xt780g3gz672 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt780g3gz672/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19581009  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October  9, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, October  9, 1958 1958 2013 true xt780g3gz672 section xt780g3gz672 Navy Interviews
Will Be Held
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Lances Carnival
And Pep Rally
6:75 P. 3., Friday

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

Volume L

Lexington, Ky., Thursday,

Oc loiter 9, 1938

Numlxr II

Coal Chosen Over Gas9 Eiecirieiiy
As Med Center Fuel
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Cost May Be $27,950 More Per Year,
Plus $370,000 For Initial Equipment

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Tlie University's new A. B. Chandler Medical Center will he heated ami cixled by a
$2,103,000
plant, whiih has been under construction since July I.
Choice of coal as a fuel for the medical school' heating and cooling plant was a victory for Kentucky's major mineral resource. The use of coal, rather than natural gas and
electricity, was decided by the engineering division cr the Kentucky Dcpaitment of Finance
at Frankfort.
It was learned by the Kernel this week that the final decision was made in the face ot
recommendations by Ellerbc and Co. of St. Paul, Minn., consulting engineers and architects
in charge of construction of the medical school, that gas and electricity be used for the
heating and cooling facility.
--

coal-burnin-

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Construction of the power plant for the new Albert B. Chandler
Memorial Hospital is shown In the foreground. In the background
is the Medical School.

In an analysis report on the
comparative costs of fuels made
last year, the Kernel has learned,
Ellerbe and Co. concluded:
J. From an economic viewpoint
there was no Justification for coal.
Operating and initial cost would
be greater.
2. The location was poor for the
pines last fall under a Depart- installation of a. coal-fire- d
boiler.
ment of State International Edu- (The "report cited two other in
cational Exchange Program, as- similar areas, which it said, had
sisting those countries in the early to be converted from coal and
stages of their organizational gas because of complaints of perwork. Ringo will speak to the sons living in the surrounding
Kansas City Rotary Club at noon areas).
Thursday.
3. Use of coal would be good
The Future Farmers of America
for "local industry."
is a national organization of 400,-00- 0
The Ellerbe report also gave
boys studying vocational agriculture in high school and stress- statistics indicating that the total
ing the development of leadership
in rural America.
The National FFA Band will
lead the American Royal Parade
Saturday morning after the conThe University of Kentucky's
vention. The Royal is the largest
dairy judging team took first place
livestock show in the midwest.
Internahonors in "the
tional Contest at Chicago Monday.
Coached by Prof. Robert Walton,
WBKY Will Meet
team was first in
the four-ma- n
New Radio Majors
the Guernsey and milking shortAn Informal meeting will be horn divisions, third in'Holsteln
held at noon today in the McVey judging and sixth in Ayrshire and
Hall studios. of WBKY to intro- Jersey judging.
Jackie Jessup, Greenville, won
duce new radio arts majors to the
first place individual honors for
staff."
station

Howard Downing Heads
National FFA Conclave
Howard Downing, national president of the Future Farmers of
America and an agriculture junior
at UK, is. in Kansas City, Mo., to
preside over meetings of the national FFA board of directors and

student officers. He will preside
at the 31st national convention
Oct.

13-1- 6.

The officers meetings include
plans for the event which will
bring 10,000 FFA members from
48 states, Puerto Rico and Hawaii.
Bob Scott, state president, Bobby
Gene Todd, vice president and Ray
Prigge, secretary, all UK agriculture studentsr will head the Kentucky delegation.
A special session during the
meeting will be devoted to international recognition of Future
Farmer groups patterned after the
FFA in other countries.
Jerry Ringo, UK journalism
student and former national vice
president of the organization will
preside over the international session. He represented the United
Stated in Japan and the Philip

TRAVIS

operating cost of a
plant might be $27,954 a year
greater than the cost of a combination
plant
The firm's report also is understood to have estimated that the
additional cost of coal equipment
over gas and
boilers would
amount to $370,000. The yearly
cost for cooling and heating by
coal was placed at $153,650 a year.
The total cost for a gas and electric plant was placed at $127,700.
The difference of $27,950 between operating costs of the two
types of plants, it was pointed out.
includes interest on the additional
$370,000 investment for coal facilities and also the difference in
coal-burni-

gas-electr-

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ic

oil-fir-

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Dairy Team Takes First

.

16-tea-

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the contest. The other three UK
team members, all of whom placed
high in the judging, were Arthur
Graden, Alexandria; Robert Bradford, Flemingsburg, and Howard
Baker. Booneville.
Walton coached the team in the
absence of Dr. Dwight M. Seatn.
head of the Dairy Section in the
College of Agriculture's Animal Industry Department. Dr. Seath is
on leave from the University.

labor costs.
Based on energy costs only,
however, It was reported that coal
would be $19,850
year less than
a
plant.
The brick heating and cooling
plant is being built about 200 feet
south of "the Medical Sciences
Building. Construction is under
contract to Hargett Construction
Co., with Meriwether, Marye and
Associates as architects and Pro
ls
aridl "Associates as mechanical consultants. All are Lexington firms.
The plant itself is about the
size of the Home Economics Building. A smokestack, with diameter
of 10 feet at the bottom and 7
feet at the top. will extend 123
feet upward. It is scheduled to be
in operation in September, 1959.
At the onset, two stoker-fire- d
boilers capable of providing 60,000
pounds of steam 24 hours a day
will be Installed. At peak rapacity,
the boilers will be capable of providing about 70,000 pounds of
steam for shorter periods of time.
It is estimated that the plant
will consume about 40 tons of coal
a day. Apparently the coal supply
will be trucked to the plant site
from a railway spur or directly
from mines. Ashes also will have to
be trucked from the boiler plant.
gas-electr-

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tor-Inge-

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.

How To Meet Your Mate

Dr. Leslie Gives Dating Clues
By MEREDA

DAVIS

"The ability to learn to date
properly will determine the ability
to choose the right person for marriage," said Dr. Gerald Leslie, professor of Sociology and director
of the Marriage Council Service at
Purdue University.
Dr. Leslie spoke. Tuesday night
ign Auauonum m
at" cmiveTsuy
the first of a lecture series being
given by the Fayette County
FamilyRi?lations CounciL
According to Dr. Leslie, there
are various developmental tasks
for the stages of life. These stages
must be conquered successfully before the person can go on to the
next stage.
Dr. Leslie cited statistics taken
from results' of studies of high
school and college students all
over the country as a basis for his
talk on "What Boys and Girls
Expect of One Another in Dating."
The questionnaires were chosen
from people of different races, religion, and background experiences
to make a more accurate analysis.
.

The studies showed that boys
and girls have similar problems in
beginning dating. The old "idea
that girls are mysterious and hard
to understand has come into existence because boys and girls tend
to be shy in discussing their fears'
and ideas. Dr. Leslie suggested
that it would be ideal if boys and
girls would admit to each other
that tney are" shy Tr scared.
The. problem of keeing the opposite sex interested was shared
by both boys and girls. This fear
is the basic cause of show-off- s,
dressflirts, and
ers. The questionaires showed that
both boys and girls did not like
people they dated to be flirtatious
or to pretend they were something
they were not. Dr. Leslie said that
It might be helpful, if the boy or
girl told his date that he liked her
the way she was, and that it
wasn't necessary to pretend with
him.
The need to prove how big or
important one is can cause a
strained relationship between a
boy and girl. The "bull sessions"
over-pretentio-

us

are a result of trying to gain prestige among your friends. When the
other person hears what has been
said about him, he will feel hurt
and may not have anything more
to do with that particular person.
The studies showed that dependability, compatible interests, pleasant disposition and manners, and
a good sense of humor were the
Important traits both "boys
girls looked for in choosing a marriage partner. Very few young
people are fooled by the glamour
aspect in dating.
Some of the things which
weren't considered important in
choosing a marriage partner were
physical beauty, popularity in dating, and romantic appeal. Girls
wanted a husband who showed
promise of getting ahead. Boys
wanted a wife who knows how to
cook and keep house.
In a test made with engaged
couples, it as found that three-fourtof them were not madly in
love with each other. Dr. Leslie
said that he did not want to deny
Continued ou Fare 8
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Sitting Pretty
Alice Redding looks over a cardboard stadium seat which will be
sold by the Thoroujhbred Klwanl Club preceding the Auburn
game Saturday. The seats are designed to support pressure of 200
pounds per square Inch and will be sold for fifty cents. Proceeds
from the sale will go to charity. When folded they make a neat

container for thing

usually taken to a football game.

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Kr.NTl'CKV KERNEL, TlmrMby,

2-- Tlir.

Students Parly Primary
Scheduled For November
The Students Party voted to
hold a primary election this fall
Jn its meeting Monday afternoon.
The party, which first attempted
the primary system for assembly
nominations last spring, put Its
Approval on the primary method
again.
There had been some discussion that some segments of the
SP were not completely satisfied
with the first primary attempt.
Students Party Chairman Jim
Ileil appointed a committee to investigate possible improvements in
the primary system used last
tprlng. The primary for the fall
- will be held in November.
The party's central committee
also approved the implementation
of an information program in conjunction with the Campus Party.
This will be directed mostly to
ireshman students in the dorms
and will be designed to acquaint
them with student government
and the two political parties.
The party also set the date for
its spring convention as April 7!
1959. This is the annual meeting
which selects the SP nominees for
president and vice president of

j

Jewell, Sliles Join
Political Science
Jewell and
Stiles Jr. have Joined
Samuel
the staff of the Political Science
Department.
Dr. Jewell graduated magna cum
laude from Harvard in 1949 and
received his Ph.D. from Pennsyl-- !
vania State. He has worked for
the government as an intelligence
analyst of Soviet foreign policy
and in the Central Intelligence
Agency, and has also taught government at Pennsylvania State.
Stiles, a native of Louisville,
received his B. A. degree from
Emory University and his M. A.
from Indiana University. He is
now working toward his Ph.D.,
which he expects to complete this
year.
Stiles has previously been employed as a statistical clerk for
John Hopkins University and an
organization and methods exam
Department
iner for
of Revenue.
Dr.

Malcolm

E.

ID Pictures
j

pictures will be given out
in the lobby of the Coliseum
under the following schedule. All
persons are asked to pick up their
pictures.
a.m. to
Thursday, Oct.

j

Initrmary

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PARTS ANO SERVICE FOR
ANY MAKI RADIO AND TV

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p. m.

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HOMI

REPAIRS

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RADIO

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The SP also accepted representative of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. The Phi Gams are about
to become the 13th organization
in the party organization.

AUTO

White You Walt

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Friday, Oct. 109 a. m. to 9 p. m.
Late registrants who have not
had picture taken must have them
taken in the lobby of the" Coliseum Oct. 10 from ft a. m. to 4 p. m.

Service

Complttt

Driva--

Facilities

U

Used Sets Bought, Sold

o4

Tradtd

Thursday
DAVIS
Admitted: William McDaniel.
Mary Jo Dixon and Judy Hott.
SERVICE CENTER
Itylly berry pie is not very
Dismissed : William McDaniel,
Pbone
417 S. Mill
popular.
Friday
Dismissed: Mary Jo Dixon and
Judy Hott.
Monday
Admitted: Mike Coyle. Bob Lin-do- n,
Brenda Clarkson, Nona PerkIncorporated
ins, Betty Jo King, and Polly
Ann Hardin.
ai
Tuesday
it
ia
JE.IV TlWb
i
VVSJYtrL.C i c
Admitted: Roger Haynia, Mike
Keffer, Joyce Anaerson. mid BarPHONE 27
bara Wilson.
Wednesday
LEXINGTON
400 E. VINE
Admitted: Grady Lee.
Colorado is the second oldest
Dismissed: Mike Keffer, Joyce
R
AAA ROAD SERVICE
Anderson, Barbara Wilson, and oil producing state in the nation.
Polly Ann Hardin.
The market for old oil is not good.
the-Kentuc-

TAYLOR

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ftt muit Jiyj live crnwirc
2-71-

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24-HOU-

Student Congress.
In adopting the primary again,
the Students Party is working
ward a plan for u joint primary
with the Campus Party. This
would mean both parties would
hold their primaries on the same

A PURE WHITE MODERN FILTER
is only the beginning of a WINSTON

day.

T(ps
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TOGS

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BY

"LINK"
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BLAZERS Are blazing Cand more
so. Take a beautiful shade of grey

flannel add black piptng throw
the "Ivy" cut to it, and sprinkle
with metallic, silver buttons and

you have "a "coat "you-c- an
well Jbe
proud of. "Blazers" are growing in
popularity by "leaps and bounds."
Smart touch put your fraternity
crest on the breast pocket or your
initials.
ROUND TABLING
(Here I go
again) "Zeta Beta Tau" Frat has
invited me to visit them for dinner
and a "round table" discussion this
coming Wednesday (before publication). Tell you about it next
edition. Any group interested in
one of these "round table" discussions (sans dinner of course) contact me and I'll be happy to set
a date.
(Not smooth
CONVERTIBLE
wheels But shirt cuffs the most
sensible idt'a in a shirt decade.
Shirts with cuffs; designed so they
can be worn with links, or as a
barrel cuff. Can be donned with
your dress-u- p
suit or your favorite
sweater. Makes sense right?
GROWING
Is the trend (and
so new I like). Trousers with no
cuffs what next???
NEXT I've gotta close my trap
for this time.
So long for now,

mil

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Med Library's Transfer
Is Scheduled For 1959-6- 0
Transfer of the numerous medical volumes to the Medical Science
ruildir.g will take place in late
1959 or early 1960, according to
Alfred W. Brandon, head medical
librarian of the Chandler Medical
Center Library.
Present headquarters for the
medical library is the Margaret
King Library, where oncoming
material Is being processed.
A great amount of material has
teen accumulated through gifts,
exchange, purchase and transfer
cf books from the main library.
The Medical Library has about
4.500 books and about 18,000 bound
journals. Approximately 800 journals are currently being received.
When the library is completely
developed, it will contain 80,000
to 100,000 volumes.
Mr. Brandon said that a full
iitaff that includes five professional librarians, four clerical
workers, and student part-tim- e
help has recently been hired. The
staff is now processing new material at the Margaret King
Library.
All materials are being stored in
the library annex and in two stor

age rooms in the Cooperstown development.
Recently the Medical Center
Library acquired a
collection of Journals, described
as a "rich research store." from
the Wistar Institute of Anatomy
and Physiology in Philadelphia.
"The materials." said Brandon,
"give the library a very firm
foundation for its basic collection."
The library Is giving some public service at the present time and
expects to give additional service
as It develops, Brandon said. 1,1

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Holmes Hall's first president is

semi-classic- al

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Laf-fert-

Phone

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OVER

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Of

the

Morris Minor

Bulky

boater

MG

Right on course for campus . . . the boat neck
sweater in giant stitch. We've a whale of a collec
tion for your choice right now!

$12.95

5

SMWYDOK--

KORK ABBOT

bV

Sedans and Convertibles
Soon To Be On Display
At

w

HELD OVER

3RD BIG

m

HARRY ALDRIDGE
MOTORS
Ph.
133 Midland

WEEK
TENNESSEE WILLIAMS PLAY
Maggie

the
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BOLD! DARING!

3-31-

(jat onaHot linHoof

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1959 Shipment

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N. Limestone

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Magnctfe
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retary-treasure-

Show Times

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STUDIO

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Portrait
Weddings
Commercial
Dances

for

Ohio, maJorir.R in medical technology. Vice president is Janice
Petrella. home economics senior
from Buffalo, New York.
music.
Dianne Richardson, I r 0 n t o n,
The person chosen will introduce
Ohio, sophomore, was elected sec- - music played on the "Music
r.
Music chairman Master-worksprogram aired
is Janet Cahow, music sophomore nightly. Monday through Friday,
from McKeesport. Pennsylvania. from 7 until 10 o'clock.

Mary Ruth Warner, elementary
education senior from Nicholas-- !
ville, is social chairman.
BEN ALI: "Damn Yankees"
Art chairman Is Carole Martin,
12:40. 2:55, 5:10. 7:25. 9:40.
junior from Trenton. New Jersey,
KENTUCKY "La Parisienne"
' 12:00, 1:53, 3:48. 5:43, 7:38, 9:33. majoring in Journalism. Ruth Ann
Hatchett, home economics sophoSTRAND: "Cat On A Ifot Tin more
from Springfield, was elected
Roof" 1:17, 3:24, 5:31, 7:38,
works chairman.
9:45.
Keeneland Hall's new officers
ASHLAND: "The Ladykillers"
are as follows: Ann Emmart, ele2:15, 5:25, 8:35.
mentary education senior from
"To Paris With Love"
Louisville, secretary: Phyllis
3:50, 7:00, 10:05.
physical education senior
from Rowlctts, treasurer. -

BIG

'

The Univrrsitjr FM radio station. WnKY U now holding auditions to find "The Voice of the
Masterworks."
Anyone from the student or fao- ulty ranks is invited to audition!
for the post. No previous radio
experience Is necessary, but applicants should have a pleasing voice,
and a knowledge of

Pat Wright, sophomore from Lima,

WHAT 1IA KAKTS LOLA GETS

I

WBKY Holds
Voice Trials

Kerneland and Holmes 1 .1
elected their officers for the
1958-5- 9
school year last week.

4,300-volu-

ratel:J:niUI
2nd

Upperclass
Dorms Elect
New Heads

tIhmmI.ii.

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The Store for College Men

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Jack CaeslwJudtth Anorsok
In

IMTR0C010

AN AVON PRODUCTION

IT'S HULA FUN AT THE BEN ALI
FRIDAY NIGHTS
CONTEST
KRESGE'S HULA-HOO- P

OPEN MONDAYS
'TIL 9 P.M.
-

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FOR THE FINEST IN
REFRESHMENT TRY
-

U-IM

If

4

MM

TO BLEND
CAMPUS COLORS
In Sweaters and
DYED

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f?ne

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XV

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Icecream
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The finest of Orion, DuPont's
makes it into a slim and
lovely chemise cardigan, and then
picks up. the .color in an orlon-woo- l
bixi at y "t i I
2oS' vki
and-- is hand
weight,
washable. In red or vicuna tan
Sizes 10 to 16.

'

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L.

Block from University
820 S. Limestone St.

non-wrinklin-

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Skirts
"Jus-Spun-

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$17.95

High St. and Cochran
.a

944 Winchester Rd.
17

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our Reasons
106 WALNUT
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1

* The Kentucky Kernel
University of Kentucky

F.ntrrrd

t

hr TVt Office

I'utlihfd

Act of Mrth 3, 1879.
Kentucky m ron! elm mntfrr unrVr
holidays nd ex.um.
rck lnr intl the rK"lr school year
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YE An

af I.minizton,

four timrs a

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ricit

11
Jim Hampton,

,

Editor-in-Chi-

m

Lakhy Van Hoose, Chief Sports Editor
Ann Roberts, Society Editor
Norman McMullin, Advertising Manager
Pdvbt Ashley, Business Manager
John Mitchell, Staff Fhotographer
Marilyn Lyvcrs and Judy Tcnnebaker, Proofreaders
Andy ErrEnsov

Ciir

frlME06C H 00 L1

ef

News Editor

THURSDAY'S NEWS STAFF
Jim Hudson, Editor

Nancy Meadows, Associate Editor

Bill Neikirk,

r

$

Sports Editor

Another Smokestack
Rising some 120 feet above the
landscape at the University's new
A. B. Chandler Medical Center will
be a majestic smokestack, carrying
off the waste products of what has
been estimated at a minimum of 40
tons of coal per day.
While there is disagreement as to
precisely how much smoke this plant
will generate, or how detrimental it
will be to surrounding 'areas, there
are other points to be considered.
The planned installation is being
made against the recommendation of
a firm of engineers with -- some 44
years experience in building medical
structures including the Mayo Clinic
in Rochester, Minn.
We do not have' the technical
knowledge to debate the relative
merits of different fuels for this plant,
nor do we intend to convey an approval of one fuel over another. Considered on their own merits, either
natural gas, electricity or coal could
be proved with proper juggling of
figures and relative advantages to
be the superior fuel.
It does seem, however, that the
recommendation- - of a competent engineering firm would be enough assurance that one type of fuel is more
suitable than another. Conversely, it
is difficult to understand how state
authorities can justify the choice of
(oal as a fuel, especially when an

v.
-.

analysis showed it to be neither as
economical nor as efficient as other
fuels.
No reasons for coal being chosen
have been given, but several possibilities are evident. It would, some
might say, aid the state's economy.
Hut the consumption of the medical
0
school plant, estimated at abJut
tons annually, would hardly aid
the coal industry enough to justify
spending $370,000 merely for coal

answer?

Those Busy Telephones
Although the addition of four outside line and 10 automatic switching
trunks for campus calls has alleviated
slightly the frustration connected
with making a phone call at UK,
no solution to the problem will be
immediately forthcoming.
lines are
Only 34
included in the present switchboard,
maximum. Theoretiout of a
cally, with the University community
approaching 10,000, almost 300 stu- dents and faculty members share one
line. Add to this the first of the year
"getxacquainted" period, inclement
weather and special campus activities
such as football games, dances and
g
carnivals. Small wonder, those
hour attempts to call a UK
extension from a LeAingioiunrtpr,
Steps have been taken to find at
UK-Lexingto-

40-lin-

-

n

e

nerve-wrackin-

(

least a - partial

solutioiU-Mainterjan-

ce

and Operations has asked the General Telephone Co. to make a sur-te- y
of existing equipment to determine the extent of the University's
telephone needs. The survey, scheduled to begin sometime this month,
will only attempt to solve the immediate problem. However, even if
General Telephone does recommend
putting a capacity outside line load
on already overworked equipment,
process of orderthe
ing the new lines and installing them
time-consumin-

g

will ensue.

U3T
Where Coal Burns, There's Smoke

Test Your Skill

11,-50-

equipment.
Other problems also are evident.
First, there is no railroad spur to the
plant site; unless one is built, the coal
will have to be brought in by truck.
Additionally, ashes will have to be
hauled away from the plant, again by
truck. Too, there is the matter of a
coal reserve which must be kept
stored somewhere in the event of
strikes or shipment stoppages. Finally,
w hile some say there will be no smoke
problem, we can but point to other
similar installations and their surrounding sooty, smoky areas. Perhaps
theirs weren't supposed to create
smoke problems, either.
It seems there must be reasons for
choosing coal when the overwhelming
mass of evidence showed it to be
undesirable for the medical center
plant. Who, we wonder, has the

A more permanent solution is to
satbe found in the
ellite board system. The purchase of
these boards has already been' authori-

zed, but again there remains the
question of delivery and installation.
And this question also has no answer.
So, the wheels have started rolling.

Someday, perhaps, UK will have an
adequate telephone system. Right
now, callers can help to ease the
existing situation by recognizing that
the University's telephone equipment

and operators are terrifically

over-

loaded.
Since it is impossible for an operator to handle an incoming Lexingtoncall while looking up a
-UK
.sojueane, ho b?.s called
formation, use the directories Or call
num.-JterJ.-

or

the dorm ctesk to find. .an. unknown
s'
number. Then, either write it down
or remember it. Also, if a busy
signal is received on repeated calls,
phoning the University operator will
do no good. Remember, there are up
to 11) extensions on every dorm
phone.
Clearly, the present telephone system is grossly inadequate. Perhaps a
better understanding of the problem
and the knowledge that at least a
temporary remedy is in' store will
lessen the general chaos. Certainly it
will help us lie with it.

-

"news matter only," but wc hope the
persons circulating them won't mind us
using them for editorial matter.
Wc realize that these cards arc being
doled out just so students can test their
skill at puking football winners, and
wc wouldn't dream of implying that
any exchange of money is involved. But
wc don't think outsiders, who often come
into the Grill, would understand this
innocent pastime, and we wouldn't want
to create any bail impressions.

If the betting on football games which
has nourished in the Grill the past few
days continues its unabated pace, it might

be a good idea to replace the sandwich
menus with tote boards, won-los- t
and other helpful hints.
The circulation of small white cards,
carrying the names of opponents in 30
football games and point odds for predicted winners, has increased to the point
where it is difficult not to notice it. Of
course, we realize the cards carry the
statement that they are to be used as
re-coi-

66

Much Ado...

99

By

GURNEY NORMAN
Pretty soon now, freshmen will be seeing signs on campus and hearing slogans
of "Join the club now" or "We want you"
or "Find fun and fellowship with so
and-so.New fraternity and sorority
will be encouraged to participledges
pate in the scores of campus organizations, and to study hard to make the
campus honoraries such as Keys, Lances,
Cwens, Alpha Lambda Delta, etc. "Put
a feather in your cap," they will say. "He
a leader at UK," you will hear. "I5e
somebody" will be the cry at every turn.

or sorority. Most campus honoraries do
nothing worthwhile. At best, most of
them will have a dinner or sponsor some
project to further their own vain interests. These idle clans supposedly exist
to set up worthwhile goals for students
to strive to attain. Now this is a noble

"

Hut students who
strive to get hi them only for that purpose (and what other purpose is there?)
can therefore only be motivated by personal vanity. This points up their empti-

ambition, granted.

.

And for the sophomores, Leadership
Conference will be coming up for your
first time soon. The sophomores who
exhibited an interest in some club last
year will be herded down to Camp
Daniel lioone to meet all the upper-classme- n
who have "succeeded" on campus, the joiners, the honored, and to be
groomed to ultimately bear the dubious
title of leader.
All this stuff is grossly overemphasized
at UK, freshmen and sophomores, assuming juniors have already observed
these phenomena). Some at this school,
you will find, are obsessed with the idea
of belonging, of getting elected
tary or president of something, of get-- .
ling.. A h'sorary !apc4 pin-- to
tfhpla"
to the masses.

isnt necessarily badrirany-- "
body is hurt it is those whose time is
monopolized by their extrac un iculars.
My reason in mentioning it here is merely
to inform you of the state of alfairs at
UK, to make you aware of what you
will later come into contact with and,
pei haps, to caution you to take all this
hoopla with a grain of salt. Don't be
overly impressed with those whose key
chains are weighted with trophies, those
whose sweaters sag with masses of glitNow-th- is

tering scraj) iion.
would especially fill you in on the
natuie of the UK honoraiy liateinity
I

ness.

Qnce you have been invited to join,

or once you request membership (more
vanity), the initiation will probably soon
follow. These. are quite interesting." In
ail probability you will pledge yourself
to higher ideals in some dark room, wear
a sinister cloak of dark material, burn
incense, drink mead, chant, kneel, and
pay the club treasurer $i.O which, as it
will be explained, "goes to national,"
whatever or whoever that is.
This is not to say that all honoraries
--

fit this category exactly. A scant few on
campus have a purpose of service to
humanity, and really do worthwhile
things. So there is nothing absolute about
any of this. And neither is this an.
ad-i;iv.i-

JhiUm

ia

Jig. ..dispensed.

witlu.They have their place. Most of the
jeople really sold on them aie okay, if
somewhat deluded.
Rut all this is to' say that if you, freshman, don't get into any of it, if you don't
have money, or political pull, or if you
happen to be in a hard college and
.can't make 3.5 standings, don't let it get
you down. Take it with the grain of salt.
You aren't compared in any way except, t pei haps, by the imbetilic. There
is no superiority or inferiority involved.
Five years horn now, who'll know the
'difference? There will only be rusted
pins and dusty ycai books to attest to the
honored's glory.

* THE KENTITKY KERNEL, Thurvl.iv.

Nl

Radio Majors Ma n WBK Y
TIKI SPOT
By

W

ILLIAM IWSll

II

I

;

If you nren't f.unihir wrh Mir
slovnii. "We HiHH(lt:t Kentucky."

The Periscope

With

On Campus

DAN MILLOTT

iui should
It's just what the
Uiuve;sity of Kentucky FM Radio
Station (!(X's five hours a d.vy, 363
days a year.
WBKY, the official
of the station are derived from
slogan, i.sduly
the
licensed by the Federal Communications Commission to broadcast
on the assigned frequency of 91.3
megacycles on the FM band with
an effective radiated power of
3.000 watts, covering roughly a
radius of 40 miles.
It is not a commercially operated radio station. It cannot tell
radio time to sponsors locally or
nationally. Its prime purpose is
to allow students preparing for a
career in commercial radio and
television to gtt the valuable experience they'll nerd to further
their careers.
One- - of the station's aims is to
give listeners an opportunity to
hear programs that are not a regular feature of local or regional
commercially operated stations. It
also helps to tell campus news and
news about the University, helping
the listeners to better understand
the University's functions and activities.
From the programming standpoint, JWUKY has much to offer
its many listeners. In music,
AVBKY biidges the gap from
Milton (Shorty) Rogers to Johann
S. Bach-quittastefully. One can
hear dramatic shows, sports news,
special events, poetry and prose
readings, UK football arid basketball, plus many other programs
of diversified interest.
One program that deserves special mention is, "The University of
Kentucky Roundtable." Now in its
25th year, this program has persons who are experts in a particular field discuss .questions on
almost any subject. Distinguished
guests are interviewed on the program, and often UK faculty members are given an opportunity to
air their views on a given topic.
This is perhaps the most , informative program broadcast by
WBKY. It is so popular, that
WHAS-Radi- o
in Louisville, airs
program at 9:30 p.m. each
the
Wednesday. This same program is
heard on WBKY at 6:30 p. m.
Thursday.
All these programs are produced, directed and aired with the
help of UK students enrolled in
radio arts. With the advice of
radio arts instructors, these students go through the daily routine
of radio broadcasti