xt780g3gxt4q https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt780g3gxt4q/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19170301  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March  1, 1917 text The Kentucky Kernel, March  1, 1917 1917 2012 true xt780g3gxt4q section xt780g3gxt4q THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
University of Kentucky
LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, MARCH I, 1917.

VOL IX

1917

KENAN

READY

FOR

WILDCATS HAVE STIFF

IS

PRINTER

GAMES ON SCHEDULE

Copy In Hands of Editor Tennessee and Cumberland
One Month Earlier
Will Prove Real
Opponents
Than Usual
MANY NEW FEATURES REVENGE
The 1917 Kentucklan will mark a
new era in college annual work in our
State. Work on the book began be
fore September registration was under
way, and practically all the copy is
now in the hands of the editors, fully
a month earlier than usual, and with
the added time given the printers the
publication should be the nearest to
mechanically perfect that has yet
been gotten out at the University.
Less than ten members of the Sen
ior class have failed to pay their dues
and a larger representation than ever
before will appear in the Senior class
section.
The view section of the book has
been made up of pictures selected
from a large number of State and
campus views. This section is to be
run in color and should prove an attractive addition to the book.
The book has been dedicated to
the Commonwealth of Kentucky. In
effecting this idea the editors have
spread of the
had a
State Capitol prepared that will be
one of the most elaborate designs
that has ever appeared in the
three-colore- d

The make-uof the fraternity section book is along a new line that will
toe a radical departure from the usual
method of handling this section.
The feature section has been the
means of settlement
for many a
grudge held by the feature editor and
taken with the pages of snaps of all
phases of college life, the pages of
cartoons, and the take-off- s
of campus
organizations, it promises to rival any
part of the book for popularity. To
predict what is to appear here is beyond the power of the reporter. The
editor of "Lykelle Poems" is likely to
say most anything about you.
The athletic section has been given
more of the time of the editor than
any other part of the book. Splendid
pictures
of all forms of athletics
have been secured and very careful
work has characterized the make-uof these pictures in the composing
room. That the engravers are doing
their part has been testified to by ail
who have seen the proofs that have
come to the office. More than half
the engraving has been completed.
Probably the section that should
make its strongest appeal to the general public and the alumni is the
insert Jubilee section. In this
p

(Continued en P

Flv)

IS

CRAVED

The schedule of the Wildcat basket
tossing aggregation when they jour
ncy southward this week-enwill bo
stiff. Cumberland College, of Williamsburg, Ky., will be the first boulder in their path. Whether it will be
removed with ease, whether a lively
scrap will ensue or whether the savage feline will stump his big toe on it
remains to be seen.
Bright and early Friday morning
they will take their departure, leaving Williestown to invade the camp
of the real enemy. An eager, excited,
sitting
crowd
straight, expectant on their bleacher
seats; a cool, impartial voice "Ready
"Ready
Kentucky?"
Tennessee?"
And then the winsome Wildcats will
endeavor to do what they so hope they
will be able to do, that is, hold their
enemies' noses and pour into their
mouths a dose of the same medicine
prescribed by them when they were
acting as doctors a fortnight or so
ago. Can t you imagine the grimace
on Jacobs' face, now? Kentucky will
have the same designs on Tennessee
Saturday night as on Friday night.
The Cats will be allopaths and homeopaths at the same time.
Besides the above combats, it is
probable, but not certain, that on Monday night Kentucky will engage the
Tusculum College quintet. The team
line-uto
as follows:
is expected
forwards;
Ireland and Campbell,
Longsworth, center;
Schrader and
Rodes, guards. Bart Peak and Boone
Simpson will make the trip as utility
men. The team leaves this morning.
d

KY. AND CINCY LAW
SCHOOLS TO DEBATE

No. 21

McBRAYER WINNER OF
UNION LIT. CONTEST
J. J. McBrayer. a Junior In the Col
lege of Law, added another star to his
crown Thursday night by winning the
Union oratorical contest. His subject
was "The Modern Paradox."
After
the contest President Barker presented him with a handsome gold medal,
as has been his custom many years
past. The Judge made a presentation
speech which called forth the highest
admiration of all those present. The
other contestants were Messrs. T. L.
Creekmore, L. F. Blsohoff, E. B. Har
din and Roy Barnhill.
The winning of this contest entitles
Mr. McBrayer to the honor of representing the Union in the
contest between the Patterson and
Union Societies, the winner of which
will represent the University in the
Intercollegiate contest to be held at
Winchester some time in May.
inter-societ- y

TO

PERFORM

IN CHAPEL

Mrs. McCracken and Prof.
Loomis Will Be
Soloists
COVER

IS

DIRECTOR

The University band, which has
made quite a reputation for itself this
year, will give its first public concert
In the ohapel tomorrow at the regular
hour. Professor Lawrence Cover, the
director, will be in charge and solos
will be rendered by Mrs. Ralph Mc
Cracken, soprano, and Professor Fred
Loomis, cornetist.
This is the first time in some years
the band has attempted such an ambitious program, and both the director
and the students deserve great credit
for the progress that has been made
so far. The program follows:
1.

March

Montezuma

La I'oloma
Gradier.
2.

Chambers.
Spanish Dance De

3. iBargo
"Resolved, that Congress should en
Huusdel.
act a law providing for one year com
4. Cornet
Solo "Turn Back the
pulsory military service for all male Universe and Give Mo Yesterday"
citizens nineteen years of age," is the Ball. Professor Fred Loomis.
subject that has been chosen for the
r. Indian War Dance Descriptive
annual debato between the Cincinnati
Bellstedt.
Law School and the College of Law
C.
Poet and Peasant Overture
of the University, which will be held
Suppe.
in chapel on tho evening of April 8.
7. Soprano Solo
"In tho Garden of
There will bo two teams chosen to
My Heart"
Ball.
Mrs. Ralph Mcrepresent tho Law College. One team
Cracken.
will go to Cincinnati, and on the same
5. Ghost
Descriptive
Dance
night the other team will debato with
Salsburg.
s
for
tho Cincinnati lads hero.
1).
March Tropic to Tropic Alexplaces on the team will be hold on
the evening or March 7, at which time ander.
10. Star Spangled Banner.
six debaters will bo selected.
Try-out-

BIG

LIFE IN THE COUNTRY

STUDENT NIGHT
FOR

STROLLER

PLAT

Transylvania Prof. Says Actors' Work Surpassing
Agriculture Builds
That of Other Years In
Character
All Respects
READS

RILEY

POEMS TO GO ON THE ROAD

"The very basis of Americanism is
the stable,
individualism
characteristic of agricultural life,"
said Professor Snoddy, professor of
College,
philosophy at Transylvania
in an address to the students at con
vocation Tuesday morning, on "Agriculture and Character."
The following sentences by Professor Snoddy are descriptive of the influence of agriculture upon character
building.
"First hand contact with nature
gives one a vital outlook on life. The
great philosophers of the past have
thot in the city with a city man's
outlook on life. But the time is com'- ing when philosophy will have the
country as its place of origination.
The great prophets of the olden time
were from rural communities; so was
the Christ.
"Intellectual rural life is going to
help us to understand the Bible; to
get the feeling of reality. There's an
instinct for the soil. Whenever you
come in contact with the soil you feel
as if you are in the presence of something real.
"In a rural community, one is In
contact with a real home. Three
times a day the family collects round
You
the table and dines together.
can never build a great national life
that has not its root in a real, genuine home.
"In our older years it gives us a
sentiment for our youth.
When a
poet spends his youth in a city, he
does not eulogize it, but, if he spends
it on a farm, he lauds it highly."
The lecture was brought to a close
with readings 'from Eugene Field and
James Whitcomb Riley, who. in the
opinion of the speaker, described
rural life and the influence of its elements better than any other poet.
d

ELECTRICAL EXPERT
ADDRESSES SENIORS
W. M. Hannah, Kentucky representative of tho Louisville branch of the
General Electric Company, lectured
to the Senior Mechanicals in Mechanical Hall, Tuesday morning. His subject was "The Development of the
Electrical Utility In tho Last Twenty-fivYears," and ho brought out in tho
physical valuation not only tho value
of property, but also the value of tho
business in the process of develop
ment us related to the amount of prop- orty Installed.
e

The Strollers have made all ar
rangements for the production of "The
Lion and the Mouse" at the Lexington Opera House, and Saturday evening, March 10, is destined to be one
of the biggest
nights of
the year for the students of the University.
No student can afford to remain
away; no student in former years who
away
stayed
to
regret
failed
it, and no student who went to see his
friends perform was ever heard to
say that he regretted his attendance.
The Strollers want all Kentucky stu
dents to attend because they are their
friends, but that is not the real reason
why they suggest their presence.
They guarantee that their performance is worth all and more than they
charge for it. A long list of successes,
beginning with "Brown of Harvard,"
and continuing thru "Father and the
Boys," has made for the Strollers the
reputation of being easily the best
amateur dramatic club in Kentucky
and one that equals in its efforts the
best of similar college societies. A
word or two to the wise is always
sufficient. Make that date and get
your seats while good ones are to be
had!
To give a further review of "The
Lion and the Mouse" at this time is
not necessary. The full story of the
play and the cast who will play the
parts has been announced already, but
the Kernel is of the opinion that full
Justice has not been done the work of
the actors in the rehearsals
For
more than four weeks almost daily
meetings have been held, and under
the efficient and tyrannical management of John Marsh, stage manager,
the players have been whipped into
shape that Is really remarkable. The
production is ready to go on now, but
the next week will be devoted to
smoothing tho rough spots and making the characters move like clockwork. Capable judges who have seon
the rehearsals declare that this cast
as a whole is better than any the
Strollers have had in recent years,
while several members stand out as
of real professional calibre.
Tho leading roles are played by Em

ory Frazier, a veteran of several successes, and Mamie Miller Woods, a
newcomer In tho ranks, but one of
Buperlativo excellence. Their work,
especially in tho dramatic

scenes in

THE LION and THE MOUSE
LEXINGTON OPERA HQHSF, SATURDAY, MARCH

I

QUI.

PRICES 25c TO

$ 00
1

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.
Go Where the Go'i Go

Penonally Picked

MEET ME AT

Tri"n8,tir;:r"s'Ei

THE ORPHEUM THEATRE

First Class in Every Appointment

BEN AU
THEATRE

WE GIVE

Feature and Comedy
Pictures

1

A

Admission
Ten
Cents

ALL

ALL NEW BUT THE NAME

Same Management Same Classy Shows
"If a Laugh wasworth $1, You'd Leave Here Rich"

1

GRAVES, COX

jj

& COMPANY

4

I

y

1

YOUNG MEN

3550

the third and fourth acts, is of the
kind that makes thrills run up the
spine of the most blase spectator.
Gus Gay, football player and graduate in dramatics from Lexington High
School, has a part scarcely second In
importance to that of the "lion" and
the "mouse," and he is playing It In a
manner that brings joy to the hearts
of the older Strollers.
Martha Buckman gives a very accurate representation
of a society
leader, and Freda Lemon, as the wife
of Judge Rossmore, plays a difficult
role In a manner that makes amateurism seem a far cry. Angela Morancy,
as the fiancee of Jefferson Ryder,
gives a comedy performance that is
up to the mark in every respect. Several of her scenes, particularly those
with Bagley, the Englishman, played
by William Shinnick, are excruciatingly funny.

Eliza Spurrier, as a country "kitchx en mechanic"; Vennie Duley, as a
prim
and
xwant the new "style ideas"! as a spinster, town Peggy Wilkinson,
"sassiety leader,"
small
as soon as they're ready. have comedy parts that are sure to
3!
T go over in wonderful style. Mary
Turner, altho her part is not quite so
important as the one she had last
your service
We're
year, will certainly linger in the memory of the audience as a real actress.
with new

I

J

at

t
t

Herndon Evans, as Judge
the impeached jurist, gives an
excellent representation of an old man
T
Stetson and Knox Hats, :c broken by a powerful enemy, and
Tate Bird, as his friend, Judge Stott,
is very effective. Preston Cherry,
New Regal, Hanan and
who was a member of the cast last
year, 'has a better part this year, and
as a politician, Senator Roberts is
Nettleton Shoes.
proving quite successful.
Grover
Creech, as the Reverend Pontifex
New Shirts and Neckwears Beetle, opens the show with the same
facility that Homer Combest opens
the door to Patterson Hall. His part
is very funny. W. C. Draddy and GorJGive them a "once over"?
don Marsh have small parts, but they
today.
play them in a manner that indicates
they will have larger roles in future
years.

I

1

GRAVES, COX I

Ross-mor-

Arrangements are being made to
take the play to several Central KenmT Ma)aiipiwii' m ijmiiu
tucky towns, and it is probable that a
contract to play Nicholasvillo next
lNCOItPORATED.
T week will be signed before Saturday.
V
Tickets will go on sale at the Opera
House next Wednesday, but those who
DAY AND NIQHT 8B88IONS desire to do so may reserve seats with
BOOKKEEPING
Emery Frazior after Monday. This is
u8lneM,PlwMrafiJiy
TYPEWRITING and done to give students the first chance
TELEGRAPHY at the choice locations, as a large
wUIORMM TrUKBSHBUP1 number of Lexington people always
lu Preuiient, hu yuit of eiperience in Mercantile tod
The University orchestra
I3nkina buu'neu, uo 40 yean educating 20,000 young attend
men and women (01 tucceu. ti Enter no w. flWfll. Wtltl.
will furnish the music.
Cottege 159 li. MalnSt.nearPoit
Depot.
Office, oppot tie
Addreu WILBUM K. SMITH. Uxladtsa. Ky.
Tickets are priced at 25 cents to
$1.00. Make that dato and get in
early!
4-

I &IC0MPANY

I

SPECIAL RATES TO
University Students

CONTEST

SUBSCRIPTION

Offered

"Superior Vaudeville"
Boxes

T

Three Cash Prizes and Copies of Kentuckian

ADA MEADE
Prices', 10, 15, 20, 25, 30,

OPEN 10:00 A. M. TO 11:00 P. M.

FREE TICKET WITH EACH ONE PURCHASED."

to 10:30 P. M.

Change of Picture Eacb Day

AdmiMion 50 nd 10c

ARE

ELIGIBLE

A subscription contest for tho Kentuckian, to tho winners of which cash
prizes will bo awarded, together with
copios of the Annual, will begin today
and all students in tho University aro
eligible to compote. To the one se
curing tho largest number of subscrip
tions, a prize of $20.00 in gold will be
given. The second prize is $10.00 in
gold and the one finishing third will
receive $5.00. The conditions of the
contest follow:
1. Every student in the University
is eligible to enter this contest, with
the exception of the members of the
Kentuckian staff.
2. The contest will begin today and
all subscriptions must be entered in
the manner and form here announced
before 3:30 p. m Thursday, April 5.
3. If 350 or more subscriptions for
tho 1917 Kentuckian are entered by
the contestants, during tho time set
out in No. 3 and in the manner and
form to be set out in No. 4, the contestant in whose name is entered the most subscriptions
will
be
awarded $20.00 in gold and a copy of
the 1917 Kentuckian.
If 175 subscriptions are entered as
nbove mentioned the contestant in
whose name the most subscriptions
are entered will be awarded $10.00 in
gold and a copy of the 1917 Kentuckian.
If 100 or more and less than 175 are
entered as set out above, the contest
ant in whose name the most subscrip
tions are entered will be awarded
$5.00 in gold and a copy of the 1917
Kentuckian.
If less than 100 subscriptions are
entered as first set out above the con
testant in whose name the most sub
scriptions are entered will be awarded
a copy of tho 1917 Kentuckian.
4. Those wishing to enter the con
test will be supplied with two kinds
of blanks. One of these when filled
out and duly signed by the one sub
scribing, will authorize the one sollc
iting the subscription to subscribe for
him a copy of the 1917 Kentuckian
and to apply the $1.00, which he, the
subscriber has given the solicitor as
part payment on the subscription
price of $2.50.
The other when filled out and signed
by the solicitor, the undersigned will
agree to subscribe for the person mentioned therein for a copy of the 1917
Kentuckian and acknowledge the receipt of $1.00, which he promises to
apply as part payment on the subscription and to give the subscriber a
receipt signed as required by the business staff.
Those contesting will file with the
t inscription manager or the business
n auager the first blank mentioned in
No. 4 and the $1.00 us required part
payment on all subscriptions thoy secure. Each one so entered will count
a vote which the contestant may enter tin his name or in tho name of any
other person who is eligible to eater
tho contest. Those soliciting will at
all times be considered as the agents

of thoso from whom thoy secure sub-

scriptions.

PHIL-OSOPHIA-

Tho Kentuckian office is room 3 in
tho basement of tho Education Building. Tho office will be open every
chnpel hour nnd every afternoon at
3:30 o'clock. Blanks and full Information will bo supplied by any of the
business staff. See C. It. Smith. W.
W. Owsley, C. M. Hubble,
F. 0.
Mnyos or Miss Martino Ratlcan.

2
HAND
DEFEAT TO WESLEYAN
CO-ED-

46-1-

S

The girls' basketball game, which
was played in Winchester between
Kentucky Wesleyan and the University of Kentucky Monday night, resulted in a score of 4G to 12 in favor of
the University girls, with Miss Drake,
of tho Wesleyan, and Miss Ellwanger,
of the University team, starring.
Miss Ellwanger scored twenty-twpoints of the game and Miss Drake
made the whole score for Kentucky
Wesleyan. Tho score stood 2C to 7
at the end of the first half and then a
score of 20 to 5 was made during the
second half. Miss Crain, of the University quintet, threw one field goal
from center.
o

The

line-u-

SILVER JUBILEE IS
PLANNED BY

was as follows:
Wesleyan.

p

U. of K.
Miss Cregor

Miss Courtney
Center.

Miss Innes

Miss Drake
Guard.

Miss Haydon

Miss B. Spencer
Guard.

N

SOCIETY
The silver jubllco of tho Philosoph-IaLiterary Society will bo celebrated this month beginning Wednesday,
March 11 and ending Saturday, March
21. A series of programs have been
arranged and tho society hopes to
make this n gala occasion.
An open mooting to which all girls
on tho campus will bo Invited, will
open tho jubilee. Wednesday night
will bo given over to old members
and all former members will bo invited as far as it is possible and it is
hoped that many of them will attend.
The program will be a repetition of
the one presented twenty years ago
and tho girls will bo in costume of
that period.
Thursday morning chapel exercises
will bo held at which tho methods of
present-dasociety will be portrayed
and a program which promises to be
entertaining will be given. Saturday
night will bo given over to a joint
meeting of all the literary societies
on the campus in tho Y. M. C. A.
rooms, when a real St. Patrick's Day
party will be given.
During the jubilee Miss Frances
Jewell will entertain the society with
a book reception at which the girls
will come representing books and the
closing affair of the week will be a
play to be given in the armory,
March 24.
n

y

Patronize Our Advertisers

Miss J. Spenser
Forward.
Miss Ellwanger
Miss Day
Forward.
$
Substitutes Kentucky, Misses Dean
and Smith; Wesleyan, Miss Howard.

Miss Crain

S

Typewriting to do.
TY. J. O. S. Box 585.

"Lexington's Bigger and Better Men's Store''
OFFERS TO THE COLLEGE YOUNG MEN

The World's Best Clothing

Hart, Schaffner & Marx
You pay no more for these good

clothes than you would just
ordinary clothes.
Won't You Come in and Look?

Kaufman Clothing Co.
See Those
New English Last
SHOES
at The Special Shoe Co s

Best in TownBlack

Priced Right too

and Tan

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206 W. Main

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Lexington, Ky.

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* NUminiiimii

ilttiMHNIMi

r

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Page

Eat Your Sandwiches

FOOTBALL DISCUSSED

The

Boot Shop

Walk-Ov- er

and Hot Chocolate at the
WOMAN'S EXCHANGE

Y. M. C. A. NOTES
BY

"HURRY-U-

YOST

P"

(PHOENIX BLOCK)

Shoes that

FEEL RIGHT
LOOK RIGHT

WEAR RIGHT

Tans for the Cadets a specialty
COME IN AND SEE US.

The College Boys' Store

GRADDY - - RYAN CO.
INCORPORATED.

Clothing,

Tailoring, Shoes & Furnishings

"Wear for Young Men ft Men Who Stay Young"

J. Franklin Corn, State Representative
TERRELL ATTENDS
ENGINEERS' MEETING
AG. SOCIETY NOTES

Dean Miller, who was scheduled to
give an Illustrated lecture
at the
meeting of the Agricultural Society,
Monday night, did not appear, disappointing a large crowd assembled to
hear him. After the roll call a business meeting was held and the society adjourned.
At the meeting of the society Monday night, March 5, Prof. W. S. Anderson will speak on "Constructive
Breeding of Farm Animals."

Professor D. V. Terrell, returning
from a conference of State testing engineers in Washington, D C, where
he represented Kentucky, states that
the standard tests for all road build
ing materials to be used in roads con
structed with federal aid have been
determined upon and will be sub
mitted to the Department of Public
Roads of Kentucky and all other
States of the Union.
Representatives of nineteen States
attended the conference. No permanent organization was effected at the
conference, but the members will be
subject to the call of Mr. Hubbard,
chief of the division of testing materials and research, for further consideration and action on the problems of road building- -

Dr. Fred Mutchler, head of the Extension Department of the Experiment
Station, and Professor George RobSTUDENT OBSERVATORY.
erts, acting dean of the College of
Agriculture of the University, left
Hobos.
for Washington, D. C, Monday, on
Our contemporary publications have
business for the Experiment Station,
devoted a good many "feet of space"
to be gone several days.
to that element in our country known
as hobos.
EXPERT ADDRESSES
The Hobo Club, at the University of
SENIOR MECHANICALS Montana, showed true hospitality to
college hobos this fall. They offered
"The whole country has its eyes free board and lodging to all students
turned upon this institution because from rival schools who bummed their
the methods employed by Dean An- way to Missoula to see the games.
derson differ from those of any other
A conductor on the Santa Fe anengineering college," said Theo
nounced, through the columns of a col
of Indianapolis, expert in heat- lege publication, that he preferred
ing and ventilating, in his address be- college hobos to soldier boys. Ho said
fore tho Senior Mechanicals in Me- college men were content with conchanical Hall Tuesday afternoon.
fiscating signs and other movable artiTho speaker said that Dean Ander- cles, while tho soldier boys removed
son ilrst gave students training in glass from the windows, brass knobs
common sense, which is essential to from the railings, and cushions from
success, and does not allow them to the seats.
specializo until after thoy have
And the success of a hobo college
college. He stated that much has been announced:
practical advantage was gained thru
"Tho first term of tho college for
having prominent ongineers and
hobos, which Is sponsored by James
to address the mechanical Cads Howe, tho millionaire hobo of
students.
St. Louis, openod in Chicago recently.
"Bo honest," was Mr. Woinshank's A building has been purchased and
advice to enginoers, who said that furnished by means of a $30,000
success was Impossible without
fund. Tho term "hobo" is to
In explaining this, the speaker bo discarded In favor of 'migratory
related personal experiences, saying unskilled labor." Sanitation and morthat ho had outlived seven competi- al valuos, vagrancy laws and tho ruditors who had used dishonest mothods ments of economics will compose the
against him.
curriculum." Miami Student.
Weln-shan-

d

3

207 W. Short St.

Famous Michigan
Coach
Addresses Seniors Friday Afternoon
"TAKES

GRIT TO WIN"

The Rov. R. T. (Jlllosnto, pastor or
tho Maxwell Presbyterian Church, addressed tho mooting hold In tho Y.
M. C. A. rooms Inst Sunday evening.
Tho substance of his talk was tin Where All is Well and Good
evangelistic appeal In which ho em- llHot'Chocolate, Home-madCandy
and Ices
phasized the vnluo of surrendering
one's life to tho Almighty.
The Rov. Mr. (illlosplo, who has
been In Lexington but n short time,
Progressive Sho Repniring Shop
sincerely hopes to bocomo bettor acLexington, Ky.
quainted with thoso who attend tho 140 S Limestone
Rubber Heels and Soles n Specialty
Y. meeting.
Ho comes recommended
to his new parish as one of tho most
ablo men In tho Southern Presbyterian Church

McGURICS
e

"You will get out of the game Just
what you put in it. The spirit of tho

contest is half of tho battle. Play a
clean game and you will have much
moro confidence and enthusiasm
in
your work," said Fielding H. Yost, tho
noted Michigan football coach, Friday
afternoon in a lecture to tho Senior
mechanicals, a class in educational
athletics and members of the football
squad. A man without courage and
confidence is licked before the game
heglns, he said. A man who can
come back after he has encountered
difficulties is made of the right stuff.
It is team play and only team play
that will yield and no eleven can succeed without it.
Yost spoke for more than two hours,
beginning with some observations 6T
sport in general, continuing with an
application of the principles involved
in football to life and concluding with
an account of some of the most important games and plays in which his
teams had participated. A section of
his address was given over to epigrammatic Unkings of life and football.
The following is taken from
Yost's philosophy:

"Hurry-Up- "

SAM GULLO

BIG PRESSING CLUB

RATE STARTING

The Rov. T. B. Roberts, of the Centenary Church, will be the speaker at
the next Y. M. C. A. meeting to oe
held Sunday evening. The Rev. Mr.
Roberts Is a graduate of Cornell University and has traveled extensively
In Palestine and other foreign coun
tries.

SUITS PRESSED I5G

We aaree to cress five suits n month
for four months for $3.00 to anyone
joining same, starting Feb. 1, 1917,
and endlna June 1. 1917. Wo aunrnn.
s
tee
work and prompt deliv
ery Trom now on. Remember, that we
taxe in this club one hundred
only
members, so come In early and sign
up. This Is the time of the year to
look good and to do so you clothes
must be well pressed.
Students who have any available
REGULAR PRICES:
time to give to tho promotion of ath
Suits Pressed
25c
letics in the Lexington public schools Cleaned and Pressed
$1.00
are requested to see Secretary John Phone 621-Cor. Lime & High Sts.
son, of the Y. M. C. A. Several students are wanted to coach baseball BECKER DRY CLEANIN6 CO
C. R. McGAUGHEY Prop.
and track teams and help with playground work. Services of any student interested will be greatly apMetropolitan
preciated.
first-clas-

Restaurant

per cent
The Place for Good Things lo Eat
In oth ALPHA TAU OMEGA HOLDS
EIGHTH ANNUAL BANQUET.
er words the most Important thing in
the game is the proper use of one's
knowledge and intelligence. So it is
DENTIST
Mu Iota chapter
of Alpha Tau
For any kind of dental ervice call on
with life.
Omega fraternity held its eighth an"The universal rule for tackling is nual banquet Saturday night at the
1ST CIIEAPJSIDK
never to let anything get away from Phoenix Hotel. About forty members
Phono
you.
Be aggressive on the offensive of the fraternity, Including a number Office hours 8 o. m. 6 p. m.
and defensive. Carry the fighting to of visitors and the pledges assembled
the enemy's territory.
Think of a in (the private dining room which was
football player who is not aggressive! decorated in the fraternity colors with W.
B.
"Be an asset, not a liability
Know the badge electrically illuminated.
SHOP
your part in each play, offensively and
Among the visitors were J. T. Gray,
The Closest Shop lo University
defensively, and do it. Eleven men chief of Province Eight, formerly of
HAIR CUT
15c
constitute a football team and the Southwestern Presbyterian University
Shave
10c
failure of one man to do his part will and Washington and Leo University;
Shampoo
15c
defeat the best efforts of all his team- W. H. Branson. G. M. Flowers, UniGlover's Shampoo.. 35c
mates. If you have failed in your versity of North Carolina; N. Ilasch,
part, and feel the game is going of Southwestern Presbyterian Univer- 153 S. Limestone St.
Lexington, Ky.
against you keep your head up, set sity; M. C. Minor and Marvin Taylor,
your jaws and go at it all the harder. University of Kansas, and the alumni:
This will determine the stuff that Is A. E. Evans, B. M Bugman, H. A.
D. PURCELL GO.
in you."
Beckham, M. A. Reimers, J. P.
30
West Mnin Street
L. E. Nollau, G. L. Jackson,
In closing, Mr. Yost said: "As you
LEXINGTON, KY.
go into life, young men, may your W. P. Tuttle, and George Becker.
kick-off- s
Members of the active chapter are:
be far toward your opponRUBBER
50c
ents' goal; may your punts never be Elmer Woodson Hughes, George
Hill, Jr., Bart Nixon Peak, Dablocked; may you never fumble; may
JUST THE THING FOR USE
you never get out of bounds; may you vid Sumner Springer, Fowler Orem
Longsworth,
IN THE LABARATORIES
keep ever advancing toward the goal; La Master, Lawrence
may you never be turned backward; Howard Irving Kinne, T. Ellis Peak,
may your team-plabe perfect and Harry L. Milward, Robert Young Irefull of determination, spirit, confi- land, Lloyd Tevis Wheeler, Frank M.
dence and loyalty; may your aims and Helck, Ernest Newton Mcllvain, Richard Lindsay Duncan, Arch Douglas
score be high ever and always."
Crenshaw, John Grant Woodruff, Edward Everett Elsey, Joseph Graham
ESSAY CONTEST IS ON
I J South Limestone
Mosely, William Reynolds Campbell,
pledges, Henry Castleman
Great Interest Is being displayed in and the
Most State Men Know Us
tho essay contest by those who are Thomas, Arthur Leo Bastln, Ashby
competing 'for tho prize offered by the Blevins, Edward Settle Dabney, John
Meal Tickets
Bonnet Fund, bequeathed to the Uni Anderson McKenzie, Edward Yancy Let us meet you
Van Doron, Irvine Scrivner and Mer-viversity by Philo Bennet. The essays
Lytic Watson.
are to ibo written on "The Origin and
"Someone has said that

75

of football is above the neck.

Dr. J. T. Slaton

884--

Martin's Barber

J.

326-3-

Ham-meke- n

APRONS

y

Martin & Stockweli's
Restaurant

n

Development of Parliamentary Institutions," and "Essential Foundations of
Republican Government." All essays
must bo completed by April 1.

lion-ost-

At the Tailor's.
"Do you want a cuff on tho trous

HYDE TO LECTURE
W. C. Hyde, of tho Kontuclcy Utilities Company, Loulsvlllo, will lecturo
to tho Senior Mechanicals in Mechani-

cal Hall Tuesday
morning at 8
o'clock. His subject will bo, "Tho
"Do you want a slap on tho mouth?" Place of tho Electric Service Utility
Lampoon.
In Modern Life."

ers?"

Franz Josef Spengler
The Photographer

in your Town

Has pleated the exacting
student and tho best people generally for fifteen
years. Can ho show you?
811 W. Main St.

Phone 1092--

y

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.

Page 4

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Published ovory Thursday throughout the College year by tho Btudent body of
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