xt77wm13nm1g https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt77wm13nm1g/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19231012  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 12, 1923 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 12, 1923 1923 2012 true xt77wm13nm1g section xt77wm13nm1g The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
VOL. XIV

LEXINGTON, KY..

STROLLER

TRYOUTS FOR

AMATEUR

NIGHT

HELD

TO BE

OCTOBER

22--

24

Contest For Stroller Eligibility
Open to All

Sixty-Fiv- e

lias been the custom for the last
nine years for the Strollers to present

4

-

(Continued on page 8.)
K

DEBATING TEAM DISCUSS
PLANS
Selection

THIS YEAR

FOR

of Team To
Competitive
Method

Be By

At a meeting of former members of
the University debating team prospective debaters for the coming year, and
Professor William R. Sutherland, of
English, plans
the Department of
were discussed for the debating of the
year.
Debates are tentative with Tennessee, Centre, Ohio State, and South
Carolina, besides many other prominent schools. Many of the smaller institutions will be dropped from the
schedule.
Selection of the team will be by the
competitive method- and any student
of the University is eligible. Preliminary tryouts will not be held until shortly after the Christmas holidays and applications will be received
until that date.
Eighteen students were present at
the opening meeting, among whom
were two women students, Prudence
Lyon and Elsie Reeves, who are reported to have been doing good work
in this field in minor ways. Others
present were: John H. Hunter, H. H.
Grooms, F. P. Bell, Joseph K. Hays,
S. H. Rice, Richard J. Frame, Win.
P. Burks, J. P. Frazier, E. P. Morris,
II. C. Johnson, W. Richard Metcalf,
-

(Continued on page 4)

Provision
21,000

HOLD

MEMORIAL

Comrade

'

Last year the National Tau Beta Pi
convention was held at Michigan, but
this year they traveled due south until
the landed on the University of Kentucky campus. On October 18, 19
and 20. 65 delegates from 45 schools
will meet here to take up the national business of the organization.
Tau Beta Pi is a National honorary
engineering fraternity. It is the goal
of every student engineer to be among
the chosen few of this society. The
members are those students who have
obtained a high standing during their
freshman and sophomore years. A
of the junior
class is
percentage
pledged and a certain percentage of
the same class is again chosen the
following year. The active Kentucky
chapter is composed of I. B. Helburm
J. W. Gudgel, W. N. Schwab, G. R.
Page, H. L. Strauss, T. L. Garwood,
C. J. Tate and C. E. Scott.
Following is a program of the convention:
Thursday morning Arrival, inspection of campus.
Thursday
noon Luncheon at the
Phoenix Hotel. Welcoming address
by Dr. Frank L. McVey and Dean F.
Paul Anderson.
Thursday night Smoker at Dicker
meeting.
Hall.
Friday morning 'Business session.
Friday afternoon Automobile tour
of Bluegrass.
night
Friday
formal
Annual
dance at Phoenix.
Saturday morning Closing business
mcet;ng.
Saturday afternoon Football game.
Saturday night Banquet.
K
CHEER LEADERS TO BE NAMED
FROM EACH CLASS IN SCHOOL

PRICE Me LEAN

PRICE

M'LEAN, VARSITY

CENTER, DIES QF INJURY
RECEIVED JDURING

GAME

Blow on Head During Cincinnati Contest Causes Blood
Clot

THOUGHT

NOT SERIOUS

Teammates Act As Pallbearers
At Last Rites For
Student
Price McLean, varsity center, of the
University of Kentucky football team,
died Sunday night at 7:15 o'clock
from injuries received in the
game played at Cincinnati Saturday afternoon. McLean
received a blow over the left eye which
caused a clot on the brain and the
Kentucky player died after an operation which, until his death, was
thought to be successful.
The injury which caused the death
of the Blue and White player was received a few minutes before theend of
the first half of the game Saturday.
From the sidelines it was not possi-a1l- e
to see that McLean was injured,
although on one play he lined up slowly and paused as if to catch his
breath. On the next play the center
got into position, apparently without
any trouble. On the field, however,
McLean was putting up a fight to
stay in the game and complete his
The 'blow that he received
work.
temporarily blinded him, but on each
play he would line up with his team
Kentuck-

y-Cincinnati

(Continued

on Page
K

Four)

--

K

Class elections
OPERA "MARTHA" CHORUS
CAST OF 45 SELECTED following dates:
Held in Form of Sextets, Thursday
for the chorus of
The final
the opera "Martha," which is to be presented by the music departmen in the
near future, were held Thursday afternoon in the music rooms under the
direction of PrPofessor Carl Lampert.
The chorus, which supports forty-fiv- e
voices, was selected 'from approximately one hundred applicants. The
were held in the form of sextettes, and each applicant was required to know and uphold his part. The
will be
results of Thursday's
disclosed next wee.
Unusual interest has been shown in
the department's selection for its 1923
production. "Martha" is the first grand
opera that has been attempted and it
supports six leads in addition to the
chorus. Each practice has been spirited throughout and present indications point toward a brilliant success.
Final

Try-out-

s

try-ou-

try-ou- ts

j

NOTICEI

try-ou-

j

The Kentuckiau this year has
a space set aside to be devoted
to the Beauty Section which will
contain the six prettiest girls in
the university. Voting will take
place next Tuesday, so watch
all posters for information and
all girls for the beauty section.

A. O. Whipple, superintendent of
grounds of the University has been
instructed to make soundings of the
site on which the football stadium of
the University is to be placed, following a meeting of the University of
Kentucky stadium executive committee, held Friday at the Lafayette Hotel.
The stadium will be completed by
September, 1924, according to the
plans outlined by J. Irvine Lylc, general manager of the Carrier Engineering Company, of New York, who is
head of the committee appointed to
supervise the erection of the football
structure.
The stadium will be erected thirty
feet south of Winslow street, on a
line with, and adjoining the new basketball building, which is now under
construction. Both structures will be
surrounded by an ornamental fence.
The architecture will conform with
that of the basketball building. The
stadium will be in the form of the letter "U." There will be 32 tiers of
seats, affording a seating capacity of
21,000 persons. Provision will also be
made for the erection of bleachers
across the open end.
Mr. Lylc has been in touch during
the fall and summer with a number
of the leading stadium architects of
the country, some of whom will be
asked to pass upon the stadium plans
in an advisory capacity. The architect
is under consideration by the commitMr. Lyle is visiting larger uni- tee.

Memorial services were held Tuesday at the fifth hour in the chapel for
Price Innes McLean, who died Sunday
at 7:30 following an operation for a
blow on the head received in the football game Saturday between University of Kentucky and University of
Cincinnati at Cincinnati.
Dr. F. L. McVey presided, opening
the exercises by reading the ninety-firpsalm which was followed by the
Lord's prayer. Doctor McVey then
introduced Doctor Bush, of the Presbyterian church, who in a few remarks
paid tribute to Price McLean, in
which he said his life was a house
with two rooms and our comrade had
only passed to the other room. He
impressed upon all the need of a larger faith in a larger and fuller life.
Professor Enoch Grehan, representing the Athletic Council and faculty
staff, made impressive remarks reminding the student body that McLean
died in service for the University and
in no better way can our recollection
of his worthiness be proved than to
carry on his burden where he left fraud to do as well as he did..
The football team was represented
by Dell Ramsey, who paid a touching
tribute to the character of his teammate, saying he was a thorough gentleman, hand ifighter, conscientious
worker and his memory leaves an inspiration and example of sportsman(Continued to Page 8)
ship to his teammates. WilKam Tate,
Kjunior class of the
president of the
University, C. M. C. Porter, president CLASS ELECTION
DATES
of the junior class in the college of engineering also spoke of the sterling
AND RULESPUBLISHED
qualities of their classmate.
Marshall Barnes, president of the
student council, presented resolutions
Vote By Secret Balwhich were adopted by the student Students to
lot and Must Sign
Docbody. After singing America,
Names
tor Bush pronounced the benediction.
st

Will Be Awarded To All
Those Who Make Good

In order to stimulate enthusiasm
and interest in athletic circles the following plans for the election of cheer
leaders have been devised. Each class
with the execption of the Juniors will
elect a member to the cheer leading
squad with a senior member as captain of the cheer leaders. The Junior class will elect two (members, one
of which will be eliminated the following year. By the election of two
leaders from the Junior class we are
more nearly assured a capable leader
for each succeeding year.
The cheer leaders are to be elected
by a popular class vote at the regular
class election and their election must
comply with the rules governing the
elections of other class officers. Let-- ,
tcrs will be awarded to cheer leaders.
K
pencil,
LOST A gold eversharp
with initials E. G. Finder please re-- (
turn to Esther Gilbert.

Will Act As Advisory
Board

Representatives of Organizations
Pay Tribute to Fallen

tend

SURVEY

Leading Architects of Country

M'LEAN

i
i

At- -

For Seating
Persons in New
Structure
Made

BEGIN GRIDIRON

SERVICES

FOR PRICE

20

Delegates of National

Fraternity to

Letters

COMPLETION SEPT, 1924

ers please report Friday at 3:30
building to

p. m. at the Gym
Ryan Ringo.

K-

19--

FOR

All candidates for cheer lead-

Su-K-

Three Best Plays to Be Selected
CONVENTION OCT,
For Hallowe'en Night
Program

1

FOOTBALL STADIUM

All who arc willing to offer
use of their cars for entertainment of Washington and Lee
team Saturday morning, report
president of
to Snecd Yager,
y
Circle.
the

It

RUSH PLANS IN BUILDING

NOTICE

SCHEDULE TO BE POSTED TAU BELTA PI TO

an entertainment known as "Amateur
All
Night" on Hallowe'en night.
players showing any particular aptitude are entered on the Stroller list of
eligrblcs and as such will be entitled
to try for parts in the Stroller play.
The following rules will govern the
contest leading up to Stroller eligibility:
1. The contest is open to any stu
dent in the University of Kentucky.
Preliminary tryouts will begin
2.
on October 22 and last thru October
24.
All entries will be scheduled to
appear some time during these days by
the Strolleers committee.
3. From the preliminary tryouts,
the three best plays will be selected
to appear before the student body in
chapel on Hallowe'en night, October
31. The best play of these three will
be selected by special judges, to which
a prize will be awarded. The prize
will be announced later.
4. Anyone desiring information or
assistance- come to Stroller headquarters in basement of Science building
from 3:30 to 5:30 p.
on any week-da- y
m. (October 10 to 18.)
5. Aspirants will be
required to

No. 3

NOTICE

--

i

OCTOBER 12, 1923

will be held on the

Senior and freshman presidents
presidents, Tuesday, Oct. 30.
Junior and sophomore presidents
and vice president, Wednesday, Oct.
and-vic-

31.

Nominations for the above offices
must be made in the form of a petition
signed by not less than 25 classmates
of the nominee. All petitions must be
in the office of the Dean of Men not
later than 6 p. in., Oct. 20.
All votes will be cast by secret ballot, all students
being required to
place their signature and the college
in which they are enrolled on their respective ballots.
Students of the Engineering College will vote in Dicker Hall.
Students of the College of Agriculture and Home Economics will vote in
the Agricultural Building.
Students of the College of Law,
Arts and Science and Education will
vote in the Administration building.

* MNMftt

Page Two

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Alumni Notes
Editor Alumni Secretary
CALENDAR
How about this, Mr. Club
Secretary?
We want announcement! of
your meetings, date, timje and
place.

I

The most historic legislation for the
University since the affirmation of the
justice of the mill tax is the aim of
the Alumni Association for the 1924
session of the Legislature. The so
Ions will be asked to make emergency
appropriations of more than half a
million dollars for buildings and equip
ment and to provide by bond issue or
special tax for the increased cost of
maintenance and a permanent bidding
program.
Organization of University of Kentucky clubs that will include backers
of the educational progress movement as well as alumni of the University will be one of the means to this
end. Alumni of many
colleges and universities have asked
for such an opportunity as this to
(back higher education in Kentucky.
The Executive Committee of the
Alumni Association has expressed the
desire that the present alumni clubs
in Kentucky be changed to University
associations or clubs and through
their regular monthly meetings carry
out, a more ambitious program with
their enlarged facilities. This plan will
have the personal supervision of Captain C. C. Calhoun, president of the
Alumni Associaiton.

which have received such impetus
since the inauguration of the C. M. T.
C, have taken on much of the army
routine and drill. Reserve officers of
the army and graduates of R. O. T.
C. units of universities
and colleges
comprise the staff of these civilian
camps and an increasing number of
preparatory schools.

"THOU SHRINKEST

their next opponents with a fierceness
mellowed by sadness.
The big, quiet, efficient Southern
lad who started a successful season
with the team had grown dear to those
who went into the game at his side
and as is often the case with those
we love most, only his removal revealed the deep affection which his
companions had for him.
Football is a hazardous game, but,
to live best and serve most anywhere
on the face of the earth is a hazardous life. McLean fell, not a victim
to the brutality of the game or the
opposing team, but to the law of averages which takes its toll relentlessly
from every enterprise in which men
engage.

Promise of Friendly Enemies in Past
Provokes Laughs

BUFFALO HOLDS

ELECTION

Begins

Campaign for 100 Percent
Membership
"The first regular meeting of the
year 1923-2- 4
was held September IS,
Of
at the Chamber of Commerce.
the nineteen members attending, five
were ncv having graduated from the
University in June. We were also
honored at this meeting with the presence of Professor L. E. Nollau, who
gave us a very interesting talk on conditions in general at the University.
Election of officers for the ensuing
year was held, resulting as follows:
'04; vice presiPresident O.
treasurer,
dent, Luke Milward
Herman Worsham '16; secretary, L.
C. Davidson '23.
"I am enclosing check for dues for
seven members. If you will send us
alist of alumni in this section who
have not paid their dues, we will try
to have an 100 percent membership
HAVE OPINIONS
The editor of this page has been bv November 1." Gilbert Frankel '19.
of
called on to ect an expression
opinion from alumni on activities and KENTUCKIANS
policies of the students, the Univer- sity authorities and the Alumni As- - Philadelphia Club Has pianncd
's
sociation.
.
Ptl0n for Centre Football Team
Many helpful suggestion shave been!
who
Enemies of the University
promised a reduction of half the student body for the proccding and the
present session arc not being reminded of the University's own answer. To
consider their vain boastings is but to
laugh.
Undergraduates and alumni were the
answer.
Knowing the truth tney
spread i.t. Ambitious young men and
women (recognized the giant among
Kentucky institutions of higher education. Attracted by the high type
of student body, the unusual educational facilities, the increasing power
and importance of the graduates to
say nothing of the prowess of the
University's representatives in sports,
music, dramatics, oratory and debate
nd sundry other (Student activities
they have established a waiting list.

cx-0-

Re-M-

BACK PREPAREDNESS
College Men Are Urged to Enter Into
Spirit of Defense Act.
Alumni of universities throughout
the country are being urged to take
an active part in the scheme of Na
tional Defense which involves training of the youth of high school age
in the summer camps of the Citizens'
Military Training Camps under the
supervision of the War Department.
The training of boys can be accomplished in a much shorter period
than for grown men and with far less
expense to the government.
Statis
ticians have indicated the economy of
such preparation over a period of fifty
years. In such a manner the country
is prepared for war without the constant challenge to conflict inspired by
a large standing army.
The improved health of the trainees
toas been one of the reasons for endorsing such training with its consequent
gain to the race. Civilian
camps,

obtained in .this manner in the past.
One of thc powerful aids to the alumni office is thc report of the secretary
of the alumni clubs on doings and debates of their several groups. Thc expansion of thc University calls for
more of this to mae possible its continued and satisfactory growth,
A TRIBUTE TO PRICE McLEAN
In the death of Price McLean,
football center, wh odied from
injuries received in the Cincinnati
game last Saturday, the University of
Kentucky has suffered a bereavement
greater than has befallen it in many
a year. The vacant place left by
McLean can be .filled satisfactorily
from out of the line of sturdy men who
practice daily on Stoll Field, but the
feeling of loss and sorrow in the
hearts of his comrades will persist
and the Wildcats will go up against

TEAR OUT AND MAIL THIS TO ALUMNI OFFICE
Filled With News and Views.

for the evening will be informal.
Acknowledgement will be appre
ciated.
Yours for Kentucky,
ROY S. CLARKE, Sec.

'10

1,

Charles E. Baldwin is practicing
law in Tulsa, Okla., with office at
4
Commercial Building. He
married Miss Nellie F. Bullcttc, March
24, 1918, and they have one daughter.
Elizabeth Ann, "Betsy" four yeans
old.
"Wish I could give more. This is
really more than my present financial
status would warrant and no one regrets more than I do. U. K. has done
a great service. Thc state faces a big
problem and thc University is fundamental in thc solution of that problem.
God speed to it." George R. Eastwood, Agricultural College Extension
Service, Ohio State University, Columbus, O.

Betwixt Us

312-31-

'13

One of thc loyal supporters of thc
Alma Mater is George Kccne Graves
MrGnavcs is a member of the
firm of Graves, Cox & Company, hold
ing thc position of Secretary-Treasu- r
er. As a member of the Executive
Committee of thc Memorial Building
Fund hc has been active in th cscr- vice of thc University in addition to
thc fact that thc firm has supported
financially all movements for thc bet
Mrs.
terment of thc institution.
Graves was Miss Katn. Lewis Clark,
'11
They have three chil
of Lexington.
One of .the boosters of the Pitts
dren, George K., Jr., Joseph Clark
and Kathcrinc L. The family reside burgh U. K. Alumni Club is H. Lee
at 248 South Ashland Ave., Lcxing Moore, who served as secretary for
two years. Mr. Moore has been with
ton, Ky.
thc Buffalo Forge Company ever since
graduating and is now manager of
their Pittsburgh office, 917 Union Ar'9t
cade. He is a life member of the
"Dear AV
"Put me down for ten bucks per Alumni Association. Mrs. Moore was
year for five years to that GLORIOUS formerly Miss Anne Milwardt
enterprise' for 'GREATER KEN- of Lexington. They have two sons,
TUCKY,' and especially for POS H. Lee Moore, Jr., scheduled to ma
TERITY. I have been dilatory in triculate at U. K. in 1934 and Stanley
this matter but my heart is with the M. Moore, a" freshman in 1937. The
University all the time." Thomas family reside at 7065 Flaccus Road,
Luther Campbell, attorney, Union ft Bon Avon, Pittsburgh. Penna.
Planters Bank & Trust Company,
'13
Memphis, Tenn.
John W. Porter has been a chem'01
ist with the American Steel Foundries
Harry Preston Bassett received his at Grantie City, 111., ever since reB. S. at thc University in 1901 and ceiving his B. S. Ind. Chem. at the
M. S. in 1902 and in 1904 a Ph.D. University.
His mailing address is
degree at Johns Hopkins University. 2007 Fair Ave., St. Louis, Mo.
cx-8-

;

ex-1- 5,

,
Comoanv for several
cuics Powder
"Divided we stand," says the Phil- - vcars ail( during ti,at tjm ewas iocat.
adelphia Club of the University of:cd at naiti,orc, Aid., San Diego, Cal..
Kentucky Alumni, who are planning alld Kcnvil, N. J. Since 1919, he has
to entertain the Centre College foot- - bcc conncott:(i w;t, Meigs, Bassott &
;r
ball team when they play the
Company, located at 739
sity of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Drcxel iiuiidig, Philadelphia, Penna.,
October 27. Alumni in all parts of ; thc capacjty Df chemical engineer,
the world will read with pride of the His rcSjdCnce address is 310 South
hospitable attitude taken by this club Thirteenth street
towards our worst rivals, but who
are above all Kentuckians. The fol'04
lowing letter from the secretary of the
Philadelphia Club is an invation to
Charles Robert Gilmore has been
you, Al, wherever you are:
connected with the oil business in varFell&w Kentuckians:
ious capacities in Tulsa, Okla., for
Greetings:
many years, except during the period
On Saturday, October 27, Centre of the world war when he was in the
College will
meet, thc University of service of his country. He has been
Pennsylvania on Franklin Field- Phil an active member of the Association
adelphia.
continuously except for one year dur
The Philadelphia Club, University of ing the war. He is now broker, oil
and real estate
Kentucky Alumni Association, plans to leaser, production
make this a great day for Kentuckians agent, with offices at 302 Drcxel Bldg.
in and near Philadelphia.
Thc Cen- He married Miss Daaida Smith in
tre football team, and those with them, 1912 and they have two sons, Robert
numbering about thirty, are to be our Beattie and David. The family reside
guests on this trip. They will remain at 1006 N. Denver Ave., Tulsa, Okla.
in Philadelphia
Saturday night, returning to Kentucky late Sunday af'06
ternoon.
Enclosed find my belated dues for
In the evening we will give a
1923.
I always enjoy the Kennel and
d
at the
wish for time to write as I have deHotel, in Philadelphia, in honor of cided
opinions on many subjects disour guests. In order to make this a
cussed in the paper and as we keep
big affair, we need the
in touch with such news. While in
and support of every Kentuckian near
Lexington in August, I took my two
Philadelphia.
The committee in
children to sec the University.
charge has arranged for an excellent
is eight and John is six and
dinner, good orchestra music, dancing
they have heard wonderful tales conand other entertainment features for
cerning the University of Michigan.
a charge of $6 per cover.
The former has been through all the
hopeful of getting Dr. John interesting buildings, played on the
We are
J. Tigert, U. S. Bureau of Education, campus and spent several days at the
Dean F. Paul Anderson, of the UniMichigan Union. I wished to imversity and Herbert Graham, secre- press them with the University of
tary of the Alumni Association, as the Kentucky as their father's influence
principal speakers for the evening.
was becoming so strong. We made
You must make reservations at three trips to the campus but the first
once as the time is getting short and time saw Dean Anderson's monkey
the committee must know how many and that was the attraction on the
to prepare for. Tickets for the game other
trips. Today if I as kthem
will be $2 and reservations for the about the University of Kentucky they
dinner $6 a cover. Send cliecks. made will immediately mention he monkey
payable to Roy S. Clarke, treasurer, and I think that was the only impreswith your reservations.
Tickets for sion made on John. Elizabeth
thc game will be mailed upon receipt
Williams (Byron G. Williams).
of check.
Dr. Williams is a not id tissue pathoCome on down to Philadelphia on logist with offices at Pa: s, 111.
Tic
the 27th and lets have a real
residence address is 316 East Craw-u:- d
Dress
Kentucky,
street.
UniTr-jslailghti-

'

-

dinner-

-dance

7

Captain and Mrs. Don P. Branson
(ncc AKce Lylc Crawley) are located
at Camp Gillard, Canal Zone, Panama;
C. A.
Captain Branson is an officer
in thc 16th Infantry, U. S. A.

Bellevue-Stratfor-

Hen-ryeit- ta

'14
"Enclosed herewith find my check
on
for 'reservation
the Kentucky
Boosters' Express.' I wand a lower in
the middle of the best car rolling.
With best wishes for another great
year for old University of Kentucky."
Jos. Roemer, Prof, of Secondary
University
of
Florida,
Education,
Gainesville, Fla.

(V

'15
"I am now employed at the U. S.
Bureau of Mines, Petroleum Experiment Station, Bartlesville, Okla. This
is the principal petroleum station of
thc bureau, handling routine and research work. Please remember me to
any of the "old guard" that you happen to meet. Best wishes for ithe continued success of the University and
thc
Association." A.
J. "Story"
Kraemer has been a chemist in the
oil business ever since receiving his
degree, except during the period of
the world war. During 1921-2- 2 he had
graduate student work in chemistry
at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, and returned to
his work with the Standard Oil Co..
at Louisville, leaving there just recently to assume his new position.
'16

"Last year I joined your 'round-uenjoyable."
and found it thoroughly
This year I want a reservation on the
'Boosters Express' and inclose check
for fare. You will note my change of
location. With best wishes for continued success in the good work of the
Alumni Association." James Franklin
Corn, attorney, Cleveland, Tenn.
p'

'II
"Inclosed arc my checks for dues
and for thc Stadium fund. I am very
thoroughly
for this movement.
I
have followed thc canipaiga with
much interest but have been out of
touch with it lately and shall be gb.'l
to get the Kernel again.
"The spirit of a school is an intangible thing, but whoever has seen a
game with our Kentucky Wildcats
has felt and thrilled to the quality of
the spirit of the University of Kentucky. It is something plucky and
gallant, with a fine steely, mounting
(Continued on page 7)

1

* Pte Three

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Society
Fraternity Pledget
Chi Omega announces the pledging
11 girls,
Misses Mildred Beam,
Bardstown; Lide Chenault, Maysville;
Harbison, Shefoyville;
Mae Murray
Mary Belle Vaughan, Shelbyville;
Elizabeth Steele and Lutie Williams,
Humphreys,
Dorothy
Lexington;
Sturgis; Cornelia Skinner, Louisville;
c
Elizabeth Regenstein, Newport;
Metcalf and Fannie Danes
Pineville.
Epsilon Omega chapter of Kappa
Delta announces 10 pledges, Misses
Eloise Crume, Bardstown; Annabel
Murphy, Madeline Arthur and Kather-in- e
Norma Carter,
Staff, Ashland;
Louisville; Margaret Dungen, Somerset; Lucille Coleman, Paducah; Julia
Dunn, Smithland; Dorothy Stehbens,
Ft. Madison, la., and Willie King,
Lexington.
Kaooa Kappa Gamma fraternity an
nounces the pledging of Misses Carolyn Bosworth, Virginia McVey, Kath-erin- e
Godsight, Mary Barrow, Elizabeth Smith. Virginia Boyd, Virginia
Owsley and Pearl McCormick, of
Lexington; Edwina Morrow and Rebecca Averill, of Frankfort; Eleanor
Tapp, Springfield; Elizabeth McDonald, Eminence; Beatrice Gant, Indianapolis, Ind.; Margaret Owens,
Somerset; Nannie Gay, Winchester;
Sarah
KetfW nilhert. Owensboro:
Curie, Cynthiana; Nelle Bush, Winchester; Mattie Ellis Gregory, Louisville, and Lana Martine Coates, Richmond.
Alpha Gamma Delta has pledged
Misses Dorothy Jameson, Cynthiana;
Dorcas
Eliot, Somerset;
Martha
Lynes. Hartford; Mary Warren Collins, Hiartford; Sue Lockett Mitchell,
'
Henderson; Mary Virginia Phillips,
Midway;
Rogers,
Newport; Ruth
Ruth C. Harris, Lexington; Emma
Moody,
Margaiet
Belle Price and
Auburn; Bertha Rogers, Frankfort;
Grace Duncan, Bowling Green, and
Lois Hargett, Augusta.
The pledges to Alpha Xi Delta fra
ternity are Misses Jeannette Ellison
and Grace Archer, Williamsburg;
Mary Brand, Mayfield; Marshall Paul,
Columbia: Iva Dudgen, Lebanon;
Mrip Pfeiffer. Louisville; Eleanor

of

Jean-nctt-

Met-cal-

rENUS
PENCILS

f.

Hall. Auburn, and Virginia Baker,
Dixon.
The seven pledges of Delta Delta
Delta fraternity are: Misses Mary
Louise Cole. Mariorie Warden, Louis
ville; Mabel C. Graham, Frankfort;
Madeline Robards, Providence; Joan
Robinson, Danville; Ethel Skidmorc,
Harlan, and Laura Dunn, Lexington.
an
Pi Alpha Theta fraternity
nounces the pledging of Misses Pau
line Ashcraft, Mt. Vornon, O.; Adeline
San ford. Carlisle: Mary Riley, More- head, and Hazel Sullivan, Mt. Sterling.
The pledge service took place at the
home of Mrs. Marvin Wade Marsh,
on Lexington avenue. Saturday after
noon.
Sigma Beta Epsilon chapter of the
University of Kentucky announces
the followine dIccIkcs: Misses Bernice
Calvert, Paris; Janet Lally and Anna
and
Lexington,
fV.Cnnnell.
Marearct Yungblut, Dayton. An in
formal reception at the chapter house
Saturday afternoon welcomed the new

We are Now in Our Ne ,v Home

Army Goods Headquarters
Main and Mill Sts.

Next to Woolworth's 5 and 10 Cent Store
Special Discount Given to University Men on

Army Shoes

....

$2.95 to $5.75
Russett Shoes
Officers Shoes . . . $2.95 to $4.95
Officers Leather Puttees $2.95 and up

lirla.

Beta chanter Alpha Delta Theta an
nounces the following pledges: Misses
Nellie Clay Corbin, Virginia Bocook,
Lucile Harp and Edith Owen Sisk, of
Lexington, and Hattie Mae Hamilton,
of Georgetown.

In Honor of Freshmen
The Woman's CluSb of the Univer
sity have issued attractive invitations
to the faculty and to memlbers of the
freshman class to be present at an in
formal party Friday evening, October
12. at 8 o'clock in Buell Armory in
honor of the freshmen.
This is the strst party of the kind
crJvPtl tO the freshmen students by the
Woman's Club. Prizes will be award
ed to the winners of puzzles and rid
dles and contests.

Make Your Selections from the most complete stock
in the city at 25 per cent saving

Army Goods Headquarters
1

Main and Mill

Phone 4792

IllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllW

Pledges
Beta Xi. local fraternity,
with chanter house at 385 ioutn
Limestone, announces the following
nlfflws! Edwin Smith, Hazard;
Crab Orchard;
fnvo Anderson.
Gates, Louisville; Robert Gos--- t.
Stuart
Franklin; Leslie Brake, Burkes- villp; Tames Gilmorc, Paridise; Ben
jamin Sims. Lexington; T. R. Million,
Pirhmond: Arthur Crone, Louisville;
James Coogle, Louisville; J. B.
Donald Griffith, Lex- Meek, Paintsville;
incrton: Ernest
fnrru Nnoier. Hindman.
Alpha Gamma Epsilon, 334
avenue, announces pledges as fol
lows- Clifton Wilkey. Clay, Ky.; A.
M. Ard, Horse Cave; M. H. Matthews.
RnrcUtown: Earl Carnco, Mayheld;
Judson Willett, Mayfield; Carlton
Maurice Vaughn,
Vonnw Padticah:
Henderson; Herbert Schoepflin, Hen
derson; Sidney Vaughn, Dixon.
K
Si emu

Wheel-Paintsvill- e;

out-riva-

220 Fifth Ave.
New York

Write far

tiAAlr1t Ml

VBNU1 EVIRMMNTTO
HecbantcM renetw

)))t

m

t

Inn

Published in
the interest Elec

tric! Dtvehtment

FOR GOOD HOME
COOKED MEALS

mn

h helped h th ''
kilpt
Industry.

Dinner 75c

UHmttMMMMtMMMMMlMW
BROMLEY
PARRISH & AND PRESSING
DRY CLEANING
152 S.

Limestone St.
DUALITY AND SERVICE

P10"

155--

Y

by

Imtituthn that will
vtr

Lunch 50c.

is to excel iisjan
society man, you couldn't have planned
your evenings better. Such persistence wjill win
out over the indolence, of the rankfcandflle,y for as
the poet saysfD f?j N ,
'The heightsby great men reached and keptjf
,yere;noi attained oy suuueuugiiiA mi
jfiut they while their cornparipnssleptv .r
Were toihng.iUpward m thc night.
1 But Jf3f6u intend to.makeiyour mark in engi-tieWrimor business, don't expect that supremacy
tenjtheaxed floor will help when you start hunt-

If your burning ambition

Th Cosmopolitan Club will meet
Friday night at 7:00 o'clock in the Y.
r C. A. rooms for the election ot
officers and to outline work for the
the
v9r All foreign students of club Uni
and
versity are members of the
therefore urged to be present at
are
.hio meetiner. The work of the club
wns verv much enjoyed by those who
took part in it last year and