xt786688kd95 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt786688kd95/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19610214  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 14, 1961 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 14, 1961 1961 2015 true xt786688kd95 section xt786688kd95 Castro Cramps Cuban's Capital
By M IKK FEARING
Thursday Associate Editor

Two years ago Premier Fidel Castro began
to strangle foreign exchange on American dollars within Cuba. Today the full impact of this
maneuver is realized in financial aid to Cuban
students studying in American schools.
Oalaor Carbontll, Havana. Cuba, a graduate art
student, said his parents have been unable
money to him for quite some time.
Carbonrll explained that in the summer
Castro lowered the amount of the Amerlran
that rould be sent from the island to $500
then to $150 a year and later he inserted a

to send

of 1959
dollars
a year;
stipula

tion that $100 rould be sent only to student. Recently the flow of capital was completely cut off.
The piemier began his strangle hold with control
of the exchange of the Cuban peso for the American
dollar. What little American money the Cubans do
have they are holding on to for security.
"I've been starving," Carbonell Jokingly said explaining what he does for money. "I've been lucky
enough to sell paintings and then go on from there."
The art student said he has looked for a job
but "there are no jobs in this town." He explained
that he has a part time job in the art department
that pays 50 rents an hour and the university is
place where he might have his room
trying to find
and board.
Continued on rage 8

V

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University of Kentucky
Vol. LI I, No. 61

LEXINGTON,

KY., TUESDAY,

FEB.

11,

11

Eight Pages

Tests May Exempt
StudeiltS From P.E.

semester of sports participation students could be expected to pass
and be permitted to bypass one se- all of the tests.
mester of the requirement.
The new requirements will not
Dr. M. M. White, dean of the affect the number of credit hours
of Arts and Sciences, said required for graduation. The physCollege
men's and women's national phys- ical education requirement is in
ical fitness norms will be used in addition to that number.
To take a closer look at the
determining whether a student
passes or fails the tests.
University physical education reThe new program replaces the quirements, the University Faculty
standard two semesters of physical appointed a committee yesterday
The plan, submitted by the De- education required for graduation. to study the requirements and reEducation Veterans, persons recommended by port back to the Faculty within a
partment of Physical
and the College of Arts and Sci- the University physician, and stu- year.
ences, makes provision for a modi- dents over 25 who were excused
This Is the first major
fied physical education requirefiom the requirement under the In the physical education change
ment fur Muduits who fail one or old program will not be required ment at UK since 1952. requireBefore
two of the test.
to enroll in P.E. classes.
then, a similar system of tests was
Students who fail all of the tests
Based on national figures. Dr. used to permit students to bypass
will be assigned to the regular White said about 14 percent of the a
requirement.
program which includes physical fitness training,
sports participation, and swimming.
Those failing only physical fitness or swimming tests, or both,
will be assigned to one semester of
physical fitness and swimming
Last week's overshoes and overcoats have given way this
training and be permitted to by- week to sneakers and
light jackets since warm weather has
pass one semester of the P.E. reinvaded the Lexington area.
quirement.
Some rain is expected durina
Students failing only the sports
The Lexington Weather Bureau the next fiye
days
tests will be Assigned to one reports temperatures
skills
will range
from 4 to 8 degrees above Lex- are forecast for Wednesday while
ington's normal which is 36 de- heavier rains are expected Thursgrees.
day and Saturday. Total accumuSUB Theater
The warm weather Is due to a lation will be between one-thiThe deadline for the Student
reversal in the usual low and high and
inches.
Union Board' New York Thecenters. A low pressure
ater trip has been extended to' pressure south of
renter
Lexington has
Thursday.
a high pressure World NeiCS liriefs
Interested persons may sign up moved north and
center that was north of Lex- in Room 123, Student Union
ington has moved south bringing
Building.
warm weather.

Students who pass screen ins;
tests for physical fitness, sports
achievement, a n d swimming
ability will be able to bypass
physical education requirements under a new plan approved yesterday by the University Faculty.

Studen Is Ch uck Sn o w Gear
For Warm Weather Garb

Trip

Kentuchian Queen

Kentuckian queen Ann Rodgers Martin are second
attendant June Moore (left) and first attendant Martha Earle
Heizer. Miss Martin, sponsored by Chi Omega, will represent
the University at the Mountain Laurel Festival this spring.
Crowning

1061

Fraternities Pledge 175;
Deferred Rush Ends Today

At 4:30 p.m. yesterday 175 students had been officially
pledged under a pioneering deferred rush system used by UK
fraternities for the first time this fall.
Dave McLellan. Interfraternity
lse from many Muemt hopln?
Council president, said. "In view tQ eliminate any
unsatisfactory

of the number eligible to pledge,
we have done exceptionally well." regujations snow most fraternities
Reports
Of the 27G pledged in the fall of are pleased with the new system
1959, the last semester under the as a whole, but several shortcom-ol- d
system, only 150 made suf- - ngS must be ironed out.
ficient academic standings to be
The biggest problem arose from

initiated.
the large percentage of freshmen
Every man pledged under the men on academic probation after
the first semester.
new system can be initiated.
Bill
IFC Rush
Chairman,
Sprague, said the fraternities are
"still shooting for 200." McLellan
Today's Activities
added that many fraternities have
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
men who haven't signed
pledged
Men may sign up for rush,
up.
Room 128, 9 a.m.-4:3- 0
p.m.
These pledges must be registerDelta Sigma Pi, Room 128,
ed with IFC by 4 p.m. today in 7:30-- 9
p.m.
Room 128, Student Union Building,
Patterson
Society,
Literary
to be officially pledged.
Room 204, 9 p.m.
McLellan seems to think that no
Phalanx, Room 205, 12-- 1 p.m.
difficulty will be met securing the
Young Republican Club, Room
25 students necessary for the goal 205. 5
p.m.
of 200 pledge when the fraternFreshman
Jam Session,
ities see that all their new memSocial Room, 6:30-- 1 p.m.
bers are registered.
Calvary Baptist Church FelIf arrangements can be made, lowship Dinner, canceled.
of all fraternities
representatives
FINE ARTS BUILDING
will meet Saturday to evaluate the
Humanities Club, Fine Art
new deferred rush system, which
Building, 7:30 p.m.
has received both criticism and

T

Lumumba's Death Stirs World

'-

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X fan

ELIZABETHVILLE, Katanga, Feb. 13 (AP) The
Katanga government today announced the death
of Patrice Lumumba and defied the United Nations
or anyone else to do anything about it.
The office of President Moise Tshombe, arch-fo- e
lies in an
of Lumumba, said the deposed
unknown grave and the village tribesmen who slew
him are getting $8,000 as a reward for capture of
criminals.
The announcement stirred a new threat of civil
war in the Congo, where illiterate millions may regard Lumumba as a martyr. It added another problem to the seemingly desperate role of the United
Nations in efforts to bring peace to this
country.

Washington Is Shocked

And The Trophy, Tool

Marcla DeWitt, reprewntiiig Chi Omega sorority, accepts from
Bob Orndorff, Kentuckian editor, the trophy awarded to the University housing unit sponsoring the Kentuckian queen. The trophy
was given for the first time llm year. (Photo by Id Van Arsdall.)

WASHINGTON, Feb. 13 (AP) Official Washington reacted with shock and dismay today to the
death of Patrice Lumumba.
An immediate fear was that the Kremlin would
seize on the event to mount a new effort to bring
the strategic Congo under Communist sway.
Through Ambassador Adlal E. Stevenson at the
United Nations, the United States renewed its push
for U.N. handling of the Congo problem as the best
way to avert meddling by outside powers.
President Kennedy "expressed great shock" when
he heard the news of the death of the Congo leader,
White House Press Secretary Pierre Salinger reported.
Stevenson termed the news "distressing and deplorable" and gave U.S. support to U.N. Secretary
General Dag Hammarskjold's call for a full and
impartial inquiry Into the circumstances of Lumumba's death.

Soviets Bound For Venus
Feb. 13 (AP) A Soviet space station
bound for Venus may pierce that planet's perpetual
cloud cover and reveal some of her secrets, scientists
said today. One aim of the spectacular space probe
is to shed light on whether there is life on that
neighbor of earth.
A rendezvous with Venus about 26 million miles
out in space sometime between May 15 and 31 was
predicted by Prof. Arl Sternfeld, a top Soviet space
scientist.
(The U.S. Naval Observatory, however, said Venus
would be 42.9 million miles away on May 20.)
The big question, Sternfeld added, is whether the
space station's radio can send back over the vast
reaches of space the data so eagerly awaited by
scientists.
d
"automatic interplanetary sta
The
tion" was launched by rocket from a heavy Sputnik
Into orbit Sunday, the Russians said. They called
put
it a great triumph of Soviet engineering.
Oleg Melnikov, physicist at Leningrad Observatory, said it is likely the station will pass through the
thick clouds that blanket Venus and obtain first hand
evidence of the planet's atmosphere.
This might show whether Venus, often called
the earth's twin, could sustain life. Most scientists
believe Venus is too hot to sustain life because it
is about a third closer to the sun than is the earth.
In various interviews, Soviet scientists said the
space vehicle should provide more exact measurements of the solar system, and furnish answers for
problems of man's flight into space.
MOSCOW,

* 11
LITTLE MAN ON. CAMPUS

2 -- THE KENTUCKY

KERNEL, Tuesday, Feb. 14,

fiPLAYER

1

FALL

pr scirnnj
is Made
zzcj Adviser

i

utMeu5 ....

rll5 61 EL-- .

181

1

ard has been appointed to a three-yeterm as adviser to the Educational Policies Commission of the
National Educational Association.
The Commission is one of the
most influential
bodies in the
country in deciding the course of
public education. Advisers counsel
the Commission In planning its
program and in preparing studies
and policy papers.
Dr. Seward, dean of women at
UK since 1957, was associated with
various other universities before
coming to UK. She was assistant
dean of women at Purdue University.
She holds the A.B. degree from
Indiana University, and the M.A.
and Ph.D. degrees from Syracuse
University.

y Seminar To Hear
Kussian

uc legate

LJi v

students ami chaperons will go to New York
sponsored United Nations
City March 8 on the
seminar.
ador Adlai Stevenson and SoA member of the Russian dele- viet Premier NiklU Khrushchev
gation to the U.N. will hold a discuss disarmament.
Thirty-fiv- e

private conference with the group
March 10 at the Soviet Mission
Headquarters. Discussion will con- sider Russia's purposes and goals
in the U.N.
In their tour of the L'.N. Build- ing the group will attend various
of the General Assembly,
They plan to hear U.S. Ambas- -

The group will spend four days
sightseeing in New York.
Places are still available for taterested students, according to Bill
Oott, seminar cochairman. noservatlons must be in the YMCA
flee, Student Union Building, by
Feb. 15.

'49' Journalism Graduate
Is Courier Managing Editor

Ben F. Reeves, a 1919 UK graduate, has been appointed
lie formerly
managing editor of the Louisville Courier-JournaWBKY-F91.3 MEGACYCLES
held the position of assistant managing editor of the newspaper.
9:00 a.m. "Kaleidoscope" (uninThe
has not had
M UK Rpeve Wfts asslstant
terrupted music)
a managing editor in recent years. newg edRor of the Kernel ,
4:00 p.m. "Music Humanities"
James S. Pope, executive editor. ftnd became
editor later
(Tchaikowsky)
has been acting in that capacity. tnat snme managing
5:00 p.m. "Sunset Moods"
ypar
Journal-sln-

OX RADIO TODAY

l.

Courier-Journ-

offWO
TEAW r.

THE?

His flWEfWlTt

$363,933 In Loans

Granted To Students
The University has distributed $363,933 in student loans
tmder the National Education Defense Act since the spring
iemester of 1959.
Dr. Cecil C. Carpenter, administrator of student loans,
raid UK has made 1,226 separate loans averaging about $300
each under the act.
Dr. Carpenter, dean of the College of Commerce, said a majority
of the loans have gone to stu- dents from small towns and rural
areas, especially in Eastern Ken- tucky.
Under the defense act, students
can borrow up to $5,000 during
f heir college careers. The first repayment is not due until a year
ufter the student leaves college.
Interest on the loans is 3 percent and a student may take up
to 10 years to repay.
If a student becomes a teacher,
10 percent of the loan Is canceled
lor. each year of teaching up to a
maximum of half the total bor-- 1

CoJlffC Ilcftds
O

O DDOSC NoiV

UK Centers
Four state college presidents expressed opposition to establishment of additional centers and
two-yecolleges as off -- campus
branches of UK at a meeting Friday in Frankfort.
According to President Frank O.
Dickey, this will have no effect
upon the center planned for
since it has already been
authorized by the legislature.

owed.

The University matches federal
unds with a 10 percent grant. The
i chool
has maintained a general
Joan fund since 1923 and still has
$42,070 on loan to 207 students
under the program.

re
He was an instructor in
Reeves has been with the paper
(music)
1952 and has handled various ism for one year at the Richmond
"World Wide News"
"Sunset Moods"
reportorial jobs, both in Frank- - Professional Institute of the Col-fo- rt
and on the Louisville city- - lege of William and Mary, Rich-ne"Commonwealth In
staff.
mond, Va.
Review" (state news)
6.25 p.m. "Sports Digest"
6:30 p.m. "WBKY Presents"
(special production)
7:00 p.m. "H Is For Joy" (about
drug addition)
7:15 p.m. ' Call From London"
(BBC news program)
While a Kernel editorialist has
When a pigeon comes In contact
7:30 p.m. "Pan American Record
been campaigning to have action with the chemical, the bird's reShow"
taken to rid the Aamtnist ration action is such that it automatically
8:00 p.m. News
of pigeons. Dr. Kenneth warns other pigeons to avoid the
8:05 p.m. "Musical Masterworks" Building
Starks, assistant professor of en- area.
11:00 p.m. News
The birds' droppings were maktomology, has been seeing to it
that a flock of pigeons at the Agr- ing a mess at the building and
UNANSWERED PHONE
icultural Experiment Station their nests were causing maintenELIZABETH. N. J. (A'h-LoT. doesn't decide to make Its home ance problems in the air conditionMackessy is listed in the telephone there.
ing system. So far, the chemical
is keeping pigeons off the building.
directory again this year. But no
the
By
one has answered his phone since areas spraying new pigeons' nesting
with a
chemical sub1935.
stance, they have been forced to
Mackessy, a young lawyer, van- move on. The University was alThe Kernel has the 10th largest
ished without trace 25 years ago lowed to use the
spray for testing circulation of dally newspapers
during a Bermuda cruise. He was purposes.
published in Kentucky.
declared legally dead nine years
ago.
But his brother, Noel, keeps the
RARE CAREER OPPORTUNITY
phone intact, just in case.
This national company has initiated a management development program in its Home Office to meet long range executive
OPEN DAILY 1:30 P.M.
requirements. Opportunities exist in Accounting, Claims, Electronics, Investment, Underwriting and Mathematics. An extensive
training and educational program is provided in all fields. Although
no special field of study is required to qualify as a trainee in this
fcuclid AvnuChvy Ch
program, a good record is important.
LAST TIMES TONIGHT
Mr. Harrison P. Warrener, Assistant Vice President, will b
"HOUSE OF USHER"
on the University of Kentucky Campus on March 3. to interview
Vincent Price Mark Damon
candidates in the Class of 1961. See your Placement Officer to
"ESTHER & THE KING"
schedule an appointment.
Richard Egart
Joan Collin
THE UNION CENTRAL LIFE INSURANCE CO.

5:30 p.m.
5:45 p.m.
6:15 p.m.

About 88 percent of UK students
are from Kentucky. All 120 counties are represented. Other stu- dents are from 43 states, the
District of Columbia, and 38 foreign countries and U.S. posses- sions.

Ag Experiment Station
Rids Itself Of Pigeons

Cincinnati, Ohio

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Feb.

New Look And Role

3

11, 1961- -3

Social Activities

For Marriage By 1975
By RAYMOND HOLBROOK

1973 marriage will
DALLAS, Tex. (Al')-- In
emerge like a butterfly from its cocoon of
outmotled traditions with a brand new look
DELTA TAU DELTA
FRESHMAN Y
and a new role in American life.
will
Alpha Xi Delta
Waller Hulette,
has been
The Freshman Y will have a award a graduate sorority,
of.
And for those who are emotionally mature elected president Junior,
of Delta Tau Valentine's Day Jam session at $1,500 for advanced fellowship the
in
the new concept will bring the marital bliss Delta for the coming year. He is 6:30, Feb. 14, In the Social Room social service field. study
an engineering major from
of the Student Union.
which the world has long idealized but rarely attained.
June Byers, president of the
The dance Is to acquaint FreshDr. Charles P. Mayer, nation- - enduring values the worth of the
Other
officers include Dick man Y members with new fresh- sorority, said that the award was
of the national philanthropes
ally known divorce lawyer turned human personality, the dignity of Lowe,
Junior, Northboro, Mass., men and all others interested in part
marriage counselor, sees this rosy man and woman and child the vice
program of Alpha XI Delta.
president; John Anderson, joining the coed organization.
future.
basic goals of human living,

Elections

Alpha Xi Award

Meetings

.

"Too many people are trying
to impose Nineteenth Century con- crpts of marriage that are com- pletely alien to present day life
and problems."
Caveman Tartirs
the history of marriage,
he points out "The first marriages
were simply marriage by capture
the caveman would conk a likely
female on the head and drag her
home to be his mate.
"Then came marriage by pur- and later marriages arranged
by families. It was not until the
Ninth or Tenth century that mutual love became the principal

jactor

Many of the prevailing concepts
of marriage today are really those
of our parents and grandparents
the Nineteenth Century marriage
where the family was largely
rural, the father was the provider
and patriarch, and the wife had
the subordinate role and endless,
menial domestic duties."
Such a concept doesn't Tit mod- rn urban life where a wife has
new independence and possibly a
job. and a husband is expected to
lo his half of the housework.
The resultant turmoil. Dr. Mayer
says, nas in many cases reverseo
roles. The wife becomes masculine
and domineering and the husband
feminine and submissive.
New Love

"Marriage based on the already
outmoded beliefs in masculine
domination, conjugal rights, and
wifely duties, will disappear," Dr.
Mayer believes "and in its place,
love and dignity of each partner
be reestablished as the basis
marriage.
"Companionship will be the key- note. Husbands and wives will be
able to clearly reaffirm the real

long
frustrated by incongruous tradi- tions."
Among the factors which Dr.
Mayer says will help bring; this
about are:
A better understanding of
self. More people will try to
understand
their motivations,
fears and frustrations and attain
emotional maturity,
Less domestic drudgery. Oreater
use 0f prepared foods and more
labor-savin- g
devices and easier-chas- e
homes will reduce
domestic duties.
Education In infantile concepts
of romantic love will give way to
a more ntei8ent choice of one's
mate 88 wel1 as PrePare yun
Pe0P,e for the realities of mar- r,pd life'
Better se education. In place
of feelings of anxiety and guilt
children will receive a whole- some understanding of sex which
will help them to grow up to be
able to give and receive love as
mature adults,
increased marriage counseling,
In addltlon to more widespread
private help by qualified coun- gelors
many dlvorce courts win
establish counseling service.
Complete independence of
women. The attainment and recognition of full equality will eliminate the wife's insistence for it
and the husband's resistance to It
and will end the conflict that results.
All of the the above factors, Dr.
Mayer believes, will help elimin-wi- ll
ate many of the symptoms of un-ftroubles,
happy marriage
money disputes, and alcoholism
because the underlying cuuses will
have been removed.

Any graduate of an accredited,
Junior, Paducah, secretary; John
FRESHMAN Y SCHEDULE
or university is eligible to
Banta, Junior, Lexington, treasurer.
Feb. 14 Valentine's Day Jam ses- college Interested
persons may obapply.
John Burkhard, Liberty, cor- sion.
tain applications from June Bjers
responding secretary; Jack Crutch-e- r,
Feb. 28 Dr. James Gladden.
at 321 Columbia Terrace, or phone
Junior, Louisville, sergeant-at-arm- s;
March 14 Discussion on Stuand Charlie Turnbull, Jun- dent Government.
The deadline for filing applicaior, Lexington, guide.
March 28 Dr. Charles Snow.
tions is March 1, 1961, Miss Byers
April 18 Frankfort trip.
CANTERBURY CLl'B
said.
May 2 Business meeting.
Judson Knight was recently
May 8 All freshmen party.
elected president of the CanterYOUNG REPUBLICANS CLUB
bury Club.
The Young Republicans Club
Cranberry Juice as a beverage
Other officers elected wereMyra will meet at 4 p.m.
today in Room or in a fruit punch is sure to make
Ooff, vice president; Gay-Elle- n
205 in the Student Union. Eleca hit with your family. For spiced
Edon, secretary; John Troy, treas- tion of officers will be held.
cranberry Juice, add a stick ot
urer; Paul Keil, worship; Peggy
PHALANX
cinnamon, whole cloves, and lemAdelman, publicity; Betty Hicks,
Phalanx, service fraternity for on slices to suit your taste; then,
music; Judy DeLaud, alter guild. YMCA
members, will hold an or heat quickly.
Jackie Macintosh, kitchen manand luncheon meeting
ager; Art Simon, membership, and ganization
at noon today in Room 205 in the
Jay Kinsberg, education and rec- Student Union.
reation.
The meeting is open to all memALPHA XI DELTA
bers and their guests. For luncheon
Anna Mae Reed, a Junior home reservations, call Ben B. Wright
economics major from Browns- or the YMCA office.
Typewriters, Adding Machinal
ville, was elected president of
CANTERBURY CLUB
Service
Sales
The Canterbury Club will have
Alpha Xi Delta.
Other
officers elected were a pancake supper at 6 tonight at
and Rentals
Kathy Lewis, vice president; Jew- the chapel.
Repair service, adding machines,
ell
Kendrick, treasurer;
Byrle
new and used portable, carbons,
For easy bathtub . cleaning,
Davidson, pldege trainer; Nene
ribbons, Olivetti printing calcuCarr, rush chairman; Judy Buis-so- n, sprinkle the tub with powdered
lators.
recording secretary; Pat Cody, bleach, then use a
Phone
387 Rose St.
corresponding secretary; Kay brush or mop.
Murphy, social chairman.
OPEN 7 DAYS
Logana Meredith, house presi
6:30 'TIL MIDNIGHT
dent; Ann Chamberlain, chaplain;
Liz Conkwright, historian; Ronda
Garrison, Journal correspondent;
BREAKFAST SPECIAL
Beverly Gonzalez, marshall; Bar1. Bacon, Ham or Sausage
bara Soloman,- mistress of cere2. Two Eggs
monies; Sharon Perkins, activities
chairman.
3. Potatoes
Susan Hoover, scholarship chair4. Toat & Coffee
music chairman; Emily Spear,
man; Norma Jean Snapp, assistant rush chairman; Carolyn Farmer, rush secretary, and Sharon
WOODLAND AND EUCLID
Phone
Adams, assistant treasurer.

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Open Mon. and Fri. 'Til 9 p.m.

heart-winne-

Housewares
Paints
Corner of Ashland anj Euclid
PHONE
Sherwin-William-

THE

CAROUSEL

VtilLSOM COX

if

Hardware

i(

PH.
EUCLID
Open 9:30 to 6:00 Daily
Diamonds
Watches
Charms

821

Girls' and Children's
Wearing Apparel
SOUTHLAND
CHEVY CHASE

CHEVY CHASE
HARDWARE
C

PH.

s

"A

R. E. WILLIAMS

ABBOTTS BARBER

VARIETY STORE

AND

IN CHEVY CHASE

BEAUTY SHOP

Phone
Free Parking
Friendly Courteous Service

Catering

803 EUCLID

To U.K.

PH.

FRIENDLY

PLACE TO SHOP"

GREENWALD'S

DELICATESSEN
8S4 E. HIGH STREET
Hot Corned Beet
Pastrami Sandwiches
For Take-Ou- t
Call

BECKER

Launders

Cleaners

LAD & LASSIE SHOP
Complete Lino ot
Children's Clothing

A

Complete Laundry and Dry
Cleaning
Representing

U.K.

Service

tor 46 Years

316

S.

ASHLAND

PH.

* Crossing Rose Street

In the past several years the loca
tion of a large portion of the University's residence and class units
on the east side of Rose Street has
created what now amounts to a major problem for pedestrian traffic.

An area that had almost no University population 10 years ago now
boasts nine sororities, 10 fraternities,
the two largest men's dormitories, a
large married student housing development, and the Medical Center,
which, when in full operation, will
accommodate several thousand medical staff members and students.

Out of this startling building spurt
have come countless invitations to
accidents involving pedestrians and
motor vehicles and perhaps even traffic deaths.
Fedestrian movement across Rose
Street from the men's residence units
and Cooperstown is facilitated to a
degree by the Washington Avenue
traffic light; the Medical Center is
not yet in full operation and its traffic problem is not yet so pressing, but
the situation near Sorority Row is
becoming increasingly hazardous.
There is a traffic signal at the
corner of Columbia Avenue and Rose
Street but with the construction of
the new science building shutting off
one sidewalk entering the center of
the campus, Sorority Row residents
find it expeditious to take their
chances with the traffic and cross
between the Chi Omega house and
Fine Arts Building.

The practice of crossing at the
Chi Omega house is one fraught
with danger in the early morning
hours as streams of autos pour down
Rose Street to the downtown area.
In addition to endangering their lives
and limbs in attempting to cross there,
pedestrians violate Lexington ordinances forbidding jaywalking; yet the
temptation to cross at the Chi Omega
house is great because it is the shortest route to one of two remaining entrances to the northeastern corner
of the campus.
No immediate solution to this
traffic problem is even in sight.
Howard Gabbard, associate city traffic engineer, recently told the Kernel
that a crosswalk or traffic light at the
location is completely out of the
question because of problems of traffic flow. Mr. Gabbard's only suggestion was a "blister" type underpass
like that planned at Harrison and
Euclid Avenues. Such an underpass
would cost approximately 100 thous- and dollars and it would be several
years before such funds could be
made available.
In light of the need for some
method of easing pedestrian movement across Rose Street, we urge the
University and the city to launch an
immediate study of the situation.
And in the meantime, a crosswalk
or blinker light warning would prove
invaluable. The possibility of serious
injury or even death should outweigh the consideration of traffic
flow.

THE READERS' FORUM
Word Shifting

To The Editor:

Thankyou for printing Don

Gal-

loway's excellent article on the First
Addition to the King Library in your
issue of Feb. 9. A slight shifting
of words might leave the impression
that our library will be the largest
and best in the country next to
Texas and Ohio State. Actually it will
be the largest and the best university
library between Ohio State and Texas.
Law rence S. Thompson
Director of Libraries

because he started sliding as we met
in the curve in front of A Building.
For some unknown reason no damage, was done to either car.
I thought some relief was in sight
Saturday noon. M&O was driving up
the street with a truck load of sand
and I took for granted they would
put the sand on the street. They
didn't. Instead it was spread on the
sidewalks. Now, I'm not the most

toj

Sandy Shawneetown

To The Editor:
When the campus was covered
with an overabundance of snow last
year, most of it falling within a
period, I remember the praise
heaped on M&O for getting the
streets and sidewalks cleaned in a
hurry. They deserved the praise then
because they did do an excellent
job. Where were they two weeks ago?
As a result of the recent snow
and sleet the streets in Shawneetown
were left a glare of ice. As a result
there were four cars which failed to
make the first curve and ended up
in the ditch. Another car coming off
one of the side streets couldn't stop
and ran over the curb and into the
ditch running parallel to the main
street. A student sideswiped my car

agile person in the world but I can
control ISO pounds a lot better than
two or three thousand pounds of
moving metal.
What good did the sand do? For
one thing, I won't have to buy sand
to put in my son's sandbox, I'll already have an apartment full.
Pete Myehs

The Kentucky Kernel
University of Kentvcky

Pruned

,our

Second clan poMiiRe

tin.. .

wee.

UOLLA

paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
dU'""'
Ks'X CHOOlTy EAH

lioH Anderson, Editor
Newton Spencer, S,rtt Editor
Mike Wenninger. Manama Editor
Hohhik Mason, Assistant Manaainfi Editor
Lew King, Advertising Manager
Editor,
Beverly Caruwell and Tom Lennos, Soiicti,Channon, Cartoonists
Skip Tayioh and Jim
N.c ky Fore, Circulation
Tehhy As... ey, Business Manager
TUESDAY NEWS STAFF
Katuy Lewis, Associate
Setts Editor

Warren Wheat,

Scottie IIeit,

Syorts

"Keep waiting, they'll run one over yet."

Canadians Trying Pay TV
TORONTO
pay
TV experiment is beginning its second year still very much an experiment.
Managers say no conclusions have
been reached. They are sitting tight
on all information about finances.
The operation began last February
with installations in 1,000 homes in
Etobicoke, a Toronto suburb. The
aim at that time was to have the
homes by the
system in
and of 1960 and in 40,000 eventually.
These goals were discarded after
initial studies indicated alterations
were needed in