xt77wm13p05d https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt77wm13p05d/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19590514  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, May 14, 1959 text The Kentucky Kernel, May 14, 1959 1959 2013 true xt77wm13p05d section xt77wm13p05d Today's Weather:
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Turn To Page 5

Elections Cause

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
Vol.L

LEXINGTON, KY. THURSDAY, MAY,

14, 1039

No.

Ill

Voting Records Reveal Fraud
In Student Congress Elections
Discrepancies Found
Involve Four Colleges
UNIVERSITY

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Proof Of Election Fraud
These student directories were used in the May f general elections to keep lists of
persons voting in the various colleges. A check of the lists revealed several instances
of fraud which were borne out by telephone conversations with voters and statements Irom persons who saw fraudulent practices being carried out.

UK Entrance Requirements
M ay Be Increased This Fall
The University Faculty has returned to the committee which Introduced to it a report calling for
increased admission requirements.
The report asked that admission
requirements be raised from the
current requirement of a high
jchool diploma and 15 units . of
acceptable high school work." to
a specific requirement of 12 units
In English, mathematics, social
foreign languages and
.studies,

vide for variable credits. Variable
This ruling- - will go into effect in
credits are credits given in courses, fall, I960. The new listings will
which under the present system, appear in the 1959-6- 0 issue of the
are scheduled by taking the a and University General Catalog.
b parts of the course.
The Monday meeting was the

last scheduled for the faculty this
semester. There will be no more
scheduled meetings until the fall
semester.
A special meeting can be called,
but Registrar C. P. Elton, a memA student will be able to take the ber of the Admission Policy Comscience.
same course over until he earns mittee, said that it is doubtful
Instead of 12 units in the re- the maximum number of credits whether such a meeting would be
quired subjects, an applicant would allowed in that course.
called.
have to score above the 50th percentile on the University classification examination.
The report recommended that
high school graduates applying for
admission to the University have
15 units cf work including
four
years of English, 3'a-- 4 years of
algebra, geometry and trigonomeDepart- Nolin area Is unknown archaeolog-icall- y,
Archaeologists in
try, three years of one foreign ment of Anthropologythe
a link is being
and
have begun
language, two years of science and a search for relics of early Ken- sought therethat
between the agricultwo years cf social studies.
tucky civilization in the Nolin tural area to the north and the
Dr. Enno E. Kraehe, chairman of
hunting and gaming land to the
Reservoir near Mammoth Cave.
the University Committee on AdThe $2,000 project is being fi- south.
mission Policy, said the committee nanced by the National Park ServThe Nolin project Is the fourth
unanimously approved the report. ice.
survey by UK anthropologists to
The reservoir is in Edmonson,
Dr. Kraehe
stated he did not Hart, Grayson and Hardin coun- locate archaeological sites in areas
know what action would be taken ties, north of Mammoth Cave.
to be covered by flood control
by the committee at this time. He
Dr. Douglas YV. Schwartz, as- projects. Previous studies 'were
said there was some sentiment sociate professor of anthropology, made at Buckhorn on the Upper
amon; the faculty for both raisiRiver, on the Rough
ng- and lowering the proposed new will direct the study. It Involves Kentucky
survey and excava- River and in the Barkley Dam
a three-mont- h
standards.
tion operation, analysis of all ma- reservoir. The latter project still Is
A new course numbering sys- terials found and a published re- in progress.
tem was approved by the faculty. port on the findings.
The Nolin Reservoir will be
The new system will provide for
All materials found will be re flooded within the next two years.
the numbering of courses by the turned to the University's Museum Tacoma Sloan and Lee Hampton,
hundreds according to what, type of Anthropology for analysis and University field archaeologists, will
of requirments it fulfills or
to comparison with other relics found conduct the survey and excavawhom it is open.
previously in surrounding regions. tion work on the Nolin project.
The new system will also pro
Schwartz explained that the Schwartz will analyze the findings.
Under the new. system a student
will schedule the same courses but
will attend the appropriate advanced classes included in the course
number.

Early Relics Sought
Near Mammoth Cave

.

Widespread fraud in the May 6 Student Congress general
elections, including ballot-bostuffing and other discrepancies
in four colleges, has been discovered by the Kernel.
A team of reporters began in- vestigating the election Tuesday
morning after learning that a
number of Arts and Sciences bal- lots had been ruled invalid when
appeared to have been cast
by the same person.
A reporter obtained the voting
lists from all colleges except Com- merce Tuesday morning, and a
thorough check showed cases
where the same person had voted
in two colleges, names of students
who did not vote were deleted
from the books, and other fraudu- lent practices. The Commerce list
was missing from the SC office
Tuesday, and has not been seen

Tuesday afternoon a Kernel re- porter was shown three Arts and
con- Sciences ballots, numbered
secutively, which had been folded
identically and marked with the
same color ink. They were folded
in half and then creased again,
with a slight fold in the upper
right corners of all three, indicat- ing that they had originally been
folded together:
A congress member called the
at 9 a. m. yesterday to re- port that the Arts and Sciences
ballots were missing from the of- fice. They had been wrapped in
bundles and filed, and all
three packages were taken from
the filing cabinet.
Mrs. Ann Jackson, a SUB infor- mation desk employee, told the
Kernel that a "tall, thin, dark- haired girl" whom she said she
did not know had asked her to
unlock the congress office about
8 a. m. yesterday. Mrs. Jackson
said she asked the girl if she were
a secretary or if she "belonged back
in the Student Congress office."
She said the girl replied: "Yes,
I want to get something out of
the files." Asked if she noticed
whether the girl was carrying any- thing when leaving the office, Mrs.
Jackson said: "No, I wasn't paying
that much attention."
The girl left the SUB, Mrs. Jack- son added, without asking that the
office be relocked.
Using the voting list from the
Economics Building poll, a

Kernel reporter Tuesday tele- phoned some 140 persons who were
listed as having voted there and
of them,
talked to about one-thiOf these, three who supposedly
not in school
voted are
this
semester. Two others whose names
were marked off the list said they
rd

had not voted at all.
election official wno closed
at 5 p. m. told the Kernel
that

that:

the IIome Economics Build-the- y
ingt the first balIot number was
250. When I left at 5 p. m., the

ballot number was 406. I checked
the voting book with the ballots
and found that 21 more ballots had
been used than students marked
off as having voted."
The official, a Campus Party
supporter, said that at one time she
turned away from the polling place
to talk briefly with a teacher, and
that six ballots were used during
that time without any voters
proachlng the area.
She also said she told one of the
other poll supervisors that she
would report the Incident, and he
said: "No you won't, because you
can't prove it."
Two students who were marked
as having voted at the Agriculture
poll also were among the voters
listed at the Arts and Science poll,
According to the Arts and
Sciences records, 23 more ballots
were found than there were
dents voting.
An Election Committee official
said yesterday that "in the first
count of the Arts and Sciences
lots, 16 faulty ones were found, half
of which were thrown out. All were
votes.
Campus Party straight-tick"Five of these w ere in numerical
sequence," he continued, "folded
together and marked in the same
manner. Three were originally
marked, erased, and then remarked
the same way."
in the College of Commerce. Bill
Holmes, a senior, told the Kernel
that he found his name marked off
the voting list when he went to
ce.

ap-sin-

stu-Ker-

nel

bal-thr-

ee

et

vote.
He said the person supervising
the poll said "Oh, I guess there's
some mistake," and then allowed
him to vote. Asked if his name

might have been crossed out by
accident, Holmes said it was in the
middle of the page and "the only
names were at
other crossed-othe very top of the page."
Another Commerce senior, Ber-Honie Meese, said he went to vote two
or three times
between early
classes, but decided to wait until
the .afternoon
because of the
ut

me

crowds.
....When he tried to vote at 4 p. m..
Meese said the person In charge
of the poll said "I'm sorry, but

Continues on Page

5

Faculty Evaluation Begun
By SC Survey Committee
Student evaluation of UK professors has begun and will continue
through next week.
The evalution is being conducted
by the Student Congress Survey
Committee. The questionalres will
be complied as eyalutions are completed.
The compiled statements will be
listed on a separate form and sent
to the professor being evaluated.
The students are asked not to sign
the evaluations.

Each student gives his classlfica
tion, over-a- ll
standing and his
standing in the course.
The professors are rated on presentation of subject matter, preparation of lecture, knowledge of
subject; class discussions, value of
textbooks, outside reading, gradin?
system, attitude toward students
and personal mannerisms.
The students are to give comments and suggestion for im'
provements In the courses.

* KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, May

2-- TIIE

11, 1939

Work Of UK Art Students
On Exhibition In Gallery
Seven graduating seniors and 18
Mudenu in upper division classes
In art are now exhibiting their art
v rk in the Fine Arts Gallery.
The exhibit includes painting,
1 nwlnjr, scTilrrttire and prints. The
orks were chosen by a jury of
iree .students and two faculty
lembcrs. The showing Is sponsored
y the Art Club and the Art Dc-- .

.mment.

graduating seniors exhibit-tht- ir
work are Carol Collins,
il Harris. Sally Hopper, Thomas
H ffinan. Delia Mason King. Don-;- o
P Pool and Charles Wade.
Students exhibiting their work
division art
j oduced in upper
Ju-II- is
IS.SCS are Ray Burklow.
uu, Diana Cress. Elizabeth
i vis,
Phyllis Dell Cort. Evelyn
Jton, Ada Gail, Bonnie Hastings,
(rt Hemlepp, Robert Herndon,
irolyn Kelly, James McCormick,
Jordelia Rosenblum, Gwin
Lane Vogel, Don Wallace,
Leita Whitesel and Ellsworth TayThe

Arts Foyer is work from courses
in Beginning Drawing and Painting, Basis Design and Public School
Art.

J

Flute Club
Sets Meeting
In Fine Arts

The Universcity Flute Club will
hold its final school year meeting
Friday evening in the Fine Arts
Building.
Meeting time is 8 p.m. in Room
6. Purpose of the club is to foster
an interest in playing the flute.
Appearing in ensemble and solo
on the final program will be Valerie Hembrea, Jody Hyden, Robert
Taylor, Jo Ann Baxter, Brooke
Griffith, Janice Cook, Sarah Baird,
Wesley Krogdahl, Linda Watkins,
lor.
and Emily Sampson. The accomThe exhibit, which opened Sun- panists will be Alice Evenburgh,
day, will contune through June Ilarryln Sallis and Frances Karp...
50.
The recital will be open to the
Also on exhibitition in the Fine public without charge.

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Student Artists Display Wort;

n.

One piece of sculpture, now on exhibit in the student art show in I lie Fine Arts Gallery,
is critically analyicri by several art students and professors. The exhibit includes
paintings, drawings, sculpture and prints.

Two Cadets

TAYLOR TIKE CO.

Research Foundation Gets Outstanding
AtPre-Cam- p

Driver Education Grant
The Kentucky Research Foundation has received a $1,500 grant
for training high school teachers
responsible for driver education in
their schools.
The fund, presented by the Allstate Foundation, provides
for
scholarships to be awarded to high

FLOWERS
For Any

Occasion
CALL

3-09-

under a priority

n COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE it

PHONE

James Demo Johns, and Alva R.
Sullivan, Air Science III cadets
were selected as the outstanding
cadets at the preliminary summer
training encampment at Memphis
Air Force Base May
Thr cadets competed against
other units from Memphis State
University and the University of

system.
Under the system, scholarships
would go to:
Educators starting a driver edprogram for the first
ucation
time, without a licensed teacher in
driver education who desire to Mississippi.
have one of their teachers licens-- i
They were selected on the basis
J.
of military bearing, proficiency in
2. Schools which are losing their
drill and
and attitude
driver education teacher and de- toward the ceremoniesmilitary
intensive
train- sire to have one of their own ing given during
the period.
teachers licensed.
The purpose of the preliminary:
3. Teachers in schools that are
summer encampment was to pre- expanding driver education
pare the cadets for a four-wee- k
grams and schools where officials
training period this summer In
prefer to license one of their prewhich the cadets will be exposed
sent teachers.
to intensive military training.
The grant is part of an Allstate
Foundation
Driver
Education
Grant program which last year
resulted in the distribution
of
$66,250 in grants to 37 colleges and
universities throughout the country.
Initiated in 1933, the program is
designed to provide a corps of
university-traine- d
driver education teachers for the nation's
high schools.

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En The
There are times in a newspaperman's career even ip the
careers of collegiate journalists
when sniffing out, investigating, substantiating and writing a "big" story
fills him with almost as much disgust at what he has uncovered as it
yet-embryon- ic

does with a feeling of accomplish-

ment at having brought rottenness
the merciless light of public
scrutiny.
This disgust, enough in itself, becomes more repugnant when the dishonesty and corruption are found to
exist in the very community which
he which the public thought to be,
by and large, the epitome of integrity, honesty and sincerity. But even
repugnance is too mild a noun to
encompass the feeling a newspaperman gets when, having ferreted out
a blatant fraud perpetrated by a group
of supposed idealists, he is asked to
suppress his findings, to "just forget
it" because he "can't do anything
about it, anyway."
Thanks to the resourcefulness of a
team of its reporters, the Kernel today
is able to publish documentary evi- dence of several instances of fraud
in last week's Student Congress elections. Even though we are thoroughly
nauseated by the newly installed congress president's attitude that everyone knows some ballot boxes were
stuffed, it always happens, it can't be
prevented, so why bother about it?
we are nonetheless proud to have obtained concrete proof of certain odious, fraudulent practices at the polls.
We believe a newspaper's surpassing information concerning a flagrant violation of election rules to be
I

Air: A Stench Of Fraud
equivalent to a doctor's not telling his
patient of a malignant though painless
cancer. Just as the cancer will someday make itself known through its
own malignancy, so will the loathsome dishonesty of fraudulent elections multiply until it has devoured
the very fibre of the body politic.
In both cases the known remedies are
surer to be effective if they are applied when the corruption is first
recognized as dangerous.
Tuesday morning the Kernel obtained from the Student Congress
office the student directories used in
the election, We found numerous
cases where persons had evidently
voted twice, in different colleges;
where persons' names were stricken
"
from the list even though they did
not vote at all; where the names of
last semester's students, no longer
in school, had been crossed out, indicating that they had voted; where
several ballots folded exactly the
same way, marked with the same
straight-partvote, in the same style
and with the same pen were inserted
in the ballot box; where more names
were crossed off the poll's student
directory than the total votes cast;
where persons came to vote and
found their names already crossed
off the list, with there being no possibility that the deletion might have
been merely an error.
The Kernel was accused Tuesday
night of stealing the voting lists from
the congress office. This is untrue,
although we admit taking them without the president's knowledge. Our reporter asked for and received the lists
from a person in the office, with the
y

Much Ado About
Fraudulent Elections
By CURNEY NORMAN

Elsewhere on this page there is excomment on the fraudulent
Student Congress elections of May 6. At
the risk of merging into ground already
covered, this column will today also concern itself with the same subject, for
I believe that too much cannot be said
about an incident of this magnitude.
This column has mentioned the following quote before, and today it is
tensive

of special significance:
"A University is but life in miniature."
I don't recall who first said this short
but significant sentence, but if ever a
true statement was made, this is it. For
practically every facet of our culture is
represented in some form, large or small,
right here at the University of Kentucky
everything from bridge circles to political parties, from a police force to corruption in public affairs.
The corruption referred to, of course,
is that evidenced by the fixed election
of last week. But it is not the intention
here to dwell on that facet of our University "life in miniature," for it suffices
to say that such corruption does exist.
What seems to me to be the most
pathetic aspect of the whole scandal is
that there are those who would prefer
the false election be ignored, would let
it slide as "one of those tilings,"" and
pretend that it didn't really happen. It
is not only those who are directly responsible for the thing that wish it to remain hidden, but others who feel it
should be covered up for such hollow
reasons as that it will result in bad publicity for the University. No doubt that,
was the thinking of those honest Teamster Union officials who first suspected
Mr. Beck of usurping the union dry that
to expose him would make people think

bad things about the Union. And the
nation saw what happened to those
people.
Other excuses are that to expose the
fraudulent election would destroy Student Congress. This is doubtful, but even
so, what student body wants its governing officials chosen by a crooked election? To let an election ' that reeks as
bad as this one remain valid is a slap
in the face of those hundreds of.
students who bothered
to
participate in the election by voting.
well-meani-

ng

Yes, there are many who would hide
their heads under the sand of this affair, even as they dislike recognizing
anything that requires thought to see and
effort to correct. It is . these spineless
University citizens who willingly accept
things as they are, who have not the
ability or initiative to criticize anything
more serious than waste paper on the
campus or dirty trays in the cafeteria.
Their criticism is never directed at anything fundamental (such as what is
wrong with a society that will condone
election frauds?), but rather, it glides
along the bare surface, observing only
those superficial
things that are Apparent anyhow, acting as those blind
people of Cermany did in the 1920s and

1930s.

The important consideration

of this

controversy lies not within any individual, but in the reaction of the student
body. Will the students tolerate the
situation as it is? Let's hope not. What
can they do? For one thing, they can
boycott any future election unless something is done about this last one, or unless a foolproof election system is devised
before the next election.

concurrence of the secretary on duty.
The voting lists were and are public
record and we had and have a right
to examine them, just as any other
interested student would have. And
evidently someone was more interested than we, because the list from
the College of Commerce disappeared
-- mysteriously and perhaps irretrievablybefore our reporter arrived at
the office.
We debated the publication of our
information rather heatedly with the
congress president Tuesday night, and
his contention was that to publish the
story would imply that his (the winning) party stuffed the ballot boxes;
that everyone knew some fraud took
place; that the story would cause
irreparable damage to Student Congress' efforts next year, perhaps even
emasculate the organization entirely;
that a new election would be impossible . because there is not enough
time and because both his and his
opponent's party would not campaign
again; that bad publicity might ensue
from our article and reflect discreditably upon the University.
We told him then and we now reiterate: the Kernel did not make this
prickly bed the persons who rigged
the election did. We are merely turning down the covers so that they may
lie in it, and if necessary we shall
air its filthy, verminous linen daily
until a new election, with precautions
to eliminate all chicanery and
is held.
It is unfortunate that the voting
system used last week makes it impossible for us to determine which
party stuffed the ballot boxes; it is
equally unfortunate that it is impossible to know exactly how many
tainted votes were cast. If we could
prove either point, we could place the
blame squarely where it belongs, and
in exact proportions. At the moment,
the onus of fraud hangs like a radioactive cloud above the entire election, in every college, contaminating
all beneath it with its falling particles
of doubt and suspicion.
Yet is it not strange that this election drew almost 500 more votes than
the past two years' elections, even
though neither Wainscott nor Jones
was particularly well known, neither
had a vastly superior platform, arid
neither campaigned any more than
r
their
predecessors? The University's enrollment has changed only
a negligible fraction from last year
to this, yet last week's vote was
greater than that of the
d
War II record, when enrollment was
more than 2,000 greater. And is it
not equally strange that the ballots
from the College of Arts and Sciences,
where the greatest number of election discrepancies occurred, should
have been mysteriously stolen yesterday?
We do not allege that either party
succeeded in stuffing an additional
500 ballots beyond those legitimately
cast, nor do we irrfply that the elec
knav-ishnes- s,

two-yea-

post-Worl-

tion results would have been any different had no fraud taken place. We
are merely citing what seems to us
to be a rather disproportionate Interest, in an election which had no
great issues involved and no candidate who would match, in prestige
and or popularity, the presidential
candidates of recent years.
When he visited the Kernel newsroom Tuesday night, Jones made the
regrettable statement that "I thought
you were running this newspaper for
the good of the students." Aside
from the fact that such a statement,
even when made in anger and with
understandable sarcasm, insults our
standards and the very foundation of
everything we have tried to accomplish as an editor, it made us wonder
if perhaps he hadn't just splintered a
loose plank in his platform-th- at
is,
the plank in which he advocates a
free press.
Fortunately we can ignore that
plank, because we have a free press,
one which realizes that freedom implies responsibility to report the truth,
no matter whom it involves. And report the truth we shall, not giving a
damn whether we can "do anything
about it," because the truth is for the
students' good.
We have always supported Student
Congress and any administrative
measures designed to give the students more control over their own
affairs. No doubt our evidence of an
election fraud will cause much stu-

dent reaction, probably largely unfavorable, but the congress has the
solution within its own power: call
a new election, immediately,, in which
cheating will be impossible. To do this
would demonstrate a sincerity and
desire to have an unquestioned election that would irmove'arry sliadow
of doubt now in the voters' minds. To
refuse would be to condone fraud
and dishonesty, and no legislative
body can hope to have either confidence, respect or efficacy if it makes
no attempt to rectify such a reprehensible travesty as last week's election.
We are putting this disgusting,

dis-

reputable i and disheartening farce
squarely in the lap of Jones and the
new congress; it they decline to act
on it, we promise to pursue a new
election with all the vigor and resources at our command, and we shall
wave the putrescent corpse of murdered honesty beneath their noses until the stench becomes as unbearable
to them as it is to us.

Kernels
"I do love my country's good with
a respect more tender, more holy,
more profound, than mine own life."

Benedict Arnold
"Bid them wash their faces, and
keep their teeth clean." IIyciene 9

"Tobacco
Reynolds

is a

dirty weed." B. J.

The Kentucky Kernel
University of Kentucky

Entered at tb Port Offic at Islington, Kentucky as second class matter under tba Act of Man 3. 1879.
Fubhkhed foul tunes a week during the uvular school year eictlit holidays and exams.
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

Jim Hampton, Editor-in-ChiNews Editor
Larhy Van Hoosr, Chief Sports Editor
Bill Nctxirx, Chief
Perry Ashley, Business Manager .
Nohman McMullin, Advertising Manager
Billie Hose Paxton, Society Editor
Howahd Barber, rhntographer
Hank Chapman, Lew Kinc, Sup Taylor And Bob IImindov, Cartoonhts
Allen Tarpon and Meheda DaVis, Circulation
ef

THURSDAY'S NEWS STAFF

James Nolan, Associate Editor

Alice Beddinc, Editor

Paul Scott,

Sports Editor

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, May

Election Fraud

Continued From Tate 1
Plie the boy, no did he know
If
already voted." Meee's In the ballots were later deposited
you've
the Commerce box.
name was already marked through.
In Engineering, 595 ballots were
He Is the only Commerce student
counted by the
hoe name appears on the top tee, but a check Elections Commitof the college's list
quarter of the pate.
showed that 612 students had votBob Gray, wiio with Dill Sikes ed. The
records were
as In charge of the poll when 8C President Tayror returned to
Jones before
Meese came to vote, said that be- the Kernel could
conduct a teletides Meese, a girl and "about three phone survey or Engineering stuethers while I was at the poll" were dents.
not allowed to vote because their
However,
a
limited survey
names had been crossed off.
showed that one person not enGray added that three students rolled in the University
voted and
were refused ballots between 2 and one, enrolled In
another college,
3 p. m. because their names had
cast a vote in Engineering.
already been deleted from the list
All
discrepancy was
Asked If he noticed any other found in the College of
discrepancies, Gray said three There were 288 ballotsEducation.
counted
ftudents tried to vote with fee slips after the election, but the records
instead of ID cards and several showed that only 277 persons voted.
ethers came to the poll with ID
This book, along with that
ards showing them enrolled in from the College of Engineering,
colleges other
than Commerce. was returned to Jones Tuesday
They had no notes from the dean night when he asked to be given
to indicate that they had trans- the records borrowed earlier
by
ferred, he said.
the Kernel.
Gray also said he gave one student a ballot and the student returned to the box with "what looked
like three or four." By the time he
had an opportunity to examine the
box, Gray said, the ballots had
been so scattered that he could
not tell whether more than one
had been cast by the same person.
A Commerce freshman told the
Kernel that he "saw what,appeared
"The rapid advancement in medto me to be the stuffing of a balicine means that the best medical
lot box." He said he was standing
near the Commerce poll when a minds are needed."
This was the idea expressed by
boy walked up and dropped "many
. Dr.
Richardson K. Noback at the
more than one" ballot In the box.
installation' banquet Sunday of
The witness said he had been
near the poll for 15 minutes or Alpha Epsilon Delta, national was
honor society which
more, and that the student had not
recently established at UK.
obtain