xt78cz322r13 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt78cz322r13/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky. Libraries Lexington, Kentucky University of Kentucky Alumni Association 1992 journals  English University of Kentucky Alumni Association This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. Kentucky alumnus Kentucky Alumnus, vol. 62, no. 3, 1992 text images Kentucky Alumnus, vol. 62, no. 3, 1992 1992 2012 true xt78cz322r13 section xt78cz322r13 KE ' Ii  
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I E  *; The Cortot Music PRESIDENT Feullu res
  j i Collection in the UK Dan Gipson ’69 _ _ ___i wr 7 ____m
i ih  L'b Ashl cl .
,t   H;O;;%;;°§°£I;f;s an A GIH Horse Murals from the popular 1940s restaurant, 6
 V   of musical history. PRESIDENT-ELECT the Golden Horseshoe, have found a home at UK
Q   T. Eugene
.  I-* V 1.62 .3 S , .’57 · · . . .
 .    I IS?\yO73I;6297 The Llggzglegi Jr C0mIC RSIIEF One enterprising studentgot relief from I0
  V 2; Kentucky Alumnus is college loans and it all started with a comic book.
.  _' Q  published quarterly TREASURER
 A ; ‘ b hU'r ' f W`ll‘ T.U l *6 · · . . . . .
 T  . .  KQ“;Ck;2i§;Zi° Bi;n§;;gham?;]€a_ 2 Defmmg the Rrofessornote This histoncal perspective I2
 - i ; Association, 400 Rose shows the changing definiuon of a university.
 , V  Street, Lexington, SECRETARY
 ‘ . Kentucky 405060119, Bob C. Whitaker ’58
F and Hm commu!} Fmnkfm Ivory Tower Myths & Focfs How many hours do pro- I6
_1   V ications, Lexington, f€SSOI`S WO1‘l T  ` " I I W7,
` V requested. Send to Stan Key ’72 Depqrfmenfs
. 1 ° The Kentucky
_}  ` ' V.   at Alumnus, UKA1umni MEMBERSHIP/ )T7TTT""")T`” h V__ rT I I I rrrw I TT
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 .t . Lexington, Kentucky Tasha Kah ’89 Around Qqmpus 2
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  STAFF
Y  V  PRINTING Brenda Bain $p0I’I'SW¤|‘CI‘l Curry`s steps to success; Van Note honored. 4
X  '  Host julia Brothers
 i Commumcauom Lind? Bmmneld CIGSS Notes A class b class u date. 24
;  . . Margie Carby y p
_ ‘ ADVERTISING Rebecca Foley
FM advertising i¤f¤r- Ruby Haidiii Fuxline Feedback and letters. 31
_ · mation, contact Charles Livingston
 ` Susan Lester at Carolyn Rhorer _ _ _
 ” ~ (606) 253-3230. Tom White F¤XIIl’\6 Focus Your response is appreciated. 32
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{   s,_,_,,,ng W BI CENTENNIAL 92 y
mihe . Shown ith ·
1 her 5 me 1941742 F"d“}'> O°t°b" 30 _ _ _ _ ,
1 Mgmu,-Y gu", frcnq hg 9:00 a.m. to Come one, Come All! K1ng Alumni House — Registration »
  *¤ *19hb ¤•‘¢ G¢¤¤‘9¢ 4:30 p.m. and Open House — All Alumni and Friends are welcome!
1 NOII¤u, S¤r¤ Ewing, C ff f d · k d k lk- t 1
E comm Wade and o ee, so t rin s an snac s -— campus maps, wa mg our
Q lvm, p°H,_ brochures, and activities schedules available
1 9:00 a.m.** Army ROTC Golf Scramble. RSVP by Oct. 19. For informa-
E tion on this and other events call 606-257-2696
{ 12 noon Presentation of Kentucky Historian Laureate Dr. Thomas D.
1 Clark’s papers to UK Libraries, Peal Gallery, reception to follow
1:30 p.m. Class of 1942 Paul Sawyier Exhibit, Singletary Center for
the Arts
2:30 p.m. Class of 1942 Campus Bus Tour on “Old Blue” from King
Alumni House
3:15 p.1n. Campus Bus Tour for all Alumni and Friends from King
Alumni House
5:00 to 7:00 p.m. Alumni Trustees Reception for all Alumni and Friends,
Hors D’oeuvres and Open Bar, King Alumni House
l 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. Nursing Alumni Reception, Hors D’oeuvres and Open Bar, 1
King Alumni House
i 6:30 p.m.*°*‘ Golden Celebration — Class of 1942 i
I Reception/Dinner/Dance, $17.50
F •6:30 p.m. Reception (cash bar)
, •7:30 p.m. Dinner
1 •8:15 p.m. Program
  •9:00 p.m. to 12 midnight- Dance featuring the
  Bourbonaires, Spindletop Hall, Iron Works Pike
j 2 licnuixrkv .-\Iumnus Fal] ]9QQ

 1
{ I·I O M E C 0 M I N G ' 9 2
_ 6:30 p.m.** Lyman T.]ohnson Alumni Awards Ban- North Building. For more information,
{ quet honoring The Trailblazers call 606-257-8827, $7.00
{ (early grads) 4:30 p.m.** Class of 1947 Reunion Dinner
\ •6:30 p.m. Mix and Mingle •4:30 p.m. Reception
*1 •7:30 p.m. Awards Banquet •5:3O p.m. Dinner, Spindletop Hall,
•9:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. — Dance (semi- $13.00
( formal) sponsored by The Black Profes- 4:30 p.m.** Class of 1952 Reunion Dinner
sional Graduates and students, music •4:30 p.m. Reception
provided by SAT Productions. For reser— •5:30 p.m. Dinner, Spindletop Hall,
vations, call 606-257-5726, Marriott’s $13.00
Griffin Gate 4:30 p.m.** Alumni Association Past Presidents and
' 7:30 p.m. “Wi1dcat Roar!" — Pep Rally for all Board Members Dinner
{ Alumni and Friends, featuring comedian   •4:30 p.m. Reception
{ Henry Chio, football coach Bill Curry,   •5:30 p.m. Dinngr, Hilary]. Boone
i athletics irector C.M. Newton, UK foot- ( Faculty Center, 13.00
` ball captains, Homecoming King and 5:00 p.m.** Class of 1967 Reunion Tailgate Barbeque
Queen finalists, the "Ye11 Like He11” com- under the Big Blue Tent, Common-
petition, and more! Memorial Coliseum wealth Stadium, $7.50
8:00 p.m.** Kirov Orchestra of St. Petersburg with 5:00 to FREE to Everyone! "UK CELEBRATES
Vladimir Feltsman, piano — Singletary 7:00 p.m.** THE BICENTENN1AL" Featuring an ABC
Center for the Arts, for ticket Daytime Star 8c HOMER LEDFORD AND
information, call 606-257-4929 I THE CABIN CREEK BAND! All under
1 ( the Big Blue Tent at Commonwealth
Saturday, October 31 { Stadium — Door Prizes!Food! Music!
{ 10:00 a.m. Homecoming Parade Viewing Party with * * Optional ($7.50) BBQ, franks and
( Sunrise Beverages and Refreshments for hamburgers, salads, corn-on—the—cob,
{ Alumni and Friends, King Alumni House baked beans and cookies* *
{ 10:00 a.m.** Mining Engineering Alumni Brunch, 5:30 p.m.** Class of 1942 Dinner and Tailgate Party
1 Mining 8c Mineral Resource Building, •5:30 p.m. Open Bar and Dinner
Room 102, no charge •7:00 p.m. Ride “O1d B1ue” to game,
( 10:00 a.m.** Civil Engineering Alumni Brunch Meet King Alumni House, $6.50
{ the new Chairman, Anderson Hall, 6:00 p.m. College of Pharmacy Tailgate Party, Con-
Y Room 257, $6.00 1 tact R. David Cobb, Pharmacy,
10:00 a.m.** Mechanical Engineering Brunch, Hilary   60o257-$805, no charge
J. Boone Faculty Center, $5.00 8:00 p.m.** Football! Wildcats meet the Mississippi
1:00 p.m.** Classes of 1942, 1947 and 1952 State Bulldogs, Commonwealth Stadium,
Keeneland Outing, view races and enjoy $18.00 each
buffet in the Phoenix Room, $30.00
4:00 p.m.** College of Engineering Barbeque Dinner I Sunday, November 1 1
•4:00 p.m. Registration 10:30 a.m.** Class of 1942 Reunion Brunch, Hilaiyj. (
•5:00 p.m. Dinner, Ag Engineering Boone Faculty Center, $9.50_ :
 E.§§.§§§§.IS ````````` §12§§ISQQZ1§§EQQLQQQQQ/i&t€Q}QZ{hL rO11QQQ§H.s...L§§.Z.i.g       1 I
1 1 Q
1 1
i Name _ _, _ _ i _ _ { Friday, October 30 _Class of 1967 Reunion Tailgate BBQ i {
{ Address _" __ f _",__ { _Golden Celebration ................... $17.50 ........................................................ $7.50 {
{ City,_,j__Y_, ,_,_ State ZIP _ ‘ __A1l University Tent Event BBQ...$7.5O {
{ Telephone _ _   Saturday, October 31 _Class of 1942 Dinner/Tailgate Party {
{ MasterCard # rrrrr _Mining Engineering Brunch..no charge ........................................................ $6.50 {
1 VISA # W, V _Civi1 Engineering Brunch ........... $6.00 _Football Game Ticket .............. $18.00 1
{ Expiration Date _ _ ,_ _, _ _Mechanical Engineering Brunch ..$5.00 i
{ Check Enclosed for $ _ __   V _Keeneland Racing Sc Buffet ...... $30.00 Sunday, November 1 {
{ _College of Engineering BBQ ....... $7.00 _ Class of 1942 Reunion Bruncl1.$9.50 {
{ MAIL TO: King Alumni House _Class of 1947 Reunion Dinner ..$13.00 {
{ University of Kentucky _Class of 1952 Reunion Dinner ..5513.00 {
1 Lexington, KY 40506-0119, _Alu1nni Association Past Presidents 1
{ or call (606) 257-7162 (FAX 606-258-1063) and Board M€ll1b€l`S ...................... $13.00 TOTAL $ -{
L ................. - .... .. ........... .. ...... .. ...----- - ---------------------------------—---—- —---
Fall 1992 Kentucky Alumnus 3

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  The h¤rd_hhhhg days T ‘ i" T  “` i  '` ‘ )"ii   to put pressure on them before they’ve
  of f¤¤rb¤II me upon SEVEII Steps lo Success even stepped on the field."
§ “‘· H°'°*h°'°°'“   more time at c c c storms rr . Curry told the Lexington Rotary
; works out under the . § .
  watchful eye of Couch Coach Bill Curry told the crowd gath- Club that there 1S a seven-step process
  Bill Curry. ered at the jefferson County Alumni to changing over to a winning atti-
  Club in August that "This year could A tude. The first four — Make a com- A
  be a big step forward for us, but a lot mitment, Set a target date, Assemble A
  of good things have to happen for l the ingredients and Give — have been
E that to occur." accomplished. Curry reiterated UK’s
  h Among the "good things" Curry said commitment to a program centered .
§ are needed is for "somebody to come on the student-athlete and to winning h
  i through and be consistent at the quar— in the “right" way within the rules of l
{ A terback position." The names that go the NCAA and the SEC. The target
  with that "somebody" are Pookiejones, date, he says, "I’d like to set it for
  Ryan Hockman or Antonio O’Ferral. now.” Curry declared that the ingredi-
l Then Curry said, "obviously, we’ve got ents have "never been here before for
to get to where we can stop people on football, but they’re here now." And,
defense. Changing schemes and new the giving Curry is talking about is of
{ offenses and new systems, all that’s the sacrificial variety. “That means to
l wonderful, but you win with people. h give when you don’tfeel like giving." ·
l The fact is we are much bigger, much i The last three steps, the ones the
§ stronger and much faster than we were program and fans face now, are more
  last year." Curny adds that the offensive difficult to achieve, says Curry. They
{ line “should be the best by far since we are to visualize precisely what it is you
l have been here." Part of this season’s want, to believe and to expect to win.
  hope lies with the six junior college Curry said, "I have never seen a great
h transfers who Curiy calls "very impres— athlete or a great leader that could
sive physically”, but added his caution not visualize his or her skill well
j that "I would not want a lot of people before it ever happened.” As for
~l licutuckv Alumnus Fall 1992

 belief, Curry pointed out that "When computer equipment. This technolo-
I the Master did the great miracles gy would allow visitors to come in and
I we’re all so familiar with in the New   take the floor with the Fabulous Five
 l Testament, almost every time He said or the most recent Unforgettables.
  something like ‘Do you believe that A Site possibilities include the
  you can be healed?’ The answer was A Lexington Center and either the
l in the affirmative, and then He said, Emb1y’s or Lowenthal’s buildings on A - s
= ‘Get up and walk.’ And then He said, A the Ben Snyder’s block, the area on \ }*
l ‘Your beliefhas made you well.’ East Main Street that has been {V    
"It is the human, belief system that bought for construction of the future   ”  
f' every single one of us has that causes   cultural center. . ·__ , q Q}
  great things to happen against the Mayor Scotty Baesler, himselfa for-       ` »
odds. We get into the fourth quarter A mer player, has said he is personally ` ii: _·,.  »·
. with most eveiy team and we’re in it. 1 committed to trying to get the basket- A _    , ·
y And there will be a time when we dom- ball museum built. He would like to  · ‘· ». _ A
‘ inate those games. But last year we have the committee’s recomenda— L _
. were dominated, and the difference tions by November. The committee t .l
1 was in the head, between the ears." and museum consultants Gail Lord '
The seventh step is the hardest to get T and Hugh Spencer plan to visit sever-
to because it requires doing steps 16 for al similar sports museums to look at . I-
along time, according to Curry, "butit’s A the types of exhibits that have been . ·
that expectation of winning that every 1 successful. They will also explore such _
great football team has. We want it to be other issues as size (a recommended ’ (
such a shock here ifwe should run out minimum of 5,000 to 8,000 square . y
1 of time while the other team still has feet); audience (from where and how ° A
, more points. We want it to be such a many); cost (to build, operate as well
shock that we just get right back to work. as admission fees and other revenue Jeff V¤¤ Nefe whe b¤|| fe 13 different
That’s what (coach Vince) Lombardi A generation), and exhibits (what Pl°Y°d d'?f°"slv° A"°"l° q°°"°"`
_ _ end and linebacker backs, under five
, meant when he said, ‘We never lost a . should the museum contain). c, UK under couch d;;;e,e,,, had
g·3m€_’ Thgfg the way we fg]; And thgfg Charlie Bradshaw in fcaehes and playing
. me Way Out tem Wm lem t0 f€€1·" rama c’c‘c as are —rr or r IEZJ‘1f..}Z?2.'i“.i'.. 225.2 Z'.? ZC.`.Tl.is
{   Atlanta F¤:¤n; for Lnducled into the
` ··2 —Y·——- LW K"' or marry  !"’ trrr Hr r 18 years, as een all with Van Note
( Basketball Museum John peiphmy is Orr is rum and jgj';jj,jy*·;:;;_{;·'gc mjgggjgyggd
_ mrmémr  Dercm Feidhaus to Japan te c<>¤¤¤ue n¤n onqme. Van r¤b..¤¤us Five bas-
Once again the idea for a University of their basketball careers. Richie Farmer Nele \y¤S @0 when kefb¤|l p|¤Yer Alex
Kentucky basketball museum is under p is taking his boyish grin to TV as he :’I;§;;:;;F:;i83`e Gm"'
discussion. The current tentative plan T encourages you to ‘drink milk’ for I
calls for a stand-alone attraction in the Southern Belle Dairies. The commer-
downtown area. Previously, the plan was cials are cleverly written to capitalize A
to make the project part of a city cultur— on Richie’s charisma. Sean Woods had i
al center, but that proposal has been a tough time on the NBA tty-out circuit (
put on hold, at least until 1994, due to which left his immediate plans uncer-
lack of funds in the urban government tain at press time. However, he played  
treasury for such things. The original p with fellow alumni Leroy Byrd and Ed  
‘ museum proposal dates back to the late i Davender in a summer league champi-
1970s when the idea for the museum onship...Rex Chapman’s been in town .
surfaced as an ideal place for the accu- this summer, too. While you might
mulated memorabilia of the legendary, guess that eating is the second favorite
late UK coach Adolph Rupp. thing football players like to do, that
The present committee of UK bas- assumption must go to basketball play-
ketball supporters headed by former ers. Yet another one, Rex, is involved &
player and current state senator jim with a new restaurant venture, Threes,
LeMaster of Paris, is looking at a pro- which opened August 20 on Maxwell
posal that includes "virtual reality" Street, the old Alley Oops location.
Fal] 1992 Kentucky Alumnus 5

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l gift to the University of Ken- abeth Thompson Catten. The restau-
l tucky of 10 horse paintings r rant building, 129 East Main Street,
[ has stirred fond memories of r was razed several years ago.
l the post—war 1940s — glory years for 1 The Golden Horseshoe was part of
I both downtown Lexington and the downtown Lexington’s centerpiece
l university community. r after World War II. It joined the
l These colorful reminders came in l Phoenix Hotel (directly across the
  In this scene or the 8. Rqy Ankenbqm the form of large, oil-on-canvas horse street}; andfnearb)LICaqary Cottage
1 1946 rhereughbred 9_Ch¤r|re serrberm scenes which graced the walls of the and t e La ayette ote to create a
  solos of Keonelond, 10. Hugh Golff; Golden Horseshoe, a favorite Lexing- hub of urban activity.
  l’“l“*°‘l bY R"'“ E"l‘ ll' E"°°lE""{'T‘°"' ton restaurant and bar in the late The paintings, by equine artist
1
{ for the Golden ager of Dixiana , , f h
r Herseshee perm; I2. Br"), 1940s and early 1950s. Russ Ellis, were an integral part o t e
l Rostourontoro some Korsner, breeder; Downtown in those days teemed Horseshoe’s plush decor. One of the
§ 'd°""l'°b'° f°‘°" w' N°"'"° °‘{""’ with economic and social activity   large canvases was a particular draw-
g They are, numbered, editor, _ ` _ , b
1 I rhreugh 22/ wm, Thereughbred not yet marred by suburban sprawl ing card. It depicts a thorough red
3 the number Record; 14. Haden and outlving shopping centers. auction at the Breeders Sales Co.’s
1 '“‘"‘°dl‘"°lY K"'l‘P“""k* °d'*°" The university campus a few blocks 1946 session at Keeneland. Around V
g beneath each face: Thoroughbred ’ _ ,
1 L Geerge Reeerd; 15_Jesk south boasted a booming popula- r the sales ring are seated notables of
Swinebroad,saIes Welch, zreedter; tion of returning war veterans. r the horse world; Ellis made many '
°°°"°"°°'”’ l6‘ H°w°' (B" °l National acclaim was showered on   faces recognizable.
2. Freeman Keyes, Wells, breeder; , . ‘ . .
, Reverre Keen rermr |y_ Leslie Cembs ul UK s beloved W1ldcats. Bear The other paintings show horse .
l 3. Charles Asbury, spendrhrih Farm; Bryant created a football program scenes of Central Kentucky, repre-
l . ' . . .
> H°d9°w°°d FY"'"’ l8‘_R"bY wh"' the likes of which UK had never senting thoroughbreds, standard-
1 4. Thomas Carr Pratt, trainer; 19. Gus _
  breeder; 5_ AI Owens, merreger er seen. Adolph Rupp and his Fabu- breds and saddlebreds. s
E Wollmom of Thoroughbred Club lous Five made a shambles of bas- The university has made no deci-
Wellman Stables; af America; . , I - · · · · · · f · _
Q 6- Gram Dorrund; 20. warren Wright kc tba l opposition ll`! the SEC, NIT sion as to the disposition o the paint
r y_ Jim clyburrr, jre Celumer perm; and NCAA. ings. But wherever they hang, they
  H ngunogrr or 21. A.B. ”t;u|| " The Golden Horseshoe paintings will bring a touch of nostalgia and
  °m wg °°°’ Crqrggxgiqjgj — with their vivid depiction of Blue Lexington lore to many Kentuckians.
1 22. c_w_ Demen; Grass equine scenes — have been Here is a look at how the paintings
. trainer. donated to the universitv b i Mrs. Eliz— came about and what the ¤ re resent.
. 5 l P
li l{a·uuu·kv .\luuu1us Fall 1992 l

 1
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The Restaurant A feet to smaller ones 5-by-5 feet. The Artist
The Golden Horseshoe opened The Horseshoe soon became Lex- Russ Ellis, a native of Dallas,
April 1, 1947. It previously was known ington’s foremost eating and drink- Texas, had been knocking around
as Keith’s Bar and Chop House, which ing place of its time. It was known race tracks for more than 30 years
restauranteur Ralph Campbell had throughout Kentucky as a favorite (as he put it) when he came to Lex-
purchased several years earlier. 1/Vhen gathering spot before and after UK ington in the mid-1940s. He joined
it was Keith’s, Campbell operated the , football and basketball games. Camp- the Thoroughbred Record as contribut-
restaurant on the first f1oor and _]oe bell installed Harry Ware as resident T ing artist and soon thereafter was
Keith ran a handbook on the second organist, and his artistry and musical commissioned by Campbell to paint
floor. Campbell remodeled after clos- personality enhanced the restau- Blue Grass equine scenes for the
ing Keith’s March 2, 1947. He did rant’s reputation. Golden Horseshoe.
away with the handbook and moved gg gg g _g gg g Ellis` reputation as a gifted horse
kitchen facilities to the second floor II, ullllruclled artist alreadygwas established. His
to enlarge the first-floor dining room gg gg ggg gg gg g   g work was familiar, said then Thorough-
and lounge area. I c°nsgder¤bIe hred Record editor Haden Kirkpatrick, l
Campbell, a nat1ve of Mercer y ggg _gg gg gg   g to practically every horse lover who
County, already had established a rep- unentgon because looks at pictures anywhege, in maga-  
utation as a first-class restauranteur. _g gg     gg gg gg zines or hanging on walls. ,
He previously had operated the Ken- many og llhe faces °‘ Ellis painted the famous set of  
tucky Bar and Restaurant in Daytona gg g gg _ gg _ murals depicting the life of the great ,
Beach Fla. { runner Seven Hearts for the Thor-  
l ’ . . O S I"$ II WEP r
` The Golden Horseshoe cuisine unl u   _ ° gs e oughbred Room of the Brown Hotel
was excellent and the cocktail identifiable. in Louisville. g l I
lounge relaxed and friendly. The _ _ His work was exhibited at major
decor, with colors of gold, subdued race tracks throughout the United
green and black, added to the It was not unusual for patrons to States, and his paintings were
restaurant’s drawing power. Artist line up through the front door reproduced in publications 110t
Ellis' handsome paintings were top- onto the Main Street sidewalk to only in America but also in France
ics of discussion by the horsy set and wait for a table or a stool at the bar. and England.
other patrons. The canvases were Apparently they thought the wait The covers he painted for the Thor-
large, ranging in size from 17-by-5 was worthwhile. oughbred Rerorrl could well be called
Fall 1992 Kentucky Alumnus 7

   y
collector’s items. His original study of l find reason to say that the paintings
Bayridge, and his painting of trainer   Ellis did for the Horseshoe were y
Max Hirsch with Assault (the 1946 ’ not impressive
Kentucky Derby winner) rank with   The major canvas, depicting the
the portrait of Ben jones and Armed   1946 thoroughbred sales at r
as among Ellis’ top works. l Keeneland, hung on the wall near  
. . . ¤
Ellis stayed in Lexington about y the Horseshoe bar. It attracted con- _ L
two years and then returned to his l siderable attention because many of  
native Texas. _ j the faces of famous persons were %
i identifiable. They included auction-  
The Puinfings l eer George Swinebroad; A.B. (Bull)  
Few observers at the time could Hancock of Claiborne Farm; War- 1
6 .
ki I
'_ S ` A .
A 05 $4 ·—
· . he     1,*%;
gy- `
  Y
Top, Thoroughbreds
raclng. Not llkely at _
Keeneland, since rall -
ls not proper style.
Bottom, § ·
Thoroughbreds at
water. One ol ElIls’ <
best works and one
of the best Q I
preserved. Canvas
palntlngs are rolled
up for storage. When
hung agaln, the
stretchlng process
wlll ellmlnate most
of the marks vlslhle
In these Y
V photographs.
S KI'lll|ICl(}` .‘\lIllllllll\    

   ren Wright jr. of Calumet Farm; condition. Two saddlebred paintings owner Ralph Campbell and his wife,
l Brownie Leach, director of are scenes in which the artist displays nee Mabel Williams.
[ Keeneland ublic relations, and ersonal touches. A ladr ridin a Althou h no record could be
P _ P 5 8 g
Col. Phil Chinn, legendary thor- saddle horse was purported to be a found regarding the artist’s commis-
oughbred breeder. likeness of artist Ellis’ wife. In a sion amount for the paintings, Camp-
r The yearling in the sales ring, iden- painting of a saddlebred standing in bell often said he had insured the
· _ tifiable by hip number, is Speculation, classic showhorse pose, the initials paintings for $25,000 — that’s in 1947
li a colt by Mahmoud. The colt was con- R.C. + M.W. are visible in a heart dollars. There also were reports at the
signed by Dr. Eslie Asbury’s Forest carved on a tree. This is an obvious time that Ellis received $5,000 for the
r Retreat Farm and brought $65,000, reference to Golden Horseshoe work, also 1947 money.
the highest price of the sale and an —»   Whatever their present-day mone-
1 enviable figure in those days. •"·|¤he Pqinfings are ef tary and artistic worth, the paintings
The other paintings depict Blue g-i`. ~+.* ~i are of inestimable value to those
Grass scenes with thoroughbreds, inesfimuble yqlue |·° who remember the Golden Horse-
standardbreds and saddlebreds. Most fg  *%-. ~-g shoe and downtown Lexington of
are in good condition but some were [hose whe remember the 1940s.
damaged in removal from the walls -— i .j%-1%
before the building was razed. the Gelder. Herseshee  
One painting of mares and foals -* g.?*+ *¥. .g# lVilliam   Hanna is a 1949 graduate (gf
watering at a pond in excellent con- and dewnfewn Lex. the UK Sclrool ofjournalisnr. He retired
dition is one of Ellis’ greatest works.   g ]9·om the Lexington Herald—Leader in
The thoroughbred racing scene and ingfen ef |·|‘e '| Q4°$• r 1986, and is a past member of the
the harness racing canvas are in mint —    f Alumni Association Board ofDirect0r1s.
  Plan A Group
   . . r-     T-   Outu Ig HHS Pau
    ·‘   ‘ ``i` 1 ‘l°*`*¤‘ ‘;·i»
 T » ie     T i  ~         At K€€I IG Zll l .
A R if   "°  i  
_ »  » T  r   TTTi   October 10-51
i' . I _   °   . iiii l T   iiii   What better way to enjoy the races thana group outing inKeeneland’s newest  
  dining facility — the Phoenix Room. Overlooking the picturesque walking ring,  
f T ` the Phoenix Room is beautifully decorated, climatecontrolled with conveniently  
T E located mutuel windows and television monitors. i
_ T · ,     Adelicious luncheon buffetis featured daily. 1
1 Tidtetsar·e$30perpe1s0nf0rIimcl1Br1f[’eta11d$20f0rSundayB1unclr
**   Individual tables arealsoavailahle alier September 28.
Call now for Fall reservations: 1800-4565412 or 1606254-5412 (Extension 210).
! Fall 1992 Kentucky Alumnus 9

 l
I
 
by Kyle Foster I
, , y I       "It was a hole in the wall, and I
I "   I said ifI didn’t make it through the
  ‘/.i   .,,_ : I first month, I wouldn’t keep doing
  I   g I it," said the UK telecommunications
l _`y_ I     _V__ I     student, w