xt78930nsv8g https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt78930nsv8g/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19370209  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February  9, 1937 text The Kentucky Kernel, February  9, 1937 1937 2013 true xt78930nsv8g section xt78930nsv8g Best Copy Available

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

TUESDAY EDITION
SEMI-WEEKL-

KERNEL

Y

UNIVERSITY

VOL. XXVII.

WILL PLAY AT
MILITARY BALL
Famous Orchestra Selected
As Response to Students'
Demand for Name
Rands
FEB. 27 SET AS DATE
FOR ANNUAL DANCE
Played

Has

for

Numerous

Tiik

RECORD MARK

I'

out Nation

RANK

Additional
Ik-e-

I'rrsidrnt of the University.

Anson Weeks and his orchestra
have been engaged to play for the
annual Military Ball, sponsored by
Scabbard and Blade, to be held Feb.
27, from 9 until 12 p. m. in the Alumni gymnasium, Paul Slaton, chairman of the orchestra committee,
announced yesterday.
In reply to the student demand
for famous"orchestras at the various
University dances, the committee
contacted such units as Benny
Meroff,
Barney Rapp, Fletcher
Henderson, Ina Ray Hutton, Al
Kandin, Johnny Hamp, George
Hamilton, Bob Crosby, Lee Bennett,
Charlie Barnett, and Earl Hines.
and chose Anson Weeks after care,
ful consideration.
Anson Weeks first gained recognition at the Hotel Mark Hopkins
In San Francisco, where he remained
for over six years, after having
played for college dances throughout California
and surrounding
states. While playing at these
dances, he gained a knowledge of
the traditions of each Institution
and made a specialty of playing the
various campus songs.
He was first brought to the attention of the nation's music lovers
through his broadcasts on the Lucky
Strike program over the National
network,
Broadcasting Company
where he was featured with Walter
Winchell, Broadway columnist, who
made famous the phrase "On with
the dancin', Anson."
His popularity at the Mark Hopkins brought him engagements In
the East, and he has appeared at
such spots as the Roosevelt and St.
Regis hotels In New York, the Rice
hotel In Houston, and the Aragon
and Trianon ballrooms in Chicago.

Young Artists
Please Audience
MYSTERYDRAMA
In Presentation
Locals Portray Rufus King's Prof. R. D. Mclntyre Intro"Invitation to a Murder,"
University and CenTo Re Presented Week of duces Kentucky Musicians
tral

February 15

A group of talented University
students, Bobby Conglcton, Versailles, a seventh grade student, and
the chapel choir of the Paris High
school presented the regular Sunday afternoon musicale in Memorial
hall February 7. R. D. Mclntyre,
chairman of the music program

Final practice is being held this
for the production of Rufus
Kings "Invitation to a Murder"
which will ba presented by local
players at the Guignol Theatre the
week of February 15. A matinee
performance will be given Saturday aft?moon, February 20.
The dominant character in the
play is Lorinda Channing who is a
descendant of the famous Borgia
family of Italy and has all the
characteristics of the famous Lu- crezia Borgia of four centuries ago.
This role is played by Mary Lyons.
The cast, which includes many
members of the University faculty,
students, and townspeople, Is as
follows: Walter Channing, Albert
Ruth
Moffet; Estelle Channing,
Johnston; Horatio Channing, L. C.
Martin, Sid Buckley;
Robinson:
Hernandez;
Pedro, J. Edwardo
Peter Thome, Phil McGee; Lorinda
Channing, Mary Lyons; Dr. Linton,
Walden Greenwell; Jeanette Thorne.
Katherine Daab; Mr. Dixon, Lee
Heine; Sergeant Selbridge, Douglas
Whitcomb; and Court Photograph
er, William Curry.
week

committee. Introduced each performer.
John Toohey, organist, of Winchester, a senior in the University
murtc department, opened the program with Roger's Sonata in E
Minor. Mr. Toohey who is the organist for St. Joseph's church, Winthroughout
chester, is
Central Kentucky for his playing.
Bobby Congleton, of Versailles,
many times winner in musical competitions, pleased the audience with
his Interpretation of Bach's
and Schubert's I
Opus 142, No. 2. He possesses real talent and gives promise
of developing into a finished pianist.
A four-ye- ar
veteran of University
musical programs, Morton Potter,
of Lexington, sang "King Ever
Glorious" from The Crucifixion by
Stainer and Lawson's "A Lazy
Song." He was accompanied at the
piano by Sue Durham Griffith. Mrs.
Griffith later took part in a piano
and organ number "Festival Overture in D," with Ruth Ecton at the
organ.
Katherine Park, who sang the
part of Maid Marian in the recent
performance of Robin Hood, rendered "Blue Are Her Eyes" by Winter Watts and "Giannini Mia" from
the Firefly, by Frlml. Miss Adelle
Genscmer played the accompaniment.
The string quartet composed of
Lee Crook, first viollin; Virginia
Tharp, second violin; Jeanette
Virginia
L a m p e r t, viola, and
Roland, cello, played G?nus Loci.
Op. 32. No. 6 by Carl Them and
Variation on the Russian National
Hymn, by Veit. The quartette gave
a finished performance, delighting
the audience with their interpretation of the numbers.
The program was closed with a
group of sacred numbers by the
chapel choir, a group of 30 selected
voices from the glee clubs of the
Paris High school. The choir was
selected and directed by Miss Ellen
Blanding, of Lexington, who has
charge of the music students in the
Paris High schools. Susan Howard
was the accompanist.
well-kno-

to"

ARE ANNOUNCED

Because of flood conditions,
it is advisable for all students
to have typhoid vaccine. Those
who should take the series of
shots are thos who have never
had any of the sers, those
who have had one series three
or more years ago, and those
who have had two or more incomplete series. Anyone who
had had two or more complete
series need not take more.
Today is the last day that students, who are intending to park
their cars in university parking
space this semester, have to register their autos. A penalty of 10
cent will be imposed for late

registration.
The first meeting of Delta Sigma Chi, newsmen's bunch, will
meet for the first time this
semester at 8 o'clock tonight at
the residence of the adviser. Refreshments will be served.
The Dutch Lunch club will not
meet on Friday of this week
refugees
are still being
housed in Maxwell Presbyterian
church.
be-ca-

Actives of Pershing Rifles will
hold an important meeting at 7:30
o'clock tonight in Major Irvin
Scudder's room in Alumni hall.

Independent girls of the University will have a meeting at 3 o'clock
this afternoon in the Woman's

Rupp

Is Pessimistic

About

total of 3.116 students enrolled
Outcome of Game;
In the University this term, near-ln- g
Praises 'Rama
high of 3,169 made
the
in the spring semester of 1930-Seeking revenge for the defeat
and surpassing by a good majority the Wildcats handed them In Tusthe total enrollment of 3,003 stu- caloosa last week, the Red Elephants
dents for the spring semester last of the University of Alabama will
year, was recorded following the storm into Lexington for a return
closing of the registration line at game with the Big Blue quintet to3:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon.
morrow night in the Euclid avenue
With still a week left to register, gymnasium.
the final registration date being set
Coach Adolph Rupp stated that
for Monday, Feb. 15, the enrollment the Crimson Tide was the most Immay surpass the 1930-3- 1
spring se- proved five in the Southeastern
mester total of 3,169.
Conference and because of the poor
Additional funds for aiding those condition that the recent long southstudents in the flood areas through ern trip imposed on the 'Cats, he is
the addition of National Youth Ad- afraid that the Tide will be too
ministration allotments have been much for them to handle.
obtained, according to Dean T. T.
Coming straight from a decisive
Jones, who is in charge of NYA ad- win over Vanderbilt, the Tuscaloosa
ministration. This aid is being giv- team Is a serious threat to hand the
en to all the colleges in the state by Kentucky team its second conferthe NYA as a legitimate flood relief ence loss of the season.
activity.
Dean Jones also anFrom the records, the fact that
nounced that those students whose the Wildcats defeated Tennessee,
will and the Vols In turn won from Alahomes were in the flooded area
be granted NYA work if they desire, bama seems to give the 'Cats a suand those already on the NYA will perior appearance. However, It took
be given additional time.
two over time periods for Tennessee
Due to the flood conditions, many to gain this win. Both Alabama and
were not able to obtain Kentucky have defeated Vanderstudents
money for their tuitions, and tem- bilt. and both spilt double headers
A

U.K.SPEAKERS

Kampus
Kernels

NYA Grant Has GAME WILL START
AT USUAL TIME
Received to Aid

Students

GUIGNOL ENACTS

Convocation Dates for Sem
ester. Schedule of Prom
inent Lecturers Released
Ry Doctor McVey
speakers
which will appear at the University
during this semester, including one
speaker this month, two in March
and one in Apijjl, was released yesterday by Pres. Frank L. McVey.
Ameen Rihanl, a native of Syria,
lecturer, author, and interpreter of
the Near East, will be the first
speaker, appearing at the convoca
tion Feb. 23. On March 2, Dr. E.
A

list

of convocation

Stanley Jones, preacher and teacher, and author of the widely known
book, "Christ of the Indian Road,"
will be the speaker, and on March
student group
20 Pan Politikon.
studying international affairs, will
sponsor its annual program, with a
prominent diplomantlc speaker who
will be announced later.

The April speaker will be Henry
Wadsworth Longfellow Dana, lecturer and teacher, who will appear
April 29.
Mr. Rihanl, who will speak at the
forthcoming convocation, came to
America as a boy, and became an
American citizen. While attending
the New York Law school, he was
forced to return to the Near East
because of ill health, and since that
time has spent long periods in both
countries writing and interpreting
the activities of American and Syrian people.
Doctor Rihanl is the author of a
number of books and has written
Some of his best
some poetry.
known works are "The Chant ol
Mystics," "Maker of Modern Ara
bia," "Around the Coasts of Arabia"
and "Arabian Peak and Desert."

The International Relations club LECKIES' NEW ROOK
will hold an Important business
IS RECEIVED HERE
meeting at 4 p. m. tomorrow in the
Woman's building. Election of ofA translation of Sir Thomas
ficers for the second semester will
be held. Members and others in- Aquinas' "Concerning Being and Es
terested in international relations sence" by Prof. George G. Leckle,
acting head of the philosphy deare invited to attend.
partment, is off the press and has
been received here. The volume is
Lances will hold an important a part of the Philosophy Source
7
o'clock Thursday book series published by D. Apple-to- n
meeting at
evening at the Phi Kappa Tau
Century, and contains a prehouse. It is Important that all face by the author.
members be present.
CAMERA CUB MEETS
Theta Sigma Phi will meet at 4
10, in
p. m., Wednesday, February
John L. Curter, Lexington Leader
the Woman's building.
stair photographer, and a graduate
of the University, displayed and ex
The Y. W. C. A. Social group will plained several kUids of cameras,
meet at 3 p. m., Wednesday, Februand an exhibit of prints, including
ary 10, in Boyd hall.
Mood pictures, at a meeting of the
Lexington Camera club at the Uni
The first general open house of versity Art Center Thursday night.
the semester will be held from 4 Twenty-eig- ht
members and guests
to 6 p. m. Friday afternoon at the were present. Announcement was
Woman's building. All students are made that a traveling exhibit of
Invited. A special invitation is ex- Contax and Leica prints will be re
ceived and exhibited by the club
tended to new student.
soon.
(Continued on Page Four)

all-ti-

31

porary relief was given by University officials by allowing the withholding of checks until funds could
be deposited, and by accepting part
payment on tuition under a plan
made available last year by the
registration committee.

HELEN STANLEY
Illness of Ten Days Fatal to
University Recorder; Has
Reen Mem her of Registrar's Staff Since 1919

ay

Former Instructor
'

with Tulane.
The Big Blue's loss to Tulane was
their first in the Southeastern Conference. This defeat set them down
to fourth place in Southeastern
ratings.
has
The Tide's starting line-u- p
not been released yet but will probably be the same that Kentucky
went up against in Tuscaloosa.
Coach Rupp plans to start the
same five men who have been beginning all of the 'Cats tilts. Hodge
and Captain Donohue will be at
the guard posts. Thompson at the
pivot position, and Carlisle and Ha-g- an
will hold down the forward assignments.

DEATH COMES TO

Mrs. Helen Stanley. University
recorder,
died early yesterday
morning at the Good Samaritan
hospitfl following a ten-dillness
of pneumonia.
Mrs. Stanley had been a member
of the Registrar's staff of the University since 1919 and had held the
Recorder
position of University
since 192S. She was bom in Mt.
Vernon, Illinois, and was a graduate of Ohio State University with
a bachelor of science degree in
home economics. She married Arch
M. Stanley in 1924. She was a memChristian
ber of the Central
church of this city.
Prof. Ezra L. Gillis, registrar.
speaks of Mrs. Stanley as follows:
'Mrs. Stanley had been a mem
ber of the Registrar's staff of the
University of Kentucky since Oc
tober, 1919. She was made University Recorded in 1925 and held this
position at the time of her death.
Mrs. Stanley was recogni.'ied as belonging to a small group of the best
Instructor recorders In the United States. In
Roy H. Owsley, former
department of political addition to her work as recorder,
in the
science, who assisted the late Dr. J. she had taught successfully the labCatron Jones in organizing the oratory work in the graduate course
Kentucky Municipal league In 1929-3- 0, In
the registrar's field of adminleft Sunday for Augusta, Me., to
assume duties as executive secre- istration. She has made a lasting
tary of the Maine Municipal asso- contribution to the Registrar's office."
ciation.
Mrs. Stanley, a native of Mt. VerHe will be accompanied to New
England by Mrs. Owsley, the form- non, Illinois, was the daughter of
er Miss Alta Mae Cole, and they Oscar L. Ashcraft and the late
Flora Colgln Ashcraft.
will make their home in Augusta.

Given Position

Bert Johnson Signs

With Brooklyn Team

l

John "Shipwreck" Kelley and
Ralph Kercheval Already
Connected With Team
Bert "Man o' War" Johnson, back-fie- ld
ace at the University of Kentucky for the past three years, last
week signed a contract to play with
the Brooklyn Dodgers, national professional
During
playing,
honored
of the

football club.
his three years of varsity
the Wildcat halfback was
by being selected on many
He was
elevens.
the first sophomore ever to be chosConferen on the
ence eleven. This year he received
honorable mention on several of the
teams.
more renowned
Johnson decided to sign with the
Brooklyn club as two former Wildcats are connected with the team.
Kelly,
John Sims "Shipwreck"
probably the fastest man ever to
have worn a Big Blue uniform, is
part owner of the Dodgers. Ralph
Kercheval, football's greatest punter, has been playing regularly for
Brooklyn since graduating from the
University.
all-st- ar

DEBATERS WIN
Upholding the affirmative and
negative sides on alternate nights,
the University high school debating
team defeated the teams of Danville
and Corbln high schools on the
topic "Resolved, that all electric
utilities should be governmentally
owned and operated," Thursday and
Friday nights in the University high
school auditorium.

KERNEL "COLLEGE NIGHT" TO BEGIN FRIDAY

I

"Beloved Enemy," starring Merle
Oberon and Brian Aherne, and nu
merous news reels relating to University life, will feature the first
of The Kentucky Kernel sponsored
"College Nights" Friday. Feb. 12, at
the Kentucky theatre.
Students will be admitted during
the evening for the afternoon price
when they present special coupons,
first of which will be published in
the Kernel Friday. These coupons
must be presented prior to 8 p. m.
Friday, the Kentucky management
states.
Before the beginning of the night's
last show, the theatre will be turned
over to students for a general pep
rally, which will consist of song
singing and cheers. Plans are un- -,
der way to have the University band
present for the first "College
Night."
Reels showing a Kentucky-Was- h

ington and Lee football game of re- cent years, shots showing the "Best
Band in Dixie," in action in Wash-- 1
Ington, D.
movies of Pershing
Rifles in formation and executing!
drills, and scenes of the recent May
'111 be shown
dur- Day celebration
ing the program.
The "Beloved Enemy" deals with
the Irish rebellion and scenes are
laid in Dublin in 1922. when that
city was under martial law. tense,
sombre, and bleeding.
As Dennis Rlordan, leader of the
Irish revolt, Brian Aherne is seen as
a typical swashbuckling, loving,
fighting,
Irishman.
Miss Oberon. the daughter of
Lord Athlelgh, British emissary sent
by the British parliament to Dublin,
meets Rlordan when she accompanies her father to the Irish city.
Situations arise when she attempts to shield the whereabouts of
Rlordan, upon whose head is posted
a reward of ten thousand pounds.

C

hot-head-

I

8

P. M.

NEW SERIES NO. 33

1

L. McA'fcV,

TOMORROW NIGHT

IM7

Total of .1.1 Ifi Enroll at Close
of Period
Yesterdav;
May Reach 3,169 High
Red Elephants Seeking Reof 1930-3venge for Defeat Handed
Them at Tuscaloosa
FER. IS FINAL DAY
Last Week
FOR CLASIFICATION

agene y.

College Dances Through-

building.

APPROACHING

kisi'onsk of students and faculty to the (.ill (or help
t ounce lion with the flood tragedy in the Ohio Valley
prompt and generous. A great deal of clothing
was given and considerable amounts of money. I want to
lake this oixrtunity to extend thanks and appreciation lo
the givers who made this ossillc, and al the same time to
thank I lie vaiious chairmen of committees and members who
Worked so effec tively and so quit kly to raise money and provide clothing. The money lias been tinned over to the Red
Cross and the clothing has been distributed through the same

),

A LA HAM A

Mexican Quintet Bows to
Wildcats by 58-3- 0
Count;
Meet Alabama Tomorrow

REGISTRATION

A MESSAGE

'CAT vs.

KENTUCKY

OF

LEXINGTON. KENTUCKY, TUESDAY. FEBRUARY

ANSON WEEKS

Basketball game

In outlinine future "Colleae
Nights," J. D. Ensminger, manager
of the theatre recently acquired by
the Schlne organization, told representatives of The Kernel that the
"present blue ribbon campaign at
Schine theatres is the result of the
acknowledged fact that present-da- y
audiences are 'choosey' about the
pictures that they desire to see.
Hollywood, consequently, in its pres
ent program, is producing only super productions, spending a far
larger amount of money on each
Present-da- y
picture than previously.
audiences are demanding better
pictures and Hollywood promises to
supply them."
Speaking for the Kentucky. Mr.
Ensminger said. "Wo aaln proini.se
full cooperation with the University
students, and we will attempt to
meet all their demands on these
College Night.' which wiU be regular weekly, Friday night, attractions at the Kentucky."

Ralph Carlisle Leads Mates
With 15 Points; Rlue
Leads Most of Reckless Tilt

NYA Offers Aid
To Needy Students

RUPPMEN LEAD AT
HALFTIME RY

University students who are
from the flood arra and are in
need of aid in order to remain
in school may obtain It by applying to the offices of the Dean
of Men or Dean of Women,
Dean T. T. Jones stated yesterday. If these students are already working under the National Youth
Administration
they may obtain additional aid
by applying.

DR.

WEIDLEIN

27-1-

9

Hodge Out With Sprained
Ankle. Rut All Others
Get In Game
Listlessly, but without
too much difficulty, Kentucky's Wildcats overcame
international complications
by defeating: the University of Mexico,
in the
Alumni gymnasium before
a crowd of 3,000 persons.
58-3-

IS

SCIENCE TALKER

0,

Although the Wildcats seemed
never in danger, the elusive and
g
men from below the
border proved to be a nuisance and
kept the Blue team on its toes
throughout. Carlisle led his team
with 15 tallies. He started the game
at forward, but was later shifted
to center, a role he sometimes as- -!
sumes.
Fatigue, the result of a long
southern tour, soon showed up on
Kentucky and passes became inaccurate. Shot after shot went wide of
the basket and many a crip failed
to connect. But the relatively small
Mexican players were tired, too, for
they have been on as long a. tour
as a basketball team ever takes.
Fresh as they might be on their own
court, these spirited, swarthy boys
might be expected to give the Big
Blue more than they could handle.
Walker easily controlled the
f,
towering over Rul. and later
over Rodriquez who replaced Rul,'
when the latter was sent to the bench
with four personal fouls chalked up
against him. The scoring started
off within seconds after the game
started when Donohue connected
his second attempt from the foul
line after having been fouled in a
tangle under the basket. But within
seconds of that score Gutierrez took
the ball under the Mexican basket
and scored a crip to place Mexico
in the lead for the first and last
time during the game.
Rul fouled Walker on the next
f,
and Walker sank both of
his gratis chances to put Kentucky
back into the lead which they held,
though often precariously.
Donohue was fouled and made
good his one chance, which was
followed by Goforth, who missed
his free throw.
By this time the game was wild.
Kentucky was missing often, rebounding pourly, and finally took
time out.
As time in was called Op per took
the ball down the floor and scored
one from the side. On the very next
play Opper took the ball on a pass
to the deep corner where, from a
difficult angle he scored another.
Close scoring followed with the
Mexicans matching the 'Cats until
a few minutes before the end of
the half, when a series of baskets
by Carlisle and Hagan put the
Ruppmen into the lead and they
were never again threatened.
The score at the half stood, Kentucky, 27 Mexico, 19.
Lolo opened the scoring for the
second half making the score 27 to
21. Then the Wildcats opened with
a rush running the score to 35 to
21. At this point Coach Rupp began
substituting freely. Carlisle. Opper,
and Tice soon ran the score to 47
quclk-pasin-

"From Universities Proceeds
Much of Rasic Knowledge
of Science" Says American
Chemical President

j

"From the universities proceeds
much of the basic knowledge of science on which the industries of today have built and will construct
for the future.'' Dr. E. R. Weidlein.
president of the American Chemical
society and director of the Mellon
Institute of Industrial Research,
Pittsburgh, Penn., said in speaking
upon "Science in Action," at the
196th meeting of the Lexington section of the American Chemical society, celebrating its 25th anniversary at the University of Kentucky,
Lexington, yesterday.
Saying that "without the evolution of scientific investigation in the
universities. Industrial laboratories,
might never have come into existence," Doctor Weidlein declared
"besides the very Idea of research,
the universities have furnished the
industries with men possessing
knowledge not only of the underlying scientific facts and theories,
but of the methods and technics of
investigational work."
Speaking of the growth of science. Doctor Weidlein said that
"since 1870 science applied to manufacturing has created eighteen new
Industries that furnish direct and
indirect employment to over ten
million persons. Science has also
effected a fourfold increase in our
standard of living since 1790. Many
of the good things of life, including
automobiles, radios, telephones, and
electric lights, are scientific creations."
Doctor Weidlein declared that
while "scientific research is still
young, even in the life of the universities, which are primarily responsible for its existence." that industries "having gained the spirit of
research from the universities, the
industries have applied its methods
to their own affairs with really
amazing results. During the last
25 years the number of industrial
research laboratories in the United
States has grown from a very few
to more than 2,000."

tip-of-

tip-of-

SECOND BID DAY

TO BE FRIDAY

Sororities Will Pledge From
1 to 3 p. m. Friday In Dean
to 24.
Play from here on
of Women's Office; Open
and furious with both
Rushing Is Allowed

out was fast
teams making
numerous wild and needless throws.
Second semester bid day for the The Mexico boys perked up for a
while at the very last to score a
nine social sororities on the University campus will be held Friday, few goals from far back in the
February 12, according to an an- court. The members of Kentucky's
by third string also had little trouble
made yesterday
nouncement
Mary Edith Bach, president of the in ringing up points. The game
ended with the 'Cats on top 58 to
women's Punhellenic council.
Those women desiring to take 30.
Throughout the game the Mexsorority bids are requested to report
at the Dean of Women's office in icans showed fine sportsmanship
the Administration building on Fri- and completely won the admiration
day afternoon between the hours of of the crowd.
The complete box score follows:
one and three.
TP
In contrast with the system of Kentucky tb
Yd
Tli
0
week, Hunan P
rushing used during the fall
12
J
t
be open rushing up until Opi. r YC
there will
4
Wulker
4
the day the bids are received. Donahue O
0
0
0
are permitted to talk with Oolorlli O
Rushees
1
15
4
sorority girls at any time and are Carlisle C C
3
Thoinphuli
not limited in their subject of conC
3
0
0
0
versation, as Is the case during the Hud her P
3
I
0
lw K P
fall rush week.
S
3
Head
On first bid day last October Oiix it,
0
0
0
3
there were approximately 150 gills Curli. (1
3
who accepted sorority membership. Combs o
Due to the decreased enrollment of Mt'Xlco U. iSOl
new students at the beginning of Cm tier re Y
4
10
the second school semester, there lolo K
4
Hul C
will probably be about 20 girls who
3
Ibarra O
will pledge next Friday.
Ramirez U
3
Rua F
j

11
13
10
10
10
10

C

1

i:aiMtllS

INTIRVUW

L Kemp, of the General Electric company, will be at the University today and tomorrow to interview mining and electrical engineering students for protective
V.

employment. Prof. W. E. Freeman,
of the College of Engineering, announced yesterday.

HoririKilrl

C

i

OPEN HOI SE AT HIGH
The senior soclul committee of
the University hluh school will hold
an open house from 8 to 11 o'clock
Saturday. February 13, in the University lnnh gymnasium, in honor
of the high school seniors and
guests. Chaperons for the occasion
will be members of the faculty.

* Best Copy
P.if;c

THE KENTUCKY

Two

diaiion, awaits (he coming of Ihe annual hell
week X'iiod, hoping for the lwst, but fearing the
disaster which, soon or lair, is bound to follow.

KERNEL

THE KENTUCKY

omcMi. NrwBrAvrn or run rmnKfrrs of
Of

THE UNlVKIWirr

Entrd

n.4 ciua

KENTUCKY

at ths Pnrt Offlr at lxlr.lnn, Krnturllf,
unrtrr tht Art of March I.

I7.

mttr

M

--

Cuttiiv Up The Campus

MKMBFR
Lexlnprton bord of Commpw
fCpnturky IntrrrnllrR'ntf Prr-AMorlatlnn

with

PuhllrKl Htnn, represented by
mfrnhft of the M1nr rnllr-tra. J. Norm Bill Co., 1
I. 4Jnd Bt., Ne Tnrk Cltf; IK B.
Ohlrajro; Call RiiUdlnf, Ban rrasclneo; Ml Wl-oo- d
wrer
., BeatU.
Blvd. IO Aofelea: 1004 Second
A

EKtruTTVl

Bo0

Si encir
(mfi iwf
ions J.
David II. Salyfrs

Gkorcf. M.

Editor-in-Chie- f

Managing Editor
News Editor
Business Manager

Ike M. Moore
Editorial Adviser
,,
Associate. Editor
Assistant Managing Editor
Assistant Editor
SPECIAL

Jetty Earl
Theo Nadelsteln
William B. Arthur
....Oeorge Turner

WRITERS
Hnluh

Franklin Drvdrn

Krrlrr

Jolnmnn

SPORTS WRITERS
J.

B.

Fmilronrr
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Louts

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Tom Wntklin
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ASSISTANT NEWS EDITORS
Hnvmond T Inlhmn
Malcolm Patterson
Tom
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Humble

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ADVERTISING STAFF
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TELephones:
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136.

e

"Yeah, she got real wild on her last date. It
stalled to thunder and lightning, and she got
kind of frightened so she let him hold her
hand!" (There's nothing like a few catty side
remarks to make a gal feel good, is there?)
1
"No! Ceitainly not! Hut definitely-n- o!
I mean no!
What? Well alright,
said no, and
then, 1 11 see you at 8:30." (Typical Iloyd hall
telephone conversation, the kind thak makes the
other gals go nuts from curiosity.)
"She says she got that bump on her head Irom
walking into a door, but that's such an old ex(Aw, what's
cuse it's not even funny anymore!"
the use? Nobody believes anything nowadays!)

DOS T LOOK NOW, BtVT-th- at
pinned to got married last night

HERE SHALL THE KERNEL ALL
STUDENT RIGHTS MAINTAIN

boy you're

1

K
HELL W EEK: HEEL'S W
oxer anil many
Now that the lirst semester
freshmen are eligible for initiation into a sotial
fraternity, the old bugaboo, hell week, will soon
be upon us. Candidates for admission into their
chosen group will soon begin to grovel at the
1

CAMPUSNICKERS:
"He wrote his family that he made E' in all
his subjects, and now they think he's a genius
because they believe that E means Excellent!"
(And they'll think he's even more of a genius
when they discover the University is going to
keep him live years before they 11. A. him!)
"1 thought he was a real newspaperman, but
I saw him yesterday chinking a milk-shakin the
(See
Commons and I was so disillusioned."
what hapjens when you see tew many movies

about newspajermenr)

.Eleanor Randolph

.,.

Society Editor
Clrornr

-

I

THEORIES:
COURTING,

.

.

actives.
feet of sadistic, blood-thirstonly difference is that
In many ways, the fiaiernity sxslcm is 'a line
COURTING
thing; likewise, in many ways, it is not so fine.
doesn't always bring results!
The worst accusation that can be made against
it at present is that, in many instances, it still
tolerates hell week practices. . The more
UNIVERSITY PES:
and progressive of the national offices of
Professor He's too busy to
The
these lodges have already passed rulings barring be absent-minded- ,
and disappoints his students
this barbaric custom, but local chapters, observby remembering all of his classes... He grqcs
ing faithfully all other fraternity rulings, in llic because he doesn't have any lime to read the
majority of cases, allow this important and vital
and the best magazines, but gives his
ordinance to go unheeded.
stoogents so much work that they don't have any
sysIn the past decade the entire Greek-lette- r
time either... He walks around muttering into
tem has been seriously threatened. In several his beard, or his beer, depending upon what
Eastern colleges a reversion to the Oxford plan kind of a prof he is, and gets a reputation because
has taken place, with the thereby resultant death he talks to himself .. .He's gotj so much to do
of all fraternity chapters taking place. It seems himself that it irks him to see his students going
likely that more and more colleges will follow. to a show, so he doubles their assignments. . .But
That this action is due in part to continual and he's a swell guy, for all that. . .AH he needs is a
week rulings, sense of proportion!
flagrant disobedience of anti-hel- l
there can be no doubt.
The national headquarters, on the lookout DON'T YOU FEEL FUNNY
for threatening danger to the system, quickly
1. When you discover you wrote all of your
passing laws prohibiting the custom. In all
finals with invisible ink?
fairness to these offices it must be said that it is
2. When your family forgets to send you your
not entirely their fault that these laws have not
tuition fees?
always been carried out by the respeciie chap3. When you wake up in the morning and exters.
pect to see the sun shining?
Undergraduate members are not so likely to
1. When you cross the street against the lights,
see the menace that the continual practice of
and find yourself being escorted back by a very
hell week is likely to bring about. Even when
large policeman?
neophvtes have sustained set ions or fatal in". When you thought your prof was only
juries resulting from some stunt, the lesson has
kidding about a surprise quiz only he wasn't?
not been taught. Next year such tiagic episodes
are forgotten and