation on the Presidential review committee, acaAbove an, you must vote tomor- demic freedom on campus, a pass-fa- il
system in elective courses, row. It you do, tnen you are com
.
By PRISCILLA DREHER
choice as to where a student will mitted to an active role in Student
The chosen authors of the U.S. Riot
live his Sophomore year and there- Government. If you don't, then Commission report went about their invesflammable
business
after, courses on the
you are more to blame for what tigatory cards of without the so often
passion that
calling
has happened than anyone.
and other programs.
precede books on the ugly American,

short cool spring

Book

ivecommenaations JOT us not mem

Afro-America-

n,

and the oppressed shadow, the black man.
"Providing an honest beginning," as the
authors state, the Report of the National

Mishap In Utah

It is hard to find words to express one's concern for the recent
events in Utah's Skull Valley. There
6,400 sheep suddenly died after the
Army had experimented with nerve
gas just over the ridge on the Dug-wa- y
Proving Ground. No one yet
knows exactly what happened or
why. But that is not the main point;
the chief consideration is that something happened which, by all the
rules of careful civilization, never
should have occurred.
We do not doubt for a moment that the Army and the Pentagon are gravely concerned over
what happened both for humanitarian and for public relations reasons. But being concerned is not
enough. This event must be taken
as another grave warning on the
perils with which mankind is experimenting and which are mounting as natural science comes up
with more and more horrifying weapons of destruction.
This is the third major mishap dealing with such weapons in
two years. The first was the radioactive pollution of farmlands
around Palomares, Spain, in January, 19GG, when three hydrogen
bombs fell there after a midair
refueling collision. The second was

the crash of a plane, bearing four
hvdrocen bombs, on Greenland two
months ago. Understandably, each
of these two incidents startled and
upset countless persons around the
world, even though the crashes
showed that the bombs' antiex-plosio- n
devices were effective.
The Utah event is more serious.
It was a deliberate experimentation
which somehow went wrong. And
while there seems to be evidence
that the sheep were killed because
of special considerations which did
.not affect other living creatures in
the same area, nonetheless no one
can be blamed if they feel uneasy
at the thought that such potentially
disastrous experiments are going
on around them.
The definitive answer to all these
mishaps and perils is, of course,
a rigid worldwide control of weapons and weaponry experimentation. Unhappily, no such blissful
state of affairs is discernible on
the farthest horizon. But this does
not eliminate the obligation for
greater care and concern than have
yet been shown. The events of Skull
Valley are a clear call for greater
wisdom.
The Christian Science Monitor

Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders
(Bantam, $1.25), was written in methodical haste by educated novices, or as
many will be saying under their breath,
by "whitey." Because the report was
written, for the most part, by white
moderates in the public limelight doesn't
make it bad, though. What it does make
is the horrors of civil disorder more believable for the people who read or heard
James Baldwin, Martin Luther King, Dick
Gregory, Floyd McKrssick, and the like,
and didn't believe.
Eldridge Cleaver, Negro author of the
new book, Soul on Ice, said of the report,
polit"Old
ical nightriders know nothing but to haul
out an investigating committee to look
into the disturbance to find the cause
of the unrest among the youth. Look into
a mirror! The cause is you, Mr. and
Mrs. America, you with your forked
tongues." The commission's report labels
discrimination and segregation as the
funny-style-

d,

zipper-mouthe- d

cause and elaborates

in

u

iaci-pacKe- u

c
chapters, divided into a rejxirter's
of three parts: What happened? Why
did it happen? and What can be done?
The authors spent millions trying to answer these basic questions, did a decent
job, got to the heart of the problem,

Iernel

The South's Outstanding College Daily

University of Kentucky
ESTABLISHED 1804

TUESDAY, APRIL 9,

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editr" rjt of the University.
John Ilk liar d Kiminins, Editor
Hubert F. Brandt, Managing Editor

106a

g

causes, as a result of a single "triggering" or precipitating" incident. Instead, it developed out of an increasingly disturbed social atmosphere, in wliich
g
typically a serious of
incidents over a period of weeksor months
became linked in the minds of many in
the Negro community with a shared network of underlying grievances. In the
cities surveyed, the commission found
police practices a major cause of rioting.
Negroes complained of verbal and physical
abuse and the failure of police to provide
protection for Negroes. Other grievances
tension-heightenin-

r

para-dis-

The Kentucky

Two premises underlie the work of
the Commission: "that this nation cannot abide violence and disorder it it is
to ensure the safety of its people and
their progress in a free society, and that
this nation will deserve neither safety
nor progress unless it can demonstrate
the wisdom and the will to undertake
decisive action against the root causes
of racial disorder." What this nation
is also fichtine is the "decisive action"
being taken by black militants, tor example, summing it up for the reader, Stokely
Carmichael said, "It's not a question of
law and order. We are not concerned with
peace. We are concerned with the liberation of black people. We have to build
a revolution."
The Commission found that "disorder
did not typically erupt without preexit-in-

etc. They also relied heavily on field
surveys conducted in 23 cities and current research. They reported the destnic-tio- n
and violence present in our society.
What they did not convey and what apparently has been left for the black man
to describe is the violence and destruction
in the. lives of people.

included unemployment, and underemployment, inadequate housing, and inade-

quate education.
The Ixxjk is thorough (700 pages), and
urgent. It advocates immediate action on
an "unprecedented scale" opening up
opportunities, removing the frustrations
and (xmerlessness among the disadvantaged, increasing communication across
racial lines to halt polarization.
The committee terminated upon presenting its final report and recommendations. The report dramatically explains
why America's problem will not be play ed
out so quickly.

.......

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, April

19G8- -5

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Kernel Forum: the readers write
By JUDY GOODRICH

Secretary, Student Congress
Elizabcthtown Community
Col