xt780g3gz68n https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt780g3gz68n/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19581104  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November  4, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, November  4, 1958 1958 2013 true xt780g3gz68n section xt780g3gz68n r

Displays, Dances, Game
Highlight UK Homecoming

71

r

no
around
Mississippi down."
clo-.Miii-

Hy WARRF.N"

if

Wllf

All that remains of the 1.18
Ht'moci miiu nro VAvinona. pile
of .Hinp lumb t.
p.irr. ni.il
chicken wire, aiui the
"Now next ye;u I'm
Homecoming festivities in. huit1
a pep rally, displays, a Wildcat
victory, crowning of a queen, and

1

ott-tre.ite-

5

I'UUM

1

Til

.

ll.ill' rlivpl.iy. "Ma-roo- n
w.s judged best nf the
inrirprnrirnts with honorable men"em"

iff

i

.

the Hilltoppers.
With the SuKy torch p.irade the
homecoming weekend began. Willi
the SC Homceoining dance the
in."8 event became a thing of the
past.
The feature of UK's first bii?
weekend was the Cais'
2
victory over Mississippi State. Phying
in a drizzle, the Wildcats had fans
referring to them as "miidcWs."
Phrases such as "Mississippi
misses boat" and "Cut 'em up Wildcats" were themes of some of the
displays erected by the Greeks
and the independents.
Winner of the fraternity division was Pi Kappa Alpha. The
PiKa's theme was "Cats Twirl
Pants of the Maroons." Hunnn-u- n
in the fraternity division wns
Delta Tau Delta displaying a
"Flying Maroon People Eater."
In the sorority division Chi
Omega took top honors with the
over
theme of "Break-fas- t
State." Second in the division was Delta Delta Delta. The
theme was "There'll be

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Two homecoming displays which won honors at Saturday's homecoming festivities. Winner of the fraternity division (top) was I'i
Kappa Alpha fraternity with its "Cats Twirl The Pants Off The
Maroons". The independent winner (below) was Keeneland Hall
with its entry of "Maroon 'Em". The winner of the sorority division
was Chi Omega.

'Caine Mutiny' Production
Opens Guignol Season

Mis-i--sip-

t

tion going to Dill.trd House's "( lit
'em up Wildcats."
The SuKy - s;onore;l torch
parade and pep rallv Friday ern-i- n
heard Coach I'danton Collier
say lr.s team w.i t 'inn to tet the
Maroons. Collier thanked SuKy tor
the-support and told the student
body the team needed the f.nis
to beat Mississippi State.

ti.

7

r

Saturday' afternoon

n

"hat-throwii-

u"

tluuns; of UK Hlumnt.
and student supprfers saw their
Cats "twnl th.e pnnts rtf the Maroons." UK's victory had very little
bearing on the SFC stand;!. hut
it was far more important to the

33-1-

mm.

put

we'll

Kernrl.md

rire
.

"

AT

victory-starve-

Wildcats.

d

Diane Vittitow,
representing Sigma
Phi Fpsilon, was crowned 10,'S
Homecoming ()uren by I K President Frank (i. Dickey. First attendant was Nina Warren, soplio-- n
Uefore
Chi Omega,

kick-of-

f.

ore, reprrentinj: Holmes Hall,
and Ann Woodward. Chi Omen.i.
sponsored by Phi Sigma Kapp.t
frateinity was second attendant.
Gov. A. B. Chandler, who traditionally crowns the Homecoming
Queen, was unable to d ) so this
year. He had to remain in Frankfort to meet some unexpected
guests to the State Capitol.

pi

Tri-Del- ts

4.1
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OITLN DIANE
The

SMirirnt

fir'--

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Kt(

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P.inJP

Lp;ei s and Ion
baiu!. was only o'.e of the

leaturnu the
scene-- ,

Con;rr-ptinvrr-

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11.11:

deviation over tlie UK

V

Dance., were held a! various
fraternity houses and other Ivx-iiutlocations familiar to tho
majority of the returning alums.
on

By DAN MILLOTT

The Guignol Theatre opened its 31st season last night with
an excellent production of "The Caine Mutiny Court Martial."
The play, adopted from Herman
'
Pulitzer Prize winning
novel. "The Caine Mutiny." has
a quality of perfection which runs
well in line with professional work.
The story deals with the court
martial tiial of Navy Lt. Maryk
who was charged with mutiny on
the USS Caine.
Maryk, played by Alec Murphy,
adjudged his commanding-officerQueeg, mentally incapable
continuing his command of the
Maryk made his decision
during a typhoon when Queeg
wouldn't give any furtfier orders.
Capt. Queeg is played by Charles
Dickens whose performance in the
final court room scene shows in
full the manner of the Captain
as Maryk had pictured him.
Charles Drew plays the part of
Lt. Grecnwald who served as
Maryk's lawyer during the trial.
Hi? part in the play is the supply-In- g
of the moral at the end.
Greenwald schemes his way
through the trial and finally gets
Queeg to break down on the witness stand. He manages to get
Maryk free from the mutiny
charge, but attests at the end of
the play that Queeg or the man
that Queeg represented was not
guilty.
The defense lawyer must be
credited with furnishing the moral
punch cf the play.
A highly humorous witness in
the trial was Seaman Urban
played by John Pritchard. His
recollections of the incident when
Maryk took over Queeg's command
proved quite delightful in an other-vis- e
serious play.
The moral which Greenwald
pointed cut at the end of the play
VFouk's

--

,

-

1BREHK-FR5-

was represented in the character
0f Lt. Keefer who was played by
Ted Freidman. Keefer was a writer
by trade and he was responsible
for Riving Maryk much of his in- formation about a possible mental
instability in Queeg.
"
Guignol has come up with an
opener for the season which is
well worth seeing. "Caine Mutiny
Court Martial" will be playing
to-Ca-

GUIGNOL TRYOUTS
Tryouts for the Guignol players' second production of the
season. "The Enchanted" by Jetn
Giraudox, will be held Sunday at
2 p. m. in the Guignol Theater.
The play is a comedy in three
acts.

UK Groups

Hold Mock
UN Meeting
countries were represented at a mock United Nations
General Assembly session Friday
night, sponsored by the Cosmopolitan Club and the YWCA.
Dr. Amry Vandenbosh introduced the topic for debate
"Should Red China be Admitted
to the UN." K. M. George, president of the General Assembly,
read the welcome address. The
secretary. Joan Brown, then read
Continued on Page

T
:

t-- 4

1

7

V--

T"

a

Volume L

Lexington, Ky., Tuesday, Nov.

m-

mm.

Chi Omega wrority took first place with their entry of Break-Fa- st
Over Mississippi State". The winner of the three divisions
were announced at the game and the trophies were formally presented at the Homecoming Dance Saturday night.

I98

Number 25

Big States Are Watched
As Nation Votes Today
Although today's national election has little significance in Kentucky, it appears that there is a
large degree of national importance involved in today's voting.
UK's Political Science Club
heard Dr. Malcolm Jewell of the
Political Science Department dis

today's election Thursday
afternoon.
Dr. Jewell shared the opinion of
many political experts that the
Democrats will make gains in both
the House and Senate. He added,
however, that these gains may not
be as high as some estimates have

cuss

Music Group
Opens Series
On Nov. 20

DAMES CLUB TO MEET
The DamwClub will have its

second meeting tomorrow at
7:30 p. m. in the Music Koom o'f

a

the Si
The program will feature a
discussion on "Developmental
Versus Traditional Philosophy of
Motherhood" by Dr. James
Gladden, assistant professor of

By BILL PASTTC1I

The Chamber of Music Society's
concert season will open
Thursday. Nov. 20, with a performance by the Claremont Quartet at the Guignol Theatre.
UK's University Quartet will entertain twice during the series,
giving a performance on. Jan. 16.
at the Guignol Theatre, then on
May 10, they will conclude the
season with an appearance at the
Transylvania Theatre at Transylvania College.
The Pasquier Trio will perform
March 1 at the Trans) Ivania Theatre, with the Rococo Fnsemble
scheduled for April 9, at the Guignol Theatre.
The Chamber Music Society has
designed its program to serve the
musical tastes of the community
as well as the University.
Tickets for all performances can
be secured from Dr. E. J. Humes-toHead of the Department of
Library Science; Dr. Oorge K.
Brady, Department of Knlih;Dr.
Kenneth Wright, Department of
Music and Prof. Fdward W. Ran-nelat the Art Departuieut.

sociology.

1958-5- 9

All wires of UK students are
Invited to attend, and those
wishing to join the Dames Club
may do so at thU meeting.

ls

gone.
One rexson Dr. Jewell gave for
the likely Democratic vote today
was the historical fact that the

party

holding

the

Fund Drive
For WUS
Begins Soon
The annual fund raisin? campaign of the World University
Service will be held Nov.
More than 40 nations participate in the program to raise money
to aid students and faculty members in countries where higher
education is less plentiful.
The money U used to build
health clinics, student medical
center and student housing. It
alio supplies textbooks and mrdi-- !
Continued on Page 3
17-2- 2.

j

presidency

u.sually loses .seats in an

off-ye-

ar

election.
Another factor contributing to
the Republicans' disadvantage in
the Senate races, according to Dr.
Jewell. Is the large number of GOP
senators who face
today.
In many easels, it was pointed
out. Republicans whose terms expired this year are not seeking
office again. Senate contests today
are for the same seats which were
elected when President Klseohower
first went into office in 1932.
One of the most prominent races
today is in California where Democrat Edmund "Pat" Brown appears
to have the ede over Senate
GOP minority Iwader William
Knowland. Newspaper polls in the
on

state give Brown

n.

i

1,

e.

atre, Fine Arts Building,

. - Forty-tw- o

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

pt.

night. Thursday, Friday and Satur-o- f
day at 8:30 in the Guignol
The-Cain-

nm m,wm il

a substantial

lead.
:e.
tyiiU
AithAuah. the
.neiv
wrong when the voter turnout 1
below normal. California votes on
a "right to worlt" amendment today as well as the governorship
and a race for United States senator.
The "right to work" amendment
alone has put the labor unions
throughout the state on a hard
campaign agalntt the measure.
ThU factor could bring out ft
heavy vote.
California's Senate race may b
hanging on the balance of how
the race for governor goes. Most
observers In California are agreed
that the race between Republican
Gov. Goxiin Knuht and Democrat Clair Engels will be consider- Continued on Page

8

1 1.

* KENTl'CKY KERNEL, Tucm1.iv. Nov.

2-- Tlir.

10",8

1,

Local Poison Control
Center To Start Soon

UK GrOlipS
( ontinurrt from r.ige

Louisville in 1851.

The Kentucky State Pharmaceutical Association and the UK
College of Pharmacy inaugurated
on April 3 a program to develop
a system of centers throughout the

'

UN

ym

jioison control center innim- - roinn control renters. One of the
linitrrl w.riv hv the UK Pilar- - duties of this committee is to
macy Collcpe will rci into effect at serve as a liaison channel lictwrrn

iho Tirxt 30 to .")0 davs.
One primal y objective of a local
poison control center is to furni.sh
poison information, such as the in- grcdicnts of drug compounds and
commercial products and the
rymptoms and recommended treat- ment of poison cases.
A center also furnishes rmerg- rncy treatment renters, reports
poison cases and provides for pub- lie information and education in
the prevention and control of ac- cidental poisoning.
This information will be con-- ;
tained in a file card system of
ahout .zu.ooo carets at the. Lexing'
ton center.
Other lniormation kept by the
center will be the current listing
of all local physicians, their office and residence addresses and
phone numbers; a current listing
of all drug stores, their phone
and the names and phone
numbers of registered pharmacists
having access to the DrescriDtion
liles after business hours.
In addition to the center at Lexington, regional centers will be
established at Ft. Thomas and
Paduoah. The first poison center
in Kentucky was established In

Na- -

tlonal Clearinzhouse for Toison
Control Centers,
The name of the Policies Com- mittee was changed to the Exccu- tivc Committee of the Kentucky
poison Control Program. Dr. Helen
b. Fraser. director of the Hureau
0f Materhal and Child Cue of the
state Department of Health, was
elected chairman of the group. Dr.
Charles A. Walton of the UK College of Pharmacy was elected vice
chairman of the committee,

two-thir-

HEATERS!

"

Opening Nife for

...

Sidney POITIER
Tony CURTIS,
''ml NF.W FKA11 RE
Lex BARKER, Mari BLANCHARD

"JUNGLE HEAT"
IJoth

has been set In the
faculty
YMCA - YWCA
annual
finance drive to be held Nov.
The drive is being conducted to
8iVC faculty members an
tunity to contribute to the program
of lhe group.
members
mav als0 contribute. Approxl- mately $1,700 was collected last
year.
The YMCA and YWCA sponsor
the freshman camp, discussion
groups, the Hanging of the Greens,
Welcome Week, Religious Emphasis Week, the employment serv-- i
ice and many other campus

First Fun IMrturr

Admission

'

90c

ThU FnnaRrmrnt Only!

8.

oppor-numbe-

"IN-CAR-

"THE DEFIANT ONES"

W

A $2,000 goal

Seniors In the College of Arts
and Sciences who expert to
graduate in June, 193!), are urged
to apply for their degrers in
Ilean White's Office, McVey
Hall 128, no later than Dec.

rs

'

mnmm
HKST LEXINGTON

SHOWINGS!

Non-facul- ty

TORRID LOVE STORY
Tony
Silvano
Richard
PERKINS
MANGANO CONTE

SAVE
Money
IT YOURSELF
Open 8 A. M. to 9 P. M. Daily
877'j E. Hi3h
PSon.

Time

DO

1.

Introducing Miss Kim Stanley

AND THE
GEISHA'

Tody!
i

wr

TOMORROW

Starts

PECK
5

JUllllUllV

C.ROLL

i

BAKER
C 'ARLT0N

HESTON
IVES
PlASL'STS

ifl

TECHNICOLOR

LAST TIMES TODAY!
"Wind Across the Everglades"
and "Hell Squad"

k

C'OLORSCOPE

"THE GODDESS"

"barbarian

ENDS

JEAN

y-f-

i

II

TYfN")
W.X..
I

fr

AH

I

J

1

..
1

iXAX
j

l?

od TECHNIRAMA

TOMORROW

Starts

--

"THIS ANGRY AGE"
The Public Disrobing of a
Hollywood Movie Queen . . .

10 min., 10c

9 lb., 20c

SCWWmT'
it

ELECTRIC

COIN OPERATED
DRYERS
WASHERS

ds

m

LAUNDRY

SELF SERVICE

SF.MORS, HARK!

IKIW6TOW-mxTut-

Co(tl Of 2.f)W S(t
Drive
hi YM-Y3--

1

Chnrtrr. Nancy Scott was
lian.c nt.u ian.
Afcrr tnc preliminaries, the Km-sia- n
dflrnate submitted the rrso- lution that Ked China he admit
led to the I N. Ilach country then
stated its views on the proposal.
In the vote that followed, the motion failed to gain thr
majority norrsvury to pass.

thr

A

Central' Haptist Hospital within individual centers and 'the

'

COLOR

1

I

iwi;?

wy

SPACE'

u

''.

nniro

"v::rf
FROM OUTER
--

state.

At the annual Pharmacy Workshop in Lexington, the Association urged all practicing pharmacists to investigate the need
for such a center in their communities and ,to actively participate in its establishment.
A policies committee of the Kentucky Poison Control Center was
formed to coordinate efforts of
individuals and organizations in
establishing a statewide system of

English: DOG'S JACKET

English: MUSICAL COMEDY
ABOUT A LUCKY SMOKER

3IOVIE GUIDE
"Manhunt in the
Jungle," 2:20, 5:30, 8:33.
"Imitation General," 3:40, 6:45.

ASHLAND
9:50.
BEN ALI

"Wind Across the Everglades." 1:10, 4:05, 7:00. 9:55.
"Hell Squad," 12. 2:55. 5:50. 8:45.
CIRCLE 25 "The Defiant Ones,"

Thlnktish:
VARGOSKO.

GEORGE

7:00. 10:35.

"Jungle Heat," 9:00.
FAMILY "This Angry Age," 7:00
and 11:00.
"The Goddess," 9:05.
KENTUCKY "Twilight For 'The

F

121. 3:2G.

WiTi IX
1

v

S, III Ti

N

We'll tell you this much: it's glowing.

English:

5:31.7:36.9:41.

ABULO

P"

English: THE WHITE HOUSE

Gods." 1:51, 5:41, 9:31.
"Kathy-O.- "
12:J1, 4:01, 7:51.
STRAND "The Barbarian and the

Geisha,"

"

WASHINGTON

r'b rna
r c 41

Thinkllsh translation: Kudos to the
new hit Smoklahoma! Plot: boy meets
cigarette, boy likes cigarette. Lucky
Strike was convincing as the cigarette, displaying honest good taste
from beginning to end. The end?

LIGHT-FINGERE-

FRESHMAN

D

JvvjLL,

1

US
JAMES

WnkUsh: PLUNDERORADOATE
English:

SHARP-TOOTHE-

D

HOUSE CAT

RICHARD PUTNA".

u rPOLINA

.

fwcm
:

STATE
lUMVMAVMWUq
'

p-it-

W

.alCiS

minilij l.'.;.J'ty JU;.J

SPEAK THINKLISHI MAKE

ISIRIKE

f';

ilium
h,.,m.mmmmi
i

$25

Just put two words together to form a new

FIAT 60 0 SEDAN
4

ryl. O.H.V. rear engine. Seats four

IhinHrsh: P ANGORA

1

STATE
iioONEK COLE. KANSAS

i-

eoiufortaMy. Heater, winddiielj

""""WNSTRIJment

wiper mid direct ion lights standard

COlt.

MAKER

one. Thinklish is so easy you'll think of
dozens of new words in seconds! We'll pay
$25 each for the hundreds of Thinkllsh words
judged best and we'll feature many in our
college ads. Send your Thinklish words (with
English translations) to Lucky Strike, Box
67A, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Enclose your name,
address, college or university and class.

equipment. Three other inoJela
awilahle.

fm

Get the genuine article

$1584.14

Get 1?lhe hoirDGsIr "Jasire
if a OJUCCCY STIRDCCE

HARRY ALDRIDGE
MOTORS 133 Midland

Tel.

CIGARETTES

63

O a.

r c.)

Product of

fjrutar-a-

n

tAraeeocTyatfp

3j&lcco

is our miidU nam

* Mil. kl'Vl

IYiIiiii" Kiflrs

Funds
(

nntinurri from Tate

tal Mipplif.
Laft year a Hungarian student
attencd UK because of a scholar.
.ship from WUS.
for the campaign
,nt UK are Nancy Waterfield and
Fred Strache. Dr. John Kuiprr,
head of the Philosophy Department, is the faculty lepresenta-tiv- e
--

en

for WUS.

Fraternities, sororities, dorml-tork- s,
and other major campus
i TRaniations Mill lirlp in the drive
lor funds.
Approximately 30 persons attended an organization meeting
held Thursday. Another meeting
will be held Nov. 13 when a film
on the work of WU3 will be shown
unci material for the campaign
will be distributed to the workers.
No goal for the campaign has
Lcm stt, but Dr. Kuiper said the
hope . to raise more money than
v.ts given last year. Last year UK
ftudents gave $1,000 to the
i.--

n.

cam-paip,-

-

Tershing Kifles Queen niul two
attendants will be chosen Nov. 6
to act as sponsors for the organization.
One girl has been nominated by
each dormitory and house on cam-- ;
pus to be judged on beauty, pvs
personality, and interest in Perching Rifles. The Queen and h r
court will be crowned at the Com-- ,
nation Bail.
An Introductory tea for eandi- dates and members will be held
this afternoon at 5 in the Si lt.
Tomorrow at 5 p.m.. Pershing
Rifles will sponsor an open house
for nominees in liuell Armory.
Flections will be held in the line
Arts Building on Thursday.
As sponsors, the girls will attend Pershig Rifles functions, and
will be invited to accompany them
on all trips and drill meets.
A

M UM If Iius,l.n.

Mvvis At

'?

I

Appi (X.ma'.elv

WIOI

K

I

Vf

l.0 College

ON

satin

111
ot

C':r.mr.e naduates a'iet.ded

a

TUISDAY, NOV. 4

iiiMti:.i: rf tlie Ninth Annual Institute 0:1 Arci.ur.tinn held tills

"Imitotion Gcncrol"

CUnM FORD.
R4 BUTTONS
James Kim:, tenor, and Sarah wfektnri by the Kentucky Snietv
of CAP;!
Hand, flutist, performed at t lo
Alto
The wrleomuu iuldie. s wa- - ien
first University Musieale Sunday
"Manhunt In The Jungle"
afternoon. Iloth are Music De- by UK Piesi.bnt Krank O. Dickey.
In Color
Addresses we.e heard I'll the
partment faculty membeis.
Robin HUGHES, Luii ALVAREZ
'Profes.-'.or.a- l
Ptln.-Prof. Kn teaches oiee and di- .subjects of
'
Plu CARTOON
of a CAP."
rects the Uimcrsity (lire Club.
and "Machine Ai count
Miss Hand, a June graduate of th'University of Michigan is now a
graduate student. An r.ssbtant instructor in the music department,
cwnftTir,
f
e.
she is studying under Alfred
fir.st flutist in the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra.
Program selections
rre from
works by lt.u h, Ilaudcl, llonrRKer.
Debussy, Dutilleux and Vau5h.u1
Williams. The recitative in "Trois
Psaun.es" by Ilonenner, was taken
froia the King James ersion of
ibe Itibie.
Ethel Banymore was born in t . I'ur one uf the I)t buy uojks
lie compoM'r won the Grand Prix
Philadelphia.
do Rome, the liit;he: t honor giu-- i
More than a half million poiby the Paris Conei vntoiy of
CYD CHARISSE
sons
and over attend Music.
r;"- adult education classes in various
. "...
niiwiiix
i,u Mmmuuii
Prof. Kiihi wa-- arcornr-nie- d
by
U. S. schools.
Ford Montgomery, pianist, ami
,
.
AKIHUK RtNfltUi MV.-- IEIF ERICKSON
Robert Kmrr, violip.ist, ai 1 Miss
DAN DURYliA
Also PATTY McCORMACK
Daird by Ann Huduleston, pianist.
s

epi-r.-iation."

Hud-uetmi'-

j

i;itvi

Sen-boqu-

n

U 's

-

rn rr

w

--

In "K ATI IV O"

There are 1,100,000 Italians in

COMPLETE

PLAYING

NOW

e

GO FORMAL

."

-

-

The campaign cuiicc of WUS is
in room 118 of the SUB.

I,

Accounting (hoh

Two Soloists
Arc Featured
At Musieale

To Selecl Qiircn
This Thursday

1

k

t

New York City.

RENTAL SERVICE

1
tlJ

For ALL Occasions

1

CENT'S

MEN'S
WEAR
TEL.

120 S. UPPER

4-65-

00

Dave Chadwick Campus Representative

JM

V

f.

J) .L )

UU

?v
VV. "JZSff'
?

U

H

"Co
me that
ogain, white

,

The case of the typing paper

that erased without

a

trace

or,

EATON'S CORRASABLE BOND

Typewriter Paper
It's a cinch to "rub out" typing errors
them
-- and
listened
iA

'Every01?

about
$ee

to!k
OS
soo"

for the

.bout

pos'ible

I

,

"clues", uhen you use
Eaton's Corrasable IJond Paper.
Never smears, never smudges besurface...
cause Corraable'slike-mai-

ami leave

He watched

a "LOOK

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f k'

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erases without a trace! (A Hick of I lie

wrist ami a pencil eraser puts things
right!) This fine quality bond paper
gives a handsome appearance to all
your work. It's a perfect crime not to
use it !

f

wuuitiiwVirtiwirWf

'1

iHrtlrihifiirttirji

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onionskin to heavy bond. In convenient
ream boxes.

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The Readers' Forum
3,

17J.

To 'I he Editor

.1

SIX DOI.I.AHS

A

Jim Hampton,

SCHOOL V.FAR

Lnnv Van IIoose, CJc

Andt ErrtnsoN, Chief Sacs Editor

Tkhi

Sports Kcifor

Ann HomrtTS, Society Editor
Norman McMcllin, Advertising Manager
Business Manager
Ashley,
John Mitchell, Sia Thotographcr
,
Marilyn Lyvrrs and Judy ft nnc baker, Proofreaders
TUESDAY'S NEWS STAFF

Dan

Millott,

Editor

At ice Rfddinc, Associate Editor

A

Tavl Scott, Sports Editor

One of Hie most important responsibilities faced by any college or university is that of providing good,
wholesome food lor dormitory residents at the lowest possible cost. In
one case. UK is failing to fulfill this
duty.
Women students living in Patterson, lioycl and Jewell halls must eat
all meals in the Jewell Cafeteria or
use poor financial strategy and pay
lor a meal twice if they eat elsewhere.
The cafeteria is allocated about SL.15
a dav from each resident's room and
board lee to cover expenses.
In contrast, Kecneland and Holmes
Hall residents pay approximately
$1.05 a day for two meals at the
SUB Cafeteria, or about 53 cents a
meal. Although the number of meals
is reduced, the quality of the food is
vastly superior to that served in
Jewell. In addition, the girls receive
larger portions and a much greater
thoice of foods.
Meals at Jewell are "adequate"
although they don't taste even reand
motely like mother's cooking
menus are reasonably varied. Where
this cafeteria falls short and sometimes fails miserably is in food preparation. A meat loaf, properly prepared, can be nourishing and delicious as well as economical. But, if

and cooked, it is
neither nourishing nor economical
because of the waste involved. This
is true of foods served in the Jewell
Cafeteria or in the plushest restaurant
in Lexington.
Originally, the kitchen at Jewell
was built to handle a capacity crowd
of 150. At present, with the addition
of extra equipment, .171 girls are led,
but the pioblcm of inadequate woik
With such limited
space remains.
facilities, the chefs and staff are admittedly under a handicap.
The food situation in these three
dormitories has been a constant and,
we believe, justifiable, source of
gripes for years. Until something is
done to raise the quality, if not the
quantity, of the food served in the
Jewell Cafeteria to at least that of the
SUB, complaints will continue to be
heard.
The most obvious "something," of
course, is the allocation of more
money to the Jewell Cafeteria. How-

badly

seasoned

ever University figures show a loss
of over $2,000 during the month of
September alone.
New cooks? More equipment?
These could be other "somethings."
We don't know the answer, but for
the sake of 371 UK women, we hope
someone does!

in a hard light battle with Mayor Thomas

By JOE HALL

D'Alesandro ol Baltimore. D'Alesandro
said he has received $12,511 and spent
--

il's ,hc

(AP)-Ma- vbc

gremlins who are doing the campaign
work lor most of the U. S. Senate
dictates ill is year.
At least, if official reports liled with
the secretary of the Senate are any
it must 'he somebody who Is willing to do the work for little or on pay.
As a shining example, there's Sen. John
who has been putT. Kennedy
t
campaign for
ting on an
even though his party considers
him a cinch to win.
Kennedy reputed he has spent no
money and received no contributions in
his campaign.
But hi Republican opponent, Vincent
J. Celeste, said last week alter a White
House visit that Kennedy was using
tac"immoral financial,
tics." Celeste said he told President Eisenhower his job is a tough one in the face
Vl tremendous spending by the Kennedy,
incli-tatio-

(D-Mass- .)

all-ou-

g

lortes.
Other Republicans have said Kennedy
and his backers are trying to roll up a
tiemendous vote lod.iy to enhance the
'

Itnatot's presidential prospects
Another member of the
nditures group

in

10.

nocontribu-tion- s

is Sen. Harry
in a tough

locked
ColdwaUT
light with Democratic Gov. Ernest W.
McFailand.
McFailand listed $7,P) received and
$5,303 kpent.
listing also was submitted
A zero-zer- o
who is
ly Sen. J, Glenn Beall
(R-Ari.-

).

(R-Md.-

Why in the woild do vou put up
with such an asinine sjoits personality as Paul "Wildcat Impressions"
Scott?

so-calle-

and now some more of the llowcring
shrubs have disappeared, but there
arc many attractive vistas, especially
where older trees lemaiu.
One thing that would help beautify
at leas't one key spot on the campus
would be the removal ol the two trash
containers which have for vears ornamented the lront ol the little plaa
in lront ol President Patterson's
statue. They ceitainly don't add to
me- the thai m ol the
well-designe- d

d

h

-

$7:50.

Thomas J. Dodd, a Democrat trying
to unseat Republican Sen. William A.
Purtell in Connecticut, reported no contributions but said he had spent $2,1)36.
Purtell listed $.1,500 in each column,
The reason that such rcjorts fail to
reflect the actualities of campaign spending is an old one provisions in the federal law which candidates have learned
to use fully.
The most important of these states that
funds flowing through local or intrastate campaign committees need not be
re)oited. Many such committees often arc
set up on behalf of candidates.
Largest totals reported so far are by
lA. Gov.. Phil UaU, DenuwraiiC. cao-iUdale in Michigan against Sen. Charles
E. Potter, Republican. Hart listed $59.-28.- 1
in contributions. $5!).0.)7 in expendi-

tures. Potter
column.

reported

$5,11.1

in each

:

Ordinarily saints grow faint to posterity; whilst epiite ordinary sinners
pass vividly down the ages. Sir Max

lkeibohiii.
Christian endeavor is notoriously
II. L.
hard on female pulchritude.
Mencken.

copies and sales aic Mill booming.
The show is put on in Mexico City
and sponsors say it's seen in about 02
cities, towns and villages.
I'SIA ollicials knew the show, first
of its kind in Latin America, was going
over big. Their mail was astonishing.
And such things as the sidewalk class
were reported to them.
They had a private research firm check.
Returns annoiinced in mid October:
almost one third of all the L50.000 sets
in the metropolitan area were tuned in
lor the bf:30 p.m. program. Average
listeners per set was three.
Further, 57 per cent ol all listening
told researchers they were seriously
studying English on the piogram, followed it regularly, planned to continue
course. '
lor the full three-montThe' audience included chambermaids,
poi ters.- - day lalxncis, college students,
business and piofessional
housewives,
with a large percentage ol white
men.
collar' workers.
Only one other piogram. an expensive
musical review, topped the "English lessons. Far below weie the Wester us.
h

It's Heavenly

A House On The Moon
By JOHN A. BARBOUR
Science Writer

Pret

Associated
I

sale:, moon
NEW YORK (AP)-F- or
aluminum conhouse, 'prc'la,)r'tatt
struction, air conditioned; 51,000 piare
feet. Will build on your moon site.
Price: F.O.ll. earth. $125,000.
That is the message a Chicago manufacturer will give the government when
he presents a 5 by ( foot scaIC model of
a proposed moon building design.
The model was shown for the lirst
time at a recent news conference.
The actual building would consist of
living chamber, 520 feet
a
long,
leet wide and 5 feet high.
'I his domed, epionset-typstructure Would
be protected by a shield, HiO feet long,
.ISO feet wide and 8.1 feet high.
Knocked down lor rocket transport,
the sit uc tine was said to take up only
about S to 10 per tent of that volume.
Dr. John S. Rinehart. director of the
Mining Research Laboratory, Colorado
School ol Mines, said it would take between 50 and 75 nxkcls to tianspoit
cigar-shape-

Kernels

Ingles?

Us ted

MEXICO CITY (AP)-- A drizzle was
falling, but a sidewalk crowd in front
of a TV store ignored it. Eyes were
glued on a set and watchers chatted
in English:
"Is she a good secretary? Yes, she is
a good secretary."
man turned to a teenA
age girl, lifted his hat, and said: "Pardon,
you should say iss, not ees." The girl
smiled her thanks, and said iss.
The program in a few weeks has surprised even its sponsors by hurtling to
the top of TV ratings in Mexico.
It's a half hour nightly 'English language lesson introduced and sponsored
American Instiby the Mexican-Norttute of Cultural Relations . under auspices of the U. S. Information Agency:
The show is simple and inexpensive.
It features a live class, with a dark-haireprofessor wearing heavy horn-riglasses." He writes words and sentences on a blackboard, ...and the class
leads them aloud.
So do tens of thousands of others
watching the show, according to a- recent survey. Textbooks priced at less
than a dollar have sold about 10,000
well-dresse-

Even know that there's not much
else to do, when you're on the
line and it's third and six, but
to punt. For alter all, if they have had
two plays and gained only lour yards,
how do you expect them to gain six
yards in. one play? It just proves to
kernel sports
me that the
columnist Paul Scott has just never
been there!
If I am wrong in the above assumption, please accept my apology. However, vou might call quartet back Scott
aside and review the situation and the
type of strategy that is. normal lor
the "Big Leagues."
Goodness, Mr. Editor, that's like
not going lor the double play .with
one out and a luuncr onlirst base.
Mary Lou C vkikr
10-ya- rd

d

Campaign Spending

no-exp- e

To The Editor:

The wild flowers have vanished

Habla

Punt

Thinl-Dow- n

pected that
ornithology and might take an interest on that score; others who study
art might have a more aesthetic
awareness. Nope, it usually isn't so.

The Jewell Hall Food

steam-rollerin-

amuse mscll
dining walks acioss the campus is to
watch the students to sec whether I
can find any evidence that they aic
aware ol the llowcrs and shrubs and
trees around them.
Unfortunately, most of the stin
dents seem to be oblivious to their
surroundings. You would have exI

a few studied botany or

Mailer Of Taslc

WASHINGTON

S'lKOlJ.Kll

:

One ol the wavs

Editor-in-Chk- f

moiial aic.i and vet they don't seem
to be needed Jot much Hash cither.

Hcautv Unseen

C

d

c

the building materials to the moon.
A former associate director of the
Smithsonian Astiophysical Observatory,
Cambridge, Mass., Dr. Rinehart acted as
technical director to the Wonder liuild-in- g
Corp. of Anient a.
T